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Title: Export implement age, vol. 15 

Place of Publication: Philadelphia, PA 

Copyright Date: 1906/1907 

Master Negative Storage Number: MNS# PSt SNPaAg152.2 



FILMED WHOLE OR IN 
PART FROM A COPY 
BORROWED FROM: 



National Agricultural 

Library 



Volume 15 
1 906/1 907 



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PXDORT 

IMPLEMENT AGE 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to American Agricultural ^ 

Machinery, Farm Supplies, Vehicles and Vehicle 
Materials, Machine Tools, Hardware Specialties, Etc. 



TEXTE FRANCAIS 
Papier Rose 



TEXTO ESPANOU 
Papel Amarino 



DEUT5CHER TEXT 
Blaues Papier 



Vol. XV. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A., OCTOBER, 1906. 




No. I 



Fabrikanten 
AA von AA 



MORGAN 6 WRIGHT 

Gummiwaaren Bester Qualitat 



MORGAN & WRIGHT 




Automobil Radreifen, Faiirzeug Radreifen, 

Hufeisen Politer 

Schliiuche, Kaut ■•chukband, Thurmattcn, VerpackunKS 
I trn»ilien, Ht'br\i>rrichlun);<^n. K^''^irpl<^s Mattcnuerk, 
Mctral-Maschincnbcutcl, kntitenmattcn, UinKC (ur kah- 
mabsonderer, u. •. w. 

7.w;inriit Jalire lange KrliihnitiK in Aet Pabrikati.jii voii 
riumiiiiw.iaren I'liser I.aKrr tiestrlit hu* den allerfciii>ttii 
Waaidiim. yualitiit uiiil Mini stels garanlirl. Jul AiifraiiKe 

[troinj.t tH-aiitWijrttt, 



Chicago, U. S. A. 



214 ^V. 47th Street. NF.W YORK 



Radreifen fur FahTzruge— Sollde und 
Politer. Fiir Haspcl JeJer jew- 
iinschten I an|;r (tellefcrt. 




Klinkrr Auliimobilradreifen 



A Plow with Reversible 

Point and Wing 




and tor this reason a plow that is a rapid seller 

The farmer appreciates it because it is always ready with a fresh cut- 
ting edge. The upper edge is always being sharpened while the lower one 
is being used. The matter of reversing them is very quick and simple— no 
wrench being required, and there is no necessity for turning the plow over. 

Wc Uglily recommend this Plow lor Clay. Gravel. Slone or a Hard Pan Soil 

For Further Particulars ami Prii «« acjilres^ 

South Bend Chilled Plow Co. Toir" 



INV. '6Q 



T 



Nev« 

cnit of 
R»*pair 
Always 
Ready 
to Work 



Whipping Atuchment 



Best and Simplest in con- 
struction of any 
press nk^c 




DAVID BRADLEY sr.':,S,KNOWN THE WORLD OVER 



The David BrddUy Baler ha* very high standing with the foreign trade. It does more than is 
chittticd for It, and does perfect woric under all condftions. Write for literature. We answer cor- 
respoudicnce in any lani^uage. 

I.a CreiiNn "Uaviil Braillry" <Ie doble e»cf nttica de accro para embalar Heno es hien 
couocida ni lodo el muudo JaniAs >r descompone y rsl& »iempre lista para el trabajo. 
Hh la nicjor. y Ml conslrurci<'iu es ni.is seiicilla que la niDRuna olra prensa jamiii fabri- 
cada. Tiene un accesorio para zurrar I.a Hmnaladora '■i)avid Bradley" ocupa una alta 
posiri(')« en el comercio exti.injero Hace mis de lo que »e le atribuye y su trabajo e» 
ptrfecto bajo loda^ la» condicionea I scrlba'tenos pidiendo nnestros impreaos, Con- 
teslaiTios la C()rre«j)ondeiicia en cualquier idioma 

I.a l>ie«.seA Foin—i'\ double came de "David Bradley" est connue dans le mondeentier. 
Kile u'esl jamais en r^paiations niais toujours au travail. Kile est la meilleure et la plus 
simple dans sa construction compnrcfi loute autre pressc manufactur^e. Kile est munie 
d'un secoueur A capuchin I.a I'resse A Foin ' David Bradley" a d*j* une frrande reputa- 
tion dans le commerce eiraiiKer. Hie parfsit plus quelle ne pretend el accotnplit sun 
travail sous toutes citcoiislances Adressei nous pour prosiKCtus, circulaires, etc. Nous 
r^poHilons en toutcs !es laiiRues. 



Made bv DAVID BRADLEY MFG. CO. 



BRADLEY. ILL. U. S. A. 



Catli 



address. "YELDARB." Codes u«edf 
"A I." *'L!«ber»" and 



"A. B.C., • 4th and 5th cdiUons, 
'Our Own." 



Lawn Mowers 

FOR HORSE 

anZ HAND USE 

Adapted for all markets 
of the world. 



CHADBORN & 
COLDWELL 
MF6. CO. 

NEWBURGH 
N.Y. 



U. S. A. 




SESD FOR 
CATALOaUB 
AND PRICES 



\ 




Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



I 



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■■■nuM«»B«flaaHniBHamBHi 






IMPERmL LINE IMPLEMENTS 




Imperial Stark Gan^ Plow 

Two sizes, cutting 24 inches and 2S 
inches : all stift centre steel. 



Specially constructed 
for export trade. 



Imperial Sprin^'Tooth 
Gultivator 



Specially designed for 
working in viueyards. 




Solid and Gut-Out 
Disc Harrows. 



Spring and Spike- 
Tooth Harrows. 




^N«S 



Several sizes and styles. a^ 

FuN Line Single and Double Furrow ('V^'J^&<V*''| 

Flows. Qultivators. Rtc. ^^ff^^ \ ^I?i%^ 



CTlTTlLOGUn. Xo. lOU 
Free on TlppHeaUon. 




THE BIJCHER & GIBBS PLOW CO. »-2» P'^od-ce Exchange, new Y N. Y., L. S. A. 



I 

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B 
E 

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MYERS 



RATCHLI 
HANDLE 



PIMPS 



Fig. ii.j^ Fig. 1160 Hijj. ii|9 Fig. n, s (iIh-s \d\f Sm) 




They are adapted for deep well use, or can be u.sed with larger 
cylinder, pumping greater quantity of water for wells of the same 
depth, on which a smaller cylinder is used in connection with the 
ordinary pump. 

ASHLAND 
OHIO 



F. L MYERS & BRO. 




'].}.;HY>J'^^- 



&Bho 



wPiilslAY *0«.i 



.. NF W yORK 

.lun* l«t., 1606. 



"olijT.HiB dtKcov*r*i) Api«rlen «™1 or*nad up r Ha* World to cItH- 
Iintlf n. 

r^«r» aificoT*r«<l t>ia •OU".'! "A'.VK 3RAT iin<l d«T«lo|Md n*« 
?^«tr f»d« ''or r»*isir.r wat^r, 

T11.1- »A-K' do«i niTK for '.h« hunun thc^ thrni an; oUiar nntuml 
• IwMint baslilKa «lr. 

7h« d«il«r 1*10 auppllM) «■• punp thnt ar'-mpllahaa thl* la a 
b«na'Hi:'.f.r •() hla locality, nnl of couraa annta tha baat (««irt*THIi WTKRSt 1 

Hava ynu r^^m your nark ir \hin llnat 

Thnt t» »^.«t aa «r» dolrc, mthI ara ti^lfj to ru* ""T narli 
hlf, »r avar;' yaar «« aylUancad by 

TKK im:'-..'! SATCHfV 1A>.T?' P'WPS'. 

Thla lira nnrka an advonca In tl,« atata of t!i« art, aa a Una 
of ■»A'"R'-< LI>VK!S" navar raachad by any ott.ar flm, 

Thay liava ae many narkad advantacaa pacullar to thamaalvaa that 
Ihav nuat ba aaan to t» appractatad. 

'nilvoMJ I-Wnrw c» ritCR'SI, at any iincla of tha hnmlla, thua 
eac-trlnf; c^*ftt foaar «n^' anaa of opTatlrn, la only ona of thaaa. 

Ihav ara aar^c tally sdaptad for hnnA tind almlntll uaa anil daap ,' 
walla. 

Waura prapnrad to contract alth riaelara fo tha axclualv* 
anla of thla Una tn all unoecuplad tarrltoi?. 

Do not «alt fqr our travalara to call on you, but arlt* ua at 
one a. 

Tour r""""?* raplj with ordar nwna profit for yuu. 






Toura tnil;. 



T. E.,lflCpUJ k WIO 



^C.U:^'-^ 



EXPORT OFFICE 

B 21 Produce Exchange, New York, U. S. A. 



Directory for Buyers. 

The names of firms given below, 
together with the goods mentioned, 
•re arranged for the convenience of 
buyers. Their products are given in 
the English, French, Spanish and 
German languages. These establish- 
ments are among the leading ones in 
the United States, are strictly reliable, 
have extensive facilities and are 
jwompt in transacting business. They 
fally understand the export trade and 
ou-efully look after all foreign orders. 
The Export Implement Age is kept 
on file in their offices, and any mention 
of the journal will be an incentive to 
even greater promptness on their part 
in obliging you. Inquiries from for- 
eign buyers desiring information rel- 
ative to American agricultural ma- 
chinery or implements addressed to 
them will be given careful and prompt 
attention. Write in any language 
you prefer. 



Repertoire a I'Usage des 
Acheteurs 

Les maisons ci-dessous et les pro- 
duits mentionn^s ont €\.€ classes dans 
cet ordre pour la commo<lit6 des ache- 
teurs de langues anglaise, fran^aise, 
espagnole et allemande. Ces dtablis- 
sements sont parmi les principaux des 
Etats-Unis, ils sont absolument 
s^rieux, ils possedent de graudes 
facilites, sont prompts en affaires. 
Ils connaissent k fond le cenimerce 
d'exportation et donnent tons leurs 
soins a I'ex^cution des commandes 
qui leur vieunent de I'^tranger. Ils 
conservent une collection de I'EXPORT 
Implement Age dans leurs bureaux, 
et la simple mention de ce journal 
stimuleradavantage encore, si possible, 
leur z^le et leur promptitude k obliger 
leurs clients. L'Export Implement 
Age, de son cflt6, donnera une prompte 
attention aux demandes de ronseigne- 
ments sur machines et instruments 
agricoles am^ricains, que peuveot lui 
adresser les acheteurs de I'^tranger. 
Bcrire dans la langue que Ton pr^fere. 



Directorio p&r& los Com- 
pradores. 

Lus nonibres de los articulos que 
fabrican las firnias 6 casas mencionadas 
& continuacion se dan, para conve- 
niencia de los compradores, en los 
idiomas ingles, trances, espanol y 
alemin. Hsos establecimientos, que 
»e cuentan entre los principales de los 
Estados Unidos, estdn completamente 
acreditados, son dignos de toda con- 
fianza y tienen las mayores facilidades 
para ejecutar y despachar con pronti- 
tud todos sus negocios. Conocen & 
fondo el comercio de exportaci6n y 
atienden con el mayor esmero a todos 
los pedidos que reciben delextranjero. 
Los utimeros del Export Implement 
Ace se coleccionan en sus oficinas, y 
toda referencia &. esta revista es un 
incentivu para atender con mayor 
prontitud aun 4 vuestros requerimien- 
tos. Todos los informes que pidan 
los compradores del extranjero serdn 
suministrados & la mayor brevedad 
por esos fabricantes sobre la ma- 
quinaria agricola 6 instrumentoa de 
Ubranza americanos. Escribidle* en 
cualquier idioma que prefiriia. 



Firmen-Verzeichnis ftir 
Kaufer. 

Die Erzeugnisse der unten ge- 
nannten Firmen sind fiir die Bequem- 
tichkeit auslandischer Kaufer in eng- 
lischer, franzosischer spanischer und 
deutscher, Sprache hier wiederge- 
geben. Genannte Etablissemente ge- 
horen zu den bedeutendsten in den 
Vereinigten Staaten; siesind in jeder 
Weise zuverliissig, besitzen ausge- 
dehnte Facilitaten und erfreuen sich 
eines ehrenvollen Rufes. Alle von' 
ihnen unternonimenen Geschiifts- 
transaktioneu werden in promptester 
Weise zur Ausfiihrung gebracht. Jedet 
hierin genannte Haus ist mit deni Ex- 
porlhaudel wohl vertraut und um aus- 
wartige Auftriige eifrig beniiiht. Das 
Export Implement Age wird von 
all diesen Firmen gelesen, dient ihnen 
sozusagen als Informations-Register 
und diirfte .somit eine Angabe dieses 
Journals bei event. Waarenbestellung 
nur zur An gung grosserer Prompt- 
heit dienen, um p.p. Kaufern in beat- 
moglicher Weise entgegenkommen zn 
konnen. Jede auswartige Anfragc 
hinsichtlichanierikanischerlandwirtn- 
schaftlicher Maschinen und Gerathc 
wird nicht allein prompte, sondem 
auch stets sorgfaltige Aufmerksamkeit 
erhalten. Interessenten konnen sich 
jeder beliebijjen Sprache zur Korre- 
spundenz hedienen. 



Ambulances 
Carres de hospital 
KrankeawiiKen lAmbulanzen) 



Baling Presses ( Hay, Straw, Etc. ) 
Presses A foln, pailie, etc. 
Prensas de Embalar ( Heno, Paja, etc. ) 
Balleo Pressen ( fiir Heu, Stroh, u. •. w. ) 

Bntdlar Mfg. Co., David. Bradley, m. . 

Oollina Plow Co.. Quincy. \i\ 

BrtelOo., OeofKCQuincy, ni 



1 
M 



Carriages 

Voitures 

Carruajes 

Kaleschen und Wag;en 

Dapaoii & Wolf, Oneida. N. Y 

Wudebaker Broo. Mf(. Co.. Sautk Bead, lad. 



Carriage Cloth 
Wagentuch 
PaAo de carruaje 
Drap de Voiture 

Fairfleld Rubber'Co., The, FairSald, Ona. 



Coal Shutes 

Charbon (Dalles a) 

Canales para De»cargar Carb6n de Piedra 

Kohlen Lade-Rlnnen 

Laoaiac Wbealbarrow C«., L^nalnB. MIcb. . . 



Corn Crushers 
Mais ( Concasaeurs de I 
Trituradoras de Maiz 
Mais Zerquetschmaschinen 



Beet Implements (Planting, Cultivating and 

Harvesting ) 
Betteraves ( Instruments pour la culture des) 
iBStrumentos para el Cultivo de la Remolacha 

( Senibradoras, Cultivadoras y Cosechadoras) 
Riibengerate (zum Pflanzen, Pfliigen und Ernten) 

MoUne Plow Co.. Molina, ni 



Binders. Self i Wheat, Rye, Oatt, etc.) 
Lleuses Automatiques (Ble, Orge, Avoine, etc.) 
Acavilladoras Automaticas (Trigo, centeno avena, 

etc.) 
Scibstbindenuuchinen (fiir Weizen, Roggen, Hafer 

n. •. w. 



Boilers. 
Chaudi^res. 
Calderas. 
Kessel. 

L«ffel & Co., 



Carriage Materials 
Articles pour voitures 
Materials for Carriages 
Wagenmaterial 



Carts (Riding) 
Charrettes (^si^ge) 
Carretones (de Montar) 
Frachtkarren (Reitkarren) 

Dapaon a Wolf Onaida. N. Y. 



Jamea, SpHncfleld, Ohio 



dder and Wine Presses 
Pressoirs k vin et k cidre 
Pren^sA para Hacer Cidra y Vino 
Kelterapparate fiir Wein und Apfeiwein 

I^anaing Wheelbarrow Co., liaoainc, Micti. .. 



Bolts and NuU. 

Boulons et Serous. 

Pernos y Tuercas. 

Bolzen und Muttem (Mutterbolzenj 

ColiiiDbiM Bolt Work*, Columbaa, Ohio . . . 

Brakes (Vehicle) 
Retrancas (Vehiculo) 
Frein (<le Voiture) 
Bremseo (fiir Fahrzenge) 

PoMerOo., The Morgan, Ftahklll an Hiidaan, N. V. 



Clothes Washing Machines 
Linge (machines k laver le) 
Maquinas de Savar Ropa 
Wische Waschmaschinen 

"1900" Waaher Co., Biitfchamton, N. V. . 



Coal Cars 

Charbon ( wagons pour ) 

Carros para Carbdn de IHedra 

Kohleawaggons 

UanaiBC Wheelbarrow' Co.. Laaalac, Mlah. 



n 



Sproat, Waldron ii Co., Muncy. Pa. 



Corn Harvesters 

Mais < Moisaonneuses de) 
Cosechadoras de Maiz 
Mais Emtemaschinen 

standard Harrow Co., Utioa, N. T. 



Corn Huskers and Shredders 

Mais (Instruments k enlever et k d^chirer les 

bracKesdu) 
Desgranadoras y Picadoras de Maiz 
Mais Enthiilsemaschinen und Ausweriapparate 

Bradley Mfc Co., David, Bradley, III. I 



Com Planters ( Hand) 
Mais (Semoirs de, k maia) 
Sembradoras de Maiz (A Mano) 
Maispflanzer ( fiir Handbetrieb) 

Ohio Cultivator Co., Tha. Belle voe. Ohio . 



Com Planters (Horse) 
iWais ( Semoirs de, i cheval ) 
Sembradoras de Maiz (para Caballo) 
Mais Pflanzmascbiaen (fiir Pferdebetricb) 



Bradley Mt%. Co., David, Bimdiey, III. 
MoiinePlowOo.. Mollne.lll 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



Corn Shelters ( Hand ) 
Mais ( Kgrenoirs tie, a main) 
Descascarador&s de Maiz (de Mano) 
Mais Pflaiumaschinen (fur Handbetrieb) 

M»r«ieillni Mf|t. Co , MarsfiileH, 111 4 

Patch. A. H.CIarkavillr. Teiiii 5 

Sprout, Wnldruii & Co., Muncy, I»« 3 

.Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y . , . 3 

U.S. Wind KiiBinpand I'ump Co . BatavU. HI. . . . '. 8S 



Corn Shellers ( Power; 
Mais (Egrenoirs de), a Anergic mecanique 
Descascaradoras de Malz (para Fueria mec&nica) 
Mais Pflanzmaschinen fiir Pferdebetrieb) 

.MarseilleuMfK. Co., M»r«eilles. Ill 

Patch. A 11. ClarkHville.Tenn 

Sprout, Waldron & Co., Muuov. Pa 

Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y. ... 



Cotton Planters 
Coton (.Seiiioirsde) 
Sembradoras de Algodbn 
Baumwoll Pflanzmaschinen 

Ohio Cullivalor Co., Tlt«. Bellevue. Ohio 



m 



Cultivating Machinery (Hand and o*rden) 

Culture du sol (lutruments pour la), d main et 

pour le jardiii 

Maquinaria Cultivadora ! de Mano y para HuerU) 
Qarten Pfliige , fiir Handbetrieb) 

Upere Plow Co.,,Tolin. Moline, III. ... 31 

Mollne Plow Co.. .Moline. III. . . ''"'*> 

Standard Harrow Co.. Utica. N. T. 3 



Cultivating Machinery ( Horse and Field) 
Culture du sol i Instruments pour la ), 4 cheTal et 
pour le champ 

Maqninaria Cultivadora <<\c Caballo j para el 
Campo) 

Bodenkultur (ieriite fUr Pferdebetrieb) 

Kr.-wllcy Win, Co , Uavid. Kradlpv. III. 
Deere Plow l^o,, .lohi., .Moline, III 

Moline Plow Co., Moline. Ill 

Ohio Cultivator Co.. The, Kelleviie Ohio 
Mandard Harrow Co.. Ulica, N. Y , , , 



1 
31 

6 
3B 

a 



Engines and Boilers i Stationary) 
Machines k vapeur et Chaudieres i fixes) 
Maquinas de Vapor y Calderas i Pijaa) 
Maschinen und Kessel ( Stationar) 

lrf>trel (k Co , .iMuf^, Sprinrrflald. Ohio .... 



eaffines i Traction and Poruble ) 

Machines A vapeur ( Pour la traction et traaspor- 

tables I 

Milquinas (De Tracci6n y Portdtiles) 

TraktionS' oder Zugmaschinen und Lokomobilta 



Feed and Ensilage Cutters 
Coupe-aliments, coupe-ensilage 
Cortadora de Forraje y Ensilaje 
Futter- und Qriinfutter (Ensilage) Schneide- 
maschinen 

Marseilles Mfg. Co., Marneilles, III 4 

Sliver Mf|f. Co., Salem Ohio '..'.'.'. 3B 



Feed Mills 

Moulins pour aliments 

Molinos de Frorraje 6 Pieoao 

Futtermijhlen 

Sprout, Waldron & Co.. Muncy, Pa s 



Files Letter and Card ) 

Systemes de classification ^ lettres et cartes) 
(Juarda-Cartas y Tarjetas 
Skripturenordner (fiir Briefe und Karter) 



Forging* Carriage) 
Pieces forgees ( Voiture) 
Forjaduras ( para carruajes) 
Schmiedereien i Kaleschen-) 



(iardening Tools ( Hand) 
Jardinage Outils de) a main 
Herramienta« de Hortelano ! de Mano) 
(iartnerei Handwerkzeug 



(irain Cleaning Machinery Rice, Coffee, Grmia 

Klc.) 

Grains Machines ilnettoyer les i : riz cafi erain 

etc. '* 

Maqijinaria pare Limpiar (jranos ( Arrot, Ca£«, 

Cranos, Ivtc. 

Qetreide Reinigungsmaschinen f\ir Reia, 
KafTee, Korn, u. s. w. : 



I A r. 



, M. 



inc V. I'u. 



Urain Drills 
Qrains i Semoirs de , 
Sembradoras de Qranos 
Drill maschinen 

Monitor Drill Co., Miiuieapolig, .Minn 
Hiipe'ior Drill Co , .Hpringfteld, Ohio . 



Qrain Urinding Mills 
Qrains i Moulins h moudre les ) 
Molinos para Oranos 
Schrotmiihien 

S"fl' '^ ^^I'"« *"« Co., Kendallvllla, latl. 
Kelly Co., The O. .<*., .SprinKfleld, Ohio . . 
Mar»eillr.Mfn Co., Mameillea, III 

••Sprout, Waldron A Co., Muncy, Pa 

U.S. Wind Rnginaaod Pump Co., BMIaWa lil' 



Hand Carts (Push) 

Charrettes h bras 

Carretillas de Mano (de Bmpuje) 

Hand-Schiebekarren 

Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, III. . . 
DemingCo, The, Salem, Ohio . . . 
Laoaiug Wkeeiharrow Co., lianalnc Mich 



1 

M 



Hand Tools (Shovels, Rakes, Hoes, Scythes. 

Forks, Etc. ) 

Outils h main (Pelles, riteaux, houes, faux, foixr- 

ches, etc. ) 

Herramlentas de Mano ( Palas, Rastrillos, Aia- 
dones, Guadaiias. Horquillas, etc.) 

Handwerkzeug (Schaufeln, Rechen, Haken, Sea- 
seu, Gabeln, u. s. w. 



o 



Harrows i Disc, Spring-Tooth and Spike-Tooth) 
Herses (a disques. a dents ^lastiques. 4 denU 
droites) 

Mielgas 6 Rastrillos (de Disco, con Dientes d* 

Kesorte y Otros) 

Eggen (niit Scheiben-. Federzahn- und Speichea- 
zahn-Vorrichtung) 



Bra<ilay .Mfg. Co . David, Bradley, III . 

Bucher & Gibhn Plow Co., Canton, Ohio 

I ollinsPlow Co..Quincy, 111 

Deere Plow Co., John, Moline, 111. '. ' ' 

Moline Plow Co.. Muline. Ill 

Ohio Cultivator (o., 1 he. Bellevue, Ohio ! 

Standard Harrow Co.. Utica. N Y. . , 



I 

1 
» 
81 

3S 
t 



Hay Loaders 
Foin ( Chargeuses dej 
Cargadoras de Heno 
Heu Auflader 



.MarMlll... Mfc 0«., Marwlllw, HI. 



Hay Presses 
Foin Presses a 
Prensa^ para Hens 
Heu Pressen 



Bradley MfK ( ,. , David, Bradley, III 
(ollina Plow Co., Quincy. III. . 

Krtel Co., Oeorge, Quincy III 

Ohio Cnliivator Co., The. BelleTue, Ohio '. 
Standard Harrow Co.. Utica NT. 



2* 



38 



Hay Rakes 
Foin Rateaux A , 
Rastros para Heno 
Heu Rechen 



B"«"«y M'tt Oo , l>8rld, Bradley, III. 
Moline Plow c;o. Moline. III. 



f: • 



Hay Tools For Handling Hay ) 
Foin Outils pour la manipulation dn) 
Herramlentas para Heno i para Manipular el Hcm) 
Heubearbeitungs-Apparate und WerkzMif* 

fjj'*^''- K * Bro., Aahland, OM* . . 

I . 9. Wind En«lne and Pomp Oo., B«t«\ Jh'. Iiil ] ] 



Hods (Steel and Wood) 

Auges ( Acier et bois ) 

Artesas de Cargar (de Acero y de Madera) 

Tiinchkiibel ( Morteltroge, aus Stahl and Holz) 



Potato Machinery 

Pommes de terre (Machines pour la culture des) 

Maquinaria para Patatas 

Kartoffel-Maschinen 



Lanaing Wheelbarrow Oo., Utnaing, Mloh. . 



» 



Implement Parts ( Rake, Teeth, Knife Sections, 

Etc.) 
Places de rechange ( Dents de riteaux, conteaux 

de faucheuses, etc. ) 
Partes de Instrumentos (Dientes de Rastrillo, 

Secciones de Cuchilla, Etc. ) 
Tbeile von Landwirthschaftsgeriithen (Rechen- 

zahne, Messertheile, u. s. w. ) 



Incubators 

Conveuses artificielles 

incubadoras 

Brutmaschinen ( tnkubatoren ) 

Brtel Co., Oeorge, ()uincy. III « 



Lawn Mowers 
Tondeuses de gazon 
Segadoras 6 Cortadoras de C^sped 
Rasen Miihmaschinen 

Olipper Lawn Mower Co., Dixon, 111 

Chadtwrii & Coldwell Mfg- Co., Newburgh, N. Y 

Leather ( Imitation) 
Leder (Imitation) 
Cuero (Iniitaci6n) 
Cuir (Imitation) 

Fairfleld Rubber Co.. The. Kalrfleld.Ctenn 



Machine Tools 
Machines-outils 
Herramlentas Mecanicas 
Maschinen- Werkzeug 

silver Mfg. Co., Salem, Ohio 



Mowers. 
Faucheuses. 
Segadoras. 
Miihmaschinen. 



Mills (Corn and Hominy i 
Moulins (pour ma'is et bouilie) 
rioiinos I para Moler Maiz Fino y Grueso) 
Miihien < fiir Getreide und indianiiches Reia, 
Hominy) 



Sprout, Waldron A Co., Muney, Pa. 
Standard Harrow Co., Utiea. N. Y. . 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, III I 

Moline Plow Co., Moline, III 6 

Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y ■ 



Pumps, Hand and Power ( Lift, Force and Spray ) 
Pompes, a main, et a energie mecanique (Pom- 

pes aspirantes, foulautes, pulv^risatrices) 
Bompas de Mano y para Fuerza Meciinica 

(Aspirantes, de Forzar y de Rociar) 
Pumpen, Hand- und Kraftpumpen (Hebe-, 

Druck- und Besprengungs-Pumpen) 



DemingCo.The, Salero, Ohio 35 

Plinth Walling Mfg Co., KendalWille.Ind 3 

Myem, F. E. St Bro., Anhland, Ohio 2 

U. S. Wind Rngine and Pump Co., Batavia, III S.^ 



Reapers. 
Moissonneuses. 
Cosechadoras 
Qetreide-Miihmaschinen. 



Rollers ( Field or Road ) 
Rouleaux (pour champs et pour routes) 
Rodillos (para Campo y para Caminoi) 
Feld- und Weg-Walzen 



Sleighs 
Tralneaux 
Trlneos 
Schlitten 

Dapaon * Wolf. Onetda. N. Y. 



3 

as 



Oil Cloth 
Toile Ciree 
Wachstuch 



Plows ( Walking. Riding and Disc) 
Charrues (ordinaires, k si^ge, 4 disques) 
Arados (de Caminar, de Montar y de Disco) 
Pfliige (Geh-, Fahr- und Scheibenpfliige) 



Bradley MfK- Co., David, Braillev, 111 1 

Bucher& OibhK Plow Co.. Canton, Ohio 2 

Uollinx Plow Co., Quincy, 111 29 

Deere Plow Co., .John, Moline, III 31 

Moline Plow Co.. Moline, 111 « 

Ohio Cultivator Co., The, Bellevue, Ohio .lA 

South Bend Chilled Plow Works. South Bend, tnd. . . I 

Standard Harrow Co., UUoa. N. Y ■ 



Bra<lley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, III. . . 
I.«naing Wheelbarrow Co., LaiiKing, Mich. 
Ohio Cultivator Co., The, Bellevue, Ohio . 
Standard Harrow Co.. Utica. N. Y 



Rubber Goods 
Articles de caoutchouc 
Articulos de Caucho 
(lummiwaaren 



Rubber Tires 

Uummireifen 

Bandes de roues en caoutchouc 

Llantas de Caucho para Ruedas 



■X 



Morgan & Wright. Chicago, 111. 



Scrapers ( Road i 
Ratissoires i pour routes) 
Oragas (para Caminos) 
Strassen Scharr-Maschioen 



Strasaen-Bbener ) 



Standarti Harrow Co.. Utica. N. V. 



Seeders, Broadcast (Grain and Grass) 
Semoirs pour semer ik la volee ( Grain et grami- 

nees i 
Maquinas de Sembrar Semillas al Vuelo (Granoa 

y Seniilla de Yerbas) 
Breitsiimaschinen (fiir Getreide und Gras) 



Sharpeners and Grinders 
Machines h remoudre et k aiguUer 
Afiladoras y Amoladoras 
Schirfe- und Schleif-Apparate 



Sprayers and Nozzles 
Instruments d'arrosage 
Rociadoras y Boquereles 
Besprengungs-Spritzen und Uebernasea 

DemingCo.,Tlie, Salem Ohio 35 

Flint A Walling Mfg. Co.. Kendallvllle. lad 8 

Myers. F. R. Ac Bro . Anhland. Ohio 2 

Standard Harrow Co., Utica. N. Y B 



Stalk Cutters 
Coupe-chaume 
Cortadoras de Tallos 
Stengel Abschneider 



Street Sprinklers 

Arrosage de.s rues (Tonneaux pour 1') 

Regadoras de Calle 

Strassen Bespreng-Wageo 



Studebaker Broa. Mfg. Co., South Bend, lo4. 



Sugar Cultivating l mptc m e nt« 
Sucre I Instruments pour la culture de la cause A) 
Instrumentos para el Cultivo Azucarero 
Zucker-Anbau Gerathe 



Threshing Machinery 
Machines a battre 
Maquinaria de Trillar 
Dresch Maschinen 



Tire Setters 

Machines k fixer les bandes de rouca 

Maquinas de Poner Llantas 

Maschinen zum Aufsetzen von Gummireifa 



Standard Tire .letter Co., Kaokuk. Iowa 



Tread Powers ( Horse, I>og, Sheep, Etc. ) 
Machines k utiliser I'^nergie de la hmmxIm 

iCheval, Chien, Mouton, etc.) 

Motores de Pisada ( para Caballo, Perro, Carnaro, 

etc.) 
Kraft-Tretmaschinen ( Pferde, Hunde, Schafa 

U. 8. W.) 



Trucks (Hand Warehouse) 
Trues ( Emmagasinage k bras> 
Carretillas de Mano para almac^a 
Transport Handwagen ( fiir Waarenha 

lAnainc Wheelbarrow Oo. Lanaing, Mieh. , 



1 



Export Implement Age 



Wagoiu (Business) 
Charettes (d'atTaires) 
Carros (para negocios) 
Wagen ( Geschaftswiigen ) 



Wagons and Buck-Wagons 
Charrettes et charrettes a lessive 
Carretones y Carretas 
W&gen und Bockwagen 

Ohio Valley Wagon Co., The. Marietta, Ohio . 



Well Tools and Drilling Machinery 
Outils pour puits et machines a forer 
Instnimentos para Abrir Pozos y Maquinaria 

para Horadar 
Bninnen-Werkzeug und Bohr-Maschinen 

Flint & WallinKMrc. Co.. Kendallville, Ind 8 



Wheels and Wheel Materials 
Roues et articles pour roues 
Kuedas y Materiales para Ruedas 
Rader und Radermaterialien 



Wagons and Carts \ I'arui ) 
Wagonnets et charrettes ( Ferme) 
Carretones y Carretas (para Hacienda) 
Landwirthschaftliche Wagen und Karren 



LMnmng Wheelbarrow Co., I.«iiiinK, .Mich. . . 
Studebaker Kroa. .Mfg. Co.. South Bend, Ind. 



Wheelbarrows 
Brouettes 
Carretillas 
Schiebekarren 

Lansing Wheelbarrow Co.. lianalne. Mich » 



Windmills (Towers and Tanks) 
Moulins h vent (Tours et reservoirs) 
Moiinos de Viento (Torres y Tanques) 
Windmuhlen (Thurm- und Biitten) 

Flint & Walling Mfg. Co., Kendallville, Ind. . 

MarwilleuMfK. Co., MarBelllea, III 

V. S. Wind Kugineand Hump Co., BataTia, ill. 



8 

* 
» 



>) 



29 

86 



Weeders 

5arcloirs m^caniques 
Desyerbadoras 
Jfcte Maschinen 

ataadard Harrow Co.. Ctlca. K. Y. 



Wheels (Carriage) 

Roues ( Voiture ) 

Ruedas (Carruaje) 

Rider ( Kaleachen und Wagen ) 



Wood Sawing Machinery 
Bois (Machines d scierle) 
Maquinaria para Aserar Madera 
Holzsage-Maschinen 

MarMilleaMfg. Co , Manwillea, 111 

U. 8. Wind Engine and Pump Co., BataWa, III. 



4 

8.^ 



Alphabetical List of Advertisers. 

Annonces par ordre Alphabetique. 

Luta Alfab^tica de las casas que se Anuncian en esta Revista. 

Alphabetisch geordnetes Inhalts-Verzeichnis von Inserenten. 



Fairfield Rubber Co., The, Fairfield, Conn. . . 
Flinl &. Walling Mfg. Co., KendallTille. Ind. 



5 "1900" WadicrCo., Binghamion, N. Y. 
3 



Ohio Cultivator Co., The, Relleme. Ohio 



31 



36 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, 111. . . 
Bucher & Oibbs Plow Co., Canton, Ohio . 



PateA, A. H., ClarkaTille, Tena 6 

Potter Co., Morgan, Firfikill-oo-Hudnon, N. Y. . 3 



Kelly Co., The O. 8., Springfield, Ohio . 
Cbadbonm A Coldwell Mfg. Co., Ncwbnigh, N. Y. 1 

Clipper Lawn Mower Co., Dixon, 111 6 

CollinB Plow Co., Qninoy. Ill •,»!• I^nsing Wheelbarrow Co., Unsing, Mich 

Colmnhw Bolt Works, Colnwbna, Ohio 36 i^el A Co., Jam... Springfield. Ohio . . 



29 



Daprton A Wolf, Oneida, N. Y 3 

Deere Plow Co., John, Moline, III 31 

Deming Co., The, Salem, Obia 35 



Ertel Os., Om., Qaiaey, III. 



.... 29 Silver Mfg. Co., The, Salem, Ohio 

South Bend Chilled Plow Co., South Bend, Ind. 

Spront, Waldron & Co., Money, Pa 

Standard Harrow Co., The, Utica, N. Y. . 

Standard Tire Setter Co,, Keoknk, Iowa . 

Stndebaker Bro«. Mfg. Co., South Bend, Ind 

MarBeilles Mfg. Co., Maraeillea, 111 4 Soperior Drill Co., Springfield, Ohio 

Moline Plow Co., Moline, 111 f 

Monitor Drill Co., Minneapolis, Minn 31 

Morgan A Wright, Chicago, III j 

Myara A Bro., F. E., Aahland. Obi« ... 9 n R Wi~i v ■ j «_ „ „ 

' "- 8. Wmd Bigiaeand PnmpCo., Batavia, 111. 



36 
1 
3 

S 
38 



Export Implement Age 



Machinery for Grinding all Kinds of Grain 
Machines a moudre tous genres de grains 
Maquinaria para moler todas glase de granos 
Maschinerie zum Mahlen aller Getreidesorten 




Standard Harrow Co. 

UTICA, N. Y., U. S. A. 



n 



./ 



y^^ 



ABERDEEN, SR. 

SPRING-TOOTH 

HARROW 

Unequalled Strength 

No Cloqglng 

Reversible Points 
on Teetli 



Write for one of our booklets which gives a full descnption of Jrench Burr and 
Attrition Feed and Meal Mills, Cottoi, Seed and Linseed Oil Cake Mills hmeo" 
Rock Mills, Cotton, Ear and Ore Crushers. Magnetic Separators, Corn bhellers. etc. 

Ecrive/ pour un pamphlet contcnant<lescription d^laillee de moulins a meules 
de France et A frottemcnt, de moulins pour grams de cotton et de tourteaux de lin, 
de moulins h picrre d'«5nieri, de hroyeurs d'^pis et de min<:Tais, de moulins uiag- 
ndtiques, d'ecosseurs, etc. 

Escribasenos pidiendo uno de nuestros libritos, en que se da una completa 
descripcion de nuestros Moiinos de Piedra Francesa y de Roce para Piensoy para 
Harina, Moiinos de Semillas de Algo<1<'.n, y para moler Tortas 'le Aceite de bemil- 
las de Linaza, Moiinos para Roca de Esmenl. Trituradoras <le Algod6n, Mazorcas 
y Minerales, Separedoras Magn^icas, Desgranadoras ile Maiz. etc. 

Man \erlauge eines unserer Biichlein, <las voile Besclireibung unserer fr««izn- 
aischen Mahlsteine und Reibevorrichtung enthiilt, wie auch aller I-utter-\or.lch 
tuneen Mehl-Muhlen, Kauniwollensaamen- und Leinolsaamen Kuchen-Muhlen, 
Schmir'gel-Bergniuhlen, Baumwollen-, Aehren- und Er/zerstuckelungs-Maschinen, 
magnetische Separatoren. Koni-Entliiilseinasclimen, u. s. w 

SPROUT, WALDRON & CO. 



• 



l>rawcr M. 



M L,' IN C V, R A., \J. «. A. 



THE STANDARD LINE indmles one and two section Spring- 
Tooth Harrows and all styles and sizes of Spike-tooth and 
Disc Harrows, Cultivating Implements. Potato Harvesters, 
Potato Sprayers, etc., and is one of the most favorably 
known lines in the leading agricultural countries. 

We guarantee prompt service for all export orders. 
Our factory is only five hours' ride from New York City. 
WRITE IN YOUR OWN LANGUAGE FOR CATALOGUE F 



ZIG ZAG STEEL 
SPIKE-TOOTH HARROW 

20-Teotli Sections 
^■Inch Teeth 



VTT 



EASY RIDING 

This two-wheeler i- our leading 
•pecialty for exjiort. 

We equip it with RUBBER TIRES. 
if desire<l, put on with two wires. The work, 
like the job itself, is sold under our positive 
guarantee. 

UT US StND YOU THE PRICES 



Dapson 6 Wolf 

ONEIDA, NEW YORK, U. S. A. 




WHOIKSALE MAKKBS t)F _ 



FINE CARRIAG 



"POTTER'S" 

■ SPRING BRAKE BLOCKS 

Have Led the Market for Nineteen Yeara, and HIa 

ADJUSTABLE SPRING BRAKE 

la a Winner From the Start 
Equally satisfactory for steel or rubber tired vehicles. 



NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 

FISHKILL-ON-HUDSON 
YORK, U.S. A. 



The Morgan Potter Co. E^ 



-sati>fact..iv work iialutally is the one you want Thf -ST.AR' 
<.„rl.ooklrt-iti HiiKli-li.Orii'a"- Freiirl. and Sp»..ish Irll all 

"STAR'* WINDMILLS 

.lesignnl for the hea»y ami varie.l woik ir.iuired of ihem 
abroad The ■■>TAK- i- l.uilt in all si/cs, tliorouRhly galvan- 
ized, has ball bearinK* and in the rasirst running Mill made 

Kor many years we have 
been eiportinR Windmills 
and know what is needed to 
meet all requirements and 
please our foreign friends. 
We understand how these 
goods should be packed for 
safe delivery, and the pack- 
ing receives our most care- 
ful attention. With 
all the required pari-. 
■t hand and proper 
ly fitted it facilitate^ ^ 

the assembling and 
erectingof the Mill- 
We build Hand 
and Windmill 

Pumpa of various 

designs all •■i'es ol 

Pine, Cypreaa and 

(iaivanizcd Steel 

Tanks, (iaivanized 

Steel Tower* any 

height. Power Wind- 

mllll for grinding 

feed and running 

light machinery and 

SteclSubitructurcs 

all heights, to sup- 
port Tanks ol any 

capacity. 

CORRKSPONHKNCK INVITKD 

KENDALLVILLE 

S.A, 



"MU" nwpwj mil 




FLINT & WALLINGIMFG. CO. RSlSiStV? 

New York Olllce. »« Wall Street. New York. U.S. A. 



Cabl. .address. "STAR." Kendallvi 
•Western fnion" and "Private. 



lie, Ind. Uoiles. 'Uieber.'' "A B C. 4lh edition. 



Export Implement Age 



WacooA (Business) 
Charettes (d'affaires) 
Carros (para negocios) 
Wigen ( Gescbaftswagen ) 



Wagons and Buck- Wagons 
Charrettes et charrettes it lessive 
Carretones y Carretas 
Wigen und Bockwagen 

Ohio Valley Wagon Co., The, Marietta, Ohio . 



Well Tools and Drilling Machinery 
Outils pour puits et machines h forer 
Instnimentos para Abrir Pozos y Maquinaria 

para Horadar 
Bninnen-Werkzeug und Bohr-Maschinen 

Flint & Walling Mfg. Co.. Kendallville, Ind 



Wheels and Wheel Materials 
Roues et articles pour roues 
Ruedas y Materiales para Ruedaa 
Rader und Radermaterialien 



Wagons and Carts ( Farm ) 
Wagonnets et charrettes ( Ferme) 
Carretones y Carretas (para Hacienda) 
Laiidwirthschaftliche Wagen und Karren 



Wheelbarrows 
Brouettes 
Carretillas 
5chiebekarren 

laming Wheelbarrow Co.. T^inalng, MIeb. 



Windmills (Towers and Tanks) 
Moulins A vent (Tours et reservoirs) 
Molinos de Viento (Torres y Tanques) 
Windmiihien (Thunn- und Biitten) 

Pllut ft Walling Mfg. Co., KendallTille, Ind. . 

MaraeilleaMfg. <'o., Mikriieilles, III 

U. S. Wind Bngine and Pump Co., BataTla. 111. 



8 

4 
■6 



)) 



Lansing Wheelbarrow Co., l«n«ng, Mich. . . 
Studabaker Broe. Mfg. Co., South Bend, Ind. 



M 



Wecders 

Bwcloirs m^caniques 
Desyerbadoras 
JMe Maschinen 

MaBdard Harrow Co.. Ctiea. N. T. 



Wheels (Carriage) 

Roues (Voiture) 

Ruedas (Carruaje) 

Rider ( Kaleschen und Wagen) 



Wood Sawing Machinery 
Bois (Machines ^ scierle) 
Maquinaria para Aserar Madera 
Holzsage-Maschinen 

MarMilleaMfg. Co, Manwillea. Ill 

U. 8. Wind Bngine and Pump Co., Batavla, III. 



4 
•S 



Alphabetical List of Advertiser!. 

Annonces par ordre Alphab^tique. 

Litta AlfaMtica de las casas que se Anundan en esta Revista. 

Alphabetisch geordnetes Inhalts-Verzeichnis von Inserenten. 



Fairfield Rubber Co., The, Fairfield, Conn 5 "1900" Washer Co., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Flint A Walling Mfg. Co., KendallTille, Ind. . . 3 



Ohio Cultirator Co., The, Reilerne, Ohio 



31 



Bradley Mfg. Co., Darid, Bradley, 111 1 

Bocber & Oibba Plow Co., Canton, Ohio 2 



Patoh, A. H.,ClarksTille, Tena 

Potter Co., Morgan, Fii>hkill-on-HndMn, N. Y. 



3C 



6 
3 



Kelly Co., The O. 8., Springfiald, Ohio M 



Cbadbonm A Coldwell Mfg. Co., Newbnigh, N. T. 1 

Clipper Lawn Mower Co., Dixon, III 6 

Collins Plow Co., Qninoy, 111 29 

Colnmhus Bolt Works, Colnmbna, Ohio 36 



DapHon A Wolf, Oneida, N. Y 3 

Deere Plow Co., John, Moline, III 31 

Deming Co., The, Salem, Ohia 35 



Laaaing Wheelbarrow Co., Lansing, Mich S6 

Leflel A Co., Jamea. Springfield, Ohio 39 SiWer Mfg. Co., The, Salem, Ohio 

South Bend Chilled Plow Co., Ronth Bend, Ind 

Sproat, Waldron A Co., Mnnoy, Pa 

Standard Hmtow Co., The, Utica, N. T. . 

Standard Tire Setter Co,, Keoknk, Iowa . . 

Studebakw Bros. M^. Co., South Bend, Ind. 

MarMilles Mfg. Co., Maraeillea, III 4 Superior Drill Co., Springfield, Ohio 

Moline Plow Co., Moline, 111 ^ 

Monitor Drill Co., Minneapolis, Minn 31 

Morgan A Wright, Chicago, 111 i 



36 
1 

S 

t 
3« 



Export Implement Age 



Machinery for Grinding all Kinds of Grain 
Macliines a moudre tous genres de grains 
Maquinaria para moler todas glase de granos 
Maschinerie zum Mahlen aller Getreidesorten 




Write for one of our booklets which gives a full description of Jrench Burr and 
Attrition, Feed and Meal Mills, Cotton Seed and Linseed Oil Cake Mills hmer>- 
Rock Mills, Cotton, Ear and Ore Crushers, Magnetic Separators, Corn Shellers, etc. 

Ecrivez pourun pamphlet contenant description d^taill^-e de tnoulins k ineules 
de France et^ frottement, de moulins pour grams de cotton et de tourteaux de lin, 
de moulins k pierre d'^meri, de broyeurs d'^pis et de minerals, de moulins mag- 
n^tiques, d'^cosseurs, etc. 

Escribasenos pidiendo uno de nuestros libritos, en que se da una compleU 
descripcic'.n de nuestros Molinos de Piedra Francesa y de Roce. para Piensoy para 
Harina, Molinos de Semillas de Algotlon, y para moler Torta.s *le Aceite de bemil- 
lasde Linaza, Molinos para Roca de Esmenl, Trituradoras de Algod6n, Mazorcas 
y Minerales, Separedoras Magnaicas, Uesgranadoras de .Maiz, etc. 

Man veriange eines unserer Biichlein, <las voile Bescbreibung unserer franz<)- 
•iacben Mablsteine und Reibevorrichtung enthalt, wie aucb aller I-utter-\oruch 
tuntren Mehl-Miihlen, BaumwoUensaamen- und Leinolsaamen Kucben-Muhlen, 
Schmirgel-Bergmiihlen, Baumwollen-, Aebren- und Er/.zerstuckelungs-Maschinen, 
magnetische Separatoren, Korn-Kntbiilseniaschineii, u. s. w 

SPROUT, WALDRON & CO. 



«rtel Oa., Om.^ Q«iMy, 111. 



Myars A Bra., F. E., Aahlaad, Obia 



» tJ. 8. Wind Eagiae and Pomp Co., Batana, IlL 



.1 



Drawer M. 



IVi U IN C V, P A., U- «. A.. 



EASY RIDING 

This two-wheeler is our leading 
specialty for export. 

We equip it with RUBBER TIRES, 
if desired, put on with two wires. The work, 
like the job itself, is sold under our positive 
guarantee. 

LET US SEND YOU THE PilCES 



Dapson 6 Wolf 

ONEIDA. NEW YORK. U. S. A 

- WHOLBSALe MAKKBS OF 



FINE CARRIAG 



The Standard Harrow Co. 



UTICA, N. Y., U. S. A. 



0-^' 



ABERDEEN, SR. 

SPRING-TOOTH 

HARROW 

Unequalled Strength 

No Clogging 

Reversible Polnit 
on Teeth 



THE STANDARD LINE includes one and two section Spring- 
Tooth Harrows and all styles and sizes of Spike-tooth and 
Disc HatTOWs, Cultivating Implements, Potato Harvesters, 
Potato Sprayers, etc., and is one of the most favorably 
known lines in the leading agricultural countries. 

We guarantee prompt service for all export orders. 
Our factory is only five hours' ride from New York City. 
WRITE IN YOUR OWN LANGUAGE FOR CATALOGUE F 



ZIG ZAG STEEL 
SPIKE-TOOTH HARROW 

20-To«lh Sectlont 
H-lnch Teeth 



rrr 




% Windmill that .lo, - satisf.clory work naturally is the one you want The •STAR' 
is the one thai pleases, our lK)oklel,s in Hnglish. German. French and Spau.ah tell aU 



about 



"STAR" WINDMILLS 



.leiiigned for the hea»y and varied wotk leijuired of them 
abroad. The "STAR" i» liuill in all sizes, thoroughly galvan- 
iied, has ball bearings and i» the easiest running Mill made 



"POTTER'S" 

■ SPRING BRAKE BLOCKS 

Havo Led tho Market for Nineteen Yeara, and HIa 

ADJUSTABLE SPRING BRAKE 

la a Winner From the Start 
Equally •■tl«f«etory for steel or rubber tired vehicles. 



NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 

FISHKILL-ON-HUDSON 
YORK, U.S.A. 



The Morgan Potter Co. ^ 




"sur ptxpiNfl mil 



For many years we have 
been eaporling Windmills 
and know what is needed to 
meet nit re.iuirements and 
please our foreign friends. 
We understand how these 
goods should be packed for 
safe delivery, and the pack- 
ing receives our most care- 
ful attention. With 
all the required parts 
at hand and proper 
ly fitted it facilitates 
the assembling and 
erecting of the Mill* 
We build Hand 
and Windmill 

Pumps of various 

designs all sizes ot 

Pine, Cypreaa ami 

Ualvanizcd Steel 

Tanks, Ualvanlzed 

Steel Towers an\ 

height, Power Wind- 
mills for grinding 

feed and running 

light machinery and 

SteclSubstructurcs 

all heights, to sup- 
port Tanks of any 

capacity. 

CORRHSPONDKNCK INVITKD 




FLINT & WALLING;MFG. CO. KSl^i^2:^r'i^' 

New York OHIce. »« Wall Street. New York. U.S. A. 
Cable Addre«., "STAR." KendallviUe, Ind. Codes, "Ueber." "A B C. 4th editio-,' 
'Western Tnion' and "Private. 



INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



Export Implement Age 




t) 



Extend your trade 
beyond tlie seas 



AMERICAN manufactures are not only in demand, 
but in many cases are given the preference in 
foreign countries. P^specially is this true of Agri- 
cultural Machinery, Farm vSupplies, Vehicles and Hard- 
ware Specialties. If you are manufacturing any of these 
goods voice it abroad and make the world your held. You 
can do it just as easily as you can secure home trade if 
you'll talk through the 



Export Implement Age 

IT REACHES ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES 
WRITE US FOR ADVERTISING RATES 



Export Implement Age 



Superior Grain Drills 

semoir. superieurs de Grain.. Manu- Made in a Urge variety of sizcs in Plain Grain I 



Semoirs Superieurs de Grains. Manu- 
factures en une grande vari^t^ de dimensions 
pour Grains seulenient on pour Grains el Fer- 
tilisants ni^lang^s, avec Disque, Houe et Soc 
creusant les sillons. Nous manufacturons des 
mode'es sp^ciaux de Semoirs de Grains pour 
I'Euio'jo, I'Australie, I'Amerique du Sud et 
le Sud de I'Afrique. Demandez les Catalogues 
descriptifs illustres. 

Sembradoras Superiores de Oranos. Se 
fabrican de tnuchos lamanosde sembrar Granos 
s61a 6 combinada con Fertilizador, con sur- 
cadores de Disco, de Azadon 6 /.apattllas. 
Nosotros fabricamos Sembradoras de tipos 
especiales para Kuropa, Australia, Sud America 
y el Africa del Sur. Knviese por un CatAlogo 
descriptivo ilustrado. 

■■Superior" Oetreiderllien. VVird in viel- 
seitiger Auswahl von Grossen hergestellt : Ein- 
facbe Getreiderillen unci Kombinationen von 
Getreide und Pflugrillen mit Scheiben, Hauen 
und Schuh-I.ockerungs Vorricbtungeri. Wir 
fabriziren besondere Arten von Getreidenllen 
fiir Europa. Australien, Siid-Amerika und Sud- 
Afrika. Man verlange illustrirte bescbreibende 
Kataloge. 

We manufacture special types of 
Grain Drills for Europe, Australia, 
South America and South Africa 



Made in a large variety of sizes in Plain 
and combined Grain and Fertilizer, with 



Grain 
Disc, 



Hoe and <;hnp furrow openers 3> $ $ 4> 



1 ', — ^ 



lOB 



THE SUPERIOR DRILL CO., Springfield, 0., U.S.A 



THE FAIRFIELD RUBBER CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Carriage Cloth, Imitation Leather, Etc. 

FAIRFIELD. CONN.. U. S. A. 

Wc '.-rhc.r v,.u w.ll rtn 1 m.r cloths more ,l«irablc fal-ic. ..,«,. havr !«-r„ ,„.-.r„lr.l 
for vour considtralion .;,i. „ 

Vol only do we utTct o.,, ;,„. ■• .- M,,.orior <o any, b..t -iome arc -jH-cal «,lh ..••. 
W> warrant all our s..o,Ih >i. every >..ain.ir, and ... all climates 
Ml we.,k i, a trial of ,mr ,.ro.luctio„s, as we kno« the re.uU «m he ...our fa»o.. 

„;ly :.» to tl.eir wai.t> a.i.I the 'ai^Kf ';."'"" " o,.r^c^.U is appreciatr.l. We refer with 

^:j!a!;;f^to'^?;;:ai;iK^;^^::r.To,i::^^. ^"^J v^;^::?t« .he Zn. of our dch. 

-en.l for .,;.ot..tio.is ,hr<n.Kh any Kxport ho..«r. or write u» direct. 

v"i-n Td-ri!i ■ . !- ■> ■■ ' Mir .sk for good", n.adr by 

The Fairfield Rubber Co. 



The Export Implement Age 

is an independent journal devoted exclusively to the Export 
Trade in Agricultural Machinery. Pumps, Wind Mills. Farm 
Tools. Dairy Supplies and Hardware Specialties. 

Advertising Rates Furnished Lpon Appllcatloi 



CLIPPER UAWIN 
MOWER GO. 




DIXOIN 

IL.l<IINOI8 



TTHE MOWER that will kill 
^ all (he Weeds In your Lawns. 
I f you keep the weeds cut 
so they do not go to seed, and 
cut your grass without breaking 
the small feeders of roots, the 
grass will become thick and the 
weeds will disappear. 

THE CLIPPER WILL DO IT 
Ask Your Dealer for Then 




GRINDS 

Corn, Wheat, 
Rye, Rice, 
Coffee, 
Spices, Etc. 



Instantly Adjusted to 
Grind Fine or Coarse. 



PATCH'S PATENT 

BidcK Hdwk (orn Sheller 



WILL DO GOOD WORK and LAST 

Qrlndlng Plate* .re ol the H.rde.t and Stronuest 
M*UI». C.n he repl«:ed .t .light cct. 

I'ackcl In barrrls..( 12each. Or.*-< weight, 24o Itw.; 
m-l. Jk« !»>»• Mea-ur,-menl (.V4 cub..- fwt. 

Am Hm PATCH, Makor, 

Glarksvllle, Tonn., !#■ S. A. 




SHELLS 

FAST. 

SHELLS 

CLEAN. 
SHELLS 

EASILY. 



Order Ihrouth any Reliable Commissieli House. 



Bowaro of 
Imitationm 



CplcilT 

SI0I2 

iHukcIt 

or era 

liovr. 



Packed 10 In a barrvl. Crww, 190 1^; 
Net, ISO lbs. Measurement b% cubic 
MADE ONLY BY 

A. H. PATCH, ^^It'V^^^. 



Export Implement Age 



Uneqnalled 
Facilities 
for Prompt 
Handling of 
Export Business 




SHANGHAI KIDD 
DISC CULTIVATOR 



Forty-six inches from lowest point of arch to the ground. 
Adjustable in wiiUh from 48 to 72 inches. Popular for culti- 
vating Corn, Cane, Tobacco, etc. Packed for export, weighs 
830 pounds. Occupies 25 cubic feet of space. 

STALK CUTTERS. WALKING AND RIDING 
PLOWS. DISC PLOWS, DISC HARROWS. 
PIPE-LEVER HARROWS. CORN PLANT- 
ERS AND DRILLS. LISTERS. COTTON 
PLANTERS. CULTIVATORS— BEET 
SEEDERS. CULTIVATORS and PULLERS 



d 



-♦^•s* 



nOLINE PLOW CO. 



MOLI NE, ILL, U. S. A. 

FOREIGN AGE.NCIE.S: 

J. 4 J. DRYSDALE 4 CO. MALCOMESS 4 CO. 

Sole Agent, for Argentine Sole AgenU for South Africa 

Buenoi Ayre.. South Amenc* East London. South Africa 




37 YEARS *>"'■•''"« hay. stmw. wool, cotton and corn fodder premies should certainly make 
,. .„ j*f u«e«j)erls and we claim that our presses are the Kimpleat. eaaieit draught on 

the team and the smoolheM tialers on the market to-tfay. • "" 

Our presses will bale from lo to iH tons a day in hay. 

Our presses will bale from lo to 15 tons a day in straw. 




J par jour 

Nos presses emballottent de 10 ft is tonnes de paille par jour. 

DeSpUeS de 37 aHoS li'fconslruimos prensaspara heno. paja, laiia. a1god6n y forraje de 

niaiztenemosqueKcrexpertoscnese rarao, y por lutanto reclamamos 



FRONT VIKW 

VVB DH PACK 

VISTA DKI. KKKNTH 

VORDHRANSICHT 

Catalogue free 

Catalogue franco sur dentande 

Catalogo Oratis 

Kataloge frel 



^rK-n"""""^?" '"'.'"'5''..''"." '■" "?"' "'rap'*''' y las mis llvianas para el acarreo por parejas de 
caballos. y Us etifardadadoras mejores que txislen hoy en el mercado 

Nueslras preiisas enfardan de lo A iK loneladas de heno por dia. 

Nuestras prensas enfardan de lo A is toneladasde paja por dla. 
37 Jahre """"'"•^'fochener Habrikation von lleupreasen Strohpressen.Wolle- und Baumwollen- 

• P.l''*:'^"' "*«■ '*"^^ Maisf utter- Pressen. sollte uns wahrlich in den Stand gesetzt haben 



Eaperten dieser Branche firworden »u seiii; 
beim Cespann der ■ ■ - 
iS "Tonneagehalf 





Our " Qem " Full Circle 



We make a Une of both Full Circle and Half Circle Presses 
f. o. b. cars New York City, on our Gem Full Circle Balers, properly crated for export: 






Net Weight. Gross Wei|[ht. Space 

iB Baler. . a,6.<io ( i. 457 Kilos) 3.7<»- ■ . "5 cubic feet 

18 Baler. . a.775 ( 1.5J6 Kilos) . . 3,800. . , . 171 cubic feet 

»a Baler . . j.975 (1,636 Kilos) .... 4.0m . . . . ijo cubic leet 



Prices, 
♦aijas (.<:44 1610) 
. aiS.oo {x't'~ S 
• "i-S" (.^46. 3 



.Nue«tra Prensa "aem" Circulo Entero 



Mosotros fabricamos un surtido completo de prensas tanto de medio circulo como de circiU* 

eotero. Los precios de eaibarque de la Prensa "Gem" son franco A bordo de los carrea 

hasia New York, y se empaquetan con aeiuridad para esportarlas 



t\ 



Notre presoe ♦•Gem" k cercie entier 



Peso Bruto. 
Prensa 14 i 18 . a,6so (1,457 Kilos) . 
Prenaa 16 » 18 . . 3,775 (>.i* Kilos; . 
Prensa 17 x aa . . 8,975 (1,636 Kilos) . 



Precio. 

a 18.00 U^j. t. 4 
M> 50 (><■«♦. 3- • 



rriz 



Nous fabriquons un asaortimeni de presses \ demi-cercle et k ccrcle entier. 
ac «o« presses '■Oera" i cercie entier, mi.ses eii wa^on ft New York et convenablenicat 
embalKes pour I'caportation: 
Poids net. Poids brut. Espace. prix 

14X18. .a,65oa.4S7kiloB) . . . . 3.7«> • ■ • 1 15 pieds cubes . . »ai5.35 ■(^44.,6.i«) 
T*xi8 .a,775 ('.5a6 kilos) . . . 3.S00 . . . . 171 pieds cubes . . . ail.oo /^it 8 A 
irxaa. .a,975 (1,636 kilos) . . .4,000. . . lao pieda cubes . . . MI.50 (j^Je! 3! 0) 



Neto. Bspacio. 

■ 3.7<« . . . . iispi^scCibicos 

.3,800. . . . 171 pi^sciibicos 

4,000, . . . laopl^scCibicos 

Uosere Voll-Zlrkel "Gem" PresM. 

Wir fabrisiren eln Asaortiment von Voll- und Halbzirkel-Presseu 
Preise unserer Volliirkel Emballage- Pressen, frel Board New York, fertli furdM 
Bxportversand verpackt: 
Nettogewicht. Bruttogewicht. Rauminhalt. Preise 

Mxi8Pre«w. .3,650(1,457510) 3,700 . . . . 1,5 Kubikfuss . . . $315.35 

iSxiSPreaae. . 3,775 (>.5J6 Kilo 3.80a . . . . 171 Kubikfuss * ^ * 

i7xa3Prcsae. . 3,975 (1,636 Kilo) 4,000 . . . . ijo Kubikfuss 



318.00 
aai.jo 



CEO. ERTEL CO. - 592 Kentucky Street. Quincy, III., U. S. A. 



(^44l<-<«) 



€ 



• • 



Export Implement Age 



V»l. XV. 



Philadelphia, Pa., V. S. X., October, 1906. 



No. I 



Address by Secretary Root at Rio de Janeiro 



T bcpf yoit to befieve that 1 lii^bl.N appre- 
ciate and thank vou for tlie honor you do 
me. I bring from my country a special grcet- 
infj to her ehlcr sisters in the civiHzation of 
America. 

I'nlikc as we are in many respects, we are 
alike in this, that we arc all ciiRaRcd under 
new conditions, and free from the trailitional 
forms and limitations of the olil world, in 
working out the same problem of popular self- 
government. 

Tt is a difficult and laborious task for each of 
us. Not in one generation nor in one century 
can the cflFective control of a superior sover- 
eign, so long deemed necessary to govern- 
ment, be rejected, and effective self-control by 
the governed be perfected in its place. The 
first fruits of democracy are many of them 



of personal interests to the public gocnl, love 
uf justice and mercy, of liberty and order. AH 
these we must work out by slow and patient 
effort ; and of how many shortcomings in his 
own land and among his own people each 
one of us is conscious ! 

Vet no student of our times can fail to sec 
that not Atnerica alone, but the whole civi- 
lized world is swinging away from its ohl 
governmental moorings and entrusting the 
fate of its civilization to the capacity of the 
popular mass to govern. P.y this pathway 
mankind is to travel, whithersoever it leads. 
Upon the success of this, our great undertak- 
ing, the hope of humanity depends. 

Nor can we fail to see that the world makes 
substantial progress towanls more perfect self- 
government. 




Mr. Elihu Root, Sccrttary ot Sutc. 



crude and unlovely; its mistakes are many, 
its partial failures many, its sins not few. 
Capacity for self-government does not come 
to man by nature. It is an art to be learned 
and it is also an expression of character to be 
developed among all the thousands of men 
who exercise popular sovereignty. 

To reach the goal towards which we are 
prcssin-.^' t'orwar<l. the eovcrning multi'.ude 
must first acquire knowledge that comes from 
universal education, wisdom that follows prac 
tical experience, personal independence and 
self-respect befitting men who acknowledge no 
superior, self-cnntrol to replace that external 
control which a democracy rejects, respect for 
law, obedience to the lawful expressions of the 
public will, consideration for the opinions and 
interests of others equally entitled to a voice 
in the State. Invalty to that abstract concep- 
tion — one's count r>- — as inspiring as that loy- 
alty to personal sovereigns which has so il- 
lumined the pages of historv. subordination 



I believe it to be true, that viewed against 
the background of conditions a century, a gen- 
eration, a decade ago, government in my own 
country has advanced, in the intelligent partic- 
ipation of the great mass of the people, in the 
fidelity and honesty with which they are rep- 
resented, in respect for law, in the obedience 
to the dictates of a sound morality, and in 
etTiciiveness and purity of administration. 

N'mvlicre in the world has this progress hrcn 
more marked than in Latin America. Out ot 
the wreck of Indian fighting and race con- 
flicts and civil wars, strong and stable gov- 
ernments have arisen. Peacefttl succession in 
accord with the people's will has replaced the 
forcible soi/nre of power permitted bv the 
people's indifference. Loyalty to country, 
its peace, its dignity, its honor, has risen above 
partisanship for individual leaders. 

The nile of law supersedes the rule of man. 
Property is protected and the fruits of enter- 
prise are secure Individual liberty is re- 



spected. Continuous public policies are fol- 
lowed; national faith is held sacred. Progress 
has not been equal everywhere, but there has 
been progress everywhere. The movement in 
the right direction is general. The right ten- 
dency is not exceptional, it is continental. The 
present affords just cause for satisfaction; the 
future is bright with hope. 

It is not by national isolation that these re- 
Milts have been accomplished, or th.it this pro- 
gress can be continued. No nation can live 
unto itself alone and continue to live. Each 
nation's growth is part of the development of 
the race. There may be leaders anrl there 
may be laggards, but no nation can long con- 
tinue very far in advance of the general pro- 
gress of mankind, and no nation that is not 
diKjtned to extinction can remain very far be- 
hind. Tt is with nations as it is with indi- 
vidual men ; intercourse, association, correc- 
tion of egotism by the inlhience of other's 
judgment, broadening of views by the exper- 
ience and thought of equals, .acceptance of the 
moral standards of a community the desire for 
whose g<x>d o])inion lends a sanction to the 
rules of right conduct — these are the condi- 
tions of growth in civilization. A people 
whose minds are not open to the lessons of 
the world's jimgress, whose spirits are not 
stirred li\ the aspirations and the .-ichievements 
i.f humanity struggling the world over for 
liberty and justice, must be left behind by 
livilizatinn. in it<; steady and l)eneficient ad 
\aiice. 

To ]in.Miiite this iimtiial intercbauL-e and 
assistance between the American republics en- 
•^aged in the saire great task, inspired by the 
same purpose, and professing the same princi- 
ples. T unilcrstand to be the function of the 
American Conference now in session. There 
IS not one of all our countries that cannot 
benefit the others; there is not one that can- 
not receive benefit from the others; there is 
not one that will not gain by the prosperity, 
the peace, the happiness of all. 

According to your program no great and 
impressive single thing is to In done by you; 
no political questions are lo lie discussed; no 
controversies are to be settled; no judgment 
is to be passed upin the conduct of any State; 
but many subjects are to be considered which 
afford the possibility of removing barriers to 
intercourse, of ascertaining for the common 
benefit what advances have been made by 
each nation in know lid-.-, in experience, in en- 
terprise, in the solution of difficult questions 
of government, and in ethical standards, of 
perfecting our knowledge of each other, and 
of doing away with the misconceptions, the 
niisunderstanding«. and the resultant preju- 
dices, that are such fruitful sources of contro- 
versy. 

.\nd there are some suliiicis in the program 
which invite discussion tli.it may lead the 
American republics towards agreement upon 
prin'-iples, the general practical applicition of 
which can come onK- in the future through 
long and patient effort. Some advance, at 
least, mav be made here towarrls the complete 



1 



8 



Export Implement Age 



rule of justice and peace among nations m 
lieu of force and war. 

The association of so many eminent men 
from ail the Republics, leaders of opinion in 
their <»\\n homes, the friendships that will 
arise amonjj you, the habit of temperate and 
kin.ily discussion of matters of common inter- 
est, the ascertainment of common >ympalhiis 
:md aims, the dissipatiiin of misunderstand- 
ings, the exliibition to all the American peoples 
of this peaceful and considerate method of 



member of the family of nations entitled to 
as much respect as those of the greatest em- 
pire, and we deem the observance of that re- 
st lect the chief guaranty of the weak against 
the oppression of the strong. We neither 
claim nt)r desire any rights, or privileges, or 
powers that we do not freely concede to every 
American republic. We wish to increase our 
prosperity, to expand our trade, to grow in 
wealth, in wisdom, and in spirit, but our con- 
ception of .the true way to accomplish this, is 



American comments is to be deemed subject 
to colonization. Let us pledge ourselves to aid 
each other in the full performance of the dut\ 
to humanity which that accepted declaration 
implies, so that in time the weakest and most 
unfortunate of our Republics may come to 
march with ef(ual step by the side of the 
stronger and more fortunate. 

Let us help each other to show that for all 
the races of nun the Lil)erty for which we 
have fonght and labored is the twin si.ster of 




Seen, in the VitUy of the Jim.. Rtvtr. One of the Beauty Spot* of Amefic*. 



conferring up<in international questions, this 
alone, quite irrespective of the resolutions you 
may adopt, and the conventions you mav sign, 
will mark a substantial advance in the direction 
of international go<">d understanding. 

These bencficicnt results the Government 
and the people of the United States of Amer- 
ica greatlv desire. We wish for no victories 
but those of peace : for no territory except our 
own : for no sovereignty except the <overeigntv 
over ourselves. We deeiu the independence 
and equal rights of the smallest and weake-t 



not to pull down others and profit by their 
ruin, but to help all friends to a common pros- 
perity and a common growth, that we luav 
all become greater and stronger together. 

Within a few months, for the first time the 
recognized possessors of every foot of soil 
upon the .American continents can be and I 
hope will be represented with the acknowl- 
edged rights of equal sovereign States, in the 
great World Congress at The Hague. This 
uill be the world's formal and final accep- 
tance of the declaration that uu part of the 



Justice and Peace. Let us unite in creating 
and niaintaining and makiim effective an .Mi- 
American public opinion, whose jiowcr shall 
influence international conduct and prevent in 
ternational wrong and narrow the causes of 
war, and forever preserve our free land from 
the burden of such armaments as are massed 
behind the frontiers of Kuropc. and bring us 
ever nearer to the perfection of ordered lib- 
erty. So shall come sccuritv and prospcrit\. 
production and trade, wealth, learning, the 
arts, and happiness for us all 



Export Implement Age 



Qas Engine Power for Farm and Shop 



Xo industry has advanced more rapidly in 
the I'nited States than the gasoline engine 
industry, just within the very recent years 
this style of power has sprung into general 
use and by reason of the imi)rovenient in the 
construction and the ease of operation, gas- 
oline engines are now enii)loyed on the farm 
and in the work shop wherever reliaV)le and 
convenient power is desired. 

Hitherto alcohol has not been useil as fuel 
in .\merica, owing to its high price, but now 
that Congress has passed the "Denature /\lco- 
hol r.ill," the field for gas engines will be 
tremendously enlarged. In a recent issue of 
the Metropolitan and Rnial llonic, appeared 
an article by .Mr. K. H. Vale, IJeatrice, Neb., 
I'. S. .\.. giving an interesting history of the 
industry and descri])tions of various types 
of gasoline engines. .\t the time Mr. Vale 
wrote this article Congress had not yet passed 
the ••Denatured Alcohol I'.ill," which is now a 
law. Mr. Vale says: 

The idea of applying the force of an ex- 
plosion, so a-- to operate machinery, was con- 
ceived about _'iK) years ago, and experiments 
were made with gunjjowder as the explosive 
element. However, no practical results were 
obtaiiKHl until the later part of the eighteenth 
century, and in fact, nothing that was in any- 
way really eflfective was accomplished until 
I'.rown's gas-vacuum engine was invented, in 
iSjt). This was probably the first engine to 
i>c operated through the force of an explosi<in ; 
or in anv event, no doubt, was the first one 
to perform actual labor. This first production 
was not altogether i)ractical aiul it was finally 
given up as a failure. P.ut little else was ac- 
complished in this direction until in 1838, and 
the following vears, when it was discovered 
that bv compressing the charge before explod- 
ing, much more satisfactory and useful results 
conl.l be obtained. r.arnett's engine, pro- 
duced in iMigland in about. 1838, was, no 
doubt, the first engine made in which the 
charge was coiiqiressed before being explod- 
ed. I'rom that time until i8(k), consiilerable 
proL,M(-.s was made, both in l'.uni|ie and in the 
ruitetl States, but the results obtained were 
not fullv practical, or at least not economi- 
cal. 

.\fler i><7o. there seccmed to have been 
better pr'.L:i> -- made in essential improvements 
looking to the economy and the proper gov- 
erning of the engine, until to-day, the gaso- 
line enj.;ine lias luen brougiit up to such a 
state of perfection in this and other countries 
that thev are vers lar-ely replacing steam en- 
gines f«'.r Use on the farm, in the blacksmith 
shop, in the i)rinti!ig ofTice and other places 
where reliable and <af(> power of moderate 
capacity is requirc<l. In fact, of late years. 
since gas iiroducer i)lant- have come mto 
vogue.^verv lar-e nmines of this class have 
been built and arc in actual and ccononucal ser- 
vice, there being engines of this tyi^e now made 
with a single cvliiider j-roduciny as much a-; 
7o<-) horse power, .iml where several cylinders 
are used in eomliinatiou. up to i.sO<^ to 2.000 
horse ])ower. 

In this counivv, we are accustomed to speak 
of these machines as gasoline engines, and in 



fact, in the United States, engines of this class 
are mainly run with gasoline. However, it is 
just as practical to u.se numerous other sub- 
stances, such as crude oil, kerosene and alco- 
hol, as well as natural gas, acetylene gas and 
va^ior gas. which also w<irk well in these in- 
ternal combustion engines. ICngines, however, 
designed for nearly all these various sub- 
stances and gases, are nearly all of somewhat 
different types than the engines constructed 
for use of gasoline, which would require some 
changes or attachments {o adapt them for 
the use of crude oil, or kerosene; but mainly 
the engines would be the same for any of these 
products. As before stated, the engines used 
in this country are mainly operated by gasri- 
line. for the reason that it is the most avail- 
able product at present, but the writer hopes 
to see the day in the near future when dena- 
turized alcohol, free from tax, will be available 
for use in thes explosive engines. 

The manufacture of gasoline engines has 
gotten to be one of the most important indus- 
tries in this country. There are now more 
than <too different factories engaged in the 
manufacture of these engines and motors, and 
the engines and motors in operation in the 
United States are now numliercd in the many 
thousands. Their safety, economy and <lur- 
ability commend them to the farmers ami 
other large users of the smaller types of en- 
gines, to such an extent that they have practi- 
cally replaced steam engines in these fields: 
and in fact, thousands of farmers who never 
used or thought of having an engine before the 
gasoline engine came into practical and ex- 
tensive use, have provided themselves with 
verv handy, reliable and durable engines. 

'I'he first engines made to be operated by 
the explosion of a charge of gas or vapor from 
gasoline, were, as before indicated, not ar- 
ranged so that the charge could be compressed, 
and while they would run. they were not suf- 
ficiently economical or powerful to iiroduce 
practical results and were soon discarded. .Ml 
types of explosive engines to-day. compress 
tile charge at firing, or of course, before it is 
hnil. The average compression in the various 
t\i)es of engines now made, perhaps being 
.iround 60 to 65 pounds per S(iuare inch. 

As it mav nf)t be clear to many who sec this 
.article as to the manner in which the gasoline 
engines operates. I will first explain that the 
eliarge of the gas or gas-producing li(|uid is 
drawn into the cylinder, usually by suction, 
logeiher with the' charge of air; the air and 
uas havin;^ been mixed in proper prM|Mirlions 
in an apartnienl or device, commonly called 
,1 carbureter, before it enters the cylinder. 
\fler tile charge enters the c\liuder it is com- 
oressed by the piston and is then fired by 
the electric battery or .some other device pro- 
vided for this |)u'rpo.se, and the force of this 
explosion drives the piston forward. They are 
two commonlv known types of these eni;iiu's. 
in the manner in which the\ operate. ;. r. 
the two cvcle and the four c\cle types. 'Phe 
two cycle tvpe is intended, under a working 
load, to take in a charge at every revolution, 
while the four cvcle type untler a full working 
load is commonly intended to take in a charge 



at every other revolution. In the two cycle 
type, the charge is fired at the highest point 
of compression, and the piston is forced out- 
ward and the residue gases escape just before 
the piston reaches the limit of its oiUward 
stroke, and about the same time the new 
charge is brought into the cylinder. The 
return of the piston compresses this new 
charge and the previous action is repeated. 

In the 4 cycle type, the charge is also fired 
at the point of highest compression, and the 
piston is forced on its outwanl stroke the 
same as in the case of the j-cycle, but in this 
tvpe. the new charge is not in until the jiis- 
t.Mi has made its return to the rear eml of the 
cylinder and forced out all the burned gases, 
whereupon as the jjiston again goes forward 
it draws in a new charge which is compressed 
in its turn, by the return of the piston on its 
second stroke, and the charge is as before, 
fired at the point of the highest compression. 

It will be seen, as before explained, that in 
the 4 cycle engine, the new charge is taken in 
and fired every other revolutif)n. whereas in 
the 2 cvcle, under a full load, the new charge 
is taken in and fired at every revolution. I'.otli 
of these types of engines are practical and 
reliable in a general way. some manufacturers 
making both types, while others make only 
one. The 4 cycle type, however, is 110 doubt 
the one most generally used. 

The main advantages commonly set forth in 
favor of the 2 cycle type are that with this 
class of engine, it is possible to use lighter fly 
wheels, and lighter construction throughout, 
for reasons which will be obvious, and it is 
sometimes preferred also on account of the 
absence of valve gear. The most generally ac- 
cepted advantage for the 4 cycle is greater 
economy, owing to the fact that the residue 
of burned gases is more thoroughly cleaned 
out of the cylinder before the insertion of a 
fresh charge. 

In addition to there being two different 
kinds of engines, in respect to the manner in 
which they operate, there arc also two general 
tvpes in form of construction, 1. c. vertical and 
horizontal. In the vertical engine, it will be 
understood that the piston operates vertically, 
whereas in the horizontal engine, the pistem 
operates horizontally. Gasoline engines are 
manufactured by many concerns in toth of 
these t\pes. The vertical occupies less floor 
space, and has some technical advantages. On 
the other hand, the horizontal engine has its 
advtantages. h'or one thing it d^x's ma pro- 
<luce such a severe shock on the foundation as 
the vertical engine, and is usually preferrctl 
where the engine i-~ ti. he mounted on wheels. 
As a matter nf fact, the chruce between these 
two styles is merely one of individual prefer- 
ence. Kither is good. 

The cylinder dimensions m g.is.iliiic engines, 
per horse power, are i|uite v.iriable. as the 
horse power depends upon some other things 
besides the piston area, or area of the cylin- 
iler, I'or instance, a gas engine having a i;iven 
diameter of piston and a given length of 
stroke, running at 40*1 revolution^ per min- 
ute, would furnish very much more i)ower 
than an engine of the same diameter and the 
same length of stroke, nimiing at only ..'oo 
revolutions. The degree of comv>ression has 
much to do also with the power developed, up 
to a certain limit. However, it has not been 
practical to go much above 65 pounds per 



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Export Implement Age 



square inch where gasoline is used. A mix- 
ture of gasoline vapor and air will often fir? 
on its own accord if the pressure runs much 
above 85 pounds per square inch. The size 
of the fly wheels also has something to do 
with the power of the engine ; therefore, with 
these various conditions affecting the power 
of the internal combustion engine, it will be 
readily understood that one cannot closclv 



there are several ways in common practice to 
reduce or modify the heat, so that it does 
not reach such a degree as to interfere with 
the operation of the engine. A water jacket 
surrounding the cylinder and connected with 
a water tank nearby is the most common way. 
Again, others use a wiater jacket and a small 
rotary pump, which causes the water to circu- 
late much more rajiidly than it otherwise 




On« of Natun'i Promontorin tn the Rockic 



estimate the power of the engine if you have 
only the size of the cylinder. 

So, in estimating horse-power of an engine 
it will be seen that ue must have more than 
merely inforniatiim as to ilu- measurements of 
the cylinder ;ni<i jiistoii. 

There i- a vrrtat amount of heat generated 
by the exjilosion in the cylinders of these en- 
gines and some way of reducing the exces- 
sive heat absorbed by the metal is necessary; 



would, and by this method a much smaller sup- 
ply of water is sufficient. In this connection 
a screen is sometimes iiso] to break up the 
stream as it comes from tin- cylinder an<l 
spread it out so it will c,><A ,u<<vv rapidly before 
entering the tank from which it is pumped. 
Oil cooling devices are use.l on some gasoline 
engines, in which the oil is used much the 
same as water, however, it does not require 
so much oil as water, and it is claimed that 



tlie oil is preferable in cold weather; however, 
there is some objection to the use of oil for 
this purpose on account of the e.xplosive qual- 
ity of oils having a petroleum base. There 
would, perliai)s, be no danger in this connec- 
tion, however, unless the oil is circulated 
through an open tank. Air coi^lcd engines are 
in use, and this way of keeping the cylinder 
sufficiently cool is preferred by some; this 
method has been perfected until it is a suc- 
cess. 

ignition of the charge is an important pro- 
cess in the operation of gasoline engines. Un- *.^ 
less the charge is tired at the right time, the VJ' 
best results will not be obtained; and again, 
unless the charge is instantly and fully explo- 
iled, the best results can not be obtained. A 
small, inefficient electric spark may fire the 
charge, but it may do it in such an ineffective 
way, that the power of the engine is materially 
reduced. Mot tube igniters are used by some 
manufacturers; this consists of a metal tube, 
heated reil hot, and placed in such a position 
that it will set fire to the gas at the proper time. 
The most conunon way is to use an electric 
battery to make the spark, and electric dyna- 
mos or magnetos, run with belts or by fric- 
tion pulleys in contact with the tly wheel'of the 
engine, are coming into quite common use. 
Any effective and reliable way of igniting the 
charge positively and always at tiie right time, 
will be found usually satisfactory. 

Lubrication is imj)ortant. In purchasing a 
gasoline engine, it is well to see that the 
methods of lubricating the piston and other 
working parts are i)ractical and cfTective. 

The crank shaft and piston rod should be 
given especial attention and only the best ob- 
tainable material should be used. The well 
made crank shaft is always forged out of a 
solid billet of steel, without any welds. The 
bearings should be well looked after to see that 
they are broad and substantial and provided 
with the i)roper oiling devices. The piston 
performs the all-im{>ortant function in the 
working of the engine and great care is exer- 
ci.sed by engine builders to see that they are 
carefully and accurately fitte<l in the cylinder 
and that the iron piston expansive rings (of 
which there are generally three to four, arc 
accurately and carefully adjusted so as to pro- 
duce the desired rtsults in ilu- operation of 
the engine. 

N'ow-a-days. gasolim- i> gimrally fed to tlu 
ni-inr by a reciiirotating |)umii; in this wav, 

ilurc IS no real clanger of tl ling ilu' engine 

with Ihiid, and it makes a iimst satisfacturv 
■ levici- for the engine feed. 

The manageiiuMit <<\ an ixpl. isiw (.iiuine is 
not at all difficult ; li.^wevir. they must receive 
a reasonable anir)unt of care and intelligeni 
attention. There are tio boilers, no fire boxe-, ^. 
no ashes, and you do not have to wait until W 
>ou can get up steam before you can begin 
work. A gasoline or other explosive engine, 
F^roperly cared for, is always ready for busi- 
ness. It can be started anv time and will 
almost mstantly produce its full horse power 
It IS the ideal engine for farmers and othcr- 
who do not need to keep an engine runnini; 
o.'iistantly, as this engine can be started olT 
promptlx ulicn wanted, without any previou- 
Ijreparation or waiting, and when the work is 
<."ne can be stopped at once, and the expense 
slops nnmediately. The fuel re<|uire.l takes ui. 
little room, no matter whether it is gaso- 



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Export Implement Age 



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line or some of the other products mentioned 
heretofore, as adapted for this class of work. 
In fact there are many advantages for the 
gasoline engine over the steam engine, and 
"it would be difficult to hit upon a single point 
where the steam engine can show an advantage 
over the explosive engine, especially for the 
use of farmers and others with whom engine 
power is an intermittent rather than a con- 
stant factor. 

Karlier in this article, we mentioned the 
several different products which are adapted 
for use as fuel in this explosive engine, l-.ach 
of the lluids mentioned arc the products ()f 
petroleum, whith the exception of alcohol 
which is a (product of the farm. Later on. 
alcohol will. ni> doubt, become the ideal fuel 
for internal combustion engines in the I nited 
States, as it is to-day in t'.ermany and I "ranee 
and other leading hUiropean nations. Kem- 
sene is but little use<l as a fuel for engines; 
however, there are some localities where it i> 
preferable on account of the i)rice per gallon, 
and engines are being nia<le which will use this 
fuel very acceptably and with satisfactory 
results. The sime can be sai<l of crude j)etro- 
leum ; in places where crude oil is pnxluced, 
this class of engine is in considerable demand, 
but in places somewhat rennive<l from the oil 
fields, the class of engines using gasoline is 
usuallv preferable, luigines working on nat- 
ural gas in ditTerent sections of the country 
where natural gas alwiunds. are very .satis- 
factory, and in fact, natural gas is an ideal 
imwer and is very generally used in such 
localities. .Xcctylen'e and other mamtfaclured 
gases may in time come into general use as 
fuels for these engines; lutwevcr, they are not 
used to any extent now, although the results 
in actual ]>ractice have been found satisfac- 
tory. 

.Mcohol .should rightfully be the larmer's 
fuel f<ir his engine, as it is derived from the 
pnjducts of the farm. It also should, in the 
writer's opinion, be generally and universall> 
used everywhere in the I'nited States as a 
fuel for internal conibusticin engines. The 
oidv bar to the general use of alcohol for a fuel 
for producing power in iiUernal combustion 
engines, being the internal revenue tax. Such 
a tax, of course, absohuely prohibits the use 
of it for these purposes, but there is iiou jiro- 
posed legislation before Congress by which it 
is propose<l to remove the tax fn.m alcohol 
u'ade from farm products, where it 1- to be 
Used for light, heat, mechanical and industrial 
purposes. The metlKKl of handling alcohol 
for these i)nrposes in foreign countries, and 
also the nieth<Hl proposed for this country, 
under the proposed legislation, is to rendir 
same niifu for beverage purposes by the addi- 
tion of some other noxious or poisonous prod- 
I net. like wix.d alcohol. This projiosed legis- 
lation has been granted a hearing by the Ways 
and Means Committee, and it is consi<lered of 
such importance that a special committee was 
appointed, and this special committee has re^ 
centlv recommended that the proposed legisla- 
tion be passe<l. In the writer's opinion, there 
has not been a bill before Congress in many 
years of more im|)ortance to the farmers than 
this pro]iose<l legislation. 

With tax-free alcohol for the purposes 
named, the products of the farm, such as pota- 
tfK-s, corn and other starch pro<lucting pro- 
ducts, will, in the course of time, furnish the 



power for the fanns. mills and factories every- 
where, and light and heat for the nation as 
well, to a large degree. Alcohol is an ideal 
fuel for internal combustion engines, and the 
writer is of the opinion it can be used 111 most 
of the engines now being operated with gaso 
line without any change whatever. 1 have 
seen it used in engines which had been bmli 
io be run by gasoline, and it was impossible t.> 
discover any difference in the power produced 
or in any of the results. It seemed to work 
just as well as the gasoline in every way. It is 
undoubte<lly better in at least one respect, /. c . 
the amoiuit of heat given off and absorbeil b> 
the cvlinder walls. The heat »\ the cylinder 
does not seem to run so high with, alcohol, 
and with alcohol therefore, less attention and 
care will be required in cooling devices. It 
seems i.robable, also, that with the .same engine 
in every way, alcohol will furnish somewhat 
more pow<er per gallon than gasoline. It needs 
no experiments to determine as to its heuig a 
success as a fuel for these engines. It has 
been widely used in h* ranee for this purjn.se 
for many years and also in C.erman\. and 
will certainfv work as well in this country, and 
it seems quite evident that the change from 
gasoline to alcohol will mean little if any ex- 
pense for the changing of the engines. 

.Mcohol is an ideal fuel for producing light 
and heat ; if it can be «jbtained at a reasonable 
price it will undoubtedly sinm be quite gener- 
ally used for lighting purposes in place of 
jietroleum and other i)roducts and undoubtedly 
will also be widely used for healing purposes, 
and remember it is essentially a ]>roduct of the 
farm. 

The gasoline engine on the farm is «ie of 
the best money makers and labor savers. It 
pumps the water, runs the w(M)d saw. feed 
"^rinder, cream separator, corn sheller. feed 
cutter, etc. It is ready for business any time, 
and there is no expense for fuel or feed when 
it is not actually working. There should Ik 
one of these engines on every well regulated 
farm. The farmer with a gasoline engine can, 
if he wishes, have his own electric lights, as 
almost any of these engines will run a dxnamo 
for lighting purposes very acceptably. 

Internal combustion engines or explosivi 
engines are the ideal and generally used power 
on the farm to-day and with alcohol as the 
fuel they will be e\ en much more popular and 
widely used. 



TEACHING ARBITRATION 



In a recent address Mr. II. P. Faunce, presi- 
dent of r.rown L'niversity, one of .\merica's 
representative institutions of learning, advo- 
cated the systematic teaching in the public 
schools of the princiiiles of arbitration in busi- 
ness and international affairs. I'resident 

I'aunce said :. 

Xo great movement is permanent until 
placed on an educational basis. Whatever en- 
ters the public mind through the schools en- 
ters as sunshine and rain into ilutiber of the 
oak. A world-wide movement is now in pro- 
gress, having as its object not the reformation 
(.f human nature, not the disbanding of all ar- 
mies and navies, but simiilv the establishment 
of a better means than war for the settling of 
the disi)utes that must occur as long as the 
nations endure. 

Already great result- liave been accomi)lish- 
ed. Arbitration has been substituted for war 
in the majority of the cases. War is now the 
exception, not the rule, in case of international 
quarrel. It is not true that "in time of peace 
we nmst jiiepare for war."' but rather that in 
time of peace we must prepare to make war 
im|iossible. 

There is a growing appreciation through 
out the world of the irrationality and futilly of 
war. We have come to realize that the simul- 
taneous discharge of pistols at fifty paces is 
no more likely to establish justice than the 
tossing of pennies or the throwing of the <lice. 
When the duelist became absurd, .luelling 
was dead. The time is surel> coming when 
the international duel will seem, in the face 
of international opinion, an utt.rly stupid wav 
of settling differences. 

What can we do in the public schools? We 
cm inculcate the broad principle that rational 
„;en. when they differ, slioul.l appeal to reason 
and not to force. Already our schoolboys <lo 
,hi- in athletics. Tlux are aernsionie.l to ac- 
eej.t thi' diCiMons ..f umpires .ind referes wUh 
,m whining or complaint. The athletic field 
i. a direct training f««r arbitration on a large 



ITALIAN IMMIGRATION 



The Italian Ciovernment reports the i-sut 
of pass|K:)rts to emigrants coming to the 
liiited States for the vear ended .\pril ,v>. 
ii^oo, to the number of i4f<.(i«^'^. bnl a much 
larger number of Italian immigrants arrived 
here in that time, l-'or the fisc.d \car K;*^;. 
the mnnber was 221.470, and more came m 
the fiscal yi'ar kkX'. They do not all sail from 
Italy. Consul Paul Xash. in a reiwrt from 
\enice. estimates that «p per cent, of the 
emigrants return to Italv ; but th.it is n. .t true 
of the Italians who come ti> the I'nited St.ite-, 
It is estimated from the deiK)sits in Italian 
banks that $8.(X)C),oon is sent to Italy each 
year bv immigrants, a consideraVile percentage 
uf whom intend to return to that country. 



-cale. 

We can teach in our schools that peace batli 
her victories no less niiowtied than war. We 
are learning to exalt a luw type of heroism— 
the heroism of the social settlement ot the citv 
missionary, of the men and women who are <lc- 
v,,lum tluir lives to the uplifting ot social 
eon.litions in the heart of our great cities, llus 
newer heroism must be taught m our public 
selii lols. 

We can inculcate the brothcrlnxHl of man 
in every class in our schools, and in every stndv 
that is' taught. We can show that racial an- 
tagonisms are baseless and brutal, b.ach ot 
the various races make. it> ou n contribution to 
modem civilization. The last address of Joht. 
Hay was an appeal for this point of view: lor 
earliest endeavor on the part of all men and 
women in resiv.nsible positions to inculcate 
the method of ai bit rati, in as a substitute for the 
utilities of war. 



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Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 

ro« CIRCUI ATIUN IN KORKIUN lOUNTITIKS ONLY. 

An Independent Journal devoted exclusively to the Export 

Trade In Agricultural Machinery, Pumps, Wind 

Mllla, Farm TooU, Dairy Supplies, and 

Hardware Specialties. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
Postage prepaid - - . . ^ Shillings 
Por un aAo, porte franco - - i Peso 
Un an, aff ranch! . . . . ^ Francs 
Fiir ein Jahr, portofrei . . ^ Mk. 25 

Please remit by draft on New York or 
International Money Order. 

WARE BROS COMPANY 

publismehs 

1010 Arch Street. Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 

Also publlshrm of "The Implement Age" and 
"The Aitirrirnii Frrlilijer." 

Copyrighlril, iqi^. hy Ware !lro». Compsiq^. 



Agent r.ir New /.riilnnil. Kichar.l Hill, Miitloik Mouw. Daven- 
I>i>rl. AucklHnd. New /.ralnnti I'rii-r, Sj. t,/. posljmitl. 

Vol. XV. Philadelphia. Pa., U.S. I.. October. 1906. fte.1 

Under no circum»tanceA do we allow commia 
•lona to advertising agents. 

I-'artn lalHir is scarcer in Atncrica year h\ 
year, \it ilu- AnuTJcaii farmers arc prtxluciuj; 
umrc aniuially. The work is .l..iu' liv nunlern 
Anuric.m iiiatle luaciiiiierv. 



Any of our advoniscrs will lu- ploasctl t.i 
st'Hil ca(aK>mu's aiul viivnl:ir> to ilmsf uhi. ,ii- 
sire to he iiitnrmed u\xm their line oi manu- 
facture. Much valuahle infuruiation niav he 
secured in this way. as i<i uh.it is the latest and 
most ittictixc -ixlc ,.i" m.ichinerv pruduceil, 
aiiil many times a cumiection may he esiahlish- 
ed which will c.'iiiiuue for \cars and he of 
i.:re.il tin.iiki.il jnotil. 



.\1I of tin .lUi I n-ci > ill ilu' I!\ loK I Ixini- 
MKNT .\t-.i have an esiahlisiud i \port huxiness. 
and letters ma\ he a.ldressed to them in an\ 
i.iiii.:!'..!-- \!l in(|uifie- and (Mders will receive 
prompt and carei'ul .itiention. It is im|i.-.riani 
that inquirif. he ,\trinielv iletinite in regard 
to the ch.iracter of information wanted and 
iinu- .md anno\aike will lu' ]irevenie<l h\ !nin- 
-ineilic. 

PROGRESS IN JAPAN 

V."oii-.ul-(U'iUT.iI TUnr\ v.. MilKr. ,1 N.^,. 
haiii.i. lepi^rts .1 tu w vennire on ilic part .m' 
Japanese merchants in the n'attir ■ f ad\i- 
ins;. 

The jiii Slii;i'p.\ a "r,.k\n iuwspa|Hr. I'.t- 
.ui.mcedi. alter consultations with the railu,,- 
bureau, the \:y\^.u Raihvas . ami the Gv..- 
yetsu Railway companies, to run an exhibit!. .ii 
train, in which tlie merchandise of 'cadins: 
-:. T- •■! I'okxo w :'l be cxhihhe.; for v.ilt. The 
CNhibit'.on train will consist of three large pas- 



seiifTor carriages. Uiie or two cars will also 
he attached as storehouses. The train was 
scheduled to leave ( )miya about the middle of 
September aiul proceed to various towns, and 
relnrninji after covering a distance of about 
i,5(X) miles in about fortv davs. 



THAT BALANCE OF TRADE 

\'>\ "balance of trade" between nations is 
iiuaiit the excess of our sales to foreign coun- 
uies above our purchases when the balance 
is favorable, and vice versa when it is other- 
wi.se — in all cases the ilillereiice between our 
sales and jiurcha.ses. This balance of trade, 
according tu the ofticial rei>ort for the year end- 
ing June .v», I'^X', was in round numbers. 
:s5i7.tKH>,(XH). I'or the last live years it aggre- 
gates tlie enormous sum of $J,8ou,ooo,ixx). If 
this balance is a real thing foreign countries 
should owf Us $j,Soo,cK)o.ocK), which as a na- 
tion we ought to be able to get whenever we 
want it, jii.st as we check on our bal.-mces in 
the bank whenever we need money. We ought 
to have no truulde at all about inoucy when 
such an enormous sum as this is to our credit 
in the banks of the old world. Real balances of 
trade are settletl by the payment of gold. It 
ajipears, however, from the same authoritv. 
that last year we received in goKl but $.V).ooo.- 
'KH>, and this evidently is all that is coming to 
us. because, as it is well know n. we are not over 
and alK>ve this liornnving large amounts of 
money abroatl. in fact, the railroads reciuiring 
very large loans on long time have been going 
tt> Kuropc for it for the last three or four 
months. l-"vidently, lhereft>re, this so-called 
balance of trade is like a baby rattle jnit in 
the hands of farmers and othcr.s to make them 
feel that they are getting rich ami have gtMul 
times. 

It may he asked, what In-conies of this sup 
posed excess of sales over purchases; Mani 
testly, there is no real e\ce>s. except as mea> 
ured by the excess of gold imports over ex- 
ports which as .ihove staled, S.V i.oixmxx) iti- 
steatl in S518.ooo.OtXJ. It nuy be asked, then, 
what becomes of this supjiose.l balance and 
what is wrong with the theor\ ..n wliich tlu-t 
balances are calculatdl : 

I'irst, the balance of tradt. -.called, i.iki- 
no avvonnt whatevir of ilu- niouev spcni l.\ 
tonriMs in Kuropc in i xcrv <<i moiuv hrouuh'i 
in by immigrants. Thi> 1- \ .u i. ai-lv V-;ima!< d 
at trom Sirti.txio.im t- S_4,«\, «> .,, , ,1 anmi.ilh 
and 1- vAidentU -. ■irwlun Lvtwuii the tsv^. 
.luM wli.it 1- 11,. jHi-.>n ha- t\ir found om , ,t 
• N ( T cm. 

>ic. .ihl. win 11 -,.,.. U ,,rr h-u.i I. I i\p. .n ili, 
x.iiue put upon tlum is ilu curnni s.ihi, ,.f th, 
C". hIs ill this c_ountr\ and m mam ea-e- ..! 
lea«t .ire vii\ far above tlu' price- .,r which 
ilie-e -.une goods are s,.ld for in f.reii^n comi 
"'.'"• '' !^ •■> iiot..ri,.ii- faet tli.i! a vTrx *,.ii 
- -able porti.Mi in our exp.-ns is ^,,],\ in f..r 
.■ cotmiries considerab'v l>e|..u ilu- \,,i. r- 



'■.'" priC' , 'niMu-e in.muf.u-niiir-. 

■" /'"'■ "".'.I- •: ereliaiu-. lia\,- a -iirpin- ,,| 
- 's that they cannot -ill and -,■ -end tlum 
~ where c'-e and sell them i"..i wli.ii,\,i 

' ■ '■•'" '-'' '' '""Kictnrcr- nften m.iUe l-n 

!,'.;1''" '•''■ .round lor their -mpl,,- 

Ihen. again, imp-rted i^oods are sained .,- 

low as |^>ssihle. because ni.m\ ,,f ,,iir dnli.- 

are ad valorem duties and the lower the price 



at which they are listed abroad the less duty 
they have to pay when they arrive in this 
country. 

Third, the balance of trade takes no account 
of the sales of bonds and stocks to foreign 
countries, nor of their re-sales to this country, 
nor of the bonds of other nations sold in the 
I'nited States. 

Hence it is a matter of utter indifference to 
farmers whether the balance of trade, so-called, 
is in favor of us or not. The real balance of 
trade, measured by the excess of gold im- 
ports over gold exports may be inportant, and 
is. 

It is a remrakable thing that England has 
enjoyed a reasonable degree of continued pros- 
|)erity for many years with the balance of trade, 
so-called, always against her. Apparently 
bu\ ing more than she sells, she grows richer 
every year, for the reason that the investments 
in the bonds and stocks and manufacturers' 
enterprises in other countries bring to her a 
continuous current of dividends. Interest and 
imifits. — Wallaces Farmer. 



INDIA NEEDS WINDMILLS 

William H. Michael, consul-general at Cal- 
cutta, reports that there is a wide field in India 
in which the windmill can be profitably used in 
lifting water for irrigation. This letter reads: 

A careful investigation into the relative cost 
of lifting water hy windmill and by bullock 
power shows that the former is much more 
economical and satisfactory. A l6-foot wind- 
mill mounted on a 40-foot tower and fitted 
with an 8-inch pump will cost, when erected 
over a well, about $500, and we assume that 
the cost of maintaining the same in gCM:)d order 
will be about ?2 per month. Such investments 
should yield about (> per cent, interest on the 
cai>ital expended, or Sj a month. Ten i)er 
cent, for <lepreciation is perhaps an excessive 
amount to allow, but it w ill be well on the safe 
-ide if we do so. This comes to S4 a month, 
making the total cost r.f the windmill S8 a 
month. 

Now this windmill will do as much work 
a- at least two pairs of good cattle, and if fitteil 
v\itli two ]niinps it wili be equivalent to three 
pin- M cattle, and the cost of lifting water 
N\iih them will amount to from $15 to $2,V50 
a month, showing a margin in favor of the 
windmill of from SO.o; to Si.v^o a month. 
This .lemoii-tration wa> made' in Madras. 
^^ Inch, perhaps, is nr,t the most favorable place 
m India to conduct ex|X'riments of this kind. 
riie kux'er tirritor\ in India where the wind 
inline. mkIi a- .ire iiiadi- in America, or in 
lact aiiyulure > 1-e. would show better results 
i- onl-iile of Madr.i- Province, on account of 
being higher and m..ie open. The manufac- 
nirer- i^\ windmills in the riiited States would. 
i iliink, tind a protitahle tield in India for their 
eiiL^mes: and it would pay them to combine 
.ind share ihe expense of exploiting the field by 
-tndiii;4 a cap.ihle .and piishinc a^eiit to India 
lor ih.it ])nrpose. 



I'oill.iiid, < »re., is sal. I to be the largest lum- 
I'tr purl in the world, .\l one time recently 
M-sels tnr foreign p4>rts were loading there. 
"I under charier, to an .i^gregate capacitx of 
.■o,o(K>,(io«i feet, and hn hom<- poiis others hav- 
ing •;,iK)o.iKH) feet inoie. 



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Export Implement Age 



n 



TALKING POINTS ON PUMPS 

Many hardware and machinery merchants 
in foreign countries, as well as in the States. 
have found pumps and hay lifting tools of 
good ipiality desirable lines to haiKlle and push 
energetically. 

That the mamifacinrers are rea<ly and ea,i;er 
to do all thev can to aid the merchants in get- 
ting their share of the business in these lines 
has been frecpiently pr.inted <.ut in recent 
articles in these columns. 

In this connection, F. K. Myers & I'.n'.. 
\shland, Ohio, export office. 11-21 IVoduce 
Exchange, New York, issue an interesting 
biMiklet entitle.1. "I'oints on rumi.s." which is 
especiallv designed for the instruction ot the 
buyer and salesmen buying or selling pumps. 
The firm suggests the importance of the 
merchants confining their efforts to one first- 
class line of goods, the sale of which will bring 
them the best and most profitable trade. 

In this wav. less money is invested, less In- 
incurre.l in 'unsalable repair parts, less cnn- 
fusi..n of prints, and having one line ot goods, 
the emploNees become better posted on them, 
and prices can be maintaine.l on a profitable 
basis aii.l a business i.lentity obtaine.l. insuring 
stability of ira.le. which cannot be easilv taken 

from them. 

i„ a.l.lition to the general -uggestions on 

subject of pumps, the 1 klet illustrates man> 

valuable points of their extensive line. 

The firm will gladly seii.l an> merchant 
intereste.1 a copv. upon ai-pli^-ali"" '"'r sune. 



A UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE 



• 



Professor ]. 1.. liorgerlvH. of the Western 
Reserve Vniversity. sets forth in the Atlanta 
Coiislitutiou the claims of l-.speranto as a 
world-language. After brief refennce t.. tnr- 
mer can<lidate languages, be says: 

The latest attempt, and the one which bids 
fair to be final, is |-.speranto. so called bx its 
author. Dr. /.ameiihoi. a Russian physician, 
who under this pseudonym pnhlishe.l scientitic 
articles before he became famous as the in- 
ventor of an artificial language. 

/amenhof. like his pred-c ss,,rs in the 
same held, was -truck In the nseles- w(allh 
,,,- i.hoins that divi.le the inhabitants ol the 
earth anil make inteinati-nal relations so dit^ 
ficuh, while at the same time thev are a pn, 
lific source of misunderstanding and cnnnt> 
among the nations. 

He was also convinced that the rea-ii wh> 
the existing universal languages had tailed m 
their purpose was that thev wer.> to., dithciilt 
—almost as difficult as the natural ones. 1 he 
cause of their difficultv lay in the grammar. 
which was too intricate, and in the vocabulary, 
which was far too varied. He forthwith com- 
posed a grammar which was simplicity itsel : 
this he did bv setting aside all rules not strictly 
needed for the construction of a logical sen- 
tence and by eliminating all exceptions 1 lu 



few remaining grammatical principles may be 
learned in half an hour. 

His next concern was the vocabulary. What 
makes the acquisition of a foreign vocabulary 
s.> hard to students is the variety of rot^s, 
the great number of ditTercnt words, lo take 
an instance from l-.nglish, to express the var- 
ious ideas suggested by one OMiccption ot 
death, we have: dead, to die, deadly, and 
deathlv, mortal, to kill, to murder, to assas- 
sinate,' to suici<le, to commit homicide, etc. 
W hat a cumbersome luxury of roots, and bow 
discouraging to the foreigner who wishes to 
learn this language ! 

.\nd vet the English is one of the easiest ot 
all l-air'opean tongues. How to reduce this 
number of roots was the great problem be- 
fore /.amenhof. He therefore t..ok one out 
.if a number, and bv means of a system ot 
suffixes and prefixes he made this one root do 
ihitv for all the others. 

In this manner the Esperanl«. dictionar> 
eontains oiilv about two thousaml roots, yet 
they are sufticient to form, bx means of deriva- 
tion, a vocabulary large en. n-h for all pur 
poses. 

I'.ut what makes matters simpler still, he 
clmse his two thousan.l ro<.ts in such a man- 
ner that thev appear familiar lo all educated 
persons of European civilization, by selecting 
first those terms w hich are already in universal 
usage, like sport, toilet, train: then h> takiii;.; 
words ctHumon to two or three leailing Ian 
guages. and finally hy adding to these a small 
number of roots iiot international, but picked 
..nt judiciouslv from various idioms, so that 
aiiv one, be lie Slav. Teuton, or Latin, finds 
that I'.speranto has a familiar appearance. 

The suffixes number about thirty and ilu 
])refixes half a dozen: they have well .lefined 
meanings, and once they are known an> ikm 
>.,n provideil with a list J>f the simple roots ean 
eonqiose his own vocabularl) aliiiosl ./</ 
lihiliiiii. so that the finest shades ..f meamnt; 
ina\ be expresseil to a nicetv. 

I should sa> that the most remarkable fea 
ture about l'".speranto, and one which no nat 
ural idiom pos.sesses to .such a degree, is this 
power of forming new wtmis once the key 
wor<l is given, ami it should be remeniberetl 
thii ill the majority of instancis this kev-woril 
is already known. 

The second striking feature is the siniplicil\ 
and regularity of "the whole grammatical 
seheine: thus are placed within easy reach two 
essential parts of a language- -the vocabulary, 
and the very simple device whereby this vocab- 
iilarv may be made to express all ideas clearly. 
To take again the word •Meath'" as an ex- 
ample: the key-word is "mort" (which we 
have in the English mortal), Reiiienil)ering 
that in h'.spcranto all nouns en<l in "o. all 
adjectives in "a," adverbs in "e." infinitives in 
■i:" that contraries arc formed In prefixing 
■'nial:" that the prefix "sen" means without: 
that the suffix "ant" marks the agent ( c^rres- 
poii.lim: to the English "ing"'!. and that the 
suffix "ig" means to cause, wc i,'et fn.ni the 
above root; niorto. death: niorta. 111. irtal: 
morti, to die; morte, mortally: ni.irtano, the 
.King man : mortanta. dying; mortigi, to cause 
deatii, or kill: mortigo. murder: mortiganto. 
murderer: mortiga. death-dealing: malmorta, 
living: senmorta, immortal: scnmorto, immor- 

talitv. etc. ..... 

The conjugation .d verbs, which is the gre.it 



stumbling-block in the study of all natural lan- 
guages, presents no difficulty whatever in Es- 
peranto. In the first place, there arc no irreg- 
ular verbs ; secondlv. there is only one ending 
for each tense; thirdly, the number of tenses 
is reduced to a strict minimum, mainly past, 
l)resent, future, and conditionally. 

The infinitive of all verbs ends in "l :" the 
present alwavs in "as ;" the past always in "is ; 
the conditional always in "us;" these endings 
are the same in the singular and the plural. 

To sum up, l-lsperanto is the easiest of all 
languages ; all that is needed to read atid write 
it is a familiaritv with the few grammatica 
principles, most of which have been explained 
'ibove. a knowledge of the thirty-odd suffixes 
and the half-dozen prefixes alluded to. and a 
dictionarv giving the two thousand roots, 
many of' which most of us know already. 

\liy one with the merest smattering of 
1 atin'and German and a knowledge of English 
ean write a letter in l-:speranto practically from 
the start : in fact, a person with a knack for 
languages can do so without this previous 
Un.mle.lge if provided with a dictionary. 

\s for si)e.aking it. that is, of cour.se. a mat- 
ter of practise. It is easy enough, yet prac- 
tise for a ctmple of months is indispensable to 
become tUient. Those interested should form 
a club aiKl meet for the purpose of conversing. 
The pronunciation is as easy as the rest ot 
the language. 

Is this artificial language to come into real 
»ise' Professor I'.orgeroff shows us that it is 
at least spreading rapidly. In June. Kjo?. 
there was niilv a handful of l-'-sjierantists m 
\merica. < >tie vear later there were titty 
clubs, mostlv in colleges. Paris offers about 
iweiitv freepublic courses. All over l-.nrope 
ihe language has hundreds of thousands ot 
ailhereiits. ' Three thousan.l Esperantists. rep-- 
reseiiting fifteen ditTercnt countries, attended 
ihe congress at P.oulogiiesur-.Mer. in .\uuust. 

H)Os. 



SAWS WITHOUT TEETH 

According to Cosmos, the employment of 
circular .lisks of iron, turning with great veleic- 
itv but possessing no teeth on the edge, for 
sawing metal, has become common in many 
works7iops. Among other places where such 
saws without teeth are used is the ceM)rate<l 
Krupp gun-works, where armor plate is some- 
times cut in this manner. The process is not a 
newlv iliscovered one. As long ago as 1824 
harrier and Collation, at Geneva, experiment- 
ed with swiftlv rotating disks of iron. They 
found that when a .lisk about 7 inches in diam- 
iter turned with a peripheral velocity of 10 
meters per second, it could be cut with a steel 
tool pressed against it, but the steel tool was 
damaged. .At a velocity of 60 meters per sec- 
ond the iron disk even cut quartz and agate. 



The American exports of agricultural im- 
plements for the fiscal year ended June 30th. 
airgregated $24,;44-4^7- an increase of about 
20 per cent, over IQ05, Mowers and reapers 
constituted about one-half of this trade. The 
best custotners of the I'nited States for these 
ijnnds for several vear<; ha'= been Xrcentina, 
to whotn wr soM last vrar S^.o'Vv;! 1- Russia 
second with $,v8;i,4s.s- Erancc, $2,805,243, 
and Germany. $2,016,894. 



w 



14 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



IS 



American Official Statistics Improved 



The l^)urt'au of Statistics of the Department 
i>f Coninurce and Labor has lately effected an 
important chanj^e in the classification of Gov- 
ennnent statistics of foreign commerce which 
will he a j^^reat improvement, especially as the 
new arranfjement will make comparisons possi- 
ble with the Censns Bureau's compilations of 
manufactures. The ohl classification of cx- 
jxjrts into the j;reat fjroups. products of aj^ri- 
culturc. manufacture, mines, forests, and fish- 
eries, was ailopted thirty-six years aij^o, when 
the L'nited States was chiefly a producer and 
exfxjfter of natural prf)ducts, the exports of 
manufactures at that time beinfj but about one- 
tenth as great as to-day. The old classification 



up the different sections may be briefly 
summed up as follows : 

The principal articles forming the first 
f^roup, "F(X»dstufFs in a natural state and food 
animals," are wheat, corn, rice and other food 
grains ; animals, except horses and mules ; cof- 
fee, tea and cocoa in natural state; oggs; fruits 
in natural state ; fresh fish ; vegetables and 
s])ices in the natural state. The principal arti- 
cles fonrijng the second grtiup. "FoodstufTs 
partly or wholly ])repared," arc flour, meal and 
preparations for table food ; fish prepared ttr 
canne<l : fruits dried, preserved or canned : 
meats and dairy products; olive and cotton 
seed f>il intended for food: wines, liquors and 




Scene on the Boardwalk. Atlantic Ctty. N. J.. U. 5. A., where a mtUien Summer Vititon promenade. 



of im|Hirts was adojjted twenty \cars ago. 
when the classes of articles forming the bulk 
of the imports also differed materially from 
those of to-day. These two old classifications 
of imports and exports differed so widely that 
they were not comparable one with the other 
in attempts to analyze the general trade move- 
ments into and out of the country. Meanwhile, 
the principal F.uropean nations have adopted 
classifications adjusted to present conditions of 
trade and differing materially from those util- 
ized in the United States, and thus rendering 
difficult a comparison of our f)w n trade figures 
by great groups with those of the leading F.u- 
ropean countries. Five groups now cover the 
ground, and the various items that go to make 



distille<l spirits ; sugar and moj.tsse^ ; canned oi 
preserved vegetables. The princijial articles 
forming the third group, "Crude materials for 
>isc in manufacturing," are raw cotton, woo], 
silk and fibers; copper ore, matte and rcgulu- ; 
coal; chemicals in a crude state; mineral oil, 
crude ; cotton sce<l and flaxseed ; leaf tobacco : 
logs, pulp wood and cabinet wood. The prin- 
cipal articles forming the class "Manufactures 
for further use in manufacturing" are copper 
in pigs, bars and ingots; chemicals prepared 
for use in manufacturing; tin in pigs or blocks ; 
yarns : iron in pigs, billets, blooms, bars, in- 
gots, sheets, tin plates and wire mds ; dia- 
monds cut, but not set ; naval stores: paraffin ; 
leather; sawed and hewn timber, lumber and 



wood pulp. The principal articles included in 
the group "Manufactures ready for consump- 
tion" are agricultural implements ; books ; cars 
and carriages ; clocks and watches ; manufac- 
tures of cotton, wool, silk and fibers; clothing; 
glass ; glassware and chiiiaware ; manufactures 
of iron, steel, brass, copper, zinc and lead, 
ready for use; jewelry; boots, shoes and 
gloves ; refined mineral oil ; vegetable oils, ex- 
cept those used for food ; animal oils ; paper 
and manufactures thereof; soap; manufactures 
of tobacco; furniture, and other finished manu- 
factures. The principal articles forming the 
group "Miscellaneous" are horses and mules. 
luirsery stock, and seeds for agricultural pur- 
|)oses. 

The change is most apparent in the export 
classification, especially as relates to the old 
group. "Products of agriculture." The articles 
of the old agricultural grouj), which aggre- 
gated $433,000,000 in the period nameil. now 
appear in the groups. "I'Vxidstuffs in the nat- 
ural state," $7g,(XX),ooo, and "Frnidstuffs partly 
or wholly prepared," $i66.CKy>.o(X), while the 
remaining $ i 88,ooo.cxto (consisting chiefly of 
raw cotton, cotton seed and leaf tobacco), form 
the chief part of the group "Crude material for 
use in manufacturing." which aggregates 
$2 1 6.000,0 X). The obi group "Manufactures." 
which aggregated $325.ooo,oo',:> in the period 
nanieil, is represented by the two new groui)s. 
"Manufactures for further use in manufac- 
luring." .Si 22.000.000. and "Mamif.utures 
re.idy for consnmption. " $244,000,000, the in 
crease of $40,0 .o,(X)o in the two new group> 
of "Maimfactures" being chiefly due to the 
transfer to ihosr classes <if lumber. na\ al ^ton>- 
.ind furs. 

An applic'itioii of this classification to the 
'lonu>tic exports of the year covered by the 
recent census of maimfactures (1(^14) shows 
ilie exportation of articles classed b\ the ceii 
siis ,1^ namifaclures as .$852,204.31)8. or 5,7'' 
jK-r criu. of the $14,802,147,087 reiMirted b\ 
tin- ceiisns ;is the value of manufactures in 
that war. this total of $832,204.31)8 being 



il)l;iined li 



■onibining the three 



groups. 
■Mamilactuies ready for consumption.'" .'^^j;. 
i)24.'>87. ■.Manufactures for further iist in 
n atiuf.icturing." $n>v?^).852, and "l-ood 
slutts parlU or wliollv prei)ared." ^5282.470. 

I liere is a sigmficance in this statemem ot 
the trilling percentage of maimfactures sent 
abroad that slunild be given more than a mere 
passing tbonght. It shows what an umlue 
au'fdint of imj)ortance is attached to the fact 
that in some cases .\merican-madc goods are 
sold abroad more cheaply than the price to 
lioiiii' (•onsum^^^ \s oiilv ;.^^ pjr cent, of 
ilu- total outpiu govs abroad, even with such 
special inducements as are soiuctimes maile in 
order to dispose of a surplus and keep ma 
chinery fully (xxupied. it would appear that 
ilie subject receives nntch more attention than 
it merits. This rapidly growing nation is also 
needing for its own use a much larger quan 
tit\ of farm products than formerly, and it 
the total of ex]xirts is to be maintained it 
will he necessary to plant a larger acreage, in 
grain especially. Moreover, it is essential thai 
the value of exports be increased, since im 
potts are growing rapidly, and the interna- 
tional balance of trade must be kept favorable, 
because this nation is not a large holder of for- 
>i„m securities, as is England, for instance.— 
ffiin's Rc-tnew. 



L'^ectridt^ entraine leau Perte, americidnes due. .ux incendie. 

Export Implement Age Une propriae singuhere du courant elec- L-experience du passe n a pas fait defaut 

trique et qui n'est pas generalement connue, pour donner au peuple americam une grande 



»OWl LA CIRCULATION i L'txtAWCER EXCLUSIVEMRNT. 

loarnat Indtpcndant exdMivement concert aux iDt«r«U du 

commerce ^exportation de» machines ■gricoles, pompca, 

moulini & vent, outils de fennes, fourniture* pour 

crtmeries et articles spiciaux de quincaiUerte. 



'I> 



Pbix d'Abonhsmbxt 

0» an, franc de port - • • iimca 

Pri*re de nona adreaaer une tralte aur New York 
ou un mandat-poate international. 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PVBUSHBKS 

1010 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 

La mtme maiaon pubUc: " The Implement Age," "The 
iVi..-.. n.r,in»*r "^ "The Carriase Monthly" et The 



est Tosmose electrique, comme on la nomme 
Un courant electrique passant dans le sol en- 
trainera de I'eau avec lui,— lentement et en fai- 
ble quantite, cela va sans dire,— dans la direc- 
tion de 1 electrode negative. Au cours d'expe- 
riences recentes en Angleterre on put faire 
penetrer de I'eau dans un tuyau vernisse depose 



leqon sur les pertes causees par les incendies. 
Temoin le grand incendie de Chicago en 1871 
dans lequel trois milles carres et un tiers de 
batinients furent detruits, ce qui causa une 
perte de 190 millions de dollars, couta la vie 
a deux cent cinquante personnes et ruina 
cinquante-six compagnies d'assurance ; I'incen- 



The Carriage Monthly" et 
Tout droiU r«»erT«a. Ware Broa. Co., 1906. 



American FertiUier 
Vehicle Dealer 



vol. XV. Philadelphie, EUt»-OnU, Octobre, 1906. No. i 



dans le sol. L'eau passait a travers les parois ^j^ ^^ Boston, en 1872, qui devasta 65 acres 

du tuyau quand le courant y passait lui-meme. ^^ occasionna des pertes evaluees a 80 millions 

L' Electrical Revinv fait la remarque que ce ^^ dollars; I'incendie de Jacksonville (Flo- 

principe pourrait etre applique ix>ur fournir de ^.j^j^^ g,,, j^j occasionnant des pertes eva- 

I'humidite aux plantes. Des courants elec- j^^^^^ :^ ,0 millions de dollars; Fincendie de 



Dans le Repertoire d'adresses A I'uMse des 
cbeteurs. dan* la premiere partle de ce llvre nous 
donnons les renselgnements en francs; nous 
avons recours A ce moyen afin de laclllter la cor- 
rwpondance avec les nulsons qui font insurer des 
•ononces dans ce Journal. 



triques convenablement disposes dans le sol 
amasseraient I'humidite que le sol contient et 
la condenseraient autour des racines. 



Les R^publiquei am^ricaines 

Dans un discours a la session speciale de la 
Conference panamericainc, a Rio de Janeiro, 
^^ M. le ministre Root assura les representants 

Steamer br^siUen ^^^ republiques latines-americaines que les 

des Etats-Unis ^.^^^^ ^.^j^ ^^ desiraient pas d'autre territoire 



M. Griscom, ambassadeur 
au Brcsil, annonce que la Compagnie bresili- 
enne des bateaux a vapeur Uoyds a etabli un 
service regulier de bateaux a vapeur entre 
Rio de Janeiro et New York. Le premier 
steamer, le Goyas. de 4,000 tonnes, a entrepris 
son premier voyage le 25 aout. 



Ann^ finandere canadienne 

Le gouvernement du Canada annonce offici- 
ellement que I'annee financiere qui jusqu'ici 
prenait fin le 30 juin, prendra fin dorenavant 
le 31 mars. Cette loi est entree en vigueur le 
ler juillet dernier et il ete decide que I'annee 
financiere 1906- 1907 ne comprendra que les 
neuf mois prenant fin au 31 mars 1907. 



que le leur, respecteraient les droits de la 
plus faible nation tout autant que ceux du plus 
vaste empire et ne reclamaient aucun privilege 
qu'ils ne reconnussent en meme temps a 
toutes les republiques americaines. Le dis- 
cours fut cordialement accueilli et Ton croit 
qu'il contribuera pas peu a faire disparaitre 
toute mefiance sur les intentions des Etats- 
L'nis. M. Root a profite de I'occasion de cette 
conference pour visiter les capitales des Re- 
publiques sud-americaines. 11 fut partout 
chaudement accueilli. 



Colii poitaux entre le P^rou et les 
Etats-Unis 

M. Hitchcock, qui remplit temporairement 



Paterson (New Jersey) en 1902, avec des 
pertes evaluees a 8 millions de dollars ; la con- 
flagration de Baltimore en 1904, qui detrusit 
140 acres d'edifices, representant une perte de 
50 millions de dollars ; et maintenant la cala- 
mite de San Francisco, ou les pertes, dit-on, 
s'eleveront a plus de 200 millions de dollars. 
Assurement la liste est suffisamment impres- 
sionnante pour etre prise a cceur, mais meme 
ces chiflfres ne donnent pas une idee exacte 
des ravages occasionnes par les incendies aux 
Etats-Unis. D'autres conflagrations, nom- 
breuses mais de moindre importance, des in- 
cendies d'edifices particuliers ont augmente 
le total, annee apres annec, si bien qu'en 1904, 
les tableaux des compagnies d'assurances mon- 
trent que les pertes dues aux incendies aux 
Etats-Unis s'elevaient a 230 millions de dol- 
lars, soit une perte quotidienne de 630,000 

dollars. 

De 1870 a 1880 les pertes annucllcs dues 
aux incendies s'elevaient approximativement 4 
60 millions de dollars; de 1880 a 1890, a 100 
millions de dollars ; de 1890 a 1900, la moyennc 
annuelle de ces pertes atteignait pres de 150 
millions de dollars. Et pour vous faire une 



♦^ 



Une voix g^nte 

Pendant la celebration de la fete du Solstice 
d'ete, au sommet de la tour Eiflfel, un mega- 

vien. d'annoncer q.,e. 4 p.r,ir du premier sep- I/appaml e« l.nven.on de »'^'_ l^*' ^ ^J,J „„i^„ ,,, „,„,eur, con« 

e„.re le, E.a.s-Unis e. .e Pero,,. Uur va.eu, du son produi, par une . -« < «P- ^ '^^ ^mieres anuee, pa, n»ins de J 

ne devra pas depasser 50 doUars. leur poid, d'un ga. detonan,. La penod,c,. e. 1 ,n ns v^ p q ^^ ^, ^ 

es, Hn,i.e a u Uvres e, leur lon^eur a 3 des detonations son. ^^^^ J'^J';. : "^ trtes na.ionales. On peu, encore 

pieds y. Le pourtour et la longueur com- ™m,ven,en,s du stylet sur le rouleau ph^o ,lan^ c ^. 

L, ne doiven. pas avoir plus de 6 pieds. graphique portan. les -P'"';;; — T™ e ^ ,a detLa.ional de Etats-Unis. 

Uscourrierscontenan. des cons ^rlePirou des v,bra.,o„s sonores. L' ^ v^e -ten on ^ .,,„,, j ,,,33,,36,. 

«r„n,Vepares aux bureaux de poste de Ne» qu'une plus c^ motns .^ "<";-"";"; ^;. ^ ' .J,,,,,,',, p,„, ^au, cbifTre qu'elle ait ia- 

York « de San Francisco. Voila qui ne peu. est adnuse. Avec cet '-'™7'- ""■'"r'' '^^.^ ,„,(„_;. k, M,a, dans r£»j,«^- 

e.re que dW grande comtu^ite pour I. lee ordinaire es. d,s„nc,en,ent en.endue a une -- '« 

commerce qui ,e tai. entre les deux pays. distance de plus de 300 P-ds- "« «'^'- 

Priir. d. m.nUonn.r c. iournal en ecHv.nt .ux p««.nn.. qui y font in.*«r d.. ...one... 



u 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



15 



American Official Statistics Improved 



riu' liiuiaii 111 Stali^tii-' nf tlu' I )rii;intmnt 
<>\ t'oiimuixc ami l-altnr lias latrly cflVcU'd an 
imiinrlatit rliaiii^c in the classiticntion of ('.(i\- 
cninH-nt -"taii-licv i,\ imii^n ciinutirrcc w liitli 
will lie- a ^rial iin]>ro\ (incnl. »'N|miall\ a^ llu 
run arranmnuiit will iiiaki- Cdinparisniis |i"i>>i- 
lilc with till- t\'iiMi> lUinau's cinnpilatinns ni' 
mannt;icliirr>. 'Vhv nld classihcalion nf tx 
pints ititii llir ;^nai ,L;niiip-, pici<liu-|s nf at^ri- 
ciilturr. inaimfailuii'. iiiiius. fintsis, and |l>|i 
i-ric^. \\a> adopted lliirty->i\ \i;us a.;'', when 
tin- I iiitcd States was oliiilU- a pr<"lniri and 
I'vjiMrtcT III natural prudncls, tin- i-\piiit~ I'f 
niamifactiirrs at that linx- luiny hut ahinit uiu- 
Kiith as f^reat a^ tii-da\. The old rlassificatinn 



up the diHticnt sccliiins nia\ ht hrictlv 
snintn«.-<l up as follows : 

The priiicii)al articles formin^r the first 
urniip. "I'oodstiitYs in a natural state and food 
animals," are \\h<at, corn, riii- and nther food 
grains: animals, exeepl horses and miiks; ,,,1 
III-, tea and coioa in natural stale; eys^^s ; iruils 
in natural state: fresh tish ; vef^etaliles and 
s]iiies in the iiatnral state. The jirineipal arti- 
rles tormin;,^ the second j^ronp, "I-'oudsluffs 
jiaiilx of will !1\ ]irepared," are llotir. mi-al and 
]ire]iaratioiis for tahle food; tish prepareil or 
tanned: fruits dried, prcserxed or canned: 
meats and dairy jiroihicts; o]i\( and cotton 
seed oil intended for food; uinis. liipiDrs and 



r 




Sctnc on th« Boardwalk, Atlantic City, N. J., U. S. A., whin t miUicn Summer Visitorj prontun.nle. 



of ini|Birts was adopted twenty \ears ,\nii, 
when the classo of ariieles formiiiL; the hulk 
of the imports also dillrrrd materi.ilU from 
thos,- r,t t.i da\. riie-i I w o old classifu-aiion-. 
of imports and r\|iorts (jittered so wiilelv ih:ii 
they were not comparalili one with llu oilui 
in attempts 1,, auaK/e the general tr;ide hiom 
uients into and out of tlie countrv , .Meauwhili . 
the princi]ial i''.uropeau natmns ha\e iidojiti d 
classiticatiiiiis adjusted |o present conditions of 
trade and ijitterini,' materirdly from ilio-, uid- 
ized in the I'nited States, and thus renderin.ir 
difficult a coniparison of our own trade fiu'ure; 
hy f^Ti-.n 1,'roup, witli those of the leadnit; F-'.u 
roiuaii coiuunes. I'ivi' i^roiips now io\ti ilu 
ground, and the various items ihai i.;o lo niaki- 



distilled spnits . simar and molasses ; eanned m 
preserxed \ iL;elal>les The princijial articles 
t'ormuiL; the third umup. "Crude matrrials for 
Use ill mannfacluriny." are raw iot|.,u. wool, 
silk and fihefs ; copper ore, main ,ind res^ulus ; 
coal, chemicals in a crude state; mineral oil. 
crude: cotton seed and l1a\-i cd ; ]vri\ toliacci. 
lo^s, pul)) wooil and I .iliiiui wiHid. The priii 
fipal articles formiui; the clas> " \|auuiacture~ 

lof further use in manufacturiuL;"' are co|ipor 
m pii^s. liars and iuuiits: chemicals ptepaied 
for use in manufacturing;: tin in piys or hlocks ; 
\arn-; iron in pii'S. hillets. hloi.ms, hars. in- 
;,:ots, sheets, tin plates and wire rods; dia 
iiionds eui. hut not stt ; iia\al -lores; paralVin . 
leather, sawed and hewn liniher, luinlier and 



wood pulp. The principal articles included in 
the ^roup "Maiuifactiires ready for consump- 
lion" are aj^ricultural implements; hcxiks ; cars 
and carriajj[es; clocks and watches; inanufac- 
iitres of cotton, wool, silk and fibers; clothing; 
i^lass ; j^lassware and cliiriauare ; manufactures 
of iron, steel, brass, copper, zinc and lead, 
ready for use; jewelry: boots, shoes and 
i^doves : refined mineral oil: vc,ijetable oils, ex 
i'e|)t those used for food; animal oils; paper 
and manufactures thereof; soap; manufactures 
of tobacco; furniture, and other finished inanu 
factures. The principal articles formini,' the 
L;ri>uj) "Miscellaneous" arc horses and mules, 
nursery stock, and seeds for agricultural pur 
poses. 

The chaiij;e is mo-,! apparent in the export 
classification, especiall) as relates to the old 
Ljiiiup. "Products oi a.uricnlture." The articles 
of the old afiricultural ^roup. which a,iigre- 
i;ated $4.^.V'>'^i'.<^'^> •" 'be period named, now 
apiie.ir in the ijroups. "l'"oodstiitVs in the nat 
iiral slate," S7i>.()(X),<K-»f>, and "h'oodstnffs parth 
or wholly pre|)ared." .*s 1 r)( i.o, >■ >,< x k 1, while the 
reitiainin!.; SiSH.ooo.o h 1 1 consistiiij; chieflv of 
raw ciiltfin. cotton seed and leaf tobacco), form 
the chief part of the j^^roiip "Crude material for 
usf in manufaclnriiiLj." which aj;^;rej;ates 
.SjKi.ofxi.oix), The old ^Tonp "Manufactures." 
which an^iirejjated S^J^.aio.oiy) in the period 
nau'.ed. is ri'presented hv the twfi new groups. 
".Manufactures for further use in niannfac 
turini;." $1 22,iK%yjOni < .lud " M .uiufacltires 
reai|\ tor consninptiou, ' S_'44 ,01 ><).()( mi, the in 
'lease o| 84o.i> (t,(m;) in thi' two new t,;ronps 
of " .\l;mnfaclures" heiim chiellx due to tin 
iransier lo those .lass, - ,,t' Inmher, n.ax.il sior< s 
ind furs. 

\n ;i)iplic itiou of tin- rlassificatmn to tin 
diiuistif exports ,if til,- \e;u' covered h\ llu 
reci 111 f, 11-11- of manufactures 1 11)04 ' show- 
du I \]M,riat'on of articles classed In ih, ci n 
siis ,1- ir.inuf;uiures ;is .SS3J,j04._^t)8, or ;.7'' 
pel- i-.in oi ih, .•si4.Soj.i47.().S- repotted \>\ 
ihe I eiisn- a- the v.ilne of nianufaclin 1 - m 
dial \iai, till- io!;d of ,*nH5j.j()4,_^i|S Ik iiil; 
'hiained Ik coniliinin^ the three ^mups. 

Nlanul.uimi - r. adx for con-umiilion.' S^j^. 
i--|.'"'^7- " Maniifaiiiires for further usi m 
1 aiiiiai luring." S\'ii,,J>)<i.>''^J. .md "P'ool 
-lull- pailK or \xholl\ prep.iiid.' S_'S_',47i|. 
S;i| 

1 lu le I- a simiiruanee in tin- -l;ileineiil oi 
llu- irilliiiL; ]n-rceiiiat^i o|" niannfail iin - s, nl 
abroad that slKmld he j^iven n:ore th;m a men 
jiassiiii. thoujjht. It shows what an undm 
.mount of imporianci i- ailached to the fact 
dial in some cases Aniericm-inade yoods ;ire 
sold abroad more che;ipl\ than tlu- urice m 



lioiue coiisunie 



\s oid\ 



tier cini, 



.1 



the toi.-il ouipiii -,„s al.ro,-id. (Veil with siirh 
siiei-i;il mdiu-enienis as are somelime- m.-ide in 
order to dispose of a surplus and ket-p ma 
ihiuerv full\ incupied. it would appear lh;i! 
the snhject receives much more attention than 
It nu rits I'his rapidly crow intj nation is also 
luedniL,' lor lis own use a much lartrtr «pian 
iii\ of f;uiii products than fornierlv. and if 
du- total of exports is to he maintained 11 
.\ill be lucessarx to plant a lirqer ,u r' .i-^e. m 
L-riin esprrially. Moreover, it is essfiuial tha: 
the value of exports be increased, since ini 
potts are .crowin.c rapidly, and the interna 
tinnal balance of trade must be kept favorable, 
Ih I .'insi ini- n.itiou i* not n Inrce bolder of for- 
' 1 11 -n mities, as is England, for instance — 
Ihni's h'l: iru' 



Export Implement Age 

rOUR LA CIRCULATION A l'ItRANCER EXCLeSIVEMRNT. 

loarnal Indipendant exclusivement consacrt aux inttrCts du 

comtnerce d'exportation des machines agrricoles, pompei, 

moulins i vent, outils de fennes, fournitures pour 

crimeries et articles npiciaux de quincaillerie. 



Paiz d'Abonnbmbnt 

On an, franc de port - 5 franca 

Priire de nous adresaer une traite sur New -Vork 
ou un mandat-poste international. 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

, PUBLISHERS 

1010 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa., U. S, A. 

ta mtrae maison public: " The Implement Age," "The 
American Fertilixer," "The Carriage Monthly" et The 
Vehicle Dealer." 

Toua droita r«ierv«s. Ware Bros. Co., 11J06. 



vol. XV. Philadelphie, EUts-Unis. Octobre, 1906. 



No. I 



Dans le Repertoire d'adresses A I'usage des 
cheteurs, dans la premiere partle dece livre nous 
donnons les renselgnements en frant^ais; nous 
avons recours h ce moyen afin de laciliter la cor- 
respondance avec les maisons qui font Insurer des 
■nnonces dans ce journal. 



L'^lectridte entraine I'eau 

L'ne propritite singuliere du courant elec- 
trique et qui n'est pas RWK'ralement connuc, 
est rosmose electrique, conime on la nomme. 
Un courant electrique passant dans le sol en- 
trainera de I'eau avec lui.— Icntement et en fai- 
ble quantite, cela va sans dire.— dans la direc- 
tion de lelcctrode negative. .\u cours d'expe- 
riences recentes en Angleterre on p"t ^a'""^ 
penetrer de I'eau dans un tuyau vernisse depose 
dans le sol. L'eau i>assait a travers les parois 
du tuyau quand le courant y passait lui-mcme. 
L' Electrical Review fait la remaniuc iiue ce 
principe pourrait etre applifiue iwur fournir de 
rhHiuidite aux plantes. Des courants t^lec- 
triques convenablement disposes dans le sol 
amasseraient I'humidite que le sol contient et 
la condenseraient autour des racines. 



Steamer br^silien 

M. Griscom, ambassadeur des Etats-Unis 
au Bresil, annonce que la Compagnie bresili- 
enne des bateaux a vapeur Lloyds a etabli un 
service regulier de bateaux a vapeur entre 
Rio de Janeiro et New York. Le premier 
steamer, le Goyas, de 4,000 tonnes, a entrepris 
son premier voyage le 25 aoiit. 



Annee finandcre canadicnne 

Le gouvernement du Canada annonce oflfici- 
ellement que I'annee financiere qui jusqu'ici 
prenait fin le 30 juin. prendra fin dorenavant 
le 31 mars. Cette loi est entree en vigueur le 
ler juillet dernier et il ett- dt^cide que I'annee 
financiere uya()-i(p7 ne comprendra que les 
neuf mois prenant fin au 31 mars 1907. 



Les R^publiques americaines 

Dans un discours a la session speciale de la 
Conference panamericaine, a Rio de Janeiro, 
>L le ministre Root assura les representants 
des republiques latines-americaines que les 
Etats-Unis ne desiraient pas d'autrc territoire 
que le leur, respecteraient les droits de la 
plus faible nation tout autant que ceux du plus 
vaste empire et ne reclamaicnt aucun privilege 
c|u'ils ne rcconnussent en ineiiie temps a 
toutes les republiques americaines. Le dis- 
cours fut cordialement accueilli et Ton croit 
qu'il contribuera pas peu a fairc <lisparaitrc 
toute mefiance sur les intentions des Etats- 
L'nis. M. Root a profite de I'occasion de cette 
conference pour visiter les capitales des Re- 
publiques sud-americaines. 11 fut partout 
chaudetuent accueilli. 



«r ) 



CoUs poitaux entre le P^rou et les 
Etats-Unis 

>L Hitchcock, qui remplit temporairement 
les fonctions de Directeur general des postes. 
vient d'annoncer que, a partir du premier sep- 
tembrc, des colis postaux pourront s'echanger 
entre les Etats-Unis et le Perou. Leur valeur 
ne devra pas depasser 50 dollars, leur poids 
est limite a 11 livres et leur longueur a 3 
pieds Yz. Le pourtour et la longueur com- 
bines ne doivent pas avoir plus de 6 pieds. 
Les courriers contenant des colis pour le Perou 
seront'prepares aux bureaux de poste de New 
York et de San Francisco. \'oi1a qui ne peut 
etre que d'une grande commodite pour le 
commerce qui se fait entre les deux pays. 



Une voix g^ante 

Pentlant la celebration de la fete <lu Solstice 
d'ete, au sommet de la tour Eiflfel, un mega- 
phone extraordinaire, capable dc transporter 
la voix humaine a une distance de pres de deux 
milles fut employe pour etonner les Parisiens. 
L'apparcil est I'invention de MM. Laiulct et 
Gautuout. Le grossissement extraordinaire 
du son produit par une serie d'cxplosions 
d'un gaz <letonant. La periodicite et I'intensite 
des detonations sont commandees par les 
mouvements du stylet sur le rouleau phono- 
graphique portant les impressions originales 
des vibrations sonores. Le son varie selon 
qu'une plus ou moins grande quantite de gaz 
est admise. Avec cet instrument, la voix par- 
lee ordinaire est distinctement entendue a une 
tlistance de plus de 300 pieds. 



Pertes americaines dues aux incendies 

L'experience du passe n'a pas fait defaut 
pour donner au peuple americain une grande 
le«;oii sur les pertes causees par les incendies. 
Temoin le grand incendie <le Chicago en 1871 
dans lequel trois milles carres et un tiers de 
batiments furent dt^truits, ce qui causa une 
perte dc lyo millions de dollars, couta la vie 
a deux cent cinquante personnes et ruina 
cinquante-six compagnies d'assurance ; I'incen- 
die de Boston, en 1872, qui devasta 65 acres 
et occasionna des pertes evaluees a 80 millions 
de dollars; I'incendie de Jacksonville (Flo- 
ride), en njoi. ttccasionnant des pertes eva- 
luees a 10 millions de dollars; lincendie de 
Paterson (New Jersey) en 1902, avec des 
pertes evaluees a 8 millions de dollars ; la con- 
flagration de Baltimore en 1904, qui detrusit 
140 acres d'edifices, representant une perte de 
50 millions de dollars ; et maintenant la cala- 
mite de San Francisco, ou les pertes, dit-on, 
s'eleveront a plus de 200 millions de dollars. 
.\ssurement la Hste est suffisamment impres- 
sionnante pour etre prise a cceur, mais meme 
ces chitTres ne donnent pas une idee exacte 
des ravages occasionnes par les incendies aux 
Etats-Unis. D'autres conflagrations, noin- 
breuses mais de moindre importance, des in- 
cendies d'edifices particuliers out augmente 
le total, annee apres annee, si bien qu'en 1904, 
les tableaux des compagnies d'assurances mon- 
trent que les pertes dues aux incendies aux 
Etats-Unis s'elevaient a 230 millions de dol- 
lars, soit une perte ciuotidiennc de 630,000 

dollars. 

De 1870 a 1880 les pertes annuelles dues 
aux incendies s'elevaient approximativement a 
fo millions de dollars; de 1880 a 1890, a 100 
millions de dollars ; de 1890 a 1900. la moyenne 
annuelle de ces pertes atteignait pres de 150 
millions de dollars. Et pour vous faire une 
idee plus claire encore si possible de I'impot 
colossal que significnt ces cbifTres sur les res- 
sources du pays, consultez les tableaux dresses 
par le comite national des assurcurs centre 
rincendie. et vous y verrez qu'au cours des 
vingt-cinq derniercs annees pas moins de 3 
milliards et demi de dollars out en- engloutis 
dans ces fcrtes nationales. On pent encore 
mieux se rendre compte ile ce total enormc, si 
on le compare a la <lettc national de Etats-Unis, 
qui. le. ter juillet iH(V). s'elevait a 2.733,236,- 
17^ dollars, le plus haut chiiTre qu'elle ait ja- 
mais atteint.— /. K. Frcitag dans VEngineer- 
mg Magazine. 



Priere de mentionner ce iournal en ecrivant aux personnes qui y font insurer de, annonce.. 



i6 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



Changement des conditions industrielles 

Las changcnicnts ijiii sc pruduiscnt dans 
I'empirt; industriel du luonde ne soiit f,aiero 
iiioins intcrcssants que les chaiigcments qui 
sopercnt dans la supreniatie politi(|ue. ( )n ne 
les rcmarque guere pendant qu'ils s'operent, 
niais ils dcvienncnt nianifestes quand on j^tte 
un regard un i)eu loin en arriere. 

C'cst ce qui ressort de quelqucs doiuiees 
conipilees par un slatisticien du Ministere du 
Commerce et du travail. 

Jl y a vingft-cinq ans, la supreniatie de I'An- 
gleterre en protluits manutaclures de fer et de 
cot on etait indisputable. Mais le pro<luit de 
fer aniericain surpasse aujourd'inii de l)eau- 
coup Ic produit anglais. Quant au.x lers de 
construction, les manufacturiers beiges les ven- 
dent a meilleur marche (jue ceux <le I'Angle- 
terre. I/Allemagne est devenue le plus for- 
midable concurrent de I'Angleterre en ])roduits 
manufactures de fer et d'acicr. Les chantiers 
de construction maritiines enlevent des com- 
inandes aux onstructeurs <\u I'ieli';i-l et ile la 
Clyde. Le^ plus gros navires ;i vapeur cuiis- 
truits dans ces dernieres annees viennent des 
chantiers alleman<ls. 

Ias manufacturiers allemands rechercbent 
de ])lus ell plus I'encouragement du gouverne- 
ment dans I'cffort qu'ils font pour se dispenser 
d'avoir a acbetcr les materiaux de fer et d'acier 
anglais. Dans les articles plus dclicats, telle 
la coutellcrie, les produits allemands font unc 
concurrence serieuse aux produits anglais sur 
les marches etrangers. La quantite de pro- 
duits allemands de cette categoric importes 
par nous attestc ce changement. 

Dans les produits manufactures de coton. 
il se produit des changements encore plus re- 
marquables. II n'y a <|ne quinzeans, la C.rande 
Uretagiie possedait lieaucouf) plus de la moitie 
de tons les metiers a filer du monde entier. 
EUe en a aujourd'inii inuins de la moitie, Dans 
le cours des viiigt deniiere-. annees Ics nu'tiers 
a filer anglais ont augmente d'environ 6 pour 
cent. l)ans le iiieme intervalle, sur le conti- 
nent de riuiro])c ct aux l''tats-Unis, les fila- 
tures (Hit augmente de 4 fois ce nombre, taii<lis 
qu'au.x Indes laugmentatiun a ele de 70 pour 
cent. 

Les filatures de coton dan> I'cxtrcnie Orient 
se de'veloppent avec une grande raindite'. 

L'Inde, la Cliine et Ic Japon niit imnicnsc- 
ment augmente leur ])roduction, en depit de 
I'etat flc trouble des affaires politiqucs en 
Orient, et sils ne fimt j)as encore de concur- 



rence sur les marches <lu monde. ils seront 
bient'it en etai de subveiiir a leiu> ])r(ipres 
besoins. 

Les Japonais, "le> Yankes-, dc l'( 'rieiit," 



line 

'ici- 

.•■i.ix 
\me- 



Essai pratique de la gazoiine 

11 ny avail jamais cu dans ce jii 
epreuve d'automobiles ayant lant i\<- 
pants que I'epreuve du rcndemeiii 
proinettent de justifier cette (jualificatioii ]tar gallons, conduite par rautomobile club 
leur activite et leur capacite imUistrielles, d'au- ri<[iie. le 5 mai dernier. Soixante et i- 

tre t'ari.n liU' iio. H- mhu ailinii-. inelicu- tures s'enaieiu fait inscrire et il y cut soiJiante- 
leux, daii^ imu ce (lu'ils font, l.eurs j)rodu- cinq i)artaiits. Le but principale de !' • me 
its sunt parfaiteiiient acheves. Les expositions etait de deterininner la quantite de c 
iiidiisirielles du Japon, ces dernieres annees, ble consniumee par mille, par les diver- 
out graiidenieiit surpris les observateurs etran- mobiles. Un premier, un second et 
gers par la varietc el re.xcellencc des produits sieme jirix cunsistant en un bol a ]• 
exposes. Xmi .-eulenieiit \ a-ti! une grande nr. en une coui>e d'argent et en une 1 



ont ete decernes aux trois voitiires qui 
rcuni le plus grand nombre de points. 
Le nombre de points de chaque von 
obtenu en nuiltipliant le poids total d 
ture une fois chargee (auquel 



■usti- 
.rato- 
\ roi- 
cll 
iaille 
aient 



lilt 

soo 
,r la 
.-. la 

'le, 



amelioration dans les industries indigenes, 
iiiais menie le> pnitluils de I'luinipe (Hit ete- 
parfaiteiiient ad(p]ites, copies ct, dans quehiues 
cas. ])erieciii>iines. 

< Ml a \ u a ces ex|Misit!ons des tissus de 

iaiiu, .le. toiles. des cotonnades. des cordages, ,{,,^05 furent arbitrairement ajoutees 

des tapis de ct,,,, ,t d. dia.n re. de reniarqua- .Hstance parcourue. Ainsi done, en r. 

bly expositi.ms .Ic pn..i„its diimiqiies, .les ar- i,,!,^ fut placee sur la base de la torn 

tides .ic pariumerie. ties brosses et divers arti- .,1,; ^^^rait du faire que les grosses x ura 

do (Ic iMiktir, <U-. lampes et des v. rrcries, des lourdes, si elles n'eussent ete handicapees. ao- 

borlogcs et des montrcs, des balances, depuis raient du I'emporter sur les voiturcs ' - 

celles qui servcnt a pcser les wagons de die- H aurait du en etre ainsi, semblait-il. e 

mills lie ler jusqu'aux instruments les plus i«rdinairement, la consommation du ga 

lielicals : .ks a|)pareils dc rclitirc ct d'imprimer, mentc pas directement avec le poids . 

des artu k~ in usage daiis la salle de classe, voiture lourde dcpense moins par toir 

ct toutes snrte-, doutils. depuis l.s machines qu'unc voiture legere. En depit dc i 

agncoles perlectionnees iuM]ua la plus fine connu, le comite charge de lepreuve 

coutellcrie ct aux instruiiieiils diirurijieaux mi les voitures legeres en ne prenant comi 

de haute prt-cisi.m matlu-mati.|m-. de toittes les machines a deux cylind' 

Xon seulcmcnt ces cliosis .^ t,,iit au Japon le 75 pour cent de leur poids reel, et p' 

aussi bicn qu'en .Vmeri.|iie ei .-,, luiroijc, niai- des machines a un seul cylindre que le 

les machines (lui servciit a k. labriquer s y e.nt. Lepreuve favorisait done les 

construisent egalcment. voitures a quatre cylindres, et il sembla 

11 ny a. jusqua present, amini traite (iiii (pie impossible qu'aucun autre type de 

|.n.te-e les inventions, les i,a!io„,,„-oi,kntaies, pfit gagner. Lepreuve eut pourtant 

et les m-vrueuN arlisaii^ iap.oia;^ m .o„t ac sult.u surprenant que la gagnante - 

coutumes i copier ce (jue bo„ kur semble. etre une voiture legere a quatre cylin.: 

I.'amiee .leniiere. cep.,„l, nt. !., ,;o„venienient type i refroidissement par I'air. voiture 

dis lMat> riiis a n<.-.K„ .,vec ie japon des ation cssentiellement americaine. Cct 

iraitcs ,,ui visent a la pn,t.rt,o„ dc.s inventions chine, pesant avec le conducteur et I'o^ 

et <les droits d-autenr amencains. teur 1.500 livres, se rendit de rue S7 '• 

La concurrence j.apo„a,M . ., des plus seri- River (New York) a Hartford (etat d- 

euses, parce ^uv k-s o,u , „, r> hal.iles nc ga- necticut), parcourant une distance <le S; 

gncnt guere que ,lix 'e..-,,,.- par jour. Les sur deux gallons de gazolitie, a unc vit. 

besoms -les ouvners .ont p,„ nonibreux, et les yenne de 17 miUes et demi a Theure. 

associations onvnere. .so,„ ,nco„„„es au Ja- on considere le fait que les premiers v 

pon. 11 est clair que le. manufacturiers des furem faits sur une route detrempec et - 

Rtats-Ums et de 1 Europe trouvent ou vont tres boueuse par une pluie torrentidlc .j 

trouver .Ian. 1e Japon un concurrent ingenieux. prit Tautomobile dans sa course, il scmb!. 

d.nt les prod,,,,, sont excellents ct qui pent p..ssible qu'unc -listance de 90 millcs. . 
les .(bienir a un prix dc revient extraordinaire- 
ment has. 



milles par gallon, aurait pu etre fraii 
la route eut ete seche. Le redacteur de 



t' 



}) 



Pr^ire de mentionner ce journal en ecrivant aux personnes qui y font ini^rer des 



annonces. 



niobilisme du Sciciititic Amcncon qui avail le 
plaisir d'etre I'observatcur sur la voiture ga- 
gnante, croit, que cette distance aurait facile- 
ment pu etre couverte par un beau temps et 
des routes seches attendu que la faible multi- 
plication dut etre employee sur un grand nom- 
bre de collines qui auraient pu autrement etre 
gravies avec la forte multiplication, attendu 
egalcment fjue par suite de I'humidite de I'air 
il fallut ouvrir la valve a aiguille du carbura- 
teur plus qu'il n'eut ete necessaire par ime 
belle journee. 

L'automobile qui gagna le second prix etait 
egalcment un des derniers types de voitures 
refroidies par I'air que le genie americain a 
imaginees et perfcctionnees. Ce qui caractc- 
rise le moteur de cette voiture, c'est que les 
cvlindres sont encaisses dans des enveloppes 
d'aluminium a travers lesquelles I'air est lance 
par un puissant soufflet. La voiture qui gagna 
le premier prix n'est refroidie au contraire que 
par le courant naturel de I'air a niesure que la 
voiture avancc, le moteur, dans ce cas, ctant 
place transversalement a I'avant de la machine 
et etant muni de soupapcs d'epuisement auxi- 
liaires actionnees mecaniquement et qui contri- 
buent a I'expulsion rapide des gaz brules. La 
valve a aiguille du carburateur pent egalcment 
etre ajustee du siege du conducteur. C'est la 
un grand avantage qu'on nc trouve guere 
dans aucune autre marque d'automobile. Une 
voiture dc la meme martpie que la gagnante 
detient le record transcontinental qui fut fait 
en moins de trente-trois jours. 

La voiture qui obtint le troisieme prix etait 
une machine a quatre cylindres, refroidie a 
I'cau, d'une marque frangaise bicn connue. Le 
nombre de points de cette machine s'elevait a 
180,642: celui de la machine qui obtint le se- 
cond prix, a 194.953. et celui cnfin de la voiture 
gagnante a 200,100. Cette voiture franqaise 
pesait 3,110 livres ct a franchi 46 millcs et 
deux dixiemes, tandis que la deaxiemc voiture 
pesait 3,270 et fit 47 milles 9 dixiemes. La 
quatrieme machine etait une grossc machine 
fran(;aise possedant un record pour I'econo- 
mie du combustible. La cinquieme etait un 
omnibus a 18 voyageurs: la sixieme etait un 
tonneau leger de la meme marque et posse- 
dant le meme moteur que la voiture gagnante. 
I^ prix de circulation par tonne-mille de ces 
six premieres voitures, en supposant que le 
combustible coiitc .'O cents le gallon, est de 
0.613, 0.452, 0.538, 0.550. o.5o<i ct 0.640 de 
cent respectivement. Un "buckboard" a un 



cylmdre fit 101.6 milles. et un tonneau a cylin- 
dre unique et portant quatre personne, 56 md- 
les 8 dixiemes.— 5"c«<?«/f^f American. 



Croissance du commerce exteriur 

Le commerce exterieur des Etats-Unis s est 
devclopiie beaucoup plus rapidcment que leur 
population duraut les ilix dernieres annees. 
Les statistiques detaillees pour I'annee finan- 
ciere 1906, lesquelles vieiiiieiil d'Otre publiecs 
par le Bureau des Statistiques du Departe- 
ment .lu Commerce et du Travail, indiqucnl 
(juc tandis que la population, tlepuis 189b, n'a 
augmente ([ue de 20 pour cent, les importations 
ont augmente de 57 pour cent, et les exporta- 
lioiis de 109 pour cent. Les imiwrtatious qui 
accuseut le plus gros gains sont les produits 
des manufactures ; I'importation des materiaux 
employes par les maiuifacturiers a augmente 
<le 05 pour cent. Quant a rexportation. ce 
sont les protluits agricoles et les produits des 
manufactures qui accuseut le plus gros gam. 
L'expurtation des produits agricoles a aug- 
mente tie 70 pour cent dans ces dernieres dix 
annees, et les produits manufactures de 163 

j>our cent. 

Cette augmentati.ju s'est produite dans le 

commerce avec toutes les grandes divisions .hi 

monde, maissent tout specialement marquee 

dans le commerce avec I'-Vsie et I'Oceanie. 

Les importations d'Europe ont augmente de 50 

]M.ur cent, celles de rAmenque du Xord de .So 

p.iur cent, celles de rAmerique du Sud de 30 

pour cent, cellCs de I'Asie et de I'Oceanie de 

80 pour cent, celles, enfin, de I'Afrique, de 13 

])<>ur cent. Les exportations en ICurope ont 

.-mgmente de 78 pour cent; les expfirtations 

<lans I'Americiue du Nord, dc 164 pour cent; 

dans rAmerique du Sud, de 107 pour cent: 

en .\sie et en C3ceanie, .k- j.v pour cent, et 

en .\frique dc 41 pour cent. 

11 s'cst egaloment produit quelqucs change- 
iniuts remarquablcs dans les routes suivies par 
cette augmentation de trafic. Si I'on compare 
k-s conditions existantcs en \*^*' a cdles qui 
existi.ieiit en i8(>'. oi, voit <iue les ports de 
r.Xtlaiitiinie accuseut une augmentation .le 329 
millions en importations, et epic les importa- 
milliims en importations ; les ports du I'aeifique 
accuseut une augmentation de 17 millions en 
iinp<»rtations et de 57 millions en exportations; 
la fronticre du nord et les ])orts des lacs, 
unc augmcntati..n de 42 millions en importa- 
ti.nis et lie i i'> iiiillii.ns en exi.ortations ; 
eiitin. les ports de rinlerieiir niontrent une 
atigiueiilation d'enviriiii iiiilliinis en importa- 
tions. 



L'evalution d'une idee 

Le 10 mars dernier etait le trentiemc anni- 
vcrsaire du jour oil le premier message tele- 
pli..niquc fut tntendu par I'invcnteur ct son 
aide. L'endroit etait I'etage le plus eleve .I'mie 
|)ension bourgeoise, a Boston, ou les experi- 
ences se poursuivaient depuis pres d'une annee. 
C'e fut en 1874 .pic Alexander Graham Bell, 
professeur de pbysi.)logie vocale a rUiiiversite 
.le Boston, ac<iuit le conviction que plusieurs 
messages du systeine Morse pouvaient se 
transnicttre a la fois sur un seul fil. En etu- 
di;iiit cette iiueslion. il eut ensuite I'idee il'uti- 
liser les vibraiioiis sympathiqucs des cordes a 
ruiiissun. Commen(;ant avec les experiences 
du itMegraphe harmonique en 1874, experi- 
ences conduites dans sa propre chambre, ct ou 
• k- ressorts d'horlogcs constituaient la partie 
issentielle de ses appareils, il passa graduelle- 
meut a des appareils, ayant pour base I'electro- 
aimaiit. Ce tut alors que Bell se convainquit 
de la p.issibilite de telegraphicr la parole, et le 
principe vrai qu'il annontja a son associe etait 
qu'une transmission de ce genre dependrait 
.lun instrument capable de produire des vibra- 
tions analogues. Ce fut le 2 juin 1875 <pie 
I'cll rcussit a cnvoyer par I'electricite le tim- 
bre du son ct i'annee suivantc, en mars, le pre- 
mier message parle fut requ par lui dans son 
humble appartement. 

Dans la genese du telephone, revolution 
d'une idee pent se suivre de pause en pause. 
En realite, I'idee originate subit une transfor- 
mation et quelques-uns des resultats elec- 
triques obtenus n'etaient ni attendus ni prc^ 
jetes, mais la conception principale etait cor- 
recte. Ia rupture d'un ressort, le premier son 
exactement reproduit, peuvent etre consideres 
comme accidentels, mais la base avail ete 
p. .see, et les conditions chercht-cs furent re- 
connues (piaml elles se presenterent. 11 fallut 
etudier et faire disparaitre bien des difficultes 
I>articuliercs avant d'offrir I'invention au pub- 
lic et meiiie l.nigtcmps apres on vit surgir des 
entraves .loin il no tut pas facile de se debar- 
ras.,r. Mai- bieiitr.t les nu-a-es devinrent 
pourtant M surs (pic. I'ete suivant, I'invention 
fut exposce a I'occasion du ceutenaire de Bhila- 
delpbie, I'armi les pers.Duncs qui I'e.xamine- 
rent. .e trouvait I'eminent savant anglais. Lord 
Kelvin, tpii se declara charme et ecrivit ces 
niots; "Cette invention, la plus grande mer- 
vcille pent -Ot re realisee par le tdegraphe 
dcTrique. a ete obteime a I'aide d'instruments 
vrainient rudimentaires." Dans I'autonme de 



Priere de mentionner ce journal en ecrivant aux personne, qui y font inserer des annonces. 



i8 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement age 



19 



la meme annee, des messages parfaitement dis- 
tincts purent etre envoyes sur deux milles de 
fil eiitre lloston et Canibridgeport. 

Une cunipagnie orj^anisee pour iutrcxluire 
le telephone dans le coniinerce comnicnga ses 
operations au printemps de 1877 ^^< P^" apres, 
Bell essaya d'envoyer des messages entre Bos- 
ton et New York ; niais les lignes telephomques 
de longue distance ne reussirent que lorsqu'un 
inventeur eut introduit I'usage des fils de cui- 
vre durcis. 

Les conditions retjuises sent bien connues 
aujourd'hui, alors que Boston pcut converser 
aisement avec ( )niaha, niais il y cut plus dun 
moment critique, alors que les experiences 
semblaient indicjuer un insucces dans quelques- 
unes des commodites qui sont aujourd'hui 
banales. A ses debuts, on ne considerait le 
telephone que comme une curiosite, mais au- 
jourdiiui sc's abjnnes se comptent par millions. 
II se rend dans les fermes aussi bien que dans 
les villcs et les villages, il fait partie intime 
des affaires et de la vie sociale. Le monde 
doit beaucoup aux inventeurs americains, dont 
I'activite est une sorte d'inspiration. lis ne 
materialisent pas toujours leurs idecs, mais ils 
sont rarement les derniers a saisir la verite 
cachee au fond du puits. — Scientific American. 



Danem&rk et Amerique 

M. Hitchcock, directeur general suppleant 
des posies, a signe avec le Danemark une con- 
vention en vertu de laquelle des colis postaux 
pourront etre echanges entre ce pays et les 
Etats-L'nis a partir du ler octobrc. 

Les colis tlevront i)as pescr plus de 4 
livres 6 onces ; leur longueur ne devra pas de- 
passer 3 pieds et demi, et le jxjurtour et la lon- 
gueur combines ne dcvront pas avoir plus de 
6 pieds. I^ \aleur maximum des colis est 
fixee a 50 dollars. Ils devront etre affranchis 
comme suit : aux Etats-l'nis, pour les colis des- 
tines au Danemark, 12 "cents" par livre ou 
fraction dc livre. 

.•\u Danemark. pour les colis destines aux 
Etats-l'nis, (k) 'ores" jmur un colis dont le 
poids ne depasse pas un kilogramme, et i 
"krona" pour les autres colis. Aux Etats- 
L'nis la postc pcut exiper dts dcstinataires, 
pour frais de livraison. une somme ne depas- 
Fant pas 5 "cents." Los reglements qui s'ap- 
pliquent aux colis postaux destines a la Nor- 
vege. s'appliquent egalement aux colis postaux 
destines au Danemark. Les courriers de colis 
postaux pour le Danemark seront prepares a 
la poste de New York. 



Freins de v^hicules 11 va sans dire que les autres freins a ressort 

II y a dix-neuf ans. M. Morgan Potter, de I'otter ne seront pas oublies : ils se fabriquent 

Fishkill-on-Hudson, N. Y. (Etats-L'nis), fit aujourd'hui de divers modeles et de quatoze 

munir un certain nombre de vehic-ules de ses grandeurs; ils peuvent s'adapter aux bandages 

freins a ressort et presque tons sont encore en d'acier ou de caoutchouc. On pent se pro- 

bon etat ; les depenses occasionnees sont curer un exemplaire de ce catalogue en s'adres- 

prLS(|ues nulles: il faudra rempiacer, de temps sant a M. Morgan Potter, Fishkill-on-Hudson/ 

en temps, un sabot use. ou peut-etre un ressort. X. Y. (Etats-L^nis d'Amerique). 
Quclques-uns de ces freins out en realite sur- 
vecu aux vehicules auxquels ils avaient d'abord 

ete fixes, on les a mis a d'autres charrettes et Progres en Chine 
ils ^«()nt encore etat ile f.iuniir dc longues Les progres en Chine se sont recemment 
annees de services. M. Potter a cu le privilege manifestes d*une fa(;on remarquable, sinon 
de voir ses freins a ressort considerablement unique. Les habitants d'un village de la pro- 
em])l<i\ts partout dans les Etats-L'nis, du vince de Fukien, convoques en reunion, prirent 
Maine a la Califomie, et surtout par les con- la determination de renoncer a I'habitude de 
structeurs de voitures et de charrettes de haute I'opium. A la suggestion de deux hommes 
qualite. Ces freins sont egalement exportes qui etaicnt alles a I'hupital de Fuchau se faire 
en grand nombre en Europe et dans d'autres traiter pour pouvoir se debarrasser de I'habi- 
pays etrangers. tels que I'Australie, la Nouvelle tude de fumer de I'opium, on adressa des 
Zelande et les iles Sandwich. lettres au directeur de I'hopital pour lui de- 
M. Potter croit que les meilleurs freins ne mander de venir a A-iong et de les aider, 
sont pas trop bons meme pour les charrettes a L'une d'elles contenait un accord respectueux 
bon marchc. et que tout frein qui ne tiendra et couche en termes soigneusement peses signe 
pas toujours, que la charrctte soit legerement par les anciens et les principaux habitants du 
ou lourdement chargee. est plus qu'inutile et village. Le docteur Wilkinson, qui raconte 
que I'acheter c'est gaspiller son argent. Du- I'histoire dans le Church Missionar\ Intelli- 
rant ces dix-neuf annees. pendant lesquelles il jienccr de juillet, se rendit en consequence au 
s'est consacre exclusivement a la fabrication village et trouva que tous les habitants pour 
du celebre frein a ressort Potter, il n'a cesse ainsi dire desiraient vivement la reforme. A 
de considerer la qualite comme de premiere inie reunion avec les principaux habitants, les 
importance, et il a toujours employe la meil- marchands d'opium eux memes se leverent et 
leure matiere premiere pour chaque piece par- dirent qu'ils voulaient cesser de vendre la 
ticuherc. drogue, et une quete fournit cinquante dollars 
La partie mecanique a toujours ete de pre- i>our acheter les medicaments neccssaires. En 
mier ordre et Ton n'a rien epargne pour se mars deniier, la salle ancestral du village fut 
procurer les machines les plus perfectionnees transforms en hopital, ou soixante-neuf pa- 
pour ce travail special. Le frein original Pot- tients hommes furent admis. une femme de la 
ter a ete perfectionne de temps a autre, et mission ayant charge de neuf femmes dans un 
aujourd'hui, comme dans le passe, ces produits autre endroit. Pendant trois semaines ils fu- 
sont sans egaux sur le marche. Toutefois, M. rent traites, ct pendant ce temps il n'y en eut 
Potter se rendant compte de la necessite de rpie deux qui penlirent courage et parterent. 
(|iKlf|uc chose de meiileur. puur los usages Des services religieux etaient tenus matin et 
generaux. que le frein non ajustahle. il a re- s<Mr, et a mesure que le temps passait, I'audi- 
cemment mis sur le marche un frein a ressort toire sciuhlait s'intcrc»cr davantage au chant 
ajustable. de modeles divers. i.rCts a fixer aux des hymnes et aux simples causeries bibliques. 
viturcs et charrettes <!c tout p„i,ls ct de toutes Dans le jour, la lamcrne magique, des exposi- 
catcg<.rics. Ce nuuvcau frein a ete mis a tions photographiques, le gramophone faisai- 
lessai chaque jour de lannee passee et il a ete ent passer d'agreables moments aux patients. 
truuve qu'il remplissait toutes les conditions Quel sera la resultat de ce mouvement, il est 
possibles ct desirables. Chacun de ces freins evidemment impossible de le dire, mais a la 
est pleinement garanti et sera envoye a I'essai requete des anciens et des chefs du village, 
a toute personne responsable. Un nouveau le mandarin a fait afficher une proclamation 
catalogue illustre sera bientot public qui de- defendant a qui que ce soit d'ouvrir une bou- 
crira le nouveau frein et ses pieces ajustables. tique d'opium dans le village. 



Export Implement Age 

PARA CIRCULAR FN EL EXTRANJKRO SOLAMBNTE. 

•*ri6dico independimle, dcdicado cxclusivamcnte al 'omen'o 

"^de comcrcbde expurtac.n.. c-n n.a.jumana P-^™ '» '\gr.. 

cultuia y Itchcrlas. iKjinbas, ni.jlmos ck- yiento, 

aperos de labian/.a y sumiiiisuos '.\ corti)os, 

haciendas, mj!eiiios de hater azucar, 

sitios de labor etc. 



^[ 



i 



Precio de SUSCRIPC16N 
■ on afio, porte franco 



I Poo 



lUmliase per giro sobre Nueva Vork 6 por librania 
postal inlernacional. 



El capital invcrtido cu establechimicuttos 
manufactureros americanos ascendio en ifp4 
a la inmensa suma de $i2,(j86,205.<>73.a^. 
segun los recienles <lritM. .-trulisticos ptd.lica- 
dos por la Oficina del ecus... Esto es un 
aumento de 41 por cicnto en ciuco ai'ios. El 
aumento en los productus i.ibriles fne dc 30 
por cicnto, habiendo llcgado su valor total en 
1905 a $14,802,147,087. 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 

1010 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa., E.U. del N.A. 

L« tnisma firma publics el "Implement Age" el "American 
"FertiJixer," el "CarriaKe Monthly' y el "VehicU Dealer. 

propiedad legalizada por Ware Bros. Co. en 1906. 



Tomo XV. FUadelfia. E V. de N. A.. Octubre de 19B6. 



No. I 



En el DIrectorio para CompraJores, en la pri- 
mers parte, hallaran nuestros lectores los In- 
formes en el idioma espanol. a fin de que puedan 
entablas una correspondencia mas satisfactoria 
con nuestros anunciantes. 



Pricre de mentionner ce iournal en ecrivant aux personnel qui y font insurer des 



an nonces. 



Se esta discutiendo en Alemania el pro- 
yecto cle celebrar una Exposicion Universal en 
Berlin en 1912. y hay esperanzas de que se 
lleve a cabo ese proyecto. 



Las exportaciones de instrumentos agricolas 
americanos durante el an<> fiscal (|ue tcrmino 
el 30 de Junio ultimo asccndiu a un total de 
$24,544,427.00, demostrando un auiiicim' ^U' 
20 por ciento sobre el afio de 1905. I^as 
guadanadoras y segadoras componian la iniiad 
dc esas exportaciones. Las naciones que mas 
de estos articulos han comprado a los Estados 
L'nidos durane los ultimos pocos afios son: 
la Republica Ahgcntina, por valor de $5.9<\^.- 
714: Rusia. por $.^851,455; Francia, $2.8*^5.- 
_'4;^, V Alemania, $2,016,894. 



Teneos Bien Informados 

(.'nnstantemenle se esian hacicudo mejora- 
inicntos en la calidad y naturaleza de los instru- 
tiiciitos agricolas. Maiiuinas tjue no hace mu- 
chds anus eran consideradas conio de mara- 
\'\\h,>i\. ]icrfecciun son \v>\ anticuadas. Le 
convienc. pues, al comprador cxlraujero te- 
nerse enterado sobre los ultimos mejoramien- 
I..S y niccani'-ni<is hcchos en toda clase de 
maquinaria agricola, y por esta razon pueden 
-IT Ic incalculable valor los catalogos y de- 
luas iiuiire-os de propagande que ofrecen los 
lahricaiiU's i\vw sc anuiiciaii en la "L.xport Im- 
plement Age" para nuestros lectores del ex- 
tranicro. Todos nuestros ananciadores se ale- 
graran dc suministrar sus catalogos y todos los 
informes deseados. Se puede llevar la corres- 
pondencia en cualquier idioma. 



Algxmos de los fabricantes de buques bri- 
tanicos declaran que los vapores mercantes se 
pueden comprar hoy por mencs de lo que cu- 
esta construirlos. Sin embargo durante el 
mes de Mayo se anadieron al Registro Brita- 
nico un total de 99 nucvos buques. la mayor 
parte grandes vapores con un total de 136,- 
712 toneladas. 

Peculiaridades de los Submarines 

Es casi tan dificil mantener el equilibrio dc 
un submarino como cl de un acroplano 6 
maquina de volar. Los grandes submarinos 
modernos, dice Sir WML White, se sumergen 
proa con unos timoncs horizontalcs mancjad..^ 
cuando estan andando. Se hace bajar la 
por diestros marineros, y el submarino se 
mueve oblicuamcnte hacia abajo. Al llcgar 
^ la profundidad deseada Ins timoncU- ticncn 
que mancjar los timones horizuutalcs dc modo 
que la nave mantcnga practicamcnte su nivel ; 
pern n, rcali<lad no hace sino un<lnlar para 
rril.a v para abajo. Es preciso que no se 
mueva nin.i;im bmnl.rc ni ningun peso dentro 
de la nave sin com|Hn>acinu dc peso immcdiato 
para rc^tal.l. ccr v inantcncr cl equilibrio, pues 
de no harcrl.. a-, inicdc Miincrgirsc el sub- 
marino hasta una i.r-.fun.lidad dcsastmsa. Se 
ha halladn. sin cnibarL;n, que cl manejo manual 
es mejor que el automatico. 



Un Gran Sifon de Riego 

Mucho interes ha excitado la apertura del 
gigantesco sifon que conduce el agua del 
canal de riego de Aragon y Cataluna a travcs 
de los valles de Sosa y Ribabona, Uevandola 
y regando mas de 247.000 acres de ticrra 
hasta aqui virtualmente estcriles por falta de 
riego. El gran sifon consistc en dns tulios 
maestros de ^s dc milla de largo, y un 
diamctro dc 12 pics 5 pulgadas. forradns on 
planchas de acero de 3 milimetros de espc-.i , 
rcforzados con aros de hierro. y encajonados 
«i concreta. Los tubos tienen capacidad para 
cnducir 7.700 galoncs de agua por segundo. 



La Clectricidad Atrae el Agua 



I'lia i"'ni)iedad singular, y generalmente 
,lrM-ii..cida. dc la CMrri.ntc elect rica cs la 
llamada i»-ninsis elcctrica. I'na corrieiite 
c.irricndo bajn la ticrra hara que el agM.n, 
dcspacio y en pcquena c.antidad pnr supucstn. 
oorra cm, clla en la dirccci6n del electrodn 
ncg.uivo. Durante .ilgunos cxi>crinicnt(.s 
hcch.w rccicnt.nuiuc cu Inglatcrra sc htzn 
tiitrar cl aijua en un tubo vidriado I'lu-l.^ .n 
tierra. Kl a-u.i pciutri'. l;i> paredcs ,V\ tul)o 
cuau.ln -c lc> pa-.-. I;i cnrricnte elt^ctrica. La 
lUcctncal Rciicic suuicre que se utiUcc esta 
prupic.lad para suministrarlcs la humedad a 
las plantas. Las corricntcs electricas debida- 
nuntc aplicadas a la ticrra recogerian el agua 
esparcida en el terrcno. y la condensarian sobre 
las raices de las plantas. 



Orden Sobre las Tarietas Postales 

Sf vera por la siguiente circular oficial que 
desde el tTies de Octubre de 1907 se podra usar 
el lailo izquierdo tie la cara de las tarjetas 
postales y pictoricas para escribir comunica- 
ciones, lo mismo que el reverso. 

Como la Convcncion Postal L'niversal 

cclebrada recientemente en Roma, Italia, para 

cl intercambio de la correspondencia adopto 

un convcnio que empczara a regir desde el 

primero de Octubre de 1907 entre todos los 

paises de la L'nion Postal, en el cual se estipida 

(|m- desde aquella fecha en adelante las 

arirta- i>ostales que contengan mensajes 

t-criin- et) cl iado izquierdo del frente de la 

t.irjeta, a^i ce.nio en el reverso de la misnia, y 

comn eM:i^ - 'H hoy admitidas en los correos 

por el prccin del tranqueo aplicable a las 

tarjiia- i>n'-talcs cambiadas entre los paises; 

I or in prcscnfe se ordcna que las tarjetas 
postales que lleven un mensaje en el Iado 
iz(|uicrdo del frente de la tarjeta— rcscrvan- 
,1,,M- cl ladn dcrecho para la direccion— con- 
Itni.la- en l,i^ valijas de correo y en los 
!--ia<'ii-. rnicln- lie i.tn.- pai-e- scan cnnsi<lcra- 
,1a- V irntadns cnmf. tarjetas p.>Mal.-; y 
cuando J iranqiuM .-iplicablc a las tarjetas 
i,<,Male> <'n el cnrreo iiuernaciniial apercce en 
ella en una cstampilla del valor cnmpleto de 
diclio franquco. dicha tarjeta sea entregada 
.1 la persona dirigida, sin cnhrar nada mas 
cowA^ fraiii|ucn. 

George H. Cortelyou, 
. hfii;i>i!str,idor Gou-raJ dc Correos. 
Washington, D. C, June 28, 1906. 
( tfdcr Xo. 1047. 



Hiiase el Favor de Mencionar el Nombre de este Peri6dico Cuando 



se Conteste i los Anundoi. 



L' 



t 



18 



Export Implement Age 



la meme aniiee. des messages partaitenient dis- 
tincts purent etre envoyes sur deux milles de 
fil entre lioston et Cambridgeport. 

Une compagnie organisee pour introduire 
le telephone dans le commerce commcn«;a ses 
operations au printemps de 1877 et, pen apres, 
Bell essaya d'envoyer des messages entre Bos- 
ton et New York ; mais les lignes telephomques 
de longue distance ne reussirent que lorsqu'un 
inventeur eut introduit I'usage des fils de cui- 
vre durcis. 

Les conditions requises sont bien connues 
aujourd'hui, alors que Boston pent converser 
aisement avcc ( )maha. mais il y eut plus d'un 
moment critique, alors que les experiences 
semblaient indiquer un insucces dans quelques- 
unes des commodites qui sont aujourd'hui 
banales. A ses debuts, on ne considerait le 
telephone que comme une curiosite, mais au- 
jourd'hui ses abonnes se comptent par millions. 
11 se rend dans les fermes aussi bien que dans 
les villes et les villages, il fait partie intime 
des affaires et de la vie sociale. I^e monde 
doit beaucoup aux inventeurs americains, dont 
I'activite est une sorte d'inspiration. lis ne 
materialisent pas toujours leurs idecs, mais ils 
sont rarement les derniers a saisir la verite 
cachee au fond du puits. — Scientific American. 



Danem&rk et Atn^rique 

M. Hitchcock, directeur general suppleant 
des j)ostes. a signe avcc le Danemark une con- 
vention en vertu de laquelle des colis postaux 
pourront etre echanges entre ce pays et les 
Etats-Unis a partir du ler octobre. 

Les colis devront pas peser plus de 4 
livres 6 onces ; leur longueur ne devra pas de- 
passer 3 pieds et demi, et le pourtour et la lon- 
gueur combines ne devront pas avoir plus de 
6 pieds. l-A valeur maximum des colis est 
fixee a 50 dollars. Ils ilevront etre affranchis 
comme suit : aux Etats-Unis, pour les colis des- 
tines au Danemark, 12 "cents" par livre ou 
fraction de livre. 

Au Danemark, pour les colis destines aux 
Etats-L'nis. 60 "ores" pour un colis dont le 
poids ne depasse pas un kilogramme, et i 
"krona" pour les autres colis. Aux Etats- 
Unis la postc j)cut oxiger des destinataires, 
pour frais de livraison. une somme ne depas- 
Fant pas 5 "cents." Les reglements qui s'ap- 
pliquent aux colis postaux destines a la Nor- 
vege, s'appliquent egalement aux colis postaux 
destines au Danemark. Les courriers de colis 
postaux pour le Danemark scront prepares a 
la poste de New York. 



Freins de v^hicules 

II y a dix-neuf ans, ^L Morgan Potter, de 
Fishkill-on-Hudson, N. Y. (Etats-Unis), fit 
munir un certain nombre de vehic-ules de ses 
freins a rossort et presque tous sont encore en 
bon etat ; les depenses occasionnees sont 
prosques nulles : il faudra reniplaccr, de temps 
en temps, un sabot use, ou peut-etre un ressort. 
Quelques-uns de ces freins ont en realite sur- 
vecu aux vehicules auxquels ils avaient d'abord 
ete fixes, on les a mis a d autres charrettes et 
ils sont encore etat de fournir de longues 
annees de services. M. Potter a eu le privilege 
de voir ses freins a ressort considerablement 
employes partout dans les Etats-Unis, du 
Maine a la Califomie, et surtout par les con- 
structeurs de voitures et de charrettes de haute 
qualite. Ces freins sont egalement exportes 
en grand nombre en Europe et dans d'autres 
pays etrangers, tels que I'Australie, la Xouvellc 
Zelande et les iles Sandwich. 

M. Potter croit que les meilleurs freins ne 
sont pas trop bons meme pour les charrettes a 
bon marche, et que tout frein qui ne tiendra 
pas toujours, que la charrette soit legerement 
ou lourdement chargee, est plus qu'inutile et 
que I'acheter c'est gaspiller son argent. Du- 
rant ces dix-neuf annees, pendant lesquclles il 
s'est consacre exclusivement a la fabrication 
du celebre frein a ressort Potter, il n'a cesse 
de considerer la qualite comme de premiere 
importance, et il a toujours employe la meil- 
leure matiere premiere pour chaque piece par- 
ticuliere. 

La partie mecanique a toujours ete de pre- 
mier ordre et Ton n'a rien epargne pour se 
procurer les rr.achines les plus perfectionnees 
pour ce travail special. Le frein original Pot- 
ter a ete perfectionne de temps a autre, et 
aujourd'hui, comme dans le passe, ces produits 
sont sans egaux sur le marche. Toutefois, M. 
Potter se rendant compte de la necessite de 
(|uclque chose de meilleur, pour les usages 
generaux, que le frein non ajustable, il a re- 
cemment mis sur le marche un frein a ressort 
ajustable, de modeles divers, prets a fixer aux 
voitures et charrettes de tout poids et de toutes 
categories. Ce nouveau frein a ete mis a 
lessai chaque jour de I'annce passee et il a ete 
trouve qu'il remplissait toutes les conditions 
possibles et desirables. Chacun de ces freins 
est pleinement garanti et sera envoye a I'essai 
a toute personne respon sable. Un nouveau 
catalogue illustre sera bientot public qui de- 
crira le nouveau frein et ses pieces ajustables. 



11 va sans dire que les autres freins a ressort 
Potter ne seront pas oublies: ils se fabriquent 
aujourd'hui de divers modeles et de quatoze 
grandeurs ; ils peuvent s'adapter aux bandages 
d'acier ou de caoutchouc. On pent se pro- 
curer un exemplaire de ce catalogue en s'adres- 
sant a M. Morgan Potter, Fishkill-on-Hudson,* 
N. Y. (Etats-L^nis d'Amerique). 



Progr^s en Chine 

Les progres en Chine se sont recemment 
manifestes d'une faqon remarquable, sinon 
unique. Les habitants d'un village de la pro- 
vince de Fukien, convoques en reunion, prirent 
la determination de renoncer a I'habitude de 
I'opium. A la suggestion de deux hommes 
qui etaient alles a I'hopital de Fuchau se faire 
traiter pour pouvoir se debarrasser de I'habi- 
tude de fumcr de I'opium, on adressa des 
lettres au directeur de I'hopital pour lui de- 
mander de venir a A-iong et de les aider. 
L'une d'elles contenait un accord respectueux 
et couche en termes soigneusement peses signe 
par les anciens et les principaux habitants du 
village. Le docteur Wilkinson, qui raconte 
I'histoire dans le Church Missionary IntelCt- 
i:enccr de juillet, se rendit en consequence au 
village et trouva que tous les habitants pour 
ainsi dire desiraient vivement la reforme. A 
une reunion avec les principaux habitants, les 
marchands d'opiuni eux memes se leverent et 
dirent qu'ils voulaient cesser de vendre la 
drogue, et une quete foumit cinquante dollars 
l)our acheter les medicaments necessaires. En 
mars dernier, la salle ancestral du village fut 
transformee en hopital, ou soixante-neuf pa- 
tients hommes furent admis, une femme de la 
mission ayant charge de neuf femmes dans un 
autre endroit. Pendant trois semaincs ils fu- 
rent traites, et pendant ce temps il n'y en eut 
que deux qui perdirent courage et parterent. 
Des services religieux etaient tenus matin et 
soir, et a mesure que le temps passait, I'audi- 
toire scmblait s'interesscr davantage au chant 
des hymnes et aux simples causeries bibliques. 
Dans le jour, la lanterne magique, des exposi- 
tions photographiques, le gramophone faisai- 
ent passer d'agreables moments aux patients. 
Quel sera la resultat de ce mouvement, il est 
t-videmment impossible de le dire, mais a la 
requete des anciens et des chefs du village, 
le mandarin a fait aflficher une proclamation 
defendant a qui que ce soit d'ouvrir une bou- 
tique d'opium dans le village. 



Pri^re de mentionner ce |ournal en ecrivant aux personnes qui y font insurer des annonces. 



•> 



Export Implement Age 



19 




El capital invertido en cstablechimieiutos 

manufactureros americanos ascendio en 1904 

,.«x C..CUUA. Es E. .xTK.s,BKo so.AMB.TK, a k iumcusa suuia de $12,686,205.67300, 

P^6dico i..depend>ente. dedicado exclu.ivamtnte al (omento ^,,g^,n \oS recientes datOS eStadistlCOS puhhca- 

^*''^^^^^<^^.^^^^tl!:^-^^:^r^^^^'- ^j; p^^ 1^ oficina del Censo. Esto es un 

aumcnto de 41 por cicnto en cinco anos. El 
aumento en los productos fabriles file dc 30 
por ciento, habiendo llegado su valor total en 
1905 a $i4,8o2,i47.o87- 



Export Implement Age 



aperos de labraii/a y summisuos a cortijos, 

haciendas, insenioB de hater azucar, 

sitios de labor etc. 



Teneos Bien Informados 



PKECIO DB SUSCRIPClfiN : 
I afio, porte franco 



I Peso 



Remitase por giro sobre Nueva York 6 por Ubranza 
posul intemacional. 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 
loio Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa., E.U. del N.A. 

La misma firma pubUca el •• Implement Age" el "American 
••FertlUier," el •Carriage Monthly y el -VehicU Dealer, 
piopiedad legalizada por Ware Bros. Co. en i90f . 



Tomo XV. Filadelfia, E. O. de W. A., Octttbre de 1506. 



No. I 



La^ cxi...rtaciones de in^trumentos agricolas 
americanos durante el afiu fiscal que termin6 
el 30 de Junio I'dtimo ascendio a un total de 
$24,544,427.00, demostrandr. un aumento de 
20 por ciento sobre el ano de igo?- ^-^^ 

guadanadoras y segadoras componian la mitad 

En el Directorlo para Compradores, en la pri- ^^^ ^^^^ exportaciones. Las naciones que mas 
mera parte, haliaran nuestros lectores los In- , , , .^ - i„, TTctn,1n<; 

I^rmes en el Idloma espaflol. a fin de que puedan de estos articulos han comprado a los Esta.los 
entahlas una correspondencla mas satisfactoria ^/nidos durane los ultimos pocos anos son: 

..*r«« -nun^iantes. ^ ^^ Rcpublica Ahgentiua, por valor de $5.9<3.3.- 

714: Rusia, por $3,851,455'. Francia. $2,895,- 



Constanlemente se estan hacieiido mejora- 
mieiitos en la calidad y naturaleza de los instru- 
meiitos agricolas. Maquinas que no hace mu- 
chos anos eran consideradas como de niara- 
villosa perfeccion son hoy anticuadas. Le 
conviene. pues, al comprador extranjero te- 
nerse enterado sobre los ultimos mejoramien- 
los V mecanismos hechos en toda clase de 
maquinaria agricola, y por esta razon pueden 
-cr le incalculable valor los catalogos y de- 
mas impresos de propagande que ofrecen los 
fabricantes que se anuncian en la "Export Im- 
plement Age" para nuestros lectores del ex- 
tranjero. Todos nuestros ananciadores se ale- 
graran de suministrar sus catalogos y todos los 
in formes deseados. Se puede llevar la corres- 
pondencia en cualquier idioma. 



con nuestros anunciantes. 



Se esta discutiendo en Alemania el pro- 
yecto de celebrar una Exposici6n Universal en 
Berlin en 1912, y hay esperanzas de que se 
lleve a cabo ese proyecto. 



-43. y Alemania, $2,016,894. 

Un Gran Sifon de Riego 

Mucho interes ha cxcitado la aiiertura del 
gigantesco sifon que conduce el agua del 
Algunos de los fabricantes de buques bri- ^^^^.^j ^j^ j.^^^^ ^^ Aragon y Cataluna a traves 
tanicos declaran que los vapores mercantes se ^^ j^^ ^^jj^g ^^ gosa y Ribabona. llevandola 
pueden comprar hoy por menos de lo que cu- ^. ^egando mas de 247.000 acres de ticrra 
esta construirlos. Sin embargo durante el j^^^^^^ j,q^,j virtualmente esteriles por falta de 
mes de Mayo se afiadieron al Registro Brita- ^.j^^^ £, gran sifon consiste en dos tubos 
nico un total de 99 nuevos buques, la mayor n^aestros de H de milla de largo, y un 
parte grandes vapores con un total de 136,- aiametro de 12 pies 5 pulgadas. forrados con 



712 toneladas. 



PecuUaridades de los Submarinos 

Es casi tan dificil mantener el equilibrio de 
un submarino como cl de un aeroplano 6 
maquina de volar. I^s grandes submarinos 
modernos. dice Sir W. IL White, se sumergen 



planchas dc acero de 3 milimetros de espesor, 
reforzados con aros de hicrrn. y cncajonados 
en concreta. Los tubos ticnen capacidad para 
conducir 7.700 galones de agua por segundo. 



La Electriddad Atrae el Agua 

Una i.ropiedad singular, y gcneralmente 
nroa con unos timones horizontals manejados .Usconncida. de la corriente electnca es la 
cuando estan andando. Se hace bajar la Ha.nada ^^mosis electrica. Ina comen.e 
nor diestros marineros, v el submarino se ,,,rnen<l., hajo la tierra hara que el agtia. 
Leve oblicuamente hacia abajo. Al Uegar .,espaci.. v en poquena cantidad per supuesto, 
a la profundida.l deseada los timonek-^ tieiien ^urra cun ella en la direccion del electrodo 
.,^c nniujar In. timones horizontales de modo negativo. Durante algtmos expenmentos 
nue la nave mantenga practicamentc su nivel : hecli..s recientemente en Inglaterra .>. In/., 
^ , r,..li,la.l nr. hace sino undnlar para entrar el agua en un tubo vidriado puesto en 
""Z i > V^ Preciso que no se .ierra. K, a.ua pene.ro las parede. ;„ 1 t.bo 

i;;^. ■ n :^nt;;mbre ni lg.n peso dentro cuando se les pas6 la corriente electric. La 

nrinnde peso immediate Ekctrkd Kez-iczv sug.ere que se utilice esta 
,elanave.ncomp.. ^c. o.n.^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ 

la*, raiccs de las plantas. 
es mejor que el automatico. 

H<i«. .1 F.vor de M.ndon.r .1 Non,br. d. ..te PerUWico C«.ndo 



Orden Sobre las Tarietas Postales 

Se vera por la siguiente circular oficial que 
desde el mes de C^ctubre de 1907 se podra usar 
el lado izquierdo de la cara de las tarjetas 
postales y pictoricas para escribir comunica- 
ciones, lo mismo que el reverso. 

Como la Convencion Postal Universal 
celebrada recientemente en Roma, Italia, para 
el intercambio de la correspondencia adopto 
un convenio que empezara a regir desde el 
primero de Octubre de 1907 entre todos los 
paises de la Union Postal, en el cual se estipula 
que desde aquella fecha en adelante las 
tarjetas postales que contengan mensajes 
escritos en cl lado izquierdo del frente de la 
tarjeta. asi como en el reverso de la misma, y 
como estas son hoy admitidas en los correos 
j)or el prccio del franqueo apHcable a las 
tarjetas postales cambiadas entre los paises ; 

For la presente se ordena que las tarjetas 
jMtstalcs que lleven un mensaje en el lado 
ixMuurd.. del frente de la tarjeta— reservan- 
do>e el lado derecho para la direccion— con- 
teiiidas en las valijas de correo y en los 
i:.tad..- rni<l<- de ntro> pai-es ^can considera- 
das V tratadas como tarjetas postales: y 
ouan.lo il franqueo aplicable a las tarjetas 
pustales en el correo intemacional apercce en 
ella en una est.ampilla del valor cnmpleto de 
,l,clio franqueo. dicha tarjeta sea entrcgada 
;i la persona dirigida. sin cbrar nada mas 
como franqueo. 

GEORCE H. CORTELVOtJ, 

.-hlmniistrmior General dc Correos. 
Washington, D. C. June 28, 1906. 
Order No. 1047. 



se Conteste i lo« Anundofc 



.1 



ao 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



21 



La Buena Voluntad Sud&niericana 

l''.l SiTiil.ii 111 .If I'.siail'i, \lr. I\i">i, »st,i ,\v 

llltlsl I alhll I Sll tl III. In IMslil \ lilp.l/ l<.'|lll' 

Si'iil.ind' lie li'> lv-l.ii|i'^ I iihIm-, id I.i Aim rn";i 
del Siir I 1. 1 1 lailii pn inuiiii.iiiiln aiilc rl 
jiiuUlii siid.iiinrii aiiii iiunsaji's di' l)iu'iia xnl 
tllUail \ ill' a])ii\o lie paili- del |i|K'1i1i) 
di' liiN I'.-^ladii-^ I indci^. al i ual ii'pro 
sciila I'l utu'ialiiu'iilo I'.l lo^ulladii do sus ilis 
cui*sii>. piililii'tis V sii> ii'laciiinc> inTsoiiales y 
ciliciali's (.•on U>-< principaU's dipl<tiiuilict)s y 
lioinlirfs lie iH't;iH-ios dc Slid Auunca no put- 
dcii inciiDS i|!K' aiiiiu'iilai' los m-iiIiihk-iiIiis ilo 
amlUtiixa >• Inirna vnhuiiad qiu- iKMictictaran 
ri'CipriHMiiii-nIo la-- iiIuiimh-. rniii' 1'^ I. --la 
cU>s I nidus \ la- navi'nu- ^iidaiiui uana^ do un 
inodti matiiiai. I'.n iiiin ilc sus iltscuisu^ reci 
rules dijit tl Scci etaiia Kixit : 

"I'ls on rxlioino salisiaoti^riii nir do los labios 
di- lino do !vf^ nia- nuauiiU's diplmuatioM d* 
Siul Am#ica. Oo mio «pi« con«:e i fowlo la 

pohtJoa iiiioinat'i.Mial. una ilectanicipn tan 
jiHta »te la ttcuiud »le mi propia tiacion para «a 
sus lu'iuianas sudaiiioi icanass 

"l«i docluaiMou I'lC Monruo. hocba cti la in- 
fancia dc la IdHMiad dc la Aiiiorica l.aima. luc 
una dtvlaractAn al tnundo ontcro ile la cnupo 
UMU'ia do !''•> I .at m,' aMiiM uMih >v p.n.i u;''i''.v 
11.11 >o .1 I iu;-^i',, 's \ - - I o^in'oiiN i'-- pai^M. 
1'n.i .1-1 1 1 ion l.\ h.\ • •..unonuio -ioini>TO ni; imi-. 
\ nil pi I'^onoi.i .u'lii', iu'iio on ]vh:i' ptT i>b>i 
o\idoiuiar sn oroonoia en «pio l.i noiiI; 
a>|uolla .',•,' 1' i.--."i 'm sido plcnanu'r.;i 
nu>>trad,i , '.rrc>ivo de*nrro'' ■ io' 

our>o d.o I.I-- n.ivu 1 < Snu 

■%nicnca han pri>hado qiu' sii- '.OH.ionoi.i.-i ii.s 
ou>n,ia- \ -,:- oa|^cidadc* han -•.■!> v >or.in 
sionipii' .»di . . , . . . 

lilx-rtad 

r.Sti^V .iipU j I .1 ■ ' 

i'ara don'.^-trar u\:^ 



tiiniando ol indi>orot<i sistem de su fjobierno 
iiiliiinal lull ol i-i.ii>lcoiniionlo dc las na- 
i-Miu> iiidopondioiuo.s dc c.•^lc contineiUc ban 
ohiotndo luoraiisns niorcadns ])ara su conier- 
oiii. oMiplfii jiai.i >u-> loiiuToianios. comestibles 
para su». piulilns y rolni^io ]iara sus pi>bres y 
para ol -nlnanlo do ■-ns |w>hlaci<ines. 

"lUiniis boolu) mas ami ]M)r ollas. Hemos 
on>a\ail<< aqui sus experiinentos on sistcmas 
tk' ^ubicrno. ha accion relleja 'U' Ins oxpori- 
luenliis aniorioani»> on imhiioa s^nboriiativa so 
ha scntitlo en todos los pnisos do l".nropa sin 
oxoi'poiiiM. \ ha .-ido nniclio nias olicaz on SU 
inlluio (|iio ninunna otra eualidad ilol aniiL^un 
sisU'ina oolonial. \ hov nnosira prosjieriilad 
esUi aumentado nu prosperitUul. 

"I. is relaeiiMios eoiiierciales, y el canibio re- 
oiproco do ideas, en coniJciinientos. litcratura 
y artci cstji auiueuiando sus |ioiIeres. su activi- 
dad iiucleciual y «us fuenas comerciales. To* 
davta no8citr»», comoivial. esptritual e intelcc- 
tuabuontc sacanw* aJgo de sua acuiuulatlos 
le»on». 



Odessa y Nueva Yotk 

I'd \ ice-Consul Smith escribe de C)dcssa 
ipio se ales^ra dc que una linea de vapores va 
a ponor vaporos que con rcLTularidad nagan 
viajes cntro aquo! piiortip y Xouva ^'ork. Rsto 
I'acililara inuoln' ol onnu-roiM oiitio !os Estados 
L"iiid<is \ lo- puorios <k-l Mar Xot;ro, y posible- 
monto con los ])nortns dol Levantc y el Medi- 
Uiranoo. I )ioo .Mr. Smith: 

"Debiilo a la iniciativa dc Mr. Rzhavnski, 
directi>r dc la Russian Steam \a\ iLration and 
Tradintr Company." \a I'^.i cuiniiania a ostable- 
cer una liiioa diroota do sahorcs dc pasaicros 
\ carga emre CMms* y Nuova York, con 
hiKlucs adecuados jiara cl trans|>orte dc emi- 
grantos. I'uo de los vapores saldra dc aquel 
pticrio a fines de Septienibre, La duraciun 
del \ iaje de I Messa a Xueva York sera de 
veinte dias. Los vapores saldran de alii 
]^"rio<licatuente. Durante el resto del presente 
afw se enviaran dos vapores, y desfnws se 
Tenovanin las conumicaciones directas con 
America en la primavera del afio* proximo 
vcnidero. 



Ua tAio de |ab6n 

Sc dice qu* en el 1' si ado »le Wasbinuton 
liav un lajnt* de iab.'>n que flo » jMr«e a 

iMH^ilii itii.> I.Il: ' Sll- anu.l- 'r,,s !■■• r'v--, 

mas inau'ria niinor.al 
Mil: -.1-- ,l.:n.i- ,|o v'.irlshad > 'i \!.-: 



>luo ha hah 



;a ni:.i.;- 
- -vhu:., 



La Nuev& Zeiandia 



la 



s ropuiv 



cienio 






en jH- 


'il 


ii ^ ^ 


antic 






UUCs 






h.»>os 






•T. 


nil 


nu^s I'o 



Papel de Algodon 

Kl papel de alpodiSn es una de las novedades. 

r.l Sill- .■•!,', .k-iii. ustrando que con los tallos 

ill ai^;' il'iii SI. |)i!0(1o I'abricar papol on la 

iina dol paiiol do hilo ile todos srrados. flesde 

111. IS nn, 1 ha<ta ol mas inferior. K.sta cs una 

'■'■"'' " ■" ■■■ — ■'!\a a la do los ilemas 

ic osa planta. tales coino 

ol nuri.^eno, d material para la 

^•don V la jKilvora sin humo. Se 

re" de tierra que produce 

'. se puo'io i-htoner por 

- ' ' .1 iMio.uia lie tail's. Calculando 

■■ > '-ISC .-i iiticva Mi.iiistna puede 

'■■■'■> 1 .1 1 J.i < « 1.1 1. Ml ' ",l;i. las 

■ ■ ■ : ■ : ,;I afi'i. Ksti 1 . ;,i 

■ -■■' -1 o,i!i' ., materia prima 

noccsaria para satisiacer la demanda del 

- Inaii'o para 

' ■! la lornia ,io pulpa 6 

'■'•' ''ifto till iiiaiorial con- 

]>apcl on la actuali- 

. <i!o ^ una osjH'cio lic ',"!''"> i^ one 

> -■ . ' .iciondo m.i- . -■ ■ s:i 

■- ^ •!-, \ ^i •'<. manda 

- > >. --.i liiak ra para otros i;sos. 

K-.<'-\ ui. \;n pr.Hlncto que hasta aqui 

rdioiaha. ta! corno* li-*s talk^s del 

.;r.i la pnlpa del papel. sera un bene- 

■ s con ol aumento dc ■5ii 



'i)i 



Mudables Condidones Industriales 



• 



Hagase el Favor de Mendonar el Nombre de este Pen6dico Cuando se Conteste £ los Aoundot. 



..- V 



Los camhios que ti'.ncn lugar en las esferas 
industriales del mnndo son apenas mcnos 
interesantos (pic los camhios dc la supremacia 
politica. Llaman poco la atencion durante su 
curso, pero se ponen de manifesto cuando se 
echa una mirada al pasado sohro un conside- 
rable periodo de ticmpo. 

En concxion con este asunto un estadistico 
del Departamciito dc (.'oniccio y Trabajo ha 
compilado datos imiwrtantes. 

Hace veinte y cinco atios era indisputable 
la supremacia tie Inglaterra en la industria 
fabril del hierro y el algoon ; pero los productos 
de hierro de los Estados Unidos superan ho> 
a los de la Gran Bretana. En hierro estrnc- 
tural, OS fabricantes de Bdlgica venden m;'is 
barato sus productos que los de Inglaterra. 
Alemania ba llegado a ser el competidor m;\s 
formidable de Inglaterra en las manufacturas 
<le hierro y acero. U)s arscnales navales les 
quitan siis contratos A los constructores 
navales dc Ik-liast y cl Clyde. I.os vapon- 
mas grandes const ruidos en aiios recientes 
salen de los arsenales navales alemanes. 

Los manufactureros alemanes o-tan sohci- 
tando cada vez mas el patrocinio de su gobierno 
para librarse de la depen.lencia de los ma- 
teriales de hierro y acero britanicos. En la 
produccion de Lis articulos mas fines, talcs 
como los de la cucbillaria. los alemanes com- 
piten con feliz exito con los ingleses en los 
mercados extranjeros. 

En las manufacturas <le algodon son todavia 
mas notables los cambios que se estan efec- 
tuado. Xo hace mas que quince anos quo 
la €,ran Ureta'-i-i tenia en operaci6n mnchisim.. 
mas de la mitad de todos los telares del mundo. 
Hoy tiene mucbo menos do la mitad. Durante 
los'ultimos veinte alios el aumento de los husos 
britanicos ha sido de cosa de un 6 por cicnto. 
En el contincnte europeo y en los Estados 
Unidos el aumento en el numcro de telares 
durante el mismo tiempo ha sido ctiatro veces 
mayor, mientras que en la India esc aumento 

ha sido dc nil "O P""" ci^?"*^- 

El desarrollo dc las manufacturas dc algndon 
en el lejano Oricnte csta pro-r<sando a un 

rapido paso. 

La China, la India y cl Japon han aumcnta-lo 
inmcns.amente sus produccioncs, a pesar de la 
insegura cnndicion .k' k-s asuntos pol.ticos del 



Oricnte, y si no compiten lodavia en los mer- 
cados del mundo, pronto abasteccran en gran 
parte sus propias necesidailes, 

Los japoneses (los "Yankees" del Orientc) 
l)rometen justificar su titulo a este nombre por 
su dcstreza y capacidad industriales, asi como 
por otras aptitudes. Son habilcs, asiduos y 
cabales en todo lo que bacon. Las exhibiciones 
industriales del Japon en anos recientes han 
asonibrado a los observadores extranjeros por 
la variedad y excelencia dc sus productos 
fabrilcs. Xo solo se hace aparente su gran 
progreso industrial, sino que tambien ban 
adoptado, cojiiado v hasta mejorado los pro- 
ductos curopcos y americanos. 

I'.ii csas exhibiciones ban mostrado genercra 
,1c Ian a, lonas y los mas fuertes tejidos <lc 
algiKlon; cables y cordcleria, alfombras de 
algodon y dc caiiamo; notables, exhibiciones 
dc productos quimicos. perfumeria ; ccpillos y 
articulos tie tcx'ador ; balanzas, desde las mas 
enormes para ])esar carros de ferro-carril 
cargados hasta las mas delicadas de gabinete; 
lamparas y cristaleria ; relojes de repisa 6 pared 

V de bolsillo; instrumentos de encuadernadores 

V de imprenta; habilitaciones de cscuela ; y 
toda clase de instrumentos y maquinas, desde 
las mas perfecciona<las para la agricultura 
hasta la mas fina cuchillerea. instrumentos 
(piirurgicos y matematicos. 

Xo solo fabrican todas esas cosas en el 
Japon como en America 6 en Europa sino que 
tambien construyeii la niaquinaria para 
bacerlas. 

Hasta el presente no ha habido con el Japon 
tratados ipie protejan las invenciones de 
l)atente de las naciones occidentales, y los 
ingeniosos artcsanos japoneses estan acostum- 
brados a copiar y reproducir los inventos (|iie 
(pucren. El afio pasado. sin embargo, negocio 
este Gobierno tratados con aquel Imperio 
Insular, con cl objecto de proteger los inventos 
y dererecbos dc .lutor norte-americanos. 

La compelcncia dc los japoneses es cosa 
seria para las demas nacionos. porquc la mano 
dc obra en el Japo sc ji.iga .a jiocii nias dc dicz 
centavos al dia. 1 ..is nooosidados dc sus 
ohroros son muy cscasas. v alii son dosoono- 
cidos 1ms oreniios dc trahajadoros, 1- rlaro 
pini s (juo I'ls manufactureros lU- l<- k.-tados 
rniil.is V lie I'.uropa ticncn quo oontar oon 
una oomiiotoncia dc i>artc <k'l Ta]Hin (juo incluyc 
kis okmontos lie ingoniosid.id, intcligencia. 
produoi.- o-.cilonto-;. V un oxtr.aordinariamente 
ha jo cost I- do produccion. 



Vapor Brasileno 

l-.l I" mba jailor Griscom in forma desde el 
r.rasil ipie la Brazilian Lloyds Steamship Com- 
panv ha ostablccitlo un scrvicio mensual de 
vapon s p;na [tasajcros entre Rio de Janeiro y 
Xui'va ^llrk. I'* I primer vapor, "Goya," de 
nil portc do 4,o<>i • loneUulas, salio de alii cl 25 
do .\''osto. 



Encotniendas Postales con el Peru 

I'.l Ailiiiinistra<lor dc Comoos < icneral in- 
torino amincia quo sc ba cclebrado con el 
I'oni un iratado (|uo cinpczij a llcvarsc a efecto 
cl 10 lU' Scjuiembre para el intercambio entre 
cl I'orh V los lvsia(k>s Lnidos de cucomicmlas 
{KWtatei. Los jjaipietes no debcn exceder un 
pc<o do I I lihras. un largo de 3'!', 6 un largo 
oomhinado con sii circumferencia'de 6 pies; 
l".l valor dol conteniilo no debe pasar de $50.00. 
l.as valijas dc los paipietes para cl Peru se 
Iknar.'in en las .idministraciones de correos de 
Xticva York y de San Francisco. Esto ha de 
ser una gran conveniencia para nuestro comer- 
cio con el I'crii. 



La Exposidon de Nueva Zeiandia 

La Exposiciim Intcrnacional de Xueva Ze- 
iandia. quo -0 alirc on cl mes de Xovieinbre. 
jiromete ser un aconteciihiento dc mayor 
importancia que jam.'is ha toni<k» lugar en la 
Australasia. 

El espacio total de k)S tcrrenos concedidos 
.1 los comisionados para la Exposicion es de 
114 "acres," y todo indica que toda esa aroa 
sera cubicrta por los edificos requeridos para 
completar los atractivos de las exhibiciones. 



La Cosecha de Tabaco Griego 

1:1 Consul Geoge Horton, de Atenas, escrilje 
que la cosecha de tabaco de Grecia en i'>'5 
fuc la mas grandc que jamas sc ha obtcniilo 
on Crocia. habiendo sido de i<>8.000,ooo de 
lihr.is. I'.so t.ahaco tiene una gran demanda 
ou I'.gipto jiara la manufactura do cigarrillos, 
ospccialmonto la i- .socha do la niarca "Sary." 
.Mcjandria, l"..uil>to, tiene on almaccn 25,000 
toroi.is do grado intorior. La mayor parte de 
liis cigarrillos dc l-'.gipto -m hechos jior 
(■,■■ p-rquo ol piapol do (-i.qarrillo cuosta 

ikin;iM,i.io 00 C.rooia, dondo o-lo articuli) es 
ini motioj.olin del Gobierno, I-.m,, ha ol.luadn 
a ii.hor uso ,W un papol m.is liarato, y de 
consiguientc tic calidad inferior, con la pordida 
do una industria para Grocia v una ganatioia 
para l-.L'ii>i". i>uos la niavor parte Ac Ins fahri- 
c:uitos do cigarrillos do Kgiptn son hoy gricgos. 



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I 



Evoiucion de un& Idea 

El 10 (Ic Marzu fuc cl tri^a*sinio aniversario 

del dia eii que cl inviiitur tkl tokiDiiu y su 
asistentf oycrun ol primer mensaje telefonico. 
El lugar fuc cl cuarto piso de una casa de 
huespedcs de Boston, donde durante un ano 
se habian estado haciendo los experimentos. 
Fue en 1874 cuardo Alexander Graham Bell, 
profesor de fisiologia vocal de la Universidad 
de Boston sc convencio <lc que varies mensajes 
telcfjraficos de piintos \ rayas de ^Morsc sc 
podian transmitir al misnio titmpo [wr un solo 
alambre. Haciendo experimentos sobre el 
particular, le ocurrio luego la idea de utilizar 
la vibracion sinipatica de los alambres acorda- 
dos el uno con el otro. Empezando con los ex- 
perimentos del tcleprafo armonico en 1874 y 
en su propio cuarto con resortes de reloj como 
parte principal de su aparato, gradualmente 
llego a ocuparse en los aparatos electro-mag- 
neeticos. Fue entonces que llego a convencerse 
de la posibilidad de telcgrafiar la palabra habla- 
da, Y anuncio a sus asociados el verdadero prin- 
cipio de que semejante transmision dependeria 
de un instrumento que aseguarara vibraciones 
analogas. El 2 de Junio de 1875 logro Bell 
enviar la cantidad del sonido por medio de 
la electricidad, y cl siguiente mes dc Marzo 
recibio el primer mensaje hablado en su 
huniilde habitacion. 

En el genesis del telefono se puede scguir 
la evoiucion dc la idea a pasos intermitcntes. 
A la vcrdad la idea original tuvo una trans- 
formacicjn, y no sc espcraban algunoos dc los 
rcsultados, piro la concepcion principal era 
exacta. El t'--talliilo dc un rcsorte fuc el 
primer suniijo rcpruduciilo con cxactitud, 
pero se hahian cchado los cimicntos, y 
las condicioncs btiscada? fueron reconocidas 
cuan<lo se cncontraron. .Mucbas dificultades 
espccialcs bupo que invcstigar y veneer antes 
de (iarse al ])iiblico cl invento, y por mucho 
ticmpo despucs bubo que combatir obstaculos 
dificiles de supcrar. Al fin y al cabo llegaron 
a ser tan seguros los mensajes telefonicos, que 
el siguiente vcrano se cxhibio el invento en la 
Exposicion del Centenarin en Filadclfia. En- 
tre los (|ue li> exaininarun sc hallaba un 
eminente bombre de cicncia inc;les. I^rd 
Kelvin, quicn exprcs/i su dclcitc y dio el 
siguiente informe: "F,sta es la mayor inara- 
villa hasta aqui rcalizada prir el telegrafo 
elcetrico y solo con un aparato casero y rudi- 
mentario." En el (4ono del siguiente ano se 
transmitieron distintamente mensajes telefo- 



nicos put un alambre de dos millas de largo 
cntrc Boston y Cambridgeport. 

I iia compania organizada para introducir el 
uso coniercialnicnte del telefono empczo sus 
operacioncs en la primavera de 1877, y poco 
despues trato Bell de enviar mensajes tele- 
fonicos entre Boston y Nueva York; pero las 
lineas de larga distancia no tuvieron buen 
exito hasta que un inventor introdujo el uso 
del alambre de cobre tensamente tendido. Las 
condicioncs requeridas son hoy objccto de 
vieja liisliiria cuando r.u^tnn pue.le tener una 
conversacion por el telefono con Omaha ; pero 
mucbas fueron las criticas circunstancias en 
que los experimentos indicaban el fracaso de 
ciertas de las utilidades del telefono que hoy 
son cosas comunes. En sus primeros anos se 
considero el telefono como una mera curiosi- 
dad ; pero en la actualidad sus suscritores se 
cuentan a millones. Hoy va a las fincas de 
campo, asi como a las ciudades y las aldeas y 
es una parte intimamente integrante de la vida 
social y comercial. Grande es la deuda del 
mundo a los inventorcs americanos, cuvo 
ingciiio \ actividad es una cspecie de ins- 
piracii'm. Xo siempre realizan sus ideas, pero 
nunca sc quedan atras en alcanzar la verdad 
epic se halla en el fonUo del pozo. — Scientific 
Americcm, 



CI Pro^reso de China 

El progreso en la China se ha mostrado 
recientemente de un modo notable, si no 
singular. El pueblo de una pequcna poblacion 
de la provincia de Eukien ha cdcbrado un 
"meeting," en que se rcsnhio dcstruir cl 
habito de fumar opio. Por indicaciini de ilos 
hnmbres que habian ido al hospital dc la ciudad 
dc luichan para curarse de los cfcctos de 
fumar opio, se dirigieron cartas al administra- 
dor del hospital supliciUKlole que vinic^e a 
Asiong a ayudarles en su enipresa. I'na de 
las cartas contcnia un convenio csmerada y 
re>-pttui>>aniente redactad'> y firmado pnr los 
ancianos y Ins ni.is di^tini^uiilds habitantes de 
aqucl pm-hlip. I'.l (|<nti r Wilkinson, que 
cucnta esta historia en cl Churcli Missionary 
fiitclligcnccr. dc Jnlio. de consiguiente, fue a 
a(piclla ])oblaciiin y hallo que practicamente 
tndo cl ])uel)l(> ansiaba aquella reforma. 
b'.n una reuni(')n dc los mas notables habitantes 
los niisnios tendero que vendcn opio de- 
clararon epic cstaban dispuestos a abandonar 
la venta del n|iii>. y cincuenta pesos se coolec- 
taron para comprar medicinas. En el mes de 
Marzo se convirtio en hospital el palacio 



hereditario de la villa, y se admitieron setenta 
y nucve pacientes de los efectos del opio, 
hacicndose cargo de nueve mujeres en otro 
lugar una senora de la Mision, Estas fueron 
asi St i< las por tres semanas, en cuyo tiempo 
sulo dos se desanimaron y dejaron la enfer- 
meria. Diariamente por la mafiana y por la 
noche se celcbraron oficios religiosos, aumen- 
tando cada dia el intcres en el canto de himnos 
religiosos y los sencillos relatos de pasajes i,|i 
de la Biblia. Durante el dia se alivio el tedio 
de los pacientes con exhibicions de la linterna 
magica y del graniofono. Cual sera el resultado 
de cse movimiento es, por supuesto, dificil de 
predecir; pero a solicitud de los mas viejos y 
l)rincipales de aquel pueblo el mandrin de la 
localidad expidio una proclama prohibiendo 
que se vt)lviese a abrir ningima tienda de opio 
en la villa. 



Puntos sobre Bombas 

Muchos comcrciantes en ferreterias v ma- 
quinaria de los paises extranjeros, asi como de 
los Estados L'nidos, han hallado que las bom- 
bas y los instrumentos ile levantar hcno dc 
bucna calidad son articulos deseables para 
comerciar con ellos, activando su venta. 

One los manufactureros estan dispuestos y 
dcscosos de hacer todo lo que pueden para 
ayudar a los cotnerciantes a obtener su parte 
de las utilidades en este negocio, se ha indicado 
a menudo en los articulos recientes que 
aparcccn en estas columnas. 

En conexion con esto F. F. Myers & Bro., 
de Ashland, Ohio, (pic tienen una oficina de 
Expnrtacion en I:'.-2i Produce Exchange. New 
York, publican un interesante librito titulado 
■■punt(i> solne las Bombas," que tiene por 
objeto instruir a los compradores y vendedores 
que compran y venden bombas. 

La tirma sugiere la importancia de concretar 
los comcrciantes sus esfuerzos a una clase de 
mercancias de primera calidad, la venta de las 
cuales Irs atraera los mejores y mas lucrativos 
negocjns. 

De este modo se inverting menos dinero, se 
leiidra nunos perrlidas en las partes de re- 
l)uestc> iinendihles y menos confusion de im- 
jircsos. y tcniendo una sola clase de articulos, 
l"s empleados ii .lependientcs sc familiarizaran 
con clli.v, s(. piKlr.'i mantcner los precios bajo 
ima base iii.is prn\ oclm^.i. y se ascgurara asi 
la cstabilidad de uu nei^nx-io que no se les 
I)odra quitar con facilidad. 

Ademas de las sugestiones generales sobre 
el asunto dc las bombas, el librito ilustra 
muchos valinsos puntos de su extcnso ramo. 

T<a firma tondr.i mucho gusto en enviar un 
ejemplar de esc librito a todo comerciante que 
se intercse y lo solicite. 



Export Implement Age 

NUR PUR'S AOSLAND BESTIMMT. 

Bin unabhaneigM Blalt, das ausschliesslich dem Exporthandel 

in laiidwirtBchaftlichcn Maschinen, I'umpen, Wind- 

motoren und sammtlichen Artikeln der Land- 

und Milchwirlichaft gewidmet i»t. 



Abonnements-Prsis : 
Fiir ein Jahr, portolrel 



Mk. 4.3S 



G«lder konnen per Tratteauf New York oder durch inlcr- 
oationale Postanweisung ubersandl werden. 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 

10 10 Arch street, 

Phltodclpbia, P«., Verdnlgte Staatcn von Nerd-Amerika. 

Von derselben Verl»Bsan«UU werden ferner herauagegeben- 

"The Implement Age rhe American Fertiliier " "The 

Carriage Monthly" und "The Vehicle Dealer." 

Verlagarecht (copyright) von Ware Bros. Co., 1906. 



keinerlei Privilegien, die es nicht frei jeder 
amerikanischen Republik einverleihen inochte. 
Diese Rede wurde herzlich empfangcn und 
glatibt man, dass es sehr dazu beitragen werde 
etwa existirende Zweifel betrefTs event. 
Zwecke der Vereinigten Staaten zu verscheu- 
chen. Herr Root benutzte diese Konferenz 
Tagung um den diversen Hauptstiidten der 
sudamerikanischen Republiken Besuche abzu- 
statten. Er wurde audi iTberall aufs Herz- 
lichste und Wamiste empfangcn. 



Band XV. Philadelphia, VereinigteSUaten.Oktober. 1906. No. i 



Im Firmenverzelchnte fur Kaufer das im ersten 
Thell dieses Blattes wledergegeben'lst, werden 
unsere geehrten Leser die betreflenden Waaren- 
artikel in deutscher Sprache wledergegeben 
flnden. Es geschleht dies um Ihnen die Mog- 
llchkeit zu geben, mit unseren Inserenten leichter 
korrespondiren zu konnen. 



Nach einem jiingst vom "Census Bureau" 
gemachten Anschlage belief sich das angelegte 
Kapital aller amerikanischen Fabriken in 
1904 auf 12,686,265,673 Dollar. Dies beweist, 
dass es sich wahrend der letzten fiinf Jahre 
um 41 Proz. erweitert hat. Der Gewinn an 
Fabrikationsprodukten betrug 30 Proz. Der 
Totalbetrag fiir 1904 belief sich auf 14.802.- 
147.087 Dollar. 



Ein grosser Bewasserungs-Syphon 

I'ngeheueres Interesse wird der vor Kurzeni 
stattgehabten Eroffnung eines riesigen Sy- 
phons geschenkt, der das Wasser von 
dem Aragon und Catalonia Bewasser- 
ungskanal iiher die Tha'^er von Sosa 
und Ribabona hinuberleitet. Vermitttelst 
dieser Leitung wird das Wasser iiber 
247.000 Morgen Landes gezogen, das bisher 
wegen Bewasserungsmangels vollstandig un- 
fnichtbar gewesen ist. Dieser grosse Syphon 
besteht aus zwei Hauptrohren, ^ Meile lang, 
12 Fuss 5 Zoll in Durchschnitt. Dieselben 
sind mit Stahlplatten, 3 Millimeter dick, 
gefiittert, mit Eisenbandern gebunden und mit 
Beton gedcckt. Die Rcihren haben eine 
Kapazitat von 7.700 Gallonen Wassers die 
Sekunde. 



Ein brasilianischcr Dampfcr 

Unser Gesandter, Herr Griscom, berichtet 
aus Brasilien, dass die Brasilianische Dampf- 
schif?ahrts-Gesellschaft "Lloyds" einen mona- 
tlichen Schiffsverkehr zwischen Rio de Janeiro 
und New York ins Leben .gerufen habe. Der 
erste diesbezugliche Dampfer "Goyas" 4000 
Tons Gehalt, segelte am 25, August. 



Eigentiimlichkeiten in Submarines 

Es ist fast ebcnsoschwer fiir ein Submarin- 
boot als fiir ein Luftschiff das Gleichgewicht 
aufrccht zu erhalten, bemerkt Herr W. H. 
White, denn 'der Akt des Untertauchens findet 
statt, wcnn die Schiffe Schnelligkeit aufrcch- 
terhalten konnen. Der Bug wird durch 
horizontale Ruderhantirt die von geschickten 
Mannern geleitet werden, alswann des Schiff 
sich schrag hcrunter senkt. Xachdem die 
gewiinschte Tiefe ereicht wordem ist. muss der 
Steuermann die horizontalcn Ruder derart 
lenken. dass das Schiflf die erforderliche 
v\agrechte Ebene, sein Niveau, aufrccht 
erhalten kann. Der SchiflFskours wird', jedoch, 
ein gar wellenformiger weil dasselbe sich auf- 
und abbewegt. Es darf im Schiflf weder 
Menschen-noch Gewichtsbewegung stattfin- 
den, es sei denn, dass sofort ein Gleichgewicht 
zur Hand ist, um dasselbe wiederherstellen zu 
konnen., soil nicht das Schiff in verderben- 
bringende Tiefe tauchen. Es wurde gefunden 
dass Hadkontrollc besser als automatische 
KontroUe sich hierbei erwics. 



Die amerikanischen Republiken 

In einer Rede vor der Spezialsitzung der 
Pan-Amerikanischen Tagung in Rio de 
Janeiro, versicherte Staats-Sekretar Root den 
anwesenden Repriisentanten der Latein-Ameri- 
kanischen Republiken, dass die Regierung 
der Vereinigten Staaten keineswegs nach 
weiterem Territorium strebe und mit dem 
eigenen Besitztuni voUkommai zufrieden set. 
Die Vereinigten Staaten. versicherte er. 
wurden die Rechte der schwiichsten Nationen 
mit demselben Respekt behandcln wie die der 
grossten Kaiserreiche. denn es strebe nach 



Eine Riesenstimme 

Wahrend der Festlichkeitsfeier der Som- 
mersonnenwende, wurde auf der Spitze des 
Eifehurmescinungewohnlich machtiger Mcga- 
phon errichtet, welcher imstande war die 
menschliche Stimme eine Distanz von fast zwei 
Meilen zu tragen. Es war dies ein neues 
Mittel die gutn Pariser zu belustigen. 
Qieser Apparat ist die Erfindung der Herren 
Laudet und Gaumont. Die ungeheuere Mach- 
tigkeit der Stimme wurde vermittelst einer 
Anzahl Explosione verpu After Gase zustande 
gebracht. Die Detonatione werden im Kreis- 
lauf sowohl als in der Starke von den 
Bewegungen des GriflFcls geleitet. welcher das 
phonographische Register das die Original- 
geprage der tonenden Schwingungen leitet, 
aufnimmt. Je nachdem eine grossere oder 
geringere Gasquantitat eingefiihrt wird, kann 
die Stimmenintensitat verschiedenartig gestal- 
tct werden. Vermittelst dieser Maschine kann 
man Worte die in eincm gewohnlichen Tone 
gesprochen werden in einer Entferiiung von 
^00 Fuss dcutlich horen. 



Odessa und New York 

Herr \ice-Konsul Smith schreibt aus 
Odessa und driickt seine Zufriedenheit dariiber 
aus, dass endlich eine Schiffslinien Verbindung 
zwischen den Odessaer und New Yorker 
Hiifen ins Leben gerufen wurde. Dadurch 
werden die Handelsbeziehungen zwischen den 
Vereinigten Staaten und den, Hafen des 
schwarzen Meeres bedeutend gestarkt werden 
und diirfte sich, moglicherweise, aufs Mor- 
genland und Mittelmeer hinauserstreckcn. 
Herr Smith schreibt : 

"Mit Bezugnahme auf die Initiative des 
Herra A. Rzhevuski, Direktor der russischen 
Dampfschiffahrts- und Handelsgesellschaft, 
soil von gen. Kompagnie eine direkte Pas.sa- 
gier- und Waarenlinie ins Leben gerufen 
werden, deren Zweck es sein soil DampfschiflF- 
verbindungen zwischen Odessa und New York 
regelmassig zu unterhalten, der sich gleichfalls 
cine Abteilung fiir Emigrantentransportation 
anschliessen soil. Die Dauer der Fahrt von 
Odessa nach New York ist auf zwanzig Tage 
bercchnet, die Dampfer werden periodisch 
ihren BcstioMnungsort verlassen. Es ist besch- 
lossen worden zwei Dampfer wahrend dieses 
Tab res noch abzufertigen. Nachher werden 
die rcgelmarsigcn Verbindungen mit Amerika 
im Friihling niichsten Jahres wieder aufge- 
nomnien werden." 



Hagase el Favor de Mendonar el Nombre de este Peri6dico Cuando se Conteste a los Anundos. 



E. WW *.be,e«. Uch bei .v.n.„rfl« Be»twort«n« i. die«n. »!.... .n.hM..«r A„»ii.n .ul dl,» ZeitKhrif. b«zi.h.n zu woU... 



..'U 



22 



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Cvolucion de un& Idea 



VA lo tit.' Mar/i) tiu- cl irii^i-siiiiK .iiiivrr.-ianu 
del »li:i I'll t|uc (.1 iiU(,-nt"r <U1 IiIi'I'iuki y -n 
asistenti- iiycnm il priiiUT iiR'n^ajc ukli'micit. 
HI hij^jar Im- cl cuario pi-M lU- una la-a lU- 
huesiJfiU's (Ic r.dslim. dondo dnraiUi- tin afii' 
sc liahian i-stadu liacit.-nd<i I is i\ii(.i"inR'iiti"~. 
I-'ut' I'll 1S74 ciiardu Alrx.iiKk-r (indiaiii I'.'ll. 
prnfc-^iir dc t'isiiiluL;ia vccal dc la I 'iiivoi>idad 
de Hostnn si- cdiivt'iicin ik- qiu- varins mensajcs 
telcjiraficds dc ]iuiUii'- y rayai^ ik- M(>r<<.- '^r 
podiaii tratisniilir al nit--iiii" lieiiiiin |Mir 1111 ^"I'l 
alanibre. llacictidi> oxinriiiietitos «i)krc e! 
particular, le dcnrrin liiL'.m_p la iilia <\i titili/ar 
la vihracion sinipalica dc k>s alanikrus aci>rila- 
dos cl uiii) cmi v] I'lri'. I-'jiiiK-zando d 11 1"- v-x- 
perimenlus dil lik'^rafo arniuiiicn en 1S74 y 
en su iiriipii) cuario en rc^drtcs de vv\<''\ i'Itii) 
parte princijjal de sii aparal'i. {irailualnuntc 
Uegu a ociiparse en los aparatos elcctrn-map^- 
neetic'i-^. kiu- ini"nc(.- que lle;^i'i a curneiicerse 
de la pii-ikilidid dc tckirrafiar la palahra liakla- 
ila. y anuncii'i a sus asociad'i- d vcrd-idrr<' firin- 
cipio de qne scmejantc transniision depcndcria 
de nil iiistruinciito que ascj^narara vibracioncs 
analojjas. El 2 dc Jmiiu <le 1875 lojjro Bell 
envinr la canti<!ad del sonid<» ]K)r niedi" de 
la electricidad, y cl -ii^uiciite mo ik' Marx" 
recibi(') el primer nien^aje liablado en su 
huuiikle habitacion. 

En el genesis del telefono se pucdc sejjnir 
la evolucion de la idea u pasos intcrmitentes. 
A la vcrdad la idea original tuvo una tran^- 
formacii'tn, y 110 se esperaban al.LjuiKK'v ,U li- 
resultadns, jiero la conccpcion princiiinl era 
exacta. I'd estallido dc tin iivuric mc cl 
primer Miiiiclo rc|iri'ilncidii con cxaciitnd, 
pern -I- h.diian icliadu ]"-. cimicntu-, v 
las ciindicii lUi -• l)n--i-ada- liicfun rcc aii 'ci'las 
cnan<lii -<• ciici 'Utraf' ni. Mnclia- ijilictiltades 
c-jicciak- liu|i'> que in\isti<,sar v \ciiccr antes 
de dar-e al puMicn v\ iiiventd. y jmr mnchn 
tiemi"' ik~]'Mi- Indi.' que cdmbatir nhstaculi >- 
difirilcs flc sniH-rar. Al fiii y al calm llec^aron 
a scr tan si-liuI'i- ]< - nn u-aies telefonicos. que 
el si^niciitc \eraiii' n' > xhiliii', d JTuentd en la 
Kvp'isicii 111 del (.'enti'iiarii I en k iladeltia. kai- 
tre ki'~ <pie 1" cxaiiiinariiu ^e hallaka nn 
I'minenle lionihre ik cicncia in^k-. I ,• ird 
Ki'lvin, (piieii (Xprc'ii -n dclcitc y din el 
si^uicntc infi'inie: "l'"sta i- la mayor niara- 
villa hasta aqui realizada jior el tele^^rafo 
eleetrico v si'do con un aparati» ra^eni v rudi- 
mcntarin." kji el i4ono del simiiente afm «e 
transmiticnm distintaincnte mcnsajes telcfo- 



nicos pur un alanibre de dos millas de largo 
ciitre i!()si(juy Canibridgeport. 

I'lia com])ania organizada para introducir cl 
iisu comcrcialmcnte del telefono eiiipezu sus 
operaciones in la primavera de 1877, y poco 
des]iues train Ik'll dc en\iar mcnsajes tele- 
li'iiiiciis eiiiie I'.ii-tiin y Xneva York; pcro las 
linear de lari;a disiancia no tuvieron biieii 
exilu lia.-ta (pie nn inventor introdujo cl uso 
del alambrc cl( (.Mkre leiisamentc teudido. Las 
coiidicifiiics requerida> -nn lio\ ojijieto dc 
\ieia hi^tiiria cuamki I'.i-idii ptude teller una 
ci 'nvi-r-aeitiu pur el tclelinn C' 'ii < hualia : pern 
mnclias lnernii la> eritiea- circiinstancias en 
que In- ex]urimentn- iiidirakan el l'raea--u cie 
eiirta^ de ]a> utilidreie^ ik.l leki'niio que Imv 
-nil cnsas cnniune>. l-'.n -',!- jirimcros auos >e 
consitk'ro el tiki'min cnm, . -.ma niera curin-i- 
dad ; ]perii en la actuali<lad -u- -u-rri'.nre^ -e 
eueiitan .i miUniu-. IIn\ \a .1 la- liucas de 
campn, a-i enmo a las cinda'k's \ las aldca> v 
e> una parte intimanieiite inteL;rante de la vida 
uncial y cniiitTcial. (irande es la dmda dc! 
mtindo ri ln> invcntori'> amcricaiin-, ciuo 
ini;eino y aetividad e- una c-pecie di' in-- 
piracinii. .\n -i(.'ni|ire rrakvan -us idr:,s. pirn 
miiiea -e qnedan atr.'i- <n au-an/ar la xer.iad 
que ^(.- lialla en el I'micln del p'JZn.^^'c/ci(/;>/\- 
.■Uiierican. 



El Progreso de China 

b'.l ]irn.;r(-(i iu la fliina se ha ninstradn 
rccientenu nie di- un nindu notable, sj nn 
siupilar. k'.l ]>uebln de una pcquefia |inblaci(ni 
de la prnvincia dc Eukien lia celebradn un 
■'meeting, ■■ en que sc rcsoh io destruir el 
habito dc funiar opin. Tor indicaeii'iti de dos 
lininlires i\'Ac liahiau ido al Im-pital de la eiu<l:id 
de l'"uelian para ctirar-e dc los cf.i in- de 
fnmar npi,,, ^i- diri^ieri.ii ra'ia- al administra- 
■ inr del lln-pit;d -iljilicand' >ie que \ illie>-e a 
X-iniiLT a ayudark - en -n i-inpre-a. I iia de 
la- carta- enntiiii.i un oniixi-uin > -nierada %' 
re-pi !i!n-aniciili' redactadn \ tlrmadn por k'- 
aneiano- y h- nia- ili-linijuidn-, liabitaiite- de 
aqiu'l ])ueliln. Id dnetnr Wilkinson, que 
i.-uiuta esta lii-Inr;:! mi el ( Jturch M ixsinnavv 
luti-lli-^iiiiCr. d(.' [ulin. d, cnnsiMiiiontc. luc a 
aqucUa jinbl'icinn \ halln ipie practicameiite 
tniln cl ]iue1iln an-ialia aquella rcforma. 
I'.ii uii;i reuninii de In- nia- U'ptablcs liabitantcs 
ln> misiiin- teudein (pie \andeii opin dc- 
elararon (|ne cstaban dispuestos a abandonar 
la vciita del npin. \ riiicuenta pesos sc coolcc- 
tamn p.ara cniiiprar mcdicinas. En el mes de 
Marzo sc convirtio en hospital el palacio 



hcrcditario de la villa, y se admitieron setenta 
y nucvc pacicntes dc los efcctos del opio, 
liaeicndosc cargo rlc nueve miijeres en ctro 
luL^ar una -cfmra dc la Mision. Estas fueron 
a-i-tidas pnr tres semanas, en ciiyo tiempo 
Mill) do- -e de-auimaron y dcjaron la enfer- 
mena. 1 )iariamcntc juir la manana y per la 
iine!i< -e cclebraroii oticios rcligiosos, aumen- 
tamln eada dia cl iiitcrcs en el canto de himnos 
reliL;in-n- y In- -encilkis relatos de pasajes 
ik la I'.iblia. hmaiue el dia se aliviu el tedio 
<le In^ ]iaeieiite> cnii exhibiciuns de la linterna 
niauica \ del u;ramnl'niio. (.'ual sera cl rcsultado 
Ic e-e iiinviinientn (.•-, pnf supuesto, dilicil de 
jireileeir: jhio a sulicitud dc los mas viejos v 
;iriniq)ale.- de aquel |nublu el mandrin dc la 
in.aliilad ex])iilin tiiia jimclama prohibicndo 
que -e \ n|\ ic.--.,- ., akrif iiinguna tieuda dc npiu 
< n la \illa. 



Puntos sobre Bombas 

-Muelin., cniiierciamcs en fcrrctcrias v ma- 
quinaria de In- p.aises cxtranjeros, asi cniiio de 
in- I.-iadn- L nidu-. hau liallado que las bom- 
ba- y In- instnimentos dc levantar hcno de 
kiiena calidad -on ariiculos deseables ]iara 
.n' H reiar cnn cUos, activando su venta. 

<Jue In- mamilacturcros estan dispucstos v 
deseosii- de liaccr tudo lo que pueden para 
ayudar a lus cumerciantes a obtener su parte 
de las iitilidadcs en este negocio, se ha indicado 
a mcnudo en los articulos recieiitcs (pie 
apanccn en estas coluinnas. 

\-.n conexiun con csto F. F. Myers & Bro., 
de Asliland, ( )liio, <|ue tienen una oficina de 
I'.xpnrtacion cu B-ji Produce Exchange. N'ew 
\ork, publican uu interesantc librito titulado 
■'l'untn> -nbrc las Bombas," que ticne por 
u-truir a lo.s compradurcs v veiidednre- 
(pt( e .inpraii y vendcn bombas. 

ka tirnia -ugicre la impurtancia (.le concrctar 
In- e, nil rcianie- -us csfucrzos a una clase de 
niercaiii la- dc primcra calidad, la venta de las 
euali'- k- alracra kis meiores v ni.is lucrativns 

Uc-nc;,,-,. 

1'' ' ■!' iiiniin -, iti\>rMr,i inciios diiiirn, -e 
tendra iiuiin- pcrdidic- en las partes de re- 
I'Ue-tn iii\enililik-s y nicrin- ennfu-i('iii dc im- 
pre-n-. N teiiieiido una -I la elasf dr artieulns. 
In- (iiqikadn- (I dependieiite> sc familiarizaran 
'■"" cl'^ -. -e pndra iiiantener Ins precios bajo 
una ka-i m.i- i)rn\ relm-a. v se ascgiirara asi 
la ( staliilid.id ,iv un ne-^ncio (]nc no se les 
pndra (|uii.ir e<in lacilidad. 

-\deiua- (k las suge-tintie- gcncralcs sobre 
el a-unto do l;is bombas, el librito ilustra 
muclins valins, K pimtfis do su extcnso ramo. 

T.a firnia tendra muelio gusto en enviar un 
ejemplar dc esc librito a todo comcrciante que 
sc intcrcse y lo .solicite. 



Export Implement Age 



23 



Export Implement Age 

NUR FUR'S AUSLAND BESTIMMT. 

Ein unabhingiges Blatt, das ausschliesslich dem Exporthandel 

in laiidVulschaitlithen Masclumi., I'limpen. \Vind- 

motoren uiid sammtlitlieii Arlikiln der Lana- 

und MilchwirlschaltgewiJmct i»l. 



Abonnements-Prkis : 
Fiir ein Jahr, portofrei 



Mk.4 J5 



Gelder konnen per Tratte auf New York oder durch intcr- 
nationale Postanweisung ubersaiidt werden. 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHEKS 

1010 Arcb Street, 

Phllwlclphia, 9m., Verelnigte StMten von Nord-Amerika. 

Von derselben Verlag»anstaU werden ferner hera.isgegeben 

"The Implement Age" "The American Fertil.«r." llu 

Carriage Monthly" und •The Vehicle Dealer." 

Verlagsrecht (copyright) von Ware Bros. Co.. 1906. 



keinerlci Privilegien, die es nicht frei jeder 
amerikanischen Republik einverleihen mochte. 
Diese Rede wurde herzlich cmpfatigen und 
glaubt man. dass es sehr dazu beitragen wcrdc 
etwa existirende Zweifcl bctreffs event. 
Zwccke der N'ereinigten Staaten zu verscheu- 
chcn. llerr Root benulzte dicsc Konfcrenz 
Taguug urn den diverscn 1 lauptstiidten der 
siidamerikanischen Rcpublikcn Besuche abzu- 
statten. k'.r wurde audi iTberall auts Herz- 
lichste und Warmste cmp>taiigeu. 



he 



BandXV Philadelphia. Vereinigte Staaten. Oktober. 1906. No. i 



Im Flrmenverzeichnis fiir Kiiuler das Im ersten 
Then dieses Blattes wlederRegeben 1st, werden 
unsere geehrten Leser die betreffenden NVaaren- 
artlkel In deutscher Sprache wiedergegeben 
finden. Es geschleht dies urn ihnen die Mog- 
llchkeit zu geben, mit unseren Inserenten lelchter 
korrespondlren zu konnen. 



Xach cinem juugst voni "Census Bureau" 
gemachten Anschlage belief sich das angclegtc 
Kapital aller amerikanisclien Fabriken in 
,004 auf 12,686,263.673 t>^'lla'-- Dies beweist. 
dass es sich wahrcud der letzten fiinf Jahre 
urn 41 Proz. ervveitert hat. Der Gewinu an 
Fabrikationsprodukten betrug },o Proz. Der 
Totalbetrag fur 1904 belief sich auf 14.80-',- 
147.087 Dollar. 



Ein grosser Bewasserungs-Syphon 

riigchcucrcs Inleresse wird der vor Kurzeni 
stattgchabtcn Eniflfnung eines rie-i-;en Si- 
phons geschenkt, der <las Wasser voii 
dciii .\ragon und Catalonia Bcwiisscr- 
ungskanal iiber die Tbiii^er von Sosa 
und Ribabona hinubcrleitet. Vemiitttelst 
,lie-er Lcitung wird das Wasser iiber 
J47..KR) Morgen Laiidcs gczogcu. das bi>licr 
wegeii Bewasserungsinangels vollstandig un- 
fruchtbar gewesen ist. Diescr grosse Syphon 
besteht aus zwei HauptnMiren, Y^ Meile lang, 
ij Fuss 5 ZoU in Durchschnitt. Dicselben 
sind mil Stahlplatten, 3 Millimeter tlick. 
gcfuttert, mit Eisenbandcrn gcbunden und mit 
Ik'ton gedcckt. Die Rohren haben cine 
Kapazitiit von 7.700 Galloncn Wassers die 
Sckunde. 



Eigentumlichkeiten in Submarines 

Es ist fast cbcusoscbwcr fiir ein Submariu- 
boot als fiir ein Luftschitif das Glcichgewicht 
aufrecht zu erhalten, bemerkt Herr \V. IT. 
W bite, denn der Akt des Untertauchens findet 
statt, wcnn die Schiflfe Schnelligkeit aufrech- 
terhalten konnen. Der lUig wird durch 
horizontale Ruderliantirl die vmi geschicktcn 
Miinncrn t;eleitet werdcii, al^waiiii des SchilT 
>icb scbriig licrunter senkt. Xachdem die 
gcwimschte Ticfe ereicht wordem ist, muss der 
Stcucrniann die horizontalen Ruder derart 
Iciikeu. dass das Scliilt die erfordcrliche 
waureehte k:bene, sein Niveau, aufrecht 
erhalten kaiin. Der Schitifskours wird. jedoch, 
ein gar wcllenformigcr wcil dasselbc sich auf- 
und abbewcgt. Es darf im SchitT wedcr 
Mcnschcn-noch Ccwichtsbewegung stattfin- 
den. es s^i deiin. da-.- -nfnrt ein Glcichgewicht 
zur Hand ist, um dasselbe wiederherstellcn zu 
kniinen,, snll iiiclit das Schit? in verderben- 
bringende Tiefe tauchen. Es wurde gcfunden 
tlass Hadkontrolle besser als automatische 
KontroUe sich hicrbci erw ie.s. 



Ein brasilianischer Dampler 

Unser Gesandter, Herr Griscom. berichtet 
aus Brasilien. dass die Brasilianische Dampf- 
scbitTahrts-Gesellschaft '-Lloyds" einen moua- 
tlichen Schiflfsverkehr zwischen Rio de Janeim 
und New York ins Lcben gerufen habe. 1 >- : 
erste diesbezugliche Dainpfer "Goyas" 4000 
Tons Gehalt, segelte am 25. August. 



Die amerikanischen Republiken 

Tn eincr Rede vor der Spczialsitzung der 
Ban-Amerikanischcn Tagung in Rin de 
Janeiro, versichertc Staats-Sekretar R.^ot den 
anwesenden Reprasentanten der Latcin-.\ineri- 
kanischen Republiken. dass die Re'-ierun- 
der Vercinigtcn Staaten keiiuswegs naek 
^vcitcrcm Territorium strebe und mit dem 
eigencn Bcsitztum vollkommcn zufricden sei. 
Die Vercinigtcn Staaten. versichertc cr. 
wiirden die RcclUc der -eluvarh-teii Xationen 
mit demselben Rcspckt beliaiideln wie die der 
grnsslcii Kaiserreiche, denn e- -trel>e nacli 



Eine Riesenstimme 

Wahrend der Festlichkeitsfeier der Som- 
mcrsonnenwendc, wurde auf der Spitze des 
Eifclturmescinungewohnlich miichtiger Mega- 
phon errichtet, welcher imstande war die 
menschliche Stinime cine Distanz von fast zwei 
Meilen zu tragen. Es war dies ein ncucs 
Mittel die gutn Pariscr zu belustigen. 
gieser Apparat ist die Erfindung der Herren 
Laudet und Gaumont. Die ungeheucre Miich- 
tigkcit der Stimme wurde vermittclst eincr 
.\nzahl Explosione verpufYtcr Ga-e /ustande 
gcbracbt. Die Detonatione werden im Kreis- 
lauf sowohl als in der Stiirke von den 
Bewegungen des GrifTcls gelcitct, welcher das 
libonographische Register das die (Iriginal- 
uepriigo der tfineiiden Schwingungen Icitet. 
autnininil. Jc nachdcm eine gnjsserc oder 
ueringerc C.asquantitat eingefubrt wird. kann 
die Stimmeiiiiitcnsitat vcr.sc!iicdeiiartig ge-ta1- 
ux werden. Vermittelst dieser Mascbinc kann 
man W'nrte die in einem gcwOmlicben Tone 
^v.prneheii wcrden in eincr kaitternung xon 

VTo k'u-^ dcutlich liiircn. 



Odessa und New York 

Herr \ ice-Konsul Smith schreibt aus 
Odessa und driickt seine Zufriedenhcit dariiber 
aus. ilass endlich eine Schiffslinien X'erbindung 
/wischen den Odessaer und Nesv Yorker 
Hiifen ins Leben gerufen wurde. Dadurch 
werden die Handelsbezichungen zwischen den 
Ycreinigten Staaten und den Hafen des 
schwarzen M ceres bedeutend gestiirkt werden 
und diirfte sich, nioglicherweise, aufs Mor- 
genland und Mittelmeer hinauserstrecken. 
Herr Smith schreibt : 

"Mit P.ezugnahmc auf die Initiative des 
Herra A. Rzhevuski. Direktor der russischen 
DanH>fschitTahrts- und Handelsgesellschaft, 
soil von gen. Konipagnie eine direkte Passa- 
gicr- und Waarenlinie ins Lcbcn gerufen 
wcrden. deren Zweck es sein soil Dampfschiff- 
verbindungen zwischen Odessa und Xew York 
rcgelmiissig zu untcrhaltcn, der sich gleichfalls 
eine .\btcilung fiir Emigrantcntransportation 
auschlicsscn soil. Die Dauer der Fahrt von 
Odessa nach Xew York ist auf zwanzig Tage 
liereelinct. die Dampfcr wcrden periodisch 
iliren Ik-'^liuimutigsort verla-scii. 1- i-t besch- 
k,s.eii worden zwei Daiiipter wahrend dieses 

jahr.- nneli abzufertigen. Xachbcr wcrden 
die regclinarsigen \erbinduiiL;eii nut .\nienka 

im I'riihliiig niicbstcn Jahres wieder aufgc- 

nomnicn werden. 



Hagase ei Favor de Mencionar el Nombre de este Periodico Cuando se Conteste a los Anuncios. 



E. WW «.b«..n. ,lch b.1 .ve„.u.«« B«..wortun, In dl.«n, BU... .n.h...e„.r An««e„ .u. dl,„ Ze«.hrl« b«l.Ken .u wo«.n. 



24 



Export Implement Age 



Ein pr&ktischer Oasolinverauch 

Nie zuvor wurdc in dicscin Iviuide cine Prii- 
fiing von Autoinobils unter so reichhaltiger 
Theilnahinc aljjrfhalten als die jiingste "Zwei 
Gallonen Leistungsfahigkeits Priifung" die 
am fiinften Mai iinter den Auspizien des Auto- 
mobil Clubs von Amcrika, stattfand. Xiclit 
allein warcn dort einundsiebzig Eintragungen 
gemacht worden, die Anzahl der Aufbrecber 
war ungemein gross und waren fiinfundsechzig 
Maschincn in Cianzcn anwcsend. Der Haupt- 
zwcck des Versuchs war die Feuerungs-Kon- 
siimption der verschiedenen Automobils per 
Mcile zu bestimmen. Der ente, zweite und 
drilte Preis bestand aus einer werthvollcn gol- 
denen Punch- Bowie mit Silberbecher un<l Mc- 
daille, die an den drei Maschinen erthcilt wur- 
den wclche die hochslen Markzeichen erhiel- 
ten. 

Das Markzeichen eines jcden Wagens wurde 
durch X'ervielfachung des Totalgewichtes des 
beladencn Wagens ( dcm nocb achthundert 
Pfund extra laut scliiedsrichterlichcm Aus- 
spnich beigefiigt wurden) mit dem Distanz- 
rcnnen erhalten. Das Wcttrennen wurde somit 
in \N'irklichkeit auf eine sogen. Tonnenmcilen- 
Basis gestellt, dcmnach die grossen, schweren 
Wagen iiber die leichteren Baues gewinnen 
wijrden, wenn die ersteren nicht daran verhin- 
dert waren. Es schien wenigstens als ob es so 
sein mtJsse, da die gewohnlicht Gaskonsump- 
tion nicht direkt mit dem Gewicht vergrossert 
wird, und ein schwerer Wagen viel billigcr zu 
fahren sei als ein leichter. Trotz dieser wohl- 
bekannten Thatsache belastete das mit diesen 
Sonderhciten betrautc Kommittee die leichten 
W'agen, indem es das Gewicht aller zweicylin- 
drigen Maschinen als nur fiinfundsiebzig Proz. 
ihres W'irkiichkeitsgewichtes und das der ein- 
cylindrigen Wagen als fiir siebzig Proz. er- 
klarte. Die schweren, viercylir.drigen Wagen 
wurden in Folge dessen durch diesen Versuch 
begiinstigt und es schien wohl kaum moglich, 
dass ein anderer Wagen itl)crhaupt gewinnen 
konne. Das erstaunenswerlhe Resultat ergab, 
jedoch, dass der Gewinncr ein viercylindriger, 
leichtwiegender offener Wagen der luftkiihlen 
Sorte war, ein Wagen distinktiv amcrikani- 
scher Ertindung. Dicsc Mascliiiic. <lie mit 
Fahrcr und Beobachtcr zu?ainmen 1,500 
Pfund wog, lief von der Siebenundfiinfzigsten 
Strasse und East River. New York, bis Hart- 
ford, Conn., also eine Distanz von siebenund- 
achtzig Meilen, mit nur zwei Gollonen Gasolin 
und machte eine Durchschnitts-Schnelligkeit 



von siebzehncinhalh Meilen per Stunde. Wenn 
man nun in lietracht zieht, dass die Wege der 
ersten fiinfunddreissig Meilen in sehr schlam- 
miger Beschaffenheit waren, durch einen Wol- 
keiibruch verursacht, welcher stattfand, gerade 
als der Wagen in voUer Schnclligkeit dahin- 
brauste, scheint es doch nicht ausgeschlossen, 
dass eine Distanz von ncunzig Meilen, oder 
fxinfundvierzig Meilen per Gallone, hatte zu- 
fiickgelegt werden koniien. wenn der Weg 
trocken gewcscn ware. Der Automobil Re- 
dakteur des "Scientific American" der das 
Vergniigen hatte "Beobachter" des (icwinn- 
wagens zu sein, glaubt bestimmt, dass diese 
Distanz zuriickgelegt hatte werden konnen, 
wenn das W'etter schon und die Wege trocken 
gewesen waren, denn es wurde eine ge- 
schwachte Schnclligkeit auf vielen Hiigeln an- 
gewendet, wo andernfalls mit Forcegetriebe 
hinaufgetuflft worden ware; dass ferner die 
Feuchtigkeit der Luft eine Ocftnung des Na- 
delventils vom Karburitcr nothwendig machte, 
und zvvar mehr als es an eincm schonen Tage 
nothwendig ware. 

Der den zweiten Preis gewinnende W^agen 
war el)en falls einer neuesten St\les nioderner 
luftkiihler Automobiles, den amcrikanischer 
Erfindungsgeist nur errlenken und vervollkom- 
men konnte. Die besondere Eigcnschaft des 
diesem Wagen zugnmdelicgenden Motors 
licgt im Cylinder, der in Aluminum Mantel ein- 
geschlossen ist, durch welche Luft vermittelst 
einer machtigen Blascpumpe, durch Triebwerk 
geleitet. hineinforcirt wird, im Unterschiede zu 
den andcren Fahrzeugen die durch den natiir- 
lichen Luftzug direkt beiin Wciterbewegen des • 
Wagens abgekiihlt werden ; in diesem Falle 
liegt <lcr Motor (pier, vorne aiu Wagen, besitzt 
Hiilfs-Dampfauslassimgsrohen mit niechani- 
schem Betricb, um eine schni.llc Aus-tossung 
event, verbranntcr Untcrlagen zu crmoglichen. 
Das Nadelventil de'i Karburittis kann auch 
vom Sitze des Warten ani^ retail irt w erdon. Es 
ist eiiu- lu^'iiidciv ciiipti-hlcii-wertlie Eigcn- 
schaft die an fast kciiicm ainkTon Wagen zu 
findcn ist. Ein \\ agon i^Uichcr Fabrikation 
wie der Gewinnende erfreut sich Recordbrecher 
des "TranskontinentaJcn Rcinnns" zu sein, der 
das Wcttrennen in weniger als dreiunddreissig 
Tagen gewann. 

Der Wagen der den drittcn Platz erhielt ist 
eine wohlbckannte franznsiclic Fabrikation mit 
vier Cvlindern wassergckiihlter Maschine. 
Dieser Wagen hatte ein Markzeichen von iSo,- 
'>42 gegcn 200,100 des ersten Gewiimers und 



3,1 10 Pfund und legte 46.2 Meilen zuriick ; der 
zweite Wagen wog 3.270 Pfund und legte 
47.9 Meilen zuriick. Die vierte Maschine war 
ein grosser franzosischcr Wagen mit Record 
fiir Feuerungs-Billigkeit. Die funfte war ein 
( )mnibusvvagen fiir achtzehn Passagiere und 
die sechste eine leichte Kaleschc gleicher Kon- 
struktion und MaschinengriJsse als der erste 
Gewinner. Die Betriebskosten per Tonmeile 
dieser ersten sechs Wagen, wenn das Brennma- 
terial mit zwanzig Cent per Galone berechnet 
wird, betrug 0.613, 0.452, 0.538, 0.559, 0.500, 
und 0.640-stel Cent pro Stiick. Ein eincylin- 
driger Bockwagen legte 101.6 Meilen und eine 
eincylindrige leichte Kalesche fiir vier Per- 
sonen 56.8 Meilen zuriick. 



Ausstellung in Neu-Seeiand 

Die Internationale Ausstellung in Neu- 

Seeland welche am i. November eroffnet 
werden soil, verspricht die allerwichtigste 
Ausstellung dieser Art in jnem Lande zit 
werden die iiberhaupt in Australicn je 
stattgefunden hat. Die Totalgrundausdehining 
die zur Verfiigung des Ausstellungs-Aus- 
schusses gestellt worden ist, betriigt 114 
Morgen Landes und scheint jedwcde 
Moglichkeit vorhanden zu sein, dass dieser 
ungeheuere Raum von den zahlrcichcn 
Gcbiiuden welche zur Koinplettirung lUr 
Sehenswiirdigkeiten' der Ausstellung in .An- 
spruch genommen ausgefullt werden 
diirfte. 



Die griechische Tabacksernte 

Herr Georg Horton, unser Konsul aus 
Athen, schreibt, dass die Ictzte in kx*?- '" 
Griechenlanil gemachte Tabacksernte, die 
allcrgnisste gewesen sei die je zuvor Griechcn- 

land erreicht — etwa 198.000.000 Pfund. Die 

"Sary" Marken Ernte belief sich auf ca. u.- 

000.000. Dicsc Marke besondcrs steht in 

grossem Berlarf fiir egyptische Cigarcttcn. 

Alexandria. Egyptcn, hat 25.000 achtundach- 

zigcr P.allen Taback geringerer Qnalitat auf 

Lager. Die meisten egyptischen Cigarcttcn 

werden viin Griechcn fabrizirt, weil das Cig- 

arcttcnpaf)icr in der Tiirkci zu teucr ist und 

dort ein Rcgicrungs Monopol bildct. Dadurch 

wurde eine billigcre, imd somit gcringcre, 

Papicrqualitat cingefiihrt, was aber auch den 

\'erlust einer Industrie fiir Griechenland 

fiihlbar machte, die von Egypten absorbirt 

wnrdc. weil, die beriihmtesten Cigaretten- 

fabrikanten Egyptens meistens Griechen sind. 



Export Implement Age 



35 



El wird gebeten, lich bci eventueller Beantwortung in diesem Blatte enthaltener Anzeigen auf diese Zeitschrift beziehen zu woUen. 



Die Evolution einer Idee 

Der zehnte Miirz wurdc als 30. Jahrestag 
gefeiert an welchem der Erfin<ler seine erste 
Telephonbotschaft seinem Assistenten sandtc. 
Der Platz der Szene war der obere Stockwerk 
einer Pension in Boston, wo fast ein Jahr 
lang Experimente unternommen wurden. Es 
war im Jahre 1874 als Alexander Graham 
Bell, seinerzeit Profssor der \okal- Physi- 
ologic an der Boston Universitat von der 
Ueberzeugung durchdrungen wurde, dass 
verschiedene Sendungcn nach dem Morse 
schen Punkt- und Strichsystem zu gleicher Zeit 
iiber ein und dasselbe Draht transmittirt wer- 
den konnen. Nachdem er sich mit dieser Idee 
eingehends zu befassen angefangen hatte, kam 
er auf die niichstfolgende Gedanken die sym- 
pathetische Vibration von Saiten, die mit cin- 
ander gestinmit und verbunden worden waren, 
zu verwerten. Er fing somit derartige Experi- 
mente in 1874 mit dcm harmonischen Tele- 
graph an, der in seinem Wohnzimmer aufgc- 
stellt vermittelst Uhrfedern, die als Hauptteil 
seiner Apparate dienten und mit denselben ver- 
bunden wurden, welche er albnahlig jedoch zur 
Anwendung mit dem Elektro-Magnetismus 
brachte und diese Idee allmahlig erweiterte. 
Eben zu jener Zeit war es, dass Herr Bell 
zur Ueberzeugung kam.dass das Telegraphiren 
der Rede und Stimme moglich sei und teilte 
demgemass diese Idee seiem Mitarbciler iv.it, 
der gleichfalls iiberzeugt wurde, dass eine 
derartige Transmission ganz von einem Instru- 
ment abhange, ilas ahnliche Vibration her- 
vorzurufen imstande wiire. Es war am zwei- 
ten Juni, 1875. dass es Jhm zum ersten Male 
gelang die Lautqualitat vermittelst der Elek- 
trisitat zu senden und am folgendcn Miirz 
wurde die erste gesprocheuc Mittcilung vom 
gliicklichen Erfinder in seiner hcsclieidcneu 
Wohnung empfagen. 

In der Telephonentwickclung kann die Evo- 
lution einer Idee beobachtct werden die mit 
langsamen Schritten weiter und immcr wciter 
ans" Endziel gelangte. Es darf thatsachlich 
behauptet werden. dass die erste Grundidee 
einer Transformation unterging und dass gar 
viele von den hervorgebrachten elektrischen 
Resultatcn wcdcr gplant noch crwartct waren, 
dass die Hauptkonception jedoch voll- 
stiindig richtig war. Das Schnappen einer 
Feder. der erste Laut gcnau wicdcrproduzirt, 
darf alknlin-s Zufall .^cnannt werden, d:»s 
Futulanunt war abcr gclcgt und <Uc gcsuchten 
Konditionen* wurden bald anerkannt nachdem 



sic ans Licht gebracht wur<Un. \ iclc 
Schwierigkeiten besonderer Art ninssicn m- 
vestigirt und fortgeschafft werden ehe dicsc 
Erfindung der Oeflfcntlidikeit ubergclxn wer- 



Zwciten in der Erreichung jcncr Wahrheit, 
welche auf .1cm Grundc der Quelle zu licgcn 
scheint. 



den konnte, und selbst lange Zeit nachhcr Uber Pumpen die fur sich selbst sprechen 



waren Schwierigkeiten zu iiberwiiulen. die sich 
nicht leicht voraussehcn liesscii. l-.ndlich 
konnte mit dem Vorgehen der Mitlcihini^cn 
derart sicher zuwege gegangcn went, n, dass 
die Erfindung im folgendcn Sommcr auf der 
zu Philadelphia stattfin<l<flulen ■Centennial 



\ iele Stahlwaaren- und Maschinenhandler 
des .\uslandes und der \'ereinigten Staaten 
haben Pumpen- und Heuaufzugmaschinen 
gefunden die nicht allein von guter Qualitiit 
sind. soiKlern sich auch als wiinschenswerter 
W arcnartikd erweist, Artikel leicht zu hantiren 



Ausstellung" vorgefuhrl werden konnte. L"n- und eiurgisch in den Handel zu bringen. 
ier denjenigen wclche sic dort eingehends Dass Fabrikanten endlich darum bemuht 

untersuchten waren der hervorragende briti- .ind ihr Bestes fiir ein geeignetes Entgegcn- 
sche Gelehrte Lord Kelvin, der von derselben kommen zur Aushalfe von Kaufleuten zu 
enthusiastisch durchdrungen wurdc und sich thun. um ihnen event, den richtigen Geschiifts- 
wie folgt deruber ausdriickte: -Dies ist anteil wiirdig zukommen zu lassen, ist in den 
vielleicht das bcdeutsamste Wunder welches Spaltcn dieser Zeiuchrift vielfach betont 
soweit vermittelst des elektrischen Telegraph- worden. 

en zustande gebracht worden ist, es iSt In eben dieser Angelegenheit veruffentilichte 
gleichsam eine Vorrichtung wclche einen die Firma F. E. Myers & Bro.. Ashland Ohio, 
heimatlichen und elementaren Charakter ,ieren Export Bureau B-21 Produce Ex- 
besitzt." Im Herbste desselben Jahres wurden change, New York, sich befindet, ein gar m- 
Mitteilungcn bereits iiber eine Strecke von teressantes Biichlein unter dem Titel "Mit- 
etwa zwei Meilen bcf6rdert. namlich zwischcn teilungen iiber Pumpen" (Points on Pumps). 
Boston und Cambridgeport. das besonders geeignet scheint Kaufern wich- 

Eine Gesellschaft zwecks Einfuhrung des tige Anleitung zu geben und Handelsre.senden 
kommerziellen Telephons wurde im I-Vuhling und VerkUufern die Pumpen kaufen oder ver- 
des Jahres 1877 ins Leben gerufen und kurze kaufen behultlich zu sein. 
Zeit darauf versuchte Herr Bell Mitte.lungcn Die Firma such zu beweisen wie wicht.g 

zwischen P.oston und New York zu befurdern ; cs fur Kaiifleute ist sich an einen emzelnen 
die Langdistanz Linien erwiesen sich jedoch d.,ch .angbaren Warenartikel zu beschranken. 
eine Enttiuischung bis ein an.lerer Ertindcr dessen \ erkauf ihnen .len besten Handelser- 
das hartgezogene Kupferdraht fur dasselbe trag gewahren kann. 

einfuhrte. Heute aller.lings sind die hiczu In .Icr Weise braucht weniger Kapital 

erforderhchen Bedingungen nichts Neues. angelegt werden. es erstehen weniger Verluste 
wenn Boston z. B. mit Omaha eine Konver- durch unverkaufbare Reparatur-Thede. wen- 
sation eingeht, doch gab es oftmals kritische iger Reklame ist erforderlich. Mit nur einer 
ZeLten und Augenblicke wenn gcwisse Ex- einzelnen Waarengattung, wird den Angesteu- 



periinente auf vollstaiuliges Misslingen bin 
zudcuten schienen und , zwar in -cvvissui 
technischen Punkten die alle luutc als 
selbstverstandlich bckannt sind. In den 
Anfangsjahren wurde das Teleph<.n .ils cine 
Kuriositat betrachtet, heute jedi.ch belauicn 
sich seine Abonnenten in die MiUionenzahl. 



ten das Hantiren derselben leichter, sie wer- 
den .larin gewandter und auch die Preise 
konnen auf profitabler Basis aufrechterhalten 
wcr.lcn. was schliesslich zur Folge hat. dass 
cine ucwis^c Geschaftsidentitat erzieU werden 
k.■mn^l.c nicht allein jede Han<lclsstabilitat 
sichert, die aber auch bleibend ist und nicht 



Es ist nicht allein auf der Farm sondern auch fortgenommen werden kann. 

in Stadt und Dorf eingefuhrt worden. es ^„,,er den allgemeinen N'orschlagen und 

bildct aber auch gleichzeitig einen bedcntcn<len Katanwcisungen tiber Pumpen, veranschaulicht 

Teil unscres konmierziellen und soziaien ^^, p.uchlein die verschiedenen Fabnkate der 

Lebens. Die amcrikanisclien Erfinder siml Hirnia und giebt wertvolle Punkte uber ihre 

zum Ln..s,cn Dank der Welt bcrechtigt, denn ausgedehnten Waarensorten. Jcdcr der sich 

ihre Thatigkeit gilt als emc Art Inspiration. fur diesen Artikel intercssirt. kann au 

1,,, .U.-uwcrdni zwar mcht immer realisirt, Wunsch em Exemplar des Bachlems zugestellt 

doch gelangen Ainerikaner selten als die erhalten. 



..«M.eB..,n..lcH..Uv.n.„e««B..„.wo.„„*lnd.».B...ee„.H.U„«An««.n„.dl.«Z.«.hH«.^^^^^^^ 



INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



26 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



27 



«'» 



Bremsen fur Fahrzeuge 

\ or iicuii/.chn Jalirtii stattctc llerr Murijan 
Potter, in Fislikill-on Hudson, N. Y., U. S. 
A., cine Reihe von Falirzeiifjfu mit scinen 
Federbrcnistn-I '.locks aus. \oii denen fast allc 
sich hcute iiii Gcbrauch inKh l)ctindcii und 
ebenso Icistungsfalii^ sind wie seinerzoit. mil 
Ausiiahnie allerdings der Abnutzuni^slmie und 
Spulfodcrn, die hie und da vom ncuen crsetzt 
werden niiissen. Viele diestr lircinsen habcn 
sich noch vollkoninicn gut i.rhallcn, wahrend 
die l)etreffenden Fahrzcuse an welcheii sie 
angebracht sind, nutzlos gewordcn sind. Sie 
sind zuni Gehrauche bei anderen \\ agen ver- 
wetidet worden und diirften sich voni ncuen 
jahrelang clort dienstfaliig erweisen. Es :sl 
Herrn Potter das anerkennenswerte Privi- 
legimn zu toil geworden, seine Erfindung in 
fast alien Staaton dieses Landes eingetiihrt 
zu sehen, von Maine bis Califoriiicn, und 
konnen dieselben hauplsachlich boi bcsscr- 
wertigen Kaleschen und Wiigen vorgefun- 
dcn \verdi'ii. W'agcnbaucr crkliircn rlicsc 
gcbrauchstiicbtig in jeder Weise welch Wun- 
der denii, da?s zahlrciche Brenisenblocks nach 
Europa und anderm auswartigen Landern, 
einscbliesslich Australien, Ncu-Seeland und 
den Hawaii Inscln in reichcr Anzabl ausge- 
fiihrt wenlen. Herr Potter glaubt. dass 
selbst fiir die billigsten Wiigen die allerbestcn 
llrtmsen nicht zu gut wiiren und dass irgetid 
einc lircnise die nicht vorhaltungsfahig genug 
konstruirt ist, inchr als nutzlos sei. ganz 
abgcsehcn davon. nii .Iri'^ Fahrzeug leicht oder 
schwer beladen ist. das Geld ist in solchem 
Falle imnier so gut wie fortgeworfcn. 
\\ jihrend seiner ganzen I'abrikantenperiode 
hielt es Hirr Potter, dass Qualitiit die erste 
W'ichtigkeit in seinen Fedcrbremscnbi(x:k< 
bilde und hat cr demgenias auch uur Maurial 
hester Qualitiit in dcr Anwendung jedes ein- 
zelnen I'.rcin.sciitii'n s Lidiraclit. 

Der tirliniscln.' 'I'cil liai >icli >Ut-. duroli 
feinstcs Maclnvork ausgtvcicli int. Kciiurlci 
Ausgaln' wurdc in Avr Aiifi-rtigung liiezu 
gespart und die allerneuc-stcn Maschincn 
werden fur ilicse spczielle Arbiit virwendet. 
\(in /.(.it zu /< it -iiid audi merklichc \'ir- 
besseruiigiii xori^onnninK'n wiiriUii und luutt 
>leiU di< -cT Artikcl that-iicblicli nlint fi(.L:iuT 
iin .Markte ila. Xnii ^cltcn fiihllc sicli I krr 
Potter von der X'ltwi'ndi^ktit dnrchdruiii;en 
etwns bf'sseres fin- dm all;^i'nuiiiin Gfliraiioh 
zu ^chatVen als di:u >ti-ts beliiliii r \m i ilcndcn 
nichtjustirbaren Hebel. und ist es dun audi 



jiingst gelungen eine "vollstiiiKlig justirbare 
I'ederbrenise" auf den Markt zu bringen, die 
in verschiedenen Gattungen und Mustern 
hergestelli wird, jede derselben kann im 
Augenblick dienstfahrig an Kalesche uilcr 
Wagen irgend eiiier I'acon und irgend eints 
<'ie\vichtes angebracht werden. Diese neue 
ISrenise ist jeder nnjglichen Priifung unter- 
zogen worden und hat sich wahreiul eines 
ganzen Jahres alien Unistiinden in bester 
\\\i>c angepasst und fiillt lieute ein viel 
jiihriges I'.cdurfnis wiinlig aus. Jede I'renisc 
ist garanlin uiid wird zuverliissigen Kuinkii 
gerne auf W'uiisfh zur IVoIk' iibersaiidt. Uald 
wird auch ein neuer Katalog voin Ertinder 
herausgegeben werden. der diese Brtinse niit 
den event. \erscbie<leiien justirbaren Teilen 
genau zur \!i>iclu zu briugiii verspricbt. 
Tin Katalog werden auch alio iibrigen Assorti- 
nients von Potters Federbreinsenblocks ver- 
trctrn seiii. die in verschiedenen Mustern 
und vierzehii Gn>ssin herm.-^tillt wi-rdiii und 
sich sowohl fiir Stahl- ndir (".uiiiinireifen 
bestens anpassen. Ein l\xeniplar dieses Kat- 
aloges kann auf Verlangen frei erhalten wer- 
<len. Man adressire lilos .Morgan Poller. 
Fishkill-on-Hudson, X. \'.. l'. S. A. 



Das Erdbeben in V&lparaiso 

Ein grosses Erdbeben in X'alparaiso. am lo 
.'August, zersti'irte einen grossen Teil der 
Stadt und vernichtetc hundertc Eeute in den 
Rninen der zusammenfallenden Gebiiude. Zwei 
ungeheuere Stcisse wurden friihabends in 
Zwisclienriiunien von nur wenigen .\ugeii- 
blicken gespiirt, und. gleicb dem Erdbeben 
in San F"ranzisco am letzten .\])ril. wurden 
dieselben dureh Feuersbriinste in den ver- 
schiidenen Sladtteilen fortgesetzt welehe siili 
auf die ganze \ ernichtunga -Area ansdehnten. 
Der \"erlust an M'enschen-Eiben soil auf 
2000 gcschiitzt werden, wiihrend der 
Giilerverlust sich auf zwischen _>3 bis 
50 .Millioneii Dollar bezilTert. .\uch in 
Santiago sollen die Stussc sehr heftig 
gewcsen sein und dcr Verlust von Leben und 
r,ut ein lietrachtlicber; auch mehrere klcinere 
beiiiegeiide Stiidte und Dorfcr sollen schwer 
darunter zu leiden gehabt haben. V'alparaisn 
ist tin verschanzter Seeiiafen und ciiio 
JIaupthandelNstadt an Jikr uistlichen Kiiste 
Sitdanierikas. Seine ICiiiw(jliiierscliafl bezif- 
fert sich auf etwa i -.o.ocx) Scclen und vielleicbl 
audi mebr. Die Stadt bat grosse industrielle 
l-.tablissenu'Uts, cine Xavigatiotissoliiiie. ein 
Museum fiir Xaturwissenscbaften und diverse 
.\kadcinien und KoUegeii. 



Der auswartige Handel erweitert sich 

Der auslandische Handel der X'ereinigten 
Staaten ist wiihrend des letzten Jahrzehntes 
weit niehr gewachsen als die Einwohnerschaft 
<lerselben. Tabellarische Berichte die fiir das 
liskaljahr i<jo6 vom Statistischen Bureau 
des Handels- und Arbcitsministeriums zusam- 
mengestellt wurden beweisen eigentiimlicher- 
weise, dass, obgleich die Einwohnerzahl seit 
iS()6 nur etwa 20 Proz. gewachsen, die Einfuhr 
57 Proz. und die Ausfuhr sogar uni 
iQij Proz. zugenominen hat. Die den 
grossten C^winn aufweisenden Einfuhr- 
sklassen bestehen aus Fabrikationen. und 
I'abrikationsmaterialien ; sic weisen ebenfalls 
eine Zunahnie von etwa 95 Proz. auf. Auf der 
Ausfuhr.seite nehnien landwirtschaftliclie Pro- 
diikte und Fabrikationen den ersten Platz ein. 
Die ausgefiihrtcn landwirtschaftlichen Pro- 
dukte und Fabrikationen weisen wahrend des 
letzten Jahrzehntes eine Zunahme von etwa 
70 Proz. auf, wiihrend die event. Fabrikation- 
en derselben etwa 163 Proz. zugenominen 
haben. 

Diese Handelserweiterung erstreckt sich 
auf fast , alien Handelschentren der 
Welt, dodi macht es sich ganz be- 
sonders in der Handelsverbinduiig zwisch- 
en Asien und Oceanic bemerkbar. 
Der europaische Einfuhrhandel weist eine 
Zunahme von etwa 50 Proz. auf. der von 
Nord-Anierika beliiuft sich auf 80 Proz.. von 
Siid-Ainerika auf 80 Proz., von Asien und 
( )ceania auf ebenfalls 80 Proz. und von Afrika 
auf nur 18 Proz. Der europiiische Ausfuhr- 
liandel vveist eine Zunahme von etwa 78 Proz. 
auf. der von Nord-Amerika steht mit einer 
Zunahnie von 164 Proz. da, Siid-Amerika 107 
Proz.. .\sien uiul Oceania 27,2 Pmz. und 
Afrika 41 Proz. 

hi .\nbetracht dieser Handelsverkehrs- 
I'.rweitening haben auch ungewohnliche \er- 
anderungeii in den verschiedenen Reiserouten 
stattgefunden. \ ergleicht man die \'erhalt- 
nis.sc in i(>o^) mit tleiien von 1896, so weisen 
die atlantischen Hiifen eine Zunahme von 
nicht weniger als 329 Millionen an Einfuhr 
und 426 Millionen an Ausfuhr auf, gegen e,y 
Millionen Ivinfuhr und 262 Millionen Ausfuhr. 
Die Hiifen der stillen Kiisten weisen eine Zu- 
nahme V011 17 Millionen I'.infuhr und >,~ Mil- 
lionen Ausfuhr auf. Die nordlichen Grenzen 
und Seeiiafen crfreuten sich einer Zunahme 
von 42 Millioiu'ii l-.infubr und 116 Millionen 
an Ausfuhr. wahrend die inlandisdien H.itVn 
eiiio Ziinabnie von etwa iieun Millionen an 
l'',iiifulir aufzuweisen halieii. 



jincient Egt;pt 

BV Mk. Wll.l.lAM Jl.NMN'.S HKVAN. 



lbinu< duonol.,gicaIl\ b-eau^e -onu oi lli. 
Hinples have been adde.l to by .lilterent km--- 
and dMiaMi- until tbcv represent the art an.l 
lif,. ,,f ni.uiv hundred ve.ar^. The tem].!.- :n 
Karnak. for iuManoe. be.ir- tlie nni.iv^> -1 
i'\;\pt''- rulers from 'riiulin.-i, lo die Kanie 
^etand from tlie Kamr-.. s lo ilie I 't. .leini. -. 
a period of ^ouie twelve liundr..! se.irs :ind 
die building of the nunien.u- i.>raniuU .-s- 
( red even a longer time. 

\> the louri>t usuall\ b-um-, a tri). tluou.^h 
l-.uxi.t with a visit to Tairo, !m 1- likds 1- 
fin.l ibe great I'.gvpti.in li.u-uin. tlu .\ n 
„.uin of Gizdi. a lining iniro.lueiion to lu- 
Mibse.|uent investigation-^, line one im.,^ 
<uiiples of all the anlii|niiies oi tlu .,.un!.v. 
, xeei.ting the pvramids and the u tuple-, aiu. 



We have been moving among the oldest 
monument- reart d by man. and lliey make 
the re~t of the world -Kin soung. In J.-q-aii 
a I'.uddbist tempU-. built \\\>\\e bnndred vear- 
;igo impressed Us with the \oulbfnlne-- oi 
Amerieaii instituti'>n> : iiiGbinawe utr. -Iioun 
teinp!e> that had Mood for tv^ent> renimie- 
aiid were toll! of e>i-|oin- and law- even older ' 
in India ue I'ound a i.agoda some luentx live 
bnndred > ear- old. and vi-ited tin -ile of a dt> 
\vli..>e foundation- were iirobablv laid more 
than tlire,- tbon-and \ear- ,a-r, ; hut Inn- ue -ee 

if luniian lienig^ who 



the inumnui' 



li irni- 



,„,K s.Mue of these are heroic in s,zo. others 
are not more than an inch in height; some are 
,iion" some beautiful and some grotesque. 
Graurte. b<.th re.l an.l black, alabaster, stone. 
uon. bronze and day-all hav.- been brongbt 

into re-inisiiiou for tlii- work. Soi i ii'< 

bronze has, upon analvMs. been te.nn<l to , on 
lain practic.-dlv the same combination oi m. t 
,,K a, tlu liVoH/e now used. 'I In le a" ■ ' ■ '^ 
-i.iUK- in wood. :md one oi ilu-. .1 pli. ■■■ 
...apb of wlneb I -eeuved ainaeud mv ail-n 
n.,u becan-e the In ,ad and fao luar a re-em 
l,l;,nee to the late Sen.ilor ll.mna ii 1- calle- 
■Sheikh el I'.eled" or \ lUlig' ^"hiel : tb.al V 
dtoiild h.-ive resisted deea\ for more ili.m lort\ 
eeiinnie- is little le- th;m marvelou-. 

\\ 1,,1, tl„ , > a\ator- lia\. 1" ' n -' avehnm 
,,„ ln-.,.n.-a' n.o,,K. die. liaxe ,.,.■,, -ouallx 
I, „ind irra-iir. - oi -^t, :ii pecimi.n . \alne. .\ 
eouH.Ur.iMe .luanlilN .^i ^oM .,n.l -I'.-r in tlw 
I,, nil of iew.-lrv lia- 1..*'! im-avh- M. .md 'I' 
niu-eiini eoniam- -p" ■'•'■'■'■- oi ex. |'" -'i'" ^\"''^- 
-bin wliid) llol onlv .H-pla\ llie -Khl ( 



d twei tbou-;in( 



, ,ar- liefore riin-t wa- 



"""• '" 1'^ ,, , ,. , vin-s an.l hieroglvplm-s trom tiie-e, 

,,,,„ „u. dnsd be.ove M.rabam api-eaud \\;'-,4 ^^^,,, fs VUvoud ,0 nnuun 

iiHin color- that has 



u)ion the earth, look ii] 
w,tb-l.«.d the diange- and delied the d.ment- 
,,,- i..yu centune-. and handle wlieal that grew 
„p.,n the banks of the Xile l-ng 1h lore Jose].!. 
|,„ilt granaries for Pliaraol,. The-nides count 
.vnturie- ;.- triiM'inglN o,, the ioiiL;ne a- a 
iie.ismv expert, or ;m insiiranee m.mnate. 
■rhe\ di-cii-- dsna-ties ili.il 
'mope wa- shrouded in 
,kne-s. b.loie the light of history dawned 
„,„„, (lu- Gang,- an.l the Vangtse: thes .1. - 
cipher hierolvphics that kepi their secrets tor 
ages and lead one am..ug ruins that astonish 
In their immeiisitv as well as by the aritsttc 
.kill which they r.A.al. 

Back in tlu- uii-t> pa-t -in the prdnsionc 



hau'lle- mnnon- 
r, ,-e an.l fill when 
da 



,,-.,111 the t..ttibs ,,f km--, but m.-iiiN .•! iii..i< 
Initi.ble rank. The e.itdv l-gvpiiatis bdu ve.l 
that man was comp..-..l ot s,,veral .lill.f. m 
entitle-. I'irst. then- w,i- tlie l.od\. ,m.l -e.- 
,.n.l. the .l..iible- ;i -< .n ..1 inv.-ilil. tovm re 
pr.i.lucing the features ..t' du b.d> 
c.ime the s,,ul. rei.resente.j a- a Imman lua-a-.l 
bir.l an.l then a si>ark ..i the .livtti. Iir. cilm 
Ixlm.uhidi has been traiislate.l as -th.- l.nm 
niMiis" It was to prevent the .1e]>arlme oi 



ihe-, aiteii.hng f.iruis ihat embalmm- 
,, -. irted t... P.y snspcn.Iitig th. .l..onM 
,.1 the bo.ly, they thought 
preserve the coiuiecliou 



11. >i.. 
t1i.it li 
bet Willi " 
i)..uble, the Soul an.l the l.im ni.n- 
pravers and olTering- th;;' > '" i 
from the secoinl «Ieath 'Ibt- i- th' 
lion of the inumuu gi\.n \'\ iivii> 
{"he Double, it was supp-. 



Ill \ ^■V 



peri...l- Ihere were tw.. h.-vpttan kmg.U.m-. ^^,^^^^^. j,,^. ,„,„„„n n-t-.l. and d„ N m 

Mue ..ceniiving upper, an.l the "th> '•. '•'^^" ^^i,;],. jt ,vent awav to c 1 •, nn. wi'Ii ili- 
Egvpl. This was prior \<> 2.5.>.> l'- < ■■ .'n'l ,^ returned from tmu t.. tm . . an ■ 



'ii:in-..., 

the ariiti.-.rs. bit! p.^rtras the bai.Us ,iim1 c,i- 

,. ,ie- of the . ail\ Iv^xplian- 

The nnisenm al-. cnlain- .iiou-li oi d.4)i 
i'. .iiml with the iiinniini. s, .am! I'f i>ii-ima- ci 
l,„,iii-. 1.. -lio'A th.il w.-avinu ^^.'i- :ni m.lits- 
n-N with which til.- !"opl. .,1 Hi..-e .lavs were 
i.iimliar. 

Pail SM- iiin-' die 11111-. iim an.l l>ro 

\-,.v,t e, , .1 t.. iho-e n;,, . , ' s whidi are t.^n l.ar-r 
\..v .111-, n .>f -a\i dial i'oHii. d ]<\ ill. '■ 

,1,,,,. I am. h.iw<\<r. coii-i i.tm. .1 1 ■■ 

,,,,, criti.-i-m of tlu •mi-, nm ni pa-mu. It '^ 
,„„l,.r ill.' .■..11'!..' .1 a l-r, II. Ii -..-i.-lx. aiu' di- 
,,nh .•,!'. ■ •■ lil.iMiali'.- 1- pi'iit.'d 111 I". ■.' b 
\\ 1,;],, lilt . xhiliil- 1" a'' a bn.M 'le 

li l-r. iii-b ;md |-.iiuli-li. -ov . an 

,:. : , ;!.li ,111.1 oiilv a few not ,ii ,di, 

\, ill, 1. .Ill 110 ■_■,::■,, -. u. ~. ■ . .\ \\ 

■ardl the minier..il- 10,1, , ,,i,.l p.. an nl 111. 

.,,.,,,.,1 ,,|,iects of itili l.-t, ilio,, who ar, nil 

,1,;,, ,,, .. .1.1 i'f. ih Ii ar,' at .1 ureal .li-a.Uaii 

1 |.j, ( 1 .11-11 1. 

\nii I le.iil t. 41 



!, 11 th 



,t, 



.1 I'.i 



:i an 



,itii lit 1' 11 



,-,..m the stirring scenes engrave-l ui.-m st..iu 
one can imagine the eontlicls winch took place 
along the fertile vallev ..f the Xile l.etore 
\leiies. the earliest known rnler. nmted the 
lwokinL;.I..in-.a~Miine,liI.elttl.'. l.ofd..t -"h 
I amis f.a-hi.,i,.-,l a donb!.- .-i-un fr h.m- 
.elf an.l adol.ie.l the lilv. or L.tii-, .iiu! lb- 
..apwa,- as sMiih.,!- of hi- coiis..lidal.,l empire^ 

We' arc pr..babh ind.bu-d M .•ertam natural 
peciiliarnie- of Kgv,.l for tlu pie-ervatu -it ot 
;,,, ,„,i,pu- .vi.leiue- ot aiicui.t cviliAiti. m 
p.^,„.l lure, l-ir-t. tluv, .- but .. ^n.dl a,... 
,„■ tillable lan.l stntdu-.l al.nig the in,.-! uon 
,U.rful ..f nx.as an.l unanl.-.l .m citlu r -uie 
,,v a barian ua-te thai ..tier- greater prot..' 
,i,,„ than a wall. ^..■.'n.l. the .^Innate ..t 
|.-..M„ i- ,lrv.,m.i tlui.-aian..<lr.-ndiin:^ ram- 
,;r,lel.ic,- and -o MoU,,, .diang.'- '.t ten, 
p,ratnre „ , .ii-tn-. .rau . 1 lunl. du' tnup e- 
and tomb- are -o n,.,-udv bml as t.. .h- 
,„„raue the vaiuial; an.l t. .urth. the -.an. - ; ^ 
,lH- .leser. hav.^ .hifle.l in a.ul cncae. t,. 
a Imti.lrc.l ueiicrations many .'' "h nu -i 
valuable ot tlu-c rdics nl a byc.'no au'' 
' 'iv,e 1- such a wealth n, archeol, .gical 
,,,.,.„,,, h,T. that .-no scar,-eU kn.-.u- uhetv 
,..,,..„„,„ l„,w tociuleii-ethemos, „up.u-, 
,.„, „„„., im.. the space all....c. -. a n- ~ 
aper arii.-li 1 shall not attempt t.« .1.-. nb. 



tins reason rooms were ma.le tot ilu 
,„.„ ,,i- the Soul and f-.r the h.abitalion 
|),,nli!e < >uc can har.lK beli<\e .t- b- 
„,„„, ,lu- duis.le.l f..riii- that tlie>. w.i. ■ 
l.rreil -o l.mu a-.:-.. 1 uiH eiu-l.-e with iln- 
,,,.,ie'.- a i.b..t..gr.iph of the mnirnu -.t 
|-..xpr- L;r.-,it bml.!. 1. aiul kiu.wn , 
I'baroah --f die ^ >ppi . ---on.- wli.. .Ii. •: ' 

,l,a,i thr.'e th..nsan.l ^ai- a^.. I !u_ I'-itul 
,„, l..ii-.a- -wax- ill.' -cl.i.f: tlf ' '-- ^ 

r, iit.i II the i^i^aiitu- -lain. - wh,. li . ' 

,, ,.,1 ,,\.,u- Ilu- Xil.'. and tlu xoi.-i •lo' -^ ' • ; 

„,,w .leiiiaiul the making ..f ' hts ' 

-traw " but tlu- mortal r.inain- o| '' 

,„■,■, xiM.lU v.call the .lax- ,,t 1-1...' - l'o„.i 

age. 

\\,th the mummies are main minmiiv c i-e-. 
„,„!,. e.were.l with buToulvphtCs. -om. o, - 
„;„,,,,,„,-.l with pictures 111 .oli.rs. aim nu-t 
..,,!„-,„ covered with a lul npoi, which ,,o 
,. face mask an.l an ....time ... th. lof.„ -. 
tlie rHcnpant- The pro, e-- 
bn.lies have Ueen (.re-. i\<.', ' ^ ^ ^ ^ 

litit the fact that tluv have on 

.,nd -iirxix..! the c.-.nnil. -- .h '• ^^ ^ ^_^ 

■ '■'■"'"'■''^ .^<.. ■■ du"' a .' bnnia.i 

.■,,11ecti.>n ol -tatiu - an.l m ■:-. 
;,,'Us.b.as,satidbi..lsttmnp..it-<hctbous 



1.. ].. 
W 



aiul 

,1 X 



■ nilar n-' 

■It all li 
,•.„,„,„,, ,l,..-.e ol the two alici. 
Mnm.'-- "I'l til. X ..'- 
n t.. 1 ' 

■ • . /u.l .111.1 t,'- 

,_ .,• ,, -MiaM ,,-,rt .-I 
ple.l 1.x ■ ' 
Ileal. -■. '■ 
i. .■•;|.| will 

, ,i.,.-ix , n 1 1 ■-"' 

,;il|C.ll.l1X .ill' 
Mill, .in.l til' 
^..111. .1 tl-i 
e!er. 

,„,n -o ^ 
l,.,!!/ atui 



1 liul.. 
.iinnii .ill 
.., , ,1 -liippi 

i!, .]■'■ 



In I r .11 . ' ■' 

.-,1 l-'.gxpt after 
.'. . V and .-oiilil 

. 1 ill,' 111. -I 
I'hdKS 

! reriav 



\ 1.1V 

Uct'ii 

,.,| ;ln, -M-li mam 

. I.. ,-.,,.,. h 

\iimi, .11. hi- wile. 
,1,, M. . I- u;i-.,l 
'iam- 



inui 
ii .in- 



MMltV •• ' 

ili'cklie-s 



s v\lii.ti ill.- 
-till .1 inx -!. 1' 



1'.,, 
1,11.1 



statues 



1 !,■, 

i,pl all' itbel .if li 
.1,, ,,n 1 . < 

i,,!. ..| llle 1' li'l'^' 



i« fArtv-five feet in hei-ht, 

.. _ . , ....,, ,.-.l>r,l 



n tnc 
fur 



EsVird gebeten, sich bei eventueUer Beantwortung in diesem Blatte enthaltener Anzeigen auf diese Zeitschrift beziehen zu woUen. 



26 



Export Implement Age 



11 



Bremsen fiir F&hrzeuge 

Vor neunzchii Jahren stattete Herr Morgan 
Potter, in Fishkill-on Hudson, N. Y., U. S. 
A., eine Reihe von Fahrzeugen niit seinen 
Federbremsen-Blocks aus, von denen fast alle 
sich heute im Gebrauch noch befinden und 
ebenso leistungsfahig sind wie seinerzeit, mit 
Ausnahme allerdings der Abnutzungsliufe und 
Spulfedern, die hie und da vom neuen ersetzt 
werden miissen. Viele dieser Bremsen haben 
sich noch voUkommen gut erhalten, wahrend 
die betreffenden Fahrzeuge an welchen sie 
angebracht sind, nutzlos geworden sind. Sie 
sind zum Gebrauche bei anderen W'agen ver- 
wendet worden und diirften sich vom neuen 
jafirelang dort dienstfahig erweisen. Es :st 
Herm Potter das anerkennenswerte Privi- 
legium zu teil geworden, seine Erfindung in 
fast alien Staaten dieses Landcs eingefiihrt 
zu sehen, von Maine bis Californien, und 
konnen dieselben hauptsachlich bei besser- 
wertigen Kaleschen und Wagen vorgefun- 
den wcrdeii. Wagenbauer crkliiren diese 
gebrauchstiichtig in jeder Weise welch Wun- 
der denn, dass zahlreiche Brcmsenblocks nach 
Europa und anderen auswartigen Landern, 
einschiiesslich Australien, Neu-Seeland und 
den Hawaii Inseln in reicher Anzahl ausge- 
fiihrt werden. Herr Potter glaubt, dass 
selbst fiir die billigsten Wagen die allerbesten 
Bremsen nicht zu gut waren und dass irgend 
eine Bremse die nicht vorhaltungsfahig genug 
konstruirt ist, mehr air nutzlos sei, ganz 
abgesehen davon, ob das Fahrzeug leicht oder 
schwer beladen ist, das Geld ist in solchem 
Falle immer so gut wie fortgeworfen. 
Wahrend seiner ganzen Fabrikantenperiode 
hielt es Herr Potter, dass Qualitat die erste 
Wichtifkeit in seinen Federbremsenblocks 
bitde und hat er demgemas auch nur Material 
bester Qualitat in der Anwendung jedes ein- 
zelnen Bremsenteiles gebracht. 

Der technische Teil hat sich stets durch 
feinstes Machwerk ausgezeich net, keincrlei 
Ausgabe wurde in der Anfcrtigung hiezu 
gespart und die alleniexicsten Maschinen 
werden fiir diese spczielle Arbeit verwendet. 
Von Zeit zu Zeit sind auch mcrkliche Ver- 
besserungcn vorgenomnien worden und heute 
steht dieser Artikel thatsachlich ohne Gcgner 
im Markte da. Nich selten fiihlte sich Herr 
Potter von der Notwendigkeit durchdrungen 
etwas besseres fiir den allgemeinen Gebrauch 
zu schaffen als den stets beliebtcr werdenden 
nichtjustirbaren Hebel, und ist es ihm auch 



jiingst gelungen eine "voUstandig justirbare 
Federbremse" auf den Markt zu bringen, die 
in verschiedenen Gattungen und Mustern 
licrgestellt wird, jede derselben kann im 
Augenblick dienstfahrig an Kalesche oder 
Wagen irgend einer Facon und irgend eines 
Gewichtes angebracht werden. Diese neue 
Bremse ist jeder moglichen Priifung unter- 
zogen worden und hat sich wahrend eines 
ganzen Jahres alien Umstanden in bester 
Weise angepasst *und fiillt heute ein viel 
jahriges Bediirfnis wtirdig aus. Jede Bremse 
ist garantirt und wird zuverlassigen Kunden 
genie auf Wunsch zur Probe iibersandt. Bald 
wird auch ein neuer Katalog vom Erfinder 
herausgegcben werden, der diese Bremse mit 
den event, verschiedenen justirbaren Teilen 
genau zur Ansicht zu bringen verspricht. 
Im Katalog werden auch alle iibrigen Assorti- 
ments von Potters Federbremsenblocks ver- 
treten sein, die in verschiedenen Mustern 
und vierzchn Grossen hergestellt werden und 
sich sowohl fiir Stahl- oder Gummireifen 
bestens anpassen. Ein Exemplar dieses Kat- 
aloges kann auf Verlangen frei erhalten wer- 
den. Man adressire bios Morgan Potter, 
Fishkill-on-Hudson, N. Y„ V. S. A. 



Das Erdbeben in VaJparaiso 

Ein grosses Erdbeljen in \'alparaiso, am i6 
August, zerstorte einen grossen Teil der 
Stadt und vernichtete hunderte Leute in den 
Ruinen der zusammenfallenden tiebaude. Zwei 
ungeheuere Stosse wurden friihabends in 
Zwischenraumen von nur wenigen Augen- 
blicken gesptirt, und, gleich dem Erdbeben 
in San Franzisco am letzten April, wurden 
dieselben durch Feuersbriinstc in den ver- 
schiedenen Stadtteilen fortgcsetzt welche sich 
auf die ganze Vernichtunga-.\rea ausdehnten. 
Der Verlust an Menschcn-Leben soil auf 
2000 geschiitzt werden, wahrend der 
Giiterverlust sich auf zwischen 25 bis 
50 Millionen Dollar bezifFert. Auch in 
Santiago sollen die Stosse sehr heftig 
gewesen sein und der Verlust von Leben und 
Gut ein bctrachtlicher ; auch mehrere kleinere 
beiliegende Stiidtc und Dcirfer sollen schwer 
darunter zu leiden gehabt haben. Valparaiso 
ist ein verschanzter Seehafen und eine 
Haupthandelsstadt an 2der westlichen Kiiste 
Siidamerikas. Seine Einwohnerschaft bezif- 
fert sich auf etwa 150.000 Scelcn und vielleicht 
auch mehr. Die Stadt hat grosse industrielle 
Etablissements, eine Navigationsschule, ein 
Museum fiir Naturwissenschaften imd diverse 
Akademien und Kollegen. 



Der aus\?artige Handel erweitert sich 

Uer auslandische Handel der Vereinigten 
Staaten ist wahrend des letzten Jahrzehntes 
weit mehr gewachsen als die Einwohnerschaft 
derselben. Tabellarische Berichte die fiir dai 
Fiskaljahr 1906 vom Statistischen BureaU: 
des Handels- und Arbeitsministeriums zusam 
mengestellt wurden beweisen eigentiimlicher- 
weise, dass, obgleich die Einwolinerzahl seit 
1896 nur etwa 20 Proz. gewachsefi, die Einfuhr 
57 Proz. und die Ausfuhr sc^ar um 
109 Proz. zugenommen hat. Die den 
grossten Gewinn aufweisenden Einfuhr- 
sklassen bestehen aus Fabrikationen, und 
Fabrikationsmaterialien ; sie weisen ebenfalls 
eine Zunahme von etwa 95 Proz. auf. Auf der 
Ausfuhrseite nehmen landwirtschaftliche Pro- 
dukte und Fabrikationen den ersten Platz ein. 
Die ausgefiihrten landwirtschaftlichen Pro- 
dukte und Fabrikationen weisen wahrend des 
letzten Jahrzehntes eine Zunahme von etwa 
70 Proz. auf, wahrend die event. Fabrikation- 
en derselben etwa 163 Proz. zugenommen 
haben. 

Diese Handelserweiterung erstreckt sich 
auf fast , alien Handelschentren der 
Welt, doch macht es sich ganz be- 
sonders in der Handelsverbindung zwisch- 
en Asien und Oceanic bemerkbar. 
Der europaische Einfuhrhandel weist eine 
Zunahme von etwa 50 Proz. auf, der von 
Nord-Amerika belauft sich auf 80 Proz., von 
Siid-Amerika auf 80 Proz., von Asien und 
Oceania auf ebenfalls 80 Proz. und von Afrika 
auf nur 18 Proz. Der europaische Ausfuhr- 
handel weist eine Zunahme von etwa 78 Proz. 
auf, der von Nord-Amerika steht mit einer 
Zunahme von 164 Proz. da, Siid-Amerika 107 
Proz.. Asien und Oceania 232 Proz. und 
Afrika 41 Proz. 

In Anbetracht dieser Handelsverkehrs- 
Erweiterung haben auch ungewohnliche Ver- 
anderungen in den verschiedenen Reiserouten 
stattgefundcn. Vergleicht man die Verhalt- 
nisse in 1906 mit denen von 1896, so weisen 
die atlantischen Hafen eine Zunahme von 
nicht weniger als 329 Millionen an Einfuhr 
und 426 Millionen an Ausfuhr auf, gegen 57 
Millionen Einfuhr und 262 Millionen Ausfuhr. 
Die Hafen der stillen Kiisten weisen eine Zu- 
nahme von 17 Millionen Einfuhr und 57 Mil- 
lionen Ausfuhr auf. Die nordlichen Grenzen 
und Seehafen erfreuten sich einer Zunahme 
von 42 Millionen Einfuhr und 116 Millionen 
an Ausfuhr, wahrend die inlandischen Hafen 
eine Zunahme von etwa neun Millionen an 
Einfuhr aufzuweisen haben. 




Export Implement Age 



*7 



m 



J 



m 



jincient Egypt 

By Mr. Wiluam Jennings Bryan. 



Wc have been moving among the oldest 
monuments reared by man. and they niakc 
the rest of the wodd seem young. In Japan 
a r.uddliist toniplc, built twelve hundred vear^ 
ago impressed us with the youthtulncss of 
American institutions ; in China wo were shown 
temples that had stood for twenty centuries 
and were told of customs and laws even older • 
in India we found a pagoda some twenty-five 
hundre.l years old, aiul visited the site of a city 
whose foundations were probably laid more 
than three thousand years ago; but liere we sec 
the nnunniied forms ot human beings who 
lived two thousand years before Christ was 
born, inspect the handiwork of men who lai.l 
down the chisel before Abraham appeared 
up..!i the earth. U^k upon colors that have 
withst.K.d tlie changes and defic.l the elements 
of fortv centuries, and handle wheat that grew 
upon tiie banks of the Nile long before Joseph 
built granaries for Pharaoh. The guides count 
centuries as trippingly on the tongue as a 
treasury expert, or an insurance magnate, 
handles millions. They discuss dynasties that 
rose an.l fell when luiropc was shrouded n. 
darkness, before the light of history dawned 
upon the Ganges an.l the Yangtse; they de- 
cipher hierolvphics that kept their secrets for 
ages an.l lead one among ruins that astoniMi 
by their innnensity as well a. l.v the artistic 
>kill which they reveal. 

Back in the mistv past— in the prehistoric 
ncriod-there were two Egyptian kingdoms. 
;,„e .KTCupving upper, and the other lower 
Firvpt This was prior to 2,500 I.. C. and 
fioni the stirring scenes engraved upon stone, 
one can imagine the conflicts which took place 
along the fertile valley of the Nile before 
Menes, the eariiest known ruler ""'t^l'l/'if 
two kingdoms, assumed the title. Lor.l of .oth 
I anils, fashioned a double crown for him- 
self and adopted the lily, or lotus, and the 
nai.vrus as svmbols of his consolidated empire 
Wc are probablv indebted to certain natiira 
IKculiarities of Egypt for the preservation o 
iH- unique evidences of ancient civilization 
fonn.l here. First, there is but a small ar a 
,.f tillable land stretched along the most won- 
.lerfnl of rivers an.l guanled on either si.le 
bv a barren waste that offers greater protec- 
don than a wall. Secn.l. the c nnate of 
Fgvp is .Irv. an.l there are no drenching rains 
to deface an.l no vi.-lent changes of tom- 
neraure to diMUte^rato. Third, the temples 

^^" Lb. ar n„i^Mvelv hnilt as to di.. 

eourage the vandal; an.l tonr.h, the sands 
the desert have drifte.l in an.l co.^c..de. It^ 
a hundred generations many of the mo.t 
valuable of these relics of a by-gone age 

There is such a wealth of archeological 

treasures hero that one scarcely know. wheTC 

o begin or h..w to condense the ni.^^i nnport- 

u th gs into the space allotted to a news- 

pape article. I shall not attempt to describe 



things chronologically because some of the 
temples have been added to by different king-- 
an.l dvnasties until they represent the art an.l 
life of many hundred vears. The temple at 
Karnak, for instance, bears the impress ot 
l-"uvpt's rulers from Thutmosis to the Kame 
se-^' and from the Rameses to the Ptolemies 
a period of some twelve hundred years, an.l 
the building of the numenms pyramids cov- 
ered even a longer time. 

\s the tourist usuallv begins a tnp through 
iCgvpt with a visit to Cairo, he is likely to 
find the great Egvptian museum, the > u- 
seiim of Gizeh, a fitting intm-luction to ln> 
subsequent investigati.ms. Here one hn.ls 
samples of all the anti.iuitics of the country 
excepting the pyramids and the temples, and 
there are mummies, sarcophagi, statues, car- 
vings and hieroglvphics from these. A cn- 
.i.lerable space is devoted to mummies, some 
from the tombs of kings, but many of ni<.re 
humble rank. The early I^gyptians beheve.l 
that man was composed of several different 
entities. First, there was the body, and sec- 
..nd, the double— a sort of invisible f..rni re- 
nr.Klncing the features of the body. Next 
came the soul, represented as a human hea.le. 
bird and then a spark of the divine fire .ralle.l 
Khu which has been translated as "the Lnm- 
in.»us." It was to prevent the .lepartur.- ..I 
these attending forms that embalming wa- 
resorted to. By suspen.ling the .lecomiM.sition 
of the bodv. they thought that they couM 
preserve the connection between it an.l tlie 
Double the Soul and the Luminous, and bv 
nravers and offerings these cnil.l be save.l 
irnm the secon.l death. This is the explana- 
tion of the mummv given by archeologists. 
The Double, it was suppose.l. never left the 
place where the mummy rested, an.l the Soul, 
while it went awav l.> coninume with llie 
gods, returned from time to time. aiKi It 
this reason rooms were ma.lc for the reeep- 
ti..n of the Soul and for the habitation of the 
Double One can hardly believe as he l..ok< 
,11.011 the shriveled forms that they were •;.- 
t.'rre.l so long ago. I will enclose with thi^ 
article a photograph of the mummy .-f 
I'gvpfs great builder, and known as tlie 
IMiaroah of the Oppression," who die.l iv.ove 
than three thousand years aL;o. ilie naii.l 
no l.mger swavs the scei.ter ; the eves l..ok no 
more upon the gigantic statues which he m-,:, 
tered along the Nile, and the voice <loe-: no 
now demand the making of "brick^ witl'.ont 
straw " but the ni.^rtal remain-^ r,t this tani.-u- 
rnler vividlv recall the .lavs <.f Ura.U h..n.l- 



age 



With the nntmmies are many iminimy c >m-. 
s,,mo cover.d with hieroglyphics. s..mc or- 
nameiue.! with pictures in coL.rs. and mos 
of them c.->vered with a lid upon which ar. 
a face mask and an outline ot the form '^t 
'he oe-eupant. The process by which theM- 
bo.lies have been preserved ^^ f[^ ?>^^:, 
but the fact that thev have outlived d> nastier 
ad irvived the countless changes of so manv 
Jenturies ^ives to them a lasting interest. Tin 

,Xct,..n .'f statues and images of f>^^^ 
beings, beasts an.l binls run up into the thons 



an.ls Some of these are heroic in size, others 
are 11. .t more than an inch in height; some are 
stn.ng some beautiful an.l s..me grotesque. 
Granite, both red and black, alabaster, stone, 
iron, bronze and clay— all have been brought 
into requisition for this work. Some of the 
br.m/c has, up.in analysis, been fonn.l to con- 
tain practically the same combination of met- 
al, as the bronze now used. There are even 
Maiues in wood, and one of these— a photo 
graph of which I secured— attracted my atten 
li.m because the head an.l face bear a resem- 
hlance to the late Senator llanna. It is called 
•Sheikh el Beled" or Milage Chief; that it 
should have resisted decay iox m..rc than forty 
centuries is little less than marvelous. 

While the excavators have been searching 
for historical recr.ls, they have occasionally 
found treasures of great pecuniary value. A 
considerable <inantitv of gol.l an.l silver in the 
form of jewelry has been unearthed, and the 
museum contaitis specimens of exquisite work- 
manship which not only display the sknl of 
the artificers, but portray the habits and cus- 
toms of the eariy Egyptians. 

The museum also cfmtains enough of cloth, 
fonn.l with the mummies, and of pictures cl 
l.ioms, to show that weaving was an m.lus- 
trv with which the people of those days were 
familiar. 

I'.ut we must leave the museum and pro- 
ceed to those masterpieces which are too large 
for any roof save that f.mned by the vaulted 
skies. ' I am. however, constrained to offer 
,.ne criticism of the nuiseum in passing. It is 
nn.ler the control of a l->cnch society, and the 
only catalogue obtainable is printed in French. 
\\ bile most of the exhibits bear a brief de- 
scripti.Mi in both French and English, some are 
labele.l in French ami only a few not at all. 
As there are no gui.les to show a visitor 
throu-T^h the numerous r.xims and point out the 
principal obiects ..f interest, those wh.i ar.' un- 
able to rea.i I'rench are at a great disadvan- 
tage Considering the number of English an.l 
\merican tourist- it '^eems strange that mor.- 
attention shrMild n.-t be pai.l to their accmm.. 

dation. . , t- . f»«._ 

|.,„ ,., tbe temples. W e re.iche.l Eg>-pt after 
the regular tourist -eason was over and couKl 
not visit all the rnins. We < -lected the tmst 
,-.,,„. ,„s. those .,1 the two ancient cities Thebes 
and Memphis, an.l they alone wmiM repay 
"a viMt to l-u-ypt. The present city ot Euxor. 
f,,„r Inm.lre.i aii-l twenty miles from Cairo. 
covers a small part of the vast area once occu- 
,ie.lb^ -Ihm.lredgate.l Thebes. n the very 
u-irt of the city a m.imni..th temple has been 
,„;„Hl where kings uorsl„,,pe,I t'i'-""f^'^^"l=">; 
rnmis It uas built .lunnu the eighteenth 
dvn.a^tv . r.. C. ^V^^ on the site ot a still older 
san.tnarv an<i .ledicate.l to .\mmnn his wife. 
\ ,t and their -.n. Khons, the M....n-god. 
W- of the column- are twelve feet in <ham- 
;tV . m..re th.-m .-..nv tV.-t in height, and stip- 
por -reat blocks of re.l granite twenty feet 
' ;nd f.nir feet in width an-l thickness^ 
s ne of the columns represent c Ins tered 
pTUs and have .-ai.tals shaped like the lotus 

d In the temple are a number ot statues 

y Kame<^es IT sonic Mttinc some standmg. 

<;,;^:?;h.^e:;atues is fortv-five feet in height 

.,,,,1 another of less dimensions was tinearthed 
o"lv about a vcar a^o. When excavations 
,,, re begun houses ...e s.reiielv res 'tig on the 
„,,, of the tcmi.le, and it i-^ believed that fur- 



1' 



Cs'wird gebeten. rich bei eventueller Beantwortung in diesem Matte enthaltener Anzeigen auf diese Zeitschrift beztehen zu woUen. 



INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



' "11 



tl 



m 



4 

I 



38 



Export Implement Age 



ther excavations will disclose an avenue Icad- 
inpf to other temples two miles away. 

In front of the lAixor temple is an obelisk 
of pink granite, a part of which ertcted in 
pairs, and the companion of this one was re- 
moved some years ago in Paris. These great 
monoliths come down to us from the period 
when the Kgyptians worshipped the sun. and 
they were intended to represent his rays. The 
oldest Egyptian obelisk is at Heliojv lis. not far 
from Cairo, and is sixty-six feet in height. It 
is supposed to have been erected 2000 to 2200 
P.. C. but it is in an excellent state of preser- 
vatinii and bids fair to bear testimony for 
ages yet to the reverence felt by t'le ."iiciciUs 
for the sun. At one time TTcliopdlis \v;is a 
thriving city and is referred to in the Bible 
as "( In." but to-dav the obelisk stands alone in 
the midst of cultivated fields, all the buildings 
having disappeared. 

While the obelisk at Heliopolis outrank-; all 
others in age, the one at Karnnk, in the 
suburbs of Luxor, has the distinction of laing 
the tallest one yet remaining. It is eight and 
a half feet in diameter at the base and ninety- 
seven and a half feet in height C eight and a 
half feet less than the obelisk at Rome). The 
obelisks were cut in a single shaft, most nf 
them from granite quarries near Assnan. 
These quarries are more than five hnndre ' 
miles south of Cairo, and it is snT>p'<=ed thai 
the obelisks were transported on the Nile to 
the places where they have since been found, 
hut how thev were hanilled or placed in pnsi- 
tinn no one kivnv ^. 

The temple of Amnion, at Karnak. is gen- 
eralK regarded as the most int'^re'^tii'g of 
temple ruins in F.gypt. It is the work of many 
kings, one adding a sanctuary, another a pylon. 
another a court, etc. — each placing his car 
touche. or seal upon his work. This ttnple. 
which wn'j officiallv styled the Throne of the 
World, covers an immense area. One ;)ylon, 
or gateway, is more than three hundred f*et 
wide, nearly a hundred and fifty f'eet high, 
and has walls sixteen feet thick, ("no court 
rovers almost a thousand square yar.ls, and 
one aisle leads between pillars sixty-nine feet 
in height, about twelve feet in diameter and 
supporting capitals of eleven feet. The -'one- 
used in this temple are of enormous size, 
and thev were probably raised to their pi -i 
tinns on scaflfolding of earth — this being aKo 
the method employed where attempt*; ha\e 
recently been made to restore fallen column-. 

The hieroglyphics upon the walls, the col- 
umns, the obelisks, and the statues, .nftor re- 
maining a pU7?le for ages, have been I'cci 
phered and woven into a consecutive hi-ti>r\. 
This was made possible by the discov.ry, in 
i"<)0. <^f what is known as the Rosetta •^loiif 
(now in the British Mn';eum'> at the nuiuth 
nf the Rosetta arm of the Nile by a French 
engineer n.Tiiied Bouchard. This stone b<ars 
a decree inscribe*! in three languages — ancient 
Egyptian, modern Egyptian and Greek, and 
furnishes the key to unlock the secrets of an 
cient history. 

The pictures represent sacrificial ceremon- 
ies, domestic and industrial scenes, battles, 
triumphal processions — all phases of life, in 
fact. One wall contains, in hieroglyphics, the 
treaty of peace which Rameses II concluded 
with the Hittites, while another wall repre- 
sents Rameses III holding a group of priso- 



ners by the hair and raising a club as if to 
strike. Close by, the god Animon is deliv- 
ering to him chained representatives of diflfer- 
eiit vanquished nations, the faces being so true 
to life that the Israelites brought from Pales- 
tine can be easily distinguished from the E.thio- 
|)ians and Nubians of the south. One of the 
lieads .seen often in the ilrawings resembles 
"the yellow kid," and the donkeys an- exactlv 
like those seen to-day. 

Euxor and Karnak are on the east bank of 
the Nile, but Thebes required both siilcs of 
the river for her gre.at population, and the west 
hank is also rich in evidence of ancient civili- 
zation. The Rameseum is here and would 
attract more attention if it were not oycr- 
>hadowed by larger temi)les ; here also are 
the "Colossi of Memtnon," one of them known 
t<i literature as the singing statue. This is 
described by Strabo and Juevenal and bears 
many inscriptions in Latin ami Greek made 
by those who visited it under the Roman rule. 
Hadrian Irmked upon it 150 A. D., and a 
poetess of his day declares that the statue 
greeted the emperor. It is supposed that the 
sound which for many years issued from the 
head of the statue just after sunrise was 
caused by the change in temperature, the gran- 
ite having been cracked ; at any rate, the sound 
ceased when the statue was repaired. It nnw 
sits, silent, and with its companion gazes 
upon the barley field that reaches out in every 
direction from their feet. 

But more interesting than the Raiueseum 
or the Colossi are the totnt)s of the kings, 
.sotne forty-two of which have already been 
discovered. At this point the wi st side of the 
valley of the Nile is walled in hv a range of 
limestone hills, one of which bears a striking 
resemblance to a pyramid. — C Could it have 
suggested the idea of a pyramid for a tomb?) 
Leaving the valley of the Nile about two miles 
north of the pyramidal hill, there is a small 
dry valley which wends its way back through 
the hills and terminates at the f(M)t of steep 
walls just west of the hill mentioned. 1 f ere 
are the tombs, hewn in the solid rock, the 
most elaborate of which is the tomb of Sitlio- 
or Seti, the father of Rameses TI. This tomb 
burrows into the hill to the depth of three 
hundred and thirty feet, a flight of stef>s 
leading down through difTermt levels and 
diflferent chambers to the final vault. The 
walls are covered with figures in colors repre- 
'•eming the king in the net of making offer- 
ings to the various g. ul^. There are also 
drawings illustrating s,-, tn- in this world and 
life as it was supposed to be in the next world. 
Some of these pictures portray a hell where 
the wicked are punished with fire, and t!ier< 
are also drawings which have been interpreted 
to the resurrection and judgment. 

Not far away is the tomb of "the Pharaoh 
of the Exodus" which contains a granite image 
of the king, and close by this tomb is another 
in which the mummied form of Pharoah still 
reposes. Grave robbing, however, was so pop 
ular an amusement in those davs that the 
bodies of nearly all the kings had been re- 
moved for safety to a secret vault which was 
so carefully concealed that they were not found 
until the nineteenth century. 

.At Memphis, which is only about eighteen 
miles from Cairo, there are tombs of less ini- 
poi lance, colossal statues of Rameses II and 



Export Implement Age 



"9 



the sarcophagi of the sacred bulls. In one of 
the tombs or Mastabas, as tombs of this style 
are called, are some of the drawings that have 
hein most widely reproduced. In one place a 
hoy is fattening geese by the stuffing process: 
in another, cranes are being fed ; here, rams 
are treading in the seed, and there, cattle 
iiorned and hornless are being driven through 
a river. Agriculture, ship-building, carpenter- 
ing and other industries are minutely pictured. 
\\ bile the human figures are stiff and angular, 
the birds and beasts are so exactly like what 
we see to-day that one could easily believe 
iliini to have been drawn by a modern artist. 

The sarcophagi of the sacred bulls, twenty- 
iour in number, and hollowed out from single 
pieces of granite and arc covered with im- 
mense slabs of the same kind of stone. Each 
is large enough to coiUain a good sized animal 
and some of them are covered with hieroglv- 
phics giving the pedigrees of the blue-blooded 
occujiants. These caskets of the royal line rest 
in subterranean vaults hewn out of rock and 
eomiected by spacious halls. 

Still nearer to Cairo, only six miles away, in 
fact, are the great pyramids of Gizeh — Cheops 
and Khcphren. These have been described so 
often that any elaborate comment upon them 
might weary the reader. We climbed to the 
-umniit of the largest, and by doing so not onlv 
gained an idea of the immensity of this three 
million cubic feet of stone, but obtained an ex 
eellent view of the green valley on the one 
side and the yellow plain of shifting sand upon 
the other, for these pyramids stand upon the 
dividing line between Egypt's far famed fertile 
lands and one of the most barren of earth's 
deserts. W^e also followed the narrow passage 
which leads to the center of the pyramid an<l 
peered into the empty granite sarcophagus 
w hich for more than four thousand years kept 
the body of the builder concealed from the 
sight of man, and when we came out, half 
crawling and half climbing, each assisted bv 
tu o Arabs.our nuiscles as well as our memories 
testified that we had .seen all of this stupen- 
'lous pile. 

At the foot of these two pyramids stands 
the silent Sphinx, and near it a granite temple 
almost as old. The Sphinx itself is a little dis 
.q>I>ointing because photographs often show it 
in the fore-ground and the pyramids behind it. 
atid it thus appears relatively larger than it 
really is. It rei)resents the body of an animal 
with a human head and is cut from a huge 
-tone that juts out into the valley. It was a 
grand conception of the brain of one long ago 
forgotten and is the oldest product of the chisel 
of man. It has outlived unnumbered genera- 
tions and seems to mock at time. Its posi 
lion by the pyramids is a fitting one, and look- 
ing upon it and them one is awed by the sen-e 
of their antiquity and recognizes the appr. . 
priateness of the lines of the lecturer. Stod- 
d;.rd: 

I'.tenial Sphinx ; 
The ])yraniid«. are thine : 
Their giant summits guard thee night and dav : 
< 'ne thee they look when -tar- in s|ilendor 
shine, 
(Jr while aronnd their crests with sunbcaius 
play ; 
Thine own coevals, who with thee remain 
Colossal genii of the boundless plain. 
Eternal Sphinx ! 




WC BUILD 

EDQines and Boilers 

From 3 to 50 tiorse-power, in a 
variety of sizes and styles 
specially well ailapted for 
foreign trade. Importers in 
position to bantlle such goo<ls 
will find it to their interest to 
j;et our catalog. Prices and 
full information furnished 
promptly on application. 

James Leffel 4 Co. 

Num. 138 
Springfield. Ohio. U. S. A. 



WIR BAUEN 

IQascliliiiiii otil Ktssel 

Von 3 bis 50 Fferdekriiflen in 
eiaer Auswahl von Grossen und 
Sorten, die sich t)esonders fiir 
den auswiirtigen Handel bestens 
eignen. Ei n f uh rh and 1 e r 
welche in der Lage sind solche 
Waaren zu fiihren, durften 
finden, dass es sich in ihrem 
Interesse erweisen wird, sich 
unsern Katalog, der Preise, 
voile Beschreibung, usw., ent- 
halt, kommen zu lassen. Der- 
selbe winl franko auf Verlangen 
sofort versandt. 

James Leffel 4 Co. 

Num. 138 
Springfield. Ohio. U. S. A. 



Noui Construifoni 

DEs umm \ mw 
u m CHAiiiiifs 

de la force de 3 u 5" chevaux- 
vapeurs et dans une varitte de 
dimensions et de genres sp6- 
cialement adapt^s d Tuidustne 
^■trangcre. Les importateurs 
qui ont occasion de s'occuper 
de ces articles trouveronl grand 
int^rcl & obtenir nos catalogues, 
nos prix et de complj^tes in- 
formations qui sont fourmes 
promptement sur demande. 

James Leffel 4 Co. 

Num. 138 
Springfield. Ohio. U. S. A. 



MANUFACTUBED BY 



fit 71 



Lansing Wheelbarrow Co. 

New York Olllce : B 21 Produce Exchange 

Lansing, Michigan, U. S. A.Vmtoo- 



Quincy 
Beauty 

Riding 
Plows. 

For use with 

Horses or 

Cattle. 



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Collins Plow Co. '^ "'T "" "" ^ 



Eli 

Baling 

Presses. 




Medal « and 
Diplomas 
World's 
Columbian 



Quincy Steel 

Lever 

Harrows 



Exposition, 
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All kinds of 



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Grade 



Collins* 

Hardened 

Steel 

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Special attention given to Packing of Export Goods. 



IN USE AT PRESENT TlflE IN 
MANY PORBION FIELDS. 



SEND FOR 

CATALOOUBS. 



A 



30 



Export Implement Aoe 



Export Implement Age 



31 



Some Recent Inventions 



The followini; nccnt iiivciitinns have been 
specially reiMirtid fur Tni: I'.xi'him Imi-i.e- 
MENT A<.K liv Mr. TxKoy I'arkn. Snlicitor of 
Patents. 707 C Street. X. W.. W asliiii,i,'ton. 
I'atents. 7<'7 C. street, X. W .. Washington. 
D. C. 

Disc Uang-Piow 

No. 825,145, Charles H. Mclvin, Molint. 111. July J. 1>»06 

A wheeled plow, consisting of a supporting- 
wheel havintr an axle mounteil for lateral 
angular movement and provided with a ver- 
tical arm, a lever ti> raise said wheel and axle, 
a laterallv angularly movable draft device. 



for actuating the counter-shaft in unison with 
the third shaft, a vibrating lever, trunnions on 
the vibrating lever, and engaging with the 
cam-grooves, a finger-bar adjustably con- 
nected with the front end of the frame, a 




and a connection including a freely longitudi- 
nally extensible element, between the said 
draft device and the vertical arm of said axle, 
to move the latter angularly in unison with 
said draft device, and automatically com- 
pensate for the vertical movement of the axle 
and wheel. 




laterally, and means whereby the forward end 
of the machine mav be adjusted to throw the 
forward cultivator-disk downwardly, thereby 
causing said disk to plow deeper than the disk 
oil the rear portion of the machine. 

The invention consists of a main sup- 
porting-frame, an auxiliary or floating frame 
looselv connected to said main frame, culti- 
vating disks carried by said floating frame. 



Mowing Machine 

No. 825.825. Stephen DougUs Grnnm. Concordia. Kan. July '0, '06 

.\ mowing machine comprising a frame, and 
a shaft jouVnaled in the frame and provided 
with wheels for supporting the frame, a 
sprocket-wheel on the shaft, a second shaft 
journaled in the frame, a sprocket-wheel 
thereon, a chain connecting the sprocket 




Mckk-bar slidably mounted theri.-on, and a 
l)itmaii-ro(l connecting the sickle-bar to tin 
vibrating kver. 

Side Delivery Buncher for Mowers 

N-i. 825.827. N«l»oii G. Hanru. Kokomo. Ind. July 10. l""©* 

ill this invention, the driving-wheel actuates 
the gear 30. and it causes the arm 32 and post 
3,^ to revolve rearward from the post shown 
ill the illustration, an<l such movement carries 
the rake from the position shown to the dotted- 
line |)Osition, and during that movement of 
the rake, the ui)per end of the post 33 will 
travel from the outer end of the slot 43 to the 
middle of the Ix-nd in said slot, when the post 
33 will Ik.' then bearing against the jirojection 
44 in the bar 41, so as to throw the rake far 




DUj ,' f . u.u.uiJjJ4ii 



iiit.ugli ill the rear to ili>oharge the bundle. 
I'he further revolution of the crank-arm 32 
will cause the return of the rake, an<l during 
such return movement, the post 33 rides on 
the cam, as shown in dr»tted lines, and lifts 
the rake over the bunch that is being fonned 
to a iK)sition in front of it, when the post rides 
down off the cam and i)erinits the rake to 
move (joun ujMin the pl.itforiii in front of the 
hunch, and then it is again swept rearward. 



No. 826,418. 



Rolling Disc Cultivator 

Henry B. Furr. Dayton. lU. 



wheels, a >ecoiid sprocket on the second shaft, 
a third shaft journaled in the frame, a sprocket- 
wheel thereon, a chain connecting the last- 
named sprocket -wheels, a roller on the third 
shaft, and having a cam-gnwve in the cylin- 
drical face thereof, .-m oil-cup partially en- 
closing the roller, a counter-shaft journaled 
in the frame and beneath the third shaft, a 
roller on the countershaft having a cam- 
groove in its cylindric.1l face symmetrical with 
respect to the first-named cam-groove, means 




lui 



means to raise and to swing said frame, and 
means wherebv when said floating frame is 
swung, said disks will be automatically turned. 



Beet Harvester 

No. 815,325. I.W.Arthur, March 20, 1906 

This invention is a beet -harvesting machine 
of the tvpe embo<lying a foliage cutter, a top- 
ping device, and beet-pulling devices, and has 
for its particular obji-ct to produce an inex- 
pensive device of this character in which dur- 
ing the travels of the machine in ojieration the 
beets will be properly and uniformly toppeil 
and raised from and deposite<l upon the sur- 
face of the ground, c)ne wherein injury to the 
beets during the to])ping an<l pulling opera- 
tions will be obviated, and one in which the 




.(dfzf 



July 17. I'D* 



The object of this invention is to provide a 
cultivator by means of which dry clods of 
dirt, weeds, antl other nibbi.sh on top of the 
ground may be thrown away from the growing 
plants and fresh dirt thrown onto the latter 
svithout danger of plowing up or injuring any 
of the plants. 

Another object is to provide a machine of 
this character, having means whereby the 
frame carrying the cultivator-disks may be 
raised or lowered, means for shifting the same 



frame carrying the cutting and topping devices 
will be automatically regulated lo accord with 
surface irregularities, thereby insuring the 
topping operation being properly performed. 

The harvester comprises a main frame, a 
carrier operatively connected therewith, a fol- 
iage-cutter sustained by the carrier, a verti 
cally-a<ljustable shoe pivotally connected in 
tear of the cutter and adajited to bear on the 
gronndsurface, and links pivotally connected 
with the shoe and havinj.; slo(-and-bolt con- 
nection with the carrier. 



The capital invested in .\mcrican manufac- 
turing establishments in itK>4 amounted to 
Si2.68r),2r)5,673, aconling to recent figures of 
the Census I'.ureau. This shows an increase 
in five years of 41 per cent. The gain in the 
products of inanufacture was 30 per cent, the 
i(Ki4 aggregate being $1 4,802, f 47,087. 



II 
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ix;&i 



Monitor Seeding Machinery 

We make Broadcast Seeders and 
Sowers and Drills 

of all sizes and styles ; with Hoe, Shoe, 

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We Claim to Make the Best Seeding Machines on Earth 

Machines that will produce the best results. Space is too limited 
to go into details, but if you will make request we will send 
illustrations and full particulars. 

MONITOR DRILL COMPANY, '•«'*,:'»••"«" Minneapolis, Minn., l). S. A. 



.vTvj»«'v\»v-«i%^:^;i;^ 



1900" IfL, WASHING MACHINES 

Tkc "1900" Btll-Be«rli| Wishioi Nackiiet repre 
senl over twenly-one ytars' practical experience, 
and. unlike any other washer uimn the market, 
it Ml tear ■■< wear (he tarmeiil. ) nt toss nnd 
tumble the gurint nt thruiiKi' < Mhirlpaol at water. 
thuAlartiai (he water Ihrtugh th<' IMicst ur caartcsl 
lakrics. cmisnig the clotlus to t)ecoine ABSO- 
lUIElT CIEAN. wilkoul ktiliat ar scrakkla*. wilkaal 
waar ar (ear. ft wilkaul Ike as< al ckeaicals. 



Awarded Gold Medal at World's 
Fair, St. Loula. 



■Ef EBENCE : Einl Nallaaal Baak al Bia«kaalaa, N.T. | 



Send orders direct or throuKh export houses. 
In latter caae send duplicate to u» to avoid errors. 




Illustrated Catalogue Sent Pealpaid on Requeat 

The "1900' WASHER COMPANY, Binghamton, N. Y., U. S. A. 







Do You Want 

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AN "AD" IN THE 

••Export Implement Age" 

an independent journal, devoted exclusively 
to export trade in American Agricultural 
Machinery, Farm Supplies, Vehicles and Ve- 
hicle Materials, Machine Tools, Hardware 
Specialties, Etc., will bring you inquiries. 
Write for rates. 

THE "EXPORT IMPLEMENT AOE" 

1010 ARCH STREET, • PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



JOHN DEERE PLOWS 



TURN THE SOIL 
THE WORLD OVER 



These plows arc the embodiment of sixty-eight years of 
experience— that is why they are the highest type of perfce- 
tion in the art of plow building. Constructed u\^n strictly 
scientific principles, of the liest materials, by artisans of the 
highest skill, in the largest plow factory in the world. 

Manufactured in all sizes aud for all purposes, from a seven- 
inch walking plow to an Kngine C.ang turning fourteen feet of 
soil at one time. 

Exported in Lar^e Quantities to All 
Parts of the Globe 

Boxed compactly for foreign shipment and in most con- 
venient form for handling. 

We solicit correspondence from importers, either direct or 
through American forwarding houses. 



DEERE & CO. 

MOLINE, ILL., U. S. A. 



32 



Export Implement Age 



WINDMILLS IN AUSTRALIA 

Special Agent Harry R. Burrill writes from 
rrcmantle, western Australia, giving the re- 
sults of his investigation as to the use of wind- 
mills in that country. American wuulmills 
control the markets -.f western Australia, al- 
though their prices hoM tirin at 20 per cent. 
higher than those manufacture.l in the I'mte.l 
States :m- imported into that Slate, and be- 
cause of their (luality. strength, and durabduy 
they have attained mu h widespread populantv 
that tin i>,.~MUilily of their being displaced by 
those Ml luirupean or even western Australian 
make appears exceedingly remote. Mr. I'.m- 
rill adds: 

-The geared mills are unif..rmly preferred, 
ahhough a small i)ercenlage uf power mills 
may be foun<l. The small demand fur the 
power mills is doubtless largely attributable to 
I, If tliey perform their work 



the exce' 



.1 e<i>t. 



to the satisfaction ui those who have instalknl 
them, and, in point of workmanship and etifi- 
cicnc'v, are not regarded as inferior to the 
geared machine. Windmills are utilized prin- 
cipallv in western Australia for irrigating and 



they have made a signal failure. Because of annually, but the demand is for the better 
■ . , f , -1 and of course, more costly windmill, while 

either the use of a cheaper ntaterial or poorer ^^^'/^Xen a corresponding falling off in 
workniansiiip r.r both the Australian windmill ^^^^ inciuiries for the lower grades. When the 
cannot stand wp against a wind velocity with stronger, heavier, American windmill was put 
the American-made article, and in other re- ,,n the ii'iarket it immediately created the fav- 
spects it is regarded as distinctly inferior. For orable impression that it still holds and all 
,bese reasons, and notwithstanding a dififer- attenipts of local manufacturers to d^^ 

supersede it by imitation have tailed. 

••.\s a usual thing American exporters pack 
the windmills properly and they arrive here 
in good condition. Isolated cases of careless 
packing might be cited, but complaints are 
tew. ivr the home shippers are evidently fully 
informed as to the requirements for the long 
voyage and but infrequently fail to provide 
-iititicient protection for the goods. 

■In sharp contrast with certain other Ameri- 
can commodities imported into western Aus- 
tralia windmills arc usually shipped according 
to specifications and at the time designated in 
the order. The importance of such action on 
the part of the American exporter and the 
necessity for cordial co-operation between 
manufacturers and importers can not be too 
>trongly emphasized in order to maintain and 
develop' this market, and the disposition thus 
far manifested has been especially gratifying 
to the dealers of this State. 

The customs duty is at present 12/2 per 
eeiit. on the comi)letc windmill, and it is not 



etiee in price of approximately 20 per cent, 
in f.ivor of the Australian windmill, the de- 
mand continues strong for tin mills manufac- 
tured in the United States, and the outlook 
for a steadil\ expanding market is encourag- 
ing. .\merican windmills, while they control 
the market, are in keen competition in west- 
ern Australia; but the rivalry is a good-natur 
ed one. and no importer can be found here who 
will depreciate the value of a competing wind- 
mill, lie may try to demonstrate tlic super- 
iority of his .irticle, but not .it the expense of 
a similar one mamifaclured in the I nited 
States. 

'The dealers of western Au>>tralia are, liow- 
ever, unanimously of the opinion .that if the 
American manufacturers desire to maintain 
their supremacy there should be no decrease in 
the weight or strength of the win<lniills now 



domestic purixises, but in the northern part oi ^.^p^^j^ted and all parts of the machine shoul.l believed that the Federal ( .ovcrnment contein 
the State they are extensively used for keep- j,^. .,<; simply made as possible. These precau- jilatcs its increase, at least for some time to 
L)f water for cattle. While ti,,ns the v regard as absolutely necessary, and come. In atldition to this, the wharfage 



r.tircitt1e,nen a. is the case with others mak- while they do not apprehen.l any pronounced charges are p. M. a ton and the cartage costs 

wUli tatticn en. a. insi-.U-uion departure from the present style ot manufac- ' 

ing use ol the windmill, the co^t ot installation ^^^1^ ^^^^^ ^^.^^^ ^^^ »^^^^^^^^ .^ ^^^^^^_ ^. ^^,.^„,i„^. 

and operation is of prime importance, owneis .^^^ tVar'that the continued and growing 

of herds will not permit the question of a few popularity of the .Xmcrican wimlmill on this 

dollars more or less, to stand in the way of market n'lay induce carlessness in construction 

(,r provoke a tendency to cheai)en the mater- 
ial. With the standard maintained, .\mcrican 



securing an article that may be depended on 
to provide an abundant and permanent supply 
of water lor their stock. An inferior windmill 
might fail at the most inopportune time to d<i 
its work properly, entailing serious loss. an<l 
cattlemen have long since ceased to be "penny 
wise and ixnmd foolish" where the initial cost 
of the windmill i- concerned. 

"Mills used for this purpose are Usually in- 
stalled in comparatively nniotc regions ac- 
cessililr i'hU hv rough c>iiniiry mad-. Cartai,'! 
is expensive, and the hauling of fuel for ])ow<r 
machines would be an expensive item. '1 he 
method usually employed is to met water 
tanks with a capacity from i.ooo to jo.noo or 
more gallons, and coimected with these tanks 
is a large watering trough for tlu' use of the 
cattle. This trough is prevented from over- 
flowing bv the neie~sary mecbaiiiral eouiri- 
vances, but it is always sutticieiuly tilled with 
water to supplv. when re(|uired. the needs of a 
thirsty herd. Tlu windmills utilized for this 
purpose arc inexpensively operated without 
the use of engines. 

"Australian manufacturers have attempted 
to copy American uindmills with a view to 
producing an article which will enable them 
successfully to cf)mpete with those imported 
from the United States, but up to this time, ac- 
cording to the dealers of Perth and Fremantle, 



ibout is. M. a ton. The gratifying position 
belli by the .\merican windmill in the western 
Australian market shows conclusively that 
([u.dity is a prime re(|iiisite to success, and that 
in the necessariis of life (for so windmills may 
be regarded in this country) a higher price is 
uncomplainingly paid if the goods be up to 



predominance in the windmill trade of western the standard established by the manufacturers 
\ustrali:i i~ a^-ured. Tlu' -ale^ are lucre.isinu ,<\ the United St.ites. 



EXPORTS OF AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 

Ar..i vT- TWKUVH MONTHS BNDINC ArousT— 



ARTICI.HS AND C01NTRIH> 



190c. 



1906. 



1904 



>9<»5 



1906. 



Mowers and reapers, and parts of | 47.'-5.S' 

Plows and cultivators, and parts of ... 219.1611 

All otlier, and parts of ... .... 557.o5<> , 

Total 11,249.769 

Exported to — 

United Kingdom $ 25718 ^ 

Belgium '.'99 1 

France 10,519! 

Germany io,t»i 

Italy 2,474 

Netherlands .i.97» 

Russia 45.505 

Other Europel I9."56 

British North America I55.2i5> 

Mexico 5X.330 

Cuba 2'. 53.5 

Argentina 497.o5*> 

Brazil '".'JS^ 

Chile '35.591 

Other South America 35. 140 

British Kast Indies 3.72o 

British Australasia i52.f''>5 

Philippine Islands 3.974 

Other Asia and Oceanica 7.f>J6 

British Africa ^''^i^ 

All other Africa 4.t>^' 

Other Countries 3.273 

ToUl ' 11.249,769 



iil 

; '1 



t 719.444 


$10,083,769 


f 9,486.553 j 


110,234.197 


' 5^,499 


2,372,271 


2.390.675 i 


2.812,939 


^^99.573 


5,59J.''77 


4.516,022 1 


6,440,54s 


I1.777.516 


118,048,717 
J1i,6i6,m5o 


116.393,250 


$19,487,6.84 


|123.'7,> 


f 864,896 


f 900, 264 


6.531 


211,888 


171, Jot, 


245.307 


14.526 


2,922,765 


2.653,8(.5 


2,9'3.945 


22,722 


l,229,6.S8 


1,193,250 


1.750,952 


1,708 


131. "67 


231 ,394 


.'56,574 


1,194 


221,839 


195.1.55 


510,172 


7,9^2 


2,929.514 


3.741,6,50 


3,399.149 


4",n22 


1,227,051 


1,0.83,773 


1,3^6554 


50 1,39" 


2,702,279 


1 ,..93,824 


2,168,568 


40,321 


247,562 


2S5.057 


371,0,50 


.S.554 


93.5,3s 


177.707 


97.0S2 


565.e'4i 


2,673.9^' 


3.071.7.M 


3,126.437 


5,7.30 


32,.3S3 


143.0,84 


64,474 


93 ."S7 


152,651 


184,067 


314,724 


3S.f'33 


Si. 633 


156,769 


206,105 


5,oS3 


46,944 


35,691 


1 49969 


35 -'.192 


i,"io,3H 


556 66(1 


M8,6l5 


l,eS9 


20,372 


23.587 


48,416 


6.176 


38,160 


103.152 


354.003 


.3^,147 


357.113 


.303.994 


257.773 


2.387 


86.721 


102,566 


126,217 


1 ,958 


15.205 


20,215 


21,334 


|i.777.5'6 


$18,048,717 


1' 6,393- 250 


$19,487,684 



II 
II 



Export Implement Age 



THIS JOURNAL 

■ R e.viOBively .lev.ite.l K. .Ani.rienn aurieuliural implements 
and machinery, pumps. wi.xlmiUs, farm tools, dairy siip- 
pliea and hardware .-peeialtie,- and it 

REPRESENTS THE OLDEST AND LARGEST 
HOUSES IN AMERICA 



who preaeiit their i;o.,il,- tliroituh our cohinin««. 
li«h each month. Kaeli is.siie full of facts. 



We puh- 



One Dollar (Four Shillin:^s is tht- .-ubscriptiou price 

for<i.\K VKAk (12 i-~u. -) which also entitles you to receive 
information liy writing us direet, on any sul.j. el connected 
with the Hues we represent. The Export Implement Tl^e 
in certainly worthy of >our interest an. I support. 

We shoul.l he pleased to place you in eoiuMiunieation with 
the manufacturers ol any special class of machinery that you 
desire to purchase, and you may also eonsider our services 
at your further eonitnand. 

Sl^n Enclosed Blank and remit »>y International 
Money Order to K.mokt I.mi'LE.me.nt Ace, No UHO Arch St., 
Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



"♦♦♦♦♦< 



DIESE ZEITSCHRIFT 

ist aiisschliesslich amerikanisclien landwirtliscliattlichen Ma 
schinen und Gerathen. sowie der Fabrikatu.n von I'umiien, 
Windmotoren, Landwirthschafts-Werk/.euKen. Molkcreiaus- 
stattungen und den diversen Branclien der Stalil- und hisen- 
waaren-lndustrie gewidmet. DieselWe 

VERTRITT DIE ALTESTEN UND DIE BEDEUTENDSTEN 
FIRMEN IN DEN VEREINIGTEN STAATEN 

die ihie Kr/eusnisse durch die Spalten dieses Hlaties /lu 
Anzeige bringen. Das Blatt erscheint mouatlich Jede 
Ausgabe enthalt luir werthvolle Thatsacheii. 

Bin Dollar {vier Mark) ist der Alwunenieiitspreis pro 
Jahr (12 Ausgaben) ftir dieselbe und jeder Ab^jiinent 1st 
aus.serdem berechtigt an uns in seiner Muttersprache zu.sclirei- 
ben und sich Auskunft iibtr irgend ein Tlienia der yon uns 
vertretenen Branchen zu erbitten. Das Export Implement 
Ajfe ist wahrlich Hirer Unterstiitzung und Hires Intetes.ses 
wiirdig. 

Wn .sind gerne erbbtig, Sie niit den Fabrikanten irgend 
welcher Maschineiisorten, fiir die vSie sicii interessiren <lurtten. 
in Verbinduiig zu setzen und wird es luis treuen. vvenii Sie 
sich unserer Dienste in irgend welcher Weise bedieneu woUten 
Man unterzeichne das heigefugte Schema und sende den 
Betrag durch "Internationale Geldanweisung •' an das 
Export Impi-Kmknt Agk, No. ioto Arch Street, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., r. S. A. 



CE JOURNAL 

est exclusivemeiit consacre aux machines et instruments agri 
coles Ainericains, ,Kjmpes. mouluis a vent, outils de ferme, 
appareils pour laiteries, articles speciaux de quincadlerie. 

IL REPRESENTE LES MAISONS AMERICAINES LES 
PLUS ANCIENNES ET LES PLUS VASTES, 

ks iiuelles otTrent leurs produils par lintermcdiaire de nos 
colonnes Le journal est mensuel. Chaque num^ro abonde 
en fails d'utilitc pratique. 

Abonnement pcmr un an: Un Dollar (quatre schellln^s 
ou einq francs. 1 Tout abonnc qui voiidra bieu nous ccrire 
directenieiit recevra tons les renseignerments qu'il pourra 
dc.irer sur les inatieres dont s'occupe le journal. L'Export 
Implement Ti^e est assurement digne de votre intcret et de 
votre concours. 

Nous serions heiireux de vous mettre en relations avec les 
fabricants de n'importe quelle categoric de machines .lue vous 
pouvez desirer vms procurer, et nos services vous sont. 
d'ailleiirs, coinpletement acquis. 

Signer le bulletin chlnclus el envoyer un mandat de 
poste international a I'Expokt Impi-EmknT AgK, No. ioio 
Arch Street. Philadelphia, Pa. i.l<:tats-Unis d'Amerique). 



ESTA REVISTA PERIODICA 

se dedica exclusivamente d los instrumentos y maquinaria 
agricolas de manufactura norte-americana. bombas, molinos 
de viento. herramientas de hacienda de cami>o, utensihos para 
leeheria \ especialidades en ferreterias, y 

REPRESENTA A LAS MAS GRANDES Y ANTIGUAS 
CASAS DE AMERICA, 

riue ofrecvn s„s jinxluctos fabriles en nuestras columnas. Se 
]\ publica todos lo-, meses. Cada muiiero estd Heno de hechos. 
♦ Un Peso euatro Ghellnes al ano es cl precio de la 

Mibscrii^Mon U2 ntimeros), y la subscriiK.on os da derecho 
,-i recibir informes, si nos escribis directamente. s..bre cualquier 
iMinto relacion.du con el ramo .le negocios .,ue representamos. 
1,1 Export Implement Tl^e es .i la verdad digna de que 
OS interescis ix.r ella y coutribuy.iis d sii sost<:-n. 

Ten.lrenww niucho tjusto eii ponerus en correspondencia con 
lo. fabricanle. de cual-puer,. el.ise especial .le ni.iquinar.a 
,,ne deseeis cMuprar. y p..<le,^ tamhien c.nsiderar ntiestre.^ 
servicios a vuestra disposici.'m, 

FIrmad la Planllla en hianeo Inclusa, y remitid 
vuestra suhscriiKi6n en un (V.h. Postal luternacion.'il a la 
ExroKT In>,...,.:mknT A-;.., No. kho Arch Street. Philadel- 
phia, I'.i., V. S A. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦••» ♦ ♦♦^ 



No. IOIO Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



34 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



NEW ZEALAND'S INTERNATIONAL 
EXPOSITION 

The New Zealand Tnternational Exhibition, 
to be hd.l at Christchurch fmm Xovenibcr i . 
UiOh, until April i;. uK)/, besides havini; cx- 
oellent denion>lraliun> <m a lar^e scale of 
the colony's jjreat industries and resources— 
gold and o.al niinint:. timber millinp, moat 
freezini;. nv->1 working. elc.-wiU have manv 
features .'i special interest to visitors troni 
other countries. Anionji these will be fine 
courts illustrative of New Zealand-s unuiue 
natural hist.^rv. the marine department s acjuar- 
inm. the (knermnent's splendid .lisplay ot the 
minerals in which the country is so rich, the 
fernery containing gar<lens of the many beau- 
tiful ferns for which Xcnv Zealand is tamou^. 
the art jjalleries illustrative of the colon> > 
wonderfully fine scenery, and the model < .ex - 
serlaml. containing cleverly designed workmg 
models of typical geysers and boiling sprmgs 
an<l fumaroies in the Rotorua thermal /.one. 

Realizing the interest shown bv tbe outside 
world in all that concerns the Maori race, the 
govermnenf of the colony has ma<le arrange- 
ments for as complete an exhibition as possi- 
ble of the pictures<|ue life, the peculiar arts, 
ceremonies and amusements and the ancient 
nnhtarv glorv of the natiye inhabitants ..f 
New Zealand. T- this end a stockaded vd- 
lage covering several acres, similar to tho.e 
occupied by Maori tribes in the early .lays, is 
being established in the exhibtion grounds. 
This will be inhabitated by families of the 
\..rth IslaiKl Maoris. iiiclu<liiiR a number ol 
people from the famous Irewera cHintry. the 
last home on the Maori lore an<l arts and cus- 
toms of the olden time. The village, with 
its loftv palisa.led walls, its luigT carved 
figures.' the curiously .lecorated dwellings, its 
carved f'Kxl stores, its earth ovens, etc.. will 
be a complete replica ..f the homes ot the 
ancient Maori. an<l within its l)oun.ls will be 
a large model of the ..Id hill forts or pas. 
with the vari..us .lef.nsive w..rks. ramparts 
citadel an.l watch f-wer. In the village will 
be found Ma<.ris. attire.l in their garments ..I 
flax, engaged in the arts ami pastimes of their 
forefathers, weaving the flax fibre into clothes 
and mats and baskets, carving figures ami 
weapons fn.m w.io.l. cutting an.l polishing the 
povm.uini ..r L;reensto,ie. the jewel st.«ne of the 
stone age, < 'n an ailjoining lakelet there 
will be a fl. <i "' Maori can.>es. including 
specimens of the slatilv dccorate-l war canoe 
or waka-taua. 

liesides the displays given by the resulenls 
of the villai:.', there will be war danc.s, poi 
dances and other perfornianci - by large vis- 
iting parties fr<nn the vari.iiis tribes of the 
North Island, Tbesc will be given in the 
large arena for sports in the park, ami will 
afTord one of the last opportunities of w itn.ss 
inp the exciting war pageants of this rele- 
bratcd fighting race. Particularly interest 
ing to ethnologists will be the few pure 
blooded survivors of the Maori people, the 
once numerous aborigines of the Chatham 
Islands, who will be brought to the exhibtion 
and will reside in the native village. 

Not only will the Maori people be well rep 



resented, but also a number of their Polyne- 
sian cousins, the islanders of the Cook group 
and adjacent atolls and islands of the great 
South .Sea. now under New Zealand's juris- 
iliction, will occupy a tyjiical South Sea Island 
village, with all the accessories illustrative of 
life in their tropic homes. They will bring 
their caiux-s ami give displays of their occu- 
pations, ceremonies and festivities. 

X'isitors to the exhibition will not only enjoy 
a summer residence in a healthy, beautiful 
city, i)Ut will be able to see the principle won- 
der ])laces ami holiday grounds of the ciii">iiy 
at small cost. There will be reduced rates for 
coastal and railway passengers, and rail ami 
steamer concessions to ami from all parts of 
these islands have been arranged. I'tvery facil- 
ity w ill be provided visitors, iiftt only to attcnrl 
the exhibition, but also to visit the w.iii.ler re- 
gion .)f the Rotorua Cicyscrland, the grand Al- 
pine district of the South Island, the beau 
tiful Southern Lakes and the womlerful sotmd 
and canons of the iMordland Xatioiial Park; 
the west oast, with its lakes and forests and 
its enormous glaciers, and the numerous olher 
fine scenic districts of the col.>nv 



A NOVEL POWER PLANT FOR 
A FARM 

In this day of pgantic hydro-electric power 
plants it is usually only such installations as 
involve the most difficult engineering prob- 
lems or surpass all others in size that create 
ciniiment. I>y way of contrast the lUcclriciil 
World calls attention to an electric power and 
lighting plant on a farm in the interior of 
Xew York State, which is probably the onlv 
.me .if its kind in the I'nite.l States; certainlv 
there can be few like it. if any. 

Through the farm in (pusti.ni flows a 
stream normally running about 4,000 cubic feet 
per minute, and on the bank of this stream 
the uiii.pie power plant was constructed. .\ 
small dam of the "flow" type was constructed. 
.V> feet wide with concrete walls and mud sills 
.ind planked with 4-inch lieml.>ck on a heavv 
timber frame, the latter being imbedde.l iii 
and bolted to the walls and sills. A double 
jilanked apron receives the fall of water that 
flows .>ver the dam and prevents the under- 
mining (>{ tlie walls. As the head of water 
is only 4'^- feet it was necessary to install a 
coinpar.itively large wheel. v> inch vertical 
type, which is rated at 17' j horse power at 1 1.^ 
revolutions per minute under the working head 
lit 4'j feet. The jxnver create. 1 by this wheel 
is transmitted ihroiigli a pair of bevel mort.tise 
gears, belted t.» a generator of 12' j-kilowatt 
caf)acity at J50 v.)lts ami i.irr) revolutions 
per minute. .\ bare aluminum cable, strung 
on cross arms m. lunted on cedar poles set 
about 100 feet apart, carries the electric eur- 
rent fmm the generator to the farm buiM- 
iilgs 1,500 leot ilistant. The wheel pit walls, 
which also support the flume and that in turn 
the power liotise. ar. of concrete, Vmilt on a 
L^doil gr.nil founflation. the b.ittom nf the 
pit being planked to prevent washing. The 
plant has now been in ojK-ration for about Ave 
months, night and day, with attention oiil\ 
tw.i or three times a week, and without a go\ • 
eriior of any kind to regulate it. An increase 
of water in the stream to about ten times 
the normal quantity made ild apparent change 
in the volt.iL;e Twent\-five lOcati.llc power 
.'_'0-volt lamps ni the house ami 8 in the 



barn give very good illumination. A 4,000- 
watt heater, which has replaced the customary 
coal stove, keeps the temperature of two 
rooms resjiectively 16 by 13 by 7J/2 feet and 
12 by \J, by y'/^ feet, each having two win- 
ilows, at about 75 degrees Fahrenheit when 
the outside temperature is about zer.>. A J-i- 
horse jiower motor runs the cream separator, 
churn and grindstone, this comparatively 
large motor for the purpose being necessary 
Xo luing a heavy separator bowl up to a 
speed of ab. lut 7.400 rcvoliuions i>er minute. 
It is proposed to do the c.ioking as well as 
furnish power inr all farm machinery to 
which it can be applied as s.Ktn as it is v>ossi- 
ble to make the change to electrical i)ower. 

This novel plant has already attracted con- 
siderable inquiry from progressive farmers, as 
there arc many places throughout the country 
where small water power, from ten to fifty 
li.>rsepower. could lie utilized and where plants 
similar to the above could be installed. It is 
interesting to note that quite recently a small 
manufacturing industry has been established 
nearby, so that here is a novel and perhans 
exaggerated illustration of the "return to the 
soil" idea, offsetting the drift to the cities. 
The installation opens the way for electrifieil 
farms to become in.histrial as well as agri- 
cultural centers even if on a small an.l modest 
scale. — Comvicrc'htl America. 



WORLD'S HARVEST SEASONS 

Theri' is a pr. "cession .if see.l-time. blos.som, 
and fruit ar.)Uiid the gl.ibe which never ends, 
it is harvest-time .mi the earth at every time 
of vear. just as thire is always sunlight shin- 
ing somewhere and always darkness some- 
where else. 

January sees harvest ended in nutst ilistricts 
in Anstrrdia an.l \eu Z.al.ind. while the peo- 
]»le of Chile and .>ther countries of southern 
Si>tith .\merica are just beginning to reap the 
fruits of their toil. 

Ipiper I'.gypt an.l Indian begin and coiitimie 
harvest through the 111. mtlis of I'ebru.iry and 
.March. 

April enlarges the number with harvest in 
S>ria. Cyj)rus. coast of I'.gypt, .Mexico. Cuba. 
I 'iTsi.i. ,ind \si,-i Min.tr. 

Ma\ is a littsy time in Centr.al .\sia. Persia. 
\lL;eri;i. Morocco, southern Texas, h'lorida, 
China, and J;ip;m. 

June calls forth the liar\esi ju California. 
< >reL;on, southern liiiied Slates, Spain. Pf)rtu 
gal. It.alv. Unngarv, Knm.inia. Turk.v, I <a 
nubi.in .*^tates. southern b' ranee. C.nece, ami 
Sicily. 

Inly sees harvest in b'tigland, Xebraska. 
S\\ it/erlaml, h-wa. Illinois. Indiana. Minnes- 
ota, I'pper Canail.i. northern I'raiue, Cer 
in.inx. .\ustri.i. ami folaml. 

August continuis tli.^ g.itluTing in the Brit- 
ish IsUs. I'ranie. (',,riiian\, I'.elgium, H.1I- 
land. Manitf)ba, l,o\\er C.inaila, neiimark, an.l 
Uussia. 

Septeuilier nil. s uortiiein Seotlaiul. south- 
ern parts lit Swediii ;iiid Norway, as well as 
the cold islands of the North Sea. 

October is the harvest month for corn in 
.America and for hardv ve^etaliles in northern 
Sweden, Norw,i\. and Ir.lan.l. 

In No\emln f. h,ir\est times begin in S. itttli 
\frica. Patagonia, ami South Australia. 



Flf. 779-No..85t «nd 10!4 



I 




(4 



OHIO 



i» 



Weight; No. 8H 
16^ lbs ; No 
lOH, iHo it>. 



CUTTERS 

I-or cutting hay, corn, cl<jver, alfalfa, 
chaff or olht-r fod.lers. 20 .litTereiit 
sizes, ill various styles, weinhiiiK from 
40 lbs., up to 4.500 lbs. 

Kasy ruiniinn. for hand or power; 
very large capacities; strong rigid con- 
struction; very durable. Machines fur- 
nished to cut any length from % inch 
up to I 'j inches. 

Send for finely illustrated catalog 
with particulars and prices f. o. b., 
New York. 

The Silver Mfg. Co. 

SALEM. OHIO, V. S. A. 




PUMPS 



For All Purposes 








Scientific Hydraulic 

Hendersons Full Circle Hand and "se Grip 

Power Cold Tire Setters Are laHof and Money Sitin 



IAAnafj^tur<d br 



THE STANDARD TIRE SETTER CO. 



I H. 1I.40RR0W. Brinhlon. Ont.. Gcn.wl ARont (or Cjnidi. 
Ort.r. from 0.h« CouMri*. May b. PUc.J Di»c. of Tl.™.Kh Ezpor.cr. 



KEOKUK 
IOWA 
U.S.A. 



cistern and Pitcher Spoat Pompa 
Hand and Houne Force Pomps 
Deep Well Pumno and Standarla 
Iron, Brnas Burt Brah-.-lined Cyllndera 
Windmill 3- Way Pompa and Standarda 
Deep Well Power PomplnB BoBtnes 
Artesian Well Btaas Working Barrcla 
llydrao ic Rams and Pomping Motors 



Triplex Power Pompa for every dntr 
Rotary and Donble-Actlng Pompa 
Power Pompa for All Porpoaea 
Hotse Power Pomps for Various Dotlcs 
Railroad and Factory Pomps 
Spraying Pompa and Noeilea 
Garden and Hand Fire Engines 
Irrigating Pompa and Cylinders 




Our General Catalogue in Hng- 
lith, containing 300 pages, will be 
•ent lo importers upon applica- 
tion. 

We also issue a General Cata- 
logue in Spanish, and a Special 
Catalogue of our Triple! and Deep 
Well I'ower Pumps. Also one of 
Spray Pnmp*. 




THE DEMING COMPANY 

S7\LEM, OHIO, U. S. a. 

Xew York Sales Otrice .- 50 and 58 Pine Street 





Send for Advertising Rates 




WIND MILLS 

HaUaday Standard. U. S. Solid Wheel. 
Gem and Comet 

Pumps. Tanks, Feed Mills. Corn Shellets 
tuid Wood-Sawing Machines. 



f 



MOULINS A VENT 

HaUaday Standard, a U. S. Roue Solidc. 
Bouclier et Comete 

Pompes, Reservoirs. Moulins a Tourraie, 

Egrenoirs de Mais 

et Machines pour sder le Bois. 




MOLINOS DE VIENTO 

HaUaday Universal. Rueda Solida, U. S 
Asegurador y Cometa 

Bombas. Tanques. Molinos de Forrajc. 

Descascaradoras de Maix 

y Maquinas para z^errar madera. 



K'al>lir eti |H<,4 
Ki»('liti in .''M 



V. S. WIND ENGINE 



BATAVIA, ILLINOIS, U. S. A. 



WINDMOTOREN 

HaUaday Standard, Ver. St. massiv. Rad. 
Schild und Komet 

• Pumpen, Wasserbehalter. Futtermtihlen. 
Mais-Enthiilsemaschinen 
und Holzsage*Apparate. 

AND PUMP CO 



\ 



Export Implement Age 



KELLY'S DUPLEX GRINDING MILL | 




=rOii CORJ^ AJ^V GO'S 

Corn With the Shucks on and Jill 
Kinds of Grain 

The only Mill that grinds on both sides of the revolving burr, 
giving double the grinding surface of any other Mill made. Made 
in sizes from 4 co 20 horse-power, and to grind from 8 to 50 bushels 
per hour. Liberal arrangements made with agents. Address the 
manufacturers, 




;i 



U 



™i 0. S. KELLY CO. 



SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 

U. S. A. 



1^ 




IJllllIi 



«iiCEiVfia '^ 



Mnv 



'Agriculture 



, EXPORT, 

Implement AoE 

A Monthly Magazine Devoted to American Agricultural 

Macliinery, Farm Supplies, Veiilcles and Vehicle 
Materials, Machine Tools, Hardware Specialties, Etc. 



TEXTE FRANCAIS 
Papier Rose 



TEXTO ESPANOL 
Papel Amarillo 



DEUT5CHER TEXT 
Blaues Papier - 




Send 3-cent stamp to pay postage > tor our I905 
eATTlLOG, with a full Hat ol rcQUirements la 



Full square, turned head Carriage, 
Star Grade Carriage, Tire, Ma- 
chine, Plow, Elevator and Stove 

Axle, Spring Bar, Saddle, Short 
Spring and other 

PRICES QUOTED ON APPLICATION 

NUTS, WASHERS, RIVETS, ETC 



BOLTS 
CLIPS 



COLUMBUS BOLT WORKS, Columbus, 0., U. S. A. 



USED THE WORLD OVER 

STUDEBAKER 

WAGONS, CARRIAGES, HARNESS, 
_= AUTOMOBILES =^=^= 

FOR BUSINESS USE AND FOR PLEASURE DRIVING 

Primed Nailer Id tnalish or SpanUh 

STUDEBAKER BROS. MFG. CO. 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. SAN FRANCISCO. PORTLAND, ORC, 
KANSAS CITV. SALT LAKE CITY. DtNVER. DALLAS 

Factory and C»ecutlvc Olllceai SOUTH BEND« IND., U. S. A. 



Famous Soil Turners 



EXPORT TRADE 




'Bissett 

Chilled 

Plows 



STEEL 

AND 

WOOD 

BEAM 

PATTERNS 



Wood Beam 
Plow 



They do the work and do it long and well. 

They're made for all kinds and conditions of soil. 

They're low in price. 

Large or small orders can be shipped promptly. 

Catalogue in English, German, French and Spanish 
for the asking. 



The Ohio Cultivator Co. - Bellevue. Ohio 



Vol. XV. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A., NOVEMBER, 1906. 



No. 2 



i 



il 




MORGAN & WRIGHT 

Manulaclurers ol 

High-Gr ade Rubbe r Goods 

AUTOMOBILF TIRES, VEHICLE TIRES, 

HORSESHOE PADS, 

Hose. Tape, Door Mala, Packing, Llll BuMpera. 

Corrugaled Malllno. Pelral Engine Bags. 

Knob Mailing, Creamery Separator Rings, Etc. 



H.rseshoe Pads 



Twi-nly >t;ir, e*|*neme in the inanut.*Lture ^'t Kul'i cr i .!*-«(), 
fitarantct; of i,n:ALiTV of ,;ua<U. CorrespcBtleme lolkitfrj 



MORGAN & WRIGHT, Defrolt, Mich., U. S. A. 



211 W. 47th SI. 
NEW YORK 




Vehicle Tiros- Solids and Cushions 

Furnished on reels in any 

length desired 




Clinrher Aulomobilr Urea 



N«vcr 
oiit of 
Repair 
AlwdYl 
Rtjdy 
to Work 



Whipping Atuchmtnt 



But and Simpltit in con- 

Itruction of Any 

press rtuulc 




DAVID BR4DLEY 



..Doublr (dm, 
Slftl Hdv Pft^s 



KNOWN THE WORLD OVER 



The David Bradley Baler has very high sundini; with the toreifin trade. It does more than is 
claimed (or it, and does perfect work under aU conditions. Write for literature . We answer cor- 
respondence in any language. 

La Prensa "David Bradlev" de doble e»c*iitrica de accro para embalar Heno e» birn 
conocida en todo el mundo 'jninis se de^cottlpone, y fslA siempre lista para ellrahiijo 
Hs la nirior. y au construcciAn es mdsseticilla que la ninKuna otra prensa jamjl.s fabri- 
cada. rienc un accesorio para lurrar. I,a Hnibaladora •David Bradley" ocupa una alta 
posici6n en el coraercio extrnnjero. Hace niiS> de loque se le atribuye, jr ku trabajo es 
prrfccto bajo todas lai condicionri. l-icilbaficnos pidiendo nuestroa impreaoa. Con- 
icslamos la correapondencia en cualquier idioma. 

I.a Presse A Foin— 4 double came de "David Bradley ' est conntie dans le raondeenlier. 
File n'esl jamais en r^parationH maJR toujours an travail Kile est la meilleure et la pliin 
simple danii «a construction comparfc 4 toutr autre presseraaiiufactur*e. Hlle est munie 
<1 un secoueur A capuchon. I.a Prcsse A Foin ■David Bradley ' a d*j4 une Krande reputa- 
tion d.itis le commerce Stranger. File parfait plus quelle ue pretend et accomplil aon 
travail sous toutes circonstanrrs. Adres-sez-nous pour prospeclni, circulaires. etc. Nous 
r<;pondonsen loules le» langues. 



Made bv DAVID BRADLEY MFG. CO.. 



BRADLtY. IIU D. S. i 



Cable address. "YELDARB." Codes used; "A. B.C., ' 4th and 5th editions, 
"Al." "Liebers" and "Our Own." 



A Plow with Reversible 

Point and Wing 




No. 95 



and tor this reason a plow fhaf is a rapid seller 

The farmer appreciates it because il is always ready with a fresh cut- 
ting edge. The upptr edge is always beitiK sharpene<l while the lower one 
is being used. The matter of reversing them is very quick and S'niple — no 
wrench being required, an<! there is no necessity for turning the plow over. 

We highly recommend this Plow lor Clay, Gravel, Slene ar a Hard Pan Soil 

For Further Particulars and Prices addrea* 

South Bend Chilled Plow Co. 'Tir° 



Lawn Mowers 

FOR HORSE 

anZ HAND USE 

Adapted for all markets 
of the world. 



CHADBORN & 
COLDWELL 
MFG. COa 

NEWBUR6H 
H.Y. 



U. S. A. 




SESD FOR 
CATALOaUB 
AND PRICES 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



MYERS 



RATCHET 
HANDLE 



PIMPS 







\w^i?'°- 






»C^-D 



tfunn 1X5 Say iloois 

Ashiaho.Ohio 



•*■• I «••«••. •*• 'O"" 



B .7-3. Ptwli... E..<-^i.>g<.. NEW VORK 
Jun* lat., 1»06. 






Thev are adapted for deep well use. or can be used wi h larger 
cvlmkr, imn.ping greater .,uantity <.f water for wells ot the same 
depth, cin which a smaller cvlinder is used m connection with the 
ordinary ])unip. 

F. t. MYERS & BRO. 



OKntlormn;-- 

Coluohuii dliico»«Md AinTlen Bn.1 op«nii<l up •> H«w *>rld to elrH- 
l«tirn. ^^^^ <,i,coTT«d «>• "CUSS VAT,VF. SRAT- and dwr.lop«l n" 

P'wv »A"V!J do«a nori for tha hUTKn r»e« man wv »—•" »> 

Hav« vmi iwda your ruirlt In tht« i*"" , » ^ ^pj, 

Thnt IB Wh»».w* ar« dolrc, nnd ar. trylr.i; to put our narx 
hlj^op •»«rj- y»ar «« •»lcUnc«d ty 

THK im;?.S RATeiff.T HAKM.f: PilMPS-. 

THU nr. m«rt. an advanca In «.- at.t. of th- art. aa a lln. 

e.curln<: cr^;^ '.-"..T-c i^"" 'S.^^-^^r'n^-Jr:^ Tn^" .i«.»in uaa and daap 
"""• w, i.r- pr-r"r.d to co«tn..t ,1th ««!." fo th. .xclu.l». 
.„X. „r .KU V,r.iu'Wort;:rvtirr:^trfai on ,«.. but «.tt. u. a. 
Your rror,pt r.,U -lt>. ord-r m«n» profit for you. 



Yours tniX;i 



ASHLAND 
OHIO 



EXPORT OFFICE 

B 21 Produce Exchange, New York, L.S. A. 











BBi rc-McrB-.B«M 



IMPERIAL LINE IMPLEMENTS 



I 



e 
I 




Imperial Stark Gan^ Plow 

Two sizes, cutting ^4 inches and J"^ 
inches ; all soft centre steel. 



Specially constructed 
lor exptirt trade. 



I Imperial Spring-Tooth 
eultivator 



I 



Solid and Gut-Out 
Disc Harrows. 



specially designed for 
working in vineyards. 



Spring and Spil<e' 
Tooth Harrows. 




■ 

I 




Several sizes and styles. 

Full Line Slni^le and Double Furrow 
Plows, Qultlvators, Etc. 

cnTTlLOGVR. So. tOU 
Free on TlppllcaUon. 




THE BICHER & GIBBS PLOW CO. ■'■^' -"•"'" ^-^^r.^^iJJ^'i'.l?''''' "*■ "■' "' ^- *' 



Directory for Buyers. 

The names of firms given below, 
together with the goods mentioned, 
are arranged for the convenience of 
bnyers. Their products are given in 
Uie English, French, Spanish and 
German languages. These establish- 
ments are among the leading ones in 
the United States, are strictly reliable, 
have extensive facilities and are 
prompt in transacting business. They 
fully understand the export trade and 
carefully look after all foreign orders. 
The Export Implemknt Age is kept 
on file in their offices, and any mention 
of the journal will be an incentive to 
even greater promptness on their part 
In obliging you. Inquiries from for- 
eign buyers desiring information rel- 
■tlTe to American agricultural ma- 
chinery or implements addressed to 
Uiem will be given careful and prompt 
attention. Write in any language 
jon prefer. 



Repertoire a I'Usage des 
Acheteurs 

Lea maisons ci-dessous et les pro- 
duits mentionn^s out ^t€ classes dans 
cet ordre pour la commodity des ache- 
teurs de Ungues anglaise, fran9ai8e, 
eapagnole et allemande. Ces ^tablis- 
sements sont parmi les principaux des 
Etats-Unis, ils sont absolument 
s^rieux, ils poss^dent de grandes 
facilites, sont prompts en affaires, 
lis connaissent k fond le cemmerce 
d'exportation et donnent tous leurs 
soins a I'ex^cution des commandes 
qui leur viennent de I'^tranger. lis 
conservent une collection de I'ExpoRT 
Implement Age dans leurs bureaux, 
et la simple mention de ce journal 
stimuleradavantage encore, si possible, 
leur zele et leur promptitude a obliger 
leurs clienU. L'Export Implement 
AGB,desonc6t6,donneraune prompte 
attention aux demandes de ronseigne- 
ments sur machines et instruments 
agricoles am^ricains, que peuvet>t lui 
adresser les acheteurs de I'dtranger. 
Ecrire dans la langue que I'on pr^fere. 



Directorio para los Com- 
pradores. 

Los nombres de los arliculos que 
fabrican las firmas 6 casas mencionadas 
& continuaci6n se dan. para conve- 
niencia de los compradores, en los 
idiomas ingles, frances, espanol y 
alemdn. Esos establecimientos, que 
%e cuentan entre los principales de los 
Estados Unidos, estan completaniente 
acreditados, son diguos de toda con- 
fianza y lienen las mayores facilidades 
para ejecutar y despachar con pronti- 
tud to<los sus negocios. Conocen d 
fondo el comercio de exportaci6n y 
atienden con el mayor esmero a todos 
los pedidos que recibeu del extranjero. 
Los ntimeros del Export Implement 
Age se coleccionan en sus oficinas, y 
toda referencia a esta revista es un 
incentive para atender con mayor 
prontitud aun a vuestros rcqueriniien- 
tos. Todos los informes que pidan 
los compradores del extranjero serdn 
suministrados d la mayor brevedad 
por esos fabricantes sobre la ma- 
quinaria agricola 6 inst rumen tos de 
labranza americanos. Escribidles en 
cualquier idioma que prefirdis. 



Firmen-Verzeichnis fur 
Kaufer. 

Die Erzeugnisse der unten ge- 
nannten Firmen sind fiir die Bequem- 
lichkeit auslandischer Kaufer in eng- 
lischer, franzcisischer spanischer und 
deut.scher, Sprache hier wiederge- 
geben. Genaiinte Elablissemente ge- 
horen zu den bedeutendsten in den 
Vereinigten Staaten; siesind in jeder 
Weise ziiverlassig, besitzen ausge- 
dehnte Facilitaten und erfreuen sich 
eines ehrenvollen Rufes. Alle von 
ihnen unternoumienen Gescliafts- 
transaktionen werden in promptester 
Weisezur Ausfiihrunggebraclit. Jedet 
hierin genannte Haus ist niit dem Ex- 
porthandel wohl vertraut und um aua- 
wartige Auftrage etfrig hemiiht. Daa 
Export Implement Age wird von 
all ditteu Firmen gelesen, dient ihnen 
sozusagen als Informations-Register 
und diirfte soniit eine Angabe dieses 
Journals bei event. Waarenbestellung 
nur zur Aiiregung grosserer Prompt- 
heit dicneii, um p.p. Kaufern in best- 
moglicher Weise entgegenkommen zn 
konnen. Jede auswartige Anfrage 
hinsichtliLhamerikanischerlandwirth- 
scbaniicher Maschinen und Gerathe 
wird nicht allein prompte, sondem 
auch stets sorgfaltige Aufmerksamkeit 
erhalten. Interessenten konnen sich 
jeder beliebigen Sprache zur Korre- 
spondenz bedienen. 



Ambulances 
Carros de hospital 
Krankenwagen (Ambulanzen) 



Baling Presses ( Tlay, Straw, Etc.) 
Presses A foin, pallle, etc. 
Pransas de Embalar (Heno, Paja, etc.) 
Ballen Presscn (fiir Heu, Stroh, u. s. w. ) 

Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Brsdley, tU 

Oollina Plow Oo.. Qulncy. IM 

Brlcl Oo., a«ora«, quincy. III 



Carriages 

Voitures 

Carruajes 

KaJeschen und Wagea 



Dspmn ft Wolf, Oneida, N. Y . 

iHudeb«ker Broa. Mf(. Co., 8*uih Band, lad. 



3 
H 



Carriage Cloth 

Wagentuch 
1 Pano de carruaje 
I Drap de Volture 

Fairfleld Rubber Co., The, Fairlleld, Ooaa. 



Beet Implements (Planting, Cultivating and 

Harvesting ) 
Batteraves (Instruments pour la culture des) 
iMtrumentos para el Cultivo de la Remolacha 

( Sembradoraa, Cultivadoras y Cosechadoras ) 
Ktibengerate (zam Pflanzen, Pfliigen und Ernten) 

Molinc Plow Co., Moline, HI • 



Binders, Self (Wheat, Rye, Oats, etc.) 

Ueuses Automatiques (Bid, Orge, Avoine, etc.) 

Agavilladoras Automaticas (Trigo, centeno avena, 

etc.) 
Salbstbindemaschinen (fiir Weizen, Roggen, Hafer 

n. 8. w. 



Boilers. 
Chaudi^res. 
Calderas. 
Kcssel. 

LettellkCo.. 



Carriage Materials 
Articles pour voitures 
Materials for Carriages 
Wagenmaterial 



Carts (Riding) 
Charrettes (4 sidge) 
Carretones (de Montar) 
Frachtkarren (Reitkarren) 

Dapaon * Wolf Onoida, N. Y. 



Jamea, SprinKflclil, Ohio 



Bolts and NuU. 

Boulons et ecrous. 

Pernos y Tuercas. 

Bolzen und Muttem (Mutterbolzen) 

Oolumhus Boll Worka.Columbna, Ohio , 

Brakes (Vehicle) 
Retrancas (Vehiculo) 
Frein (de Voiiure) 
Bremsen (fiir Fahrzeuge) 

Potter Co., The Morgan, Fiahklll on Hiidaon, N. Y. 



Cider and Wine Presses 
Pressoirs A vin et A cidre 
Prensas para Hacer CIdra y Vino 
K^terapparate fiir Wein und Apfelweia 

LanainK Wheelbarrow Co., Ii«niiint, Mich. . . 



Clothes Washing Machines 
Llnge (machines & laver le) 
Maquinas de Savar Ropa 
Wiische Wasch maschinen 

"1900" WaaherCo,, ninKbamton. NY 81 



Coal Cars 

Charbon ( wagons pour) 

Carros para Carb6n de Piedra 

Kohlenwaggons 

Lanainc Wbeolbarrow Oo., L»na<ag. Mieh. 



Coal Shutes 

Charbon (Dalles i.) 

Canales para Descargar Carbon de Piedra 

Kohlen Lade-Rinnen 

Lanains Wheelbarrow Co.. Lansing, Mich. ...... 2* 



Com Crushers 
Mais (Concasseurs de) 
Trituradoras de Maiz 
Mais Zerquetschmaschinen 

■proal, Waldron & Co., Muney, Pa. t 



Corn Harvesters 
Mais ( Moissonneuses de) 
Cosechadoras de Maiz 
Mais Emtemaschinea 

•Undard Harrow Oo., UUoa, N. T t 



Corn Huskers and Shredders 

Mais (Instruments & enlever et 4 d<chire»- les 

braclies du) 
Desgranadoras y Picadoras de Maiz 
Mais Enthiilsemaschinen und Auswerfapparat* 

Bradley Mfs Co., David. Brwlley, 111. 



Corn Planters ( Hand ) 
Mais (Semoirs de, i main) 
Scmbradoras de Maiz (A Mano) 
Maispflanzer (fiir Handbetrieb) 

Ohio Cultivator Co., The. B«llev«e. Ohio . 



Com Planters ( Horse) 
Mais ( .Semoirs de, \ cheval ) 
Sembradoras de Maiz (para Caballo) 
Mais Pflanzmaschlnen (fiir Pferdebetrieb) 



BraHlry Mfn. Co., David, Bradley, III. 
Moiine Plow Co.. Moline, III 



Export Implement Age 



Corn Shelters (Hand) 
Mais ( H>?renoirs de, a main) 
Oescascaradoras de Maiz (de Mano) 
Mais Pflanzmaschinen (fiir Handbetrieb') 

MarKrilleB Mf(t. Co.. MarxrilleH, 111 

PbU-Ii, A. H..Clark»villr.Tenn 

8pri>iit. Walilroii (t Co.. Muncy, Pa 

• 9tan<l»ril Harrow Co., I'tica. N. Y. . ... • • 
U. S. Wind KiiKine and Pump Co.. BatevU, III. 



4 
S 
3 
3 
35 



Feed and Ensila$;e Cutters 
Coupe-aliments, coupe-ensilage 
Cortadora de Forraje y Ensilaje 
Futter- und Grunfutter (Ensilage) Schnelde- 
maschinen 

Marseilled Mfg. Co., Marseille*, 111 

Silver Mfg. Co., Salem Ohio 



Corn Shellers { Power) 
Mais ( Egrenoirs de ), d energie mecanique 
Oescascaradoras de Maiz (para Fueria mecdnica) 
Mais Pflanzmaschinen fiir Pferdebetrieb) 

MarwilleHMfif. CcMaroeilles, 111 * 

Patch. A H .Clarksville.Tenn » 

Sprout. WaldroiiA Co., Muiicy. Pa J 

Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y • 



Cotton Planters 
Coton (Senioirsde) 
Sembradoras de Algodoo 
Baumwoil Pflanzmaschinen 

Ohio OuUivator Co . The, Bellevue, Ohio 36 



Cultivating Machinery (Hana and (j*rden) 
Culture du sol (Intruments pour la), i main et 

pour le jardiii 
Maquinaria Cultivadora (de Mano y para HuerU) 
Clarten Pfliige (fiir Handbetrieb) 

I)e«re I'low Co., J.ihn, Moline, 111 'J 

Molliir Plow Co.. Moline. Ill '• 

SUndard Harrow Co., U»ic», N. Y • 



Engines and Boilers i Stationary) 
Machines i vapeur et Chaudieres ( fixea) 
Maquinas de Vapor y Calderas ( Pijas) 
Maachinen und Kessel i Stationar) 

I*tfel * I" , 'niii'*. "prinirfleld, Ohio 



36 



Feed Mills 

Moulins pour aliments 

Molinos de Frorraje 6 Pienso 

Futtermiihien 

Sprout. Waldron & Co., Muncy, Pa ^ 



Cultivating Machinery ; Horse and Field) 
Culture du sol i Instruments pour la), i chCTal et 

pour le champ 
Maqninaria Cultivadora (de Caballo j para el 

Campo) 
Bodenkultur Oerate (fiir Pferdebetrieb) 

Bradley Mf|{. Co., David, Hrftdlry, 111. . j 

Deere Plow Co., John. Moline, 111 31 

t Moline Plow Co., Moline. III. J 

Ohio Cultivator Co.. The, Bellevue, Ohio *) 

Standard Harrow Co., I'tica, N. Y. . . . < 



Hand Carts (Push) 

Charrettes A bras 

Carretillas de Mano (de Bmpuje) 

Hand-Schiebekarren 

BriMlley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, III. . . . 

DemingCo., The, Salem, Ohio 

LaoinK Wkeelkarrow Co., Laoaing, MIoh. 



Hand Tools (Shovels, Rakes, Hoes, Scythea, 
Forks, Ktc.) 

Outils h main ( Pelles, rateauz, houes, faux, foor- 
ches, etc. ) 

Herramientas de Mano ( Palas, Rastrillos, Axa- 
dones, Guadafias. Horquillas, etc.) 

Handwerkzeug (Schaufeln, Rechen. Haken, Sea- 
sen, Gabelu, u. s. w. 



Files I Letter and Card ) 

Systemes de classification (lettres et cartea) 
Quarda-Cartas y larjetas 
Skripturenordner (fiir Briefe und Karter) 



Forgings Carriage) 
Pieces forgees > Voiture) 
Forjaduras ' para carruajes) 
Schmiedereien ( Kaleschen-) 



Qardening Tools ( Hand) 
Jardinage i Outils de) a main 
Herramientas de Hortelano (de Mano) 
Qiirtnerei Handwerkzeug 



drain Cleaning Machinery ( Rice, Coffee, Grain, 

Ktc.) 
drains Machines A nettoyer les ) : riz, caf6, grain, 

etc. 
Maquinaria pare Limpiar dranos (Arroz, Caf<, 

Granos, FUc. > 
detreide Reinigungsmaschinen (fiir Reis, 

Kaffee, Korn, u. s w. i 



Hprniit, Waldron & Co . ,Mnn< 



drain Drills 
drains i Semoirs de ) 
Sembradoras de dranos 
Drillmaschinen 

Monitor Drill ('»., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Superior Drill (>>., Sprtngfleld. Ohio . 



Engines (Traction and Portable) 

Machines 4 vapeur (Pour la traction et transpor- 

tables ) 
H^uinas (De Traccidn j Portdtiles) 
Traktions- Oder Zugmaschinen und L«konioMI«a 



Harrows i Disc, Spring-Tooth and Spike-Tooth) 
Herses (k disques, a dents ^lastiques, i denta 

droites) 
Mielgas 6 Rastrillos (de Disco, con Dieotea da 

Resorte y Otros ) 
Eggen (mit Scheiben-, Federzahn- und SpeicbcB* 

zahn-Vorrichtung ) 



Bradley .Mfg. Co , David, Bradley, III 1 

Buclier & Uibbs Plow Co., Canton, Ohio I 

Collins Plow Co.. Quincy, 111 IS 

Deere Plow Co., John, Moline, III 11 

Moline Plow Co., Moline, III • 

Ohio Cultivator ('o.. The, Bellevue, Ohio 3* 

Standard Harrow Co.. Utica, NY I 



Hay Loaders 
Foin (Chargeuses de) 
Cargadoras de Heno 
Heu Auflader 

MarMille« Mfg Co., Marfieilleo. [U 4 



Hay Presses - 
Foin I Presses A ) 
Prensas para Heno 
Heu Pressen 



Bradlev Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, III | 

<'ollin« Plow Co..Quincy, 111 2* 

Kriel Co.. 'Jeorge, tjnincv. Ill ( 

Ohio Cultivator Cn, The! Bellevue, Ohio 86 

standard Harrow Co.. UUea. NT a 



31 
5 



Hay Rakes 
Foin I Rdteaux A) 
Rastros para Heno 
Heu Rechen 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, III. 
Molina Plow C!o., Moline. Ill 



drain drinding Mills 
drains \ Moulins k moudre les) 
Molinos para dranos 
Schrotmiihlen 

K«lly r'o, The o. S., Springfield, Ohio 36 

MarMilleaMfg. Co., Mameilles, 111 4 

Sprout, Waldron & Oo., .Muncy, Pa 3 

V. S Wind Bngina and Pump Co., Batevia, III S'> 



Hay Tools ( For Handling Hay j 
Foin I Outils pour la manipulation do) 
Herramientas para Heno ( para Manipular el Heno) 
Heubearbeitungs-Apparate und Werkzeufs 



Myers. P. E. * Bro., Ashland, Ohio 2 

U.S. WindBi^neand PtmpOo,, Batavia, III SB 



Export Implement Age 



rfo<l8 (Steel and Wood) 

Auges (Acier et bois) 

Artesas de Cargar (de Acero y de Madera) 

Tiinchkiibel (Morteltroge, aus Stahl und Hole) 



Potato Machinery 

Pommes de terre (Machines pour la culture des) 

Maquinaria para Patatas 

Kartoffel-Maschinen 



Lansing Wbealbarrow Co., LabsIdb, Mioh. . 



29 



implement Parts (Rake, Teeth, Knife Sections, 

Etc.) 
Pieces de rechange ( Dents de rateaux, conteaux 

de faucheuses, etc. ) 

Partes de Instrumentos (Dientes de Rastrillo, 

Secciones de Cnchilla, Etc. ) 
Tlieile von Ljindwirthschaftsgeriithen (Recbea- 

zahne, Messertbeile, u. s, w, ) 



incubators 

Conveuses artificlelles 

incubadoras 

Ey-utmaschinen (Inkubatoren) 

Ertel Co., George, Quincy, III. . . 



Ljiwn Mowers 
Tondeuses de gazon 
Segadoras 6 Cortadoras de C^sped 
Rasen Mahmaschinen 



Clipper Lawn Mower Co., Dixon, III 5 

Cbadborn & Coldwell Mfg-Co., Newburgh, N. Y I 

Leather ( Imitation) 
Leder (Imitation) 
Cuero (Imitaci6n) 
Cuir (Imitation) 

Kairfleld ICubberOo. The, Kalrfleld. Cobb S 



Machine Tools 
Machlnes-outils 
Herramientas Mecanicaa 
Maschinen-Werkzeug 

Sllvar Hfg. Oo., Salem, Ohio 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, III. 

Moline Plow Co., Moline, III 

Standard Harrow Co., Utlca, N. Y. . . 



Pumps, Hand and Power ( Lift, Force and Spray) 
Pom pes, i main, et A Energie mecanique ( Pom- 

pes aspirantes, foulautes, pulv^risalrices) 
Bompas de Mano y para Fuerza Mecanica 

(Aspirantes, de Forzar y de Rociar) 
Pumpen, Hand- und Kraftpumpen (Hebe-, 

Druck- und Besprengungs-Pumpen) 



Doming Co.. The, Salem. Ohio 

Myers, F. B. & Bro., Ashland, Ohio 

0. S. Wind Rngina and Pump Oo., Batavia. III. 



Mowers. 
Faucheuses. 
Segadoras. 
Miihmaschlnen. 



Mills (Corn and Hominy) 
Moulins (pour mats et bouilie) 
riolinos (para Moler Maiz Pino y Gmeso) 
Mtihien (fiir Getreide und indianisches Reis, 
Hominy) 

Sprout, Waldron St Oo., Muncy, Pa. 3 

Standard Harrow Co., l.Ttica. N. Y 3 



Oil aoth 

Toile Cir^e 
Wachstuch 



Plows (Walking, Riding and Disc) 
Charrues (ordinaires, 4 si^ge, & disques) 
Arados (de Caminar, de Moutar y de Disco) 
Pfliige (Geh-, Fahr- und Scheit>enpfliige) 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley. Ill 1 

Biicher 8t Oibha Plow Oo., Canton, Ohio .... 2 

Collins Plow Co., quincr. Ill tg 

Deere Plow Co., John, Moline, III ■ . • . -^ 

Moline Plow Co.. Moline, III • • • ■ ^ 

Ohio Cultivator Co., The. Bellevue, Ohio m 

South Ilend Chilled Plow Works, South Bend Ind . . 1 

Standard Harrow Oo., UUoa, N. T $ 



Sleighs 
Traineaux 
Trineos 
Schiitten 

Dapaon * Wolf, Oneida, N. T. 



Reapers. 
Moissonneuses. 
Cosechadoras 
detreide-Mahmaschlnen. 



Rollers ( Field or Road) 
Rouleaux (pour champs et pour routes) 
Rodillos ( para Campo y para Caminot) 
Feld- und Weg-Walzen 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, III. . . 
Lansing Wheelbarrow Co., lAnsing, MIoh. , 
Ohio Cultivator Co., The, Bellevue, Ohio . 
Standard Harrow Co.. Utioa, N. Y 



29 



Rubber doods 
Articles de caoutchouc 
Articulos de Caucho 
duramiwaaren 



Rubber Tires 

dummireifen 

Bandes de roues en caoutchouc 

Llantas de Caucho para Ruedaa 

Morgan & Wright, Chicago. Ill 



Scrapers ( Road ) 

Ratissolres (pour routes) 

Oragas (para Caminos) 

Strassen Scharr-Maschinea (Straasen-Bbener) 

Standard Harrow Co., UMea, H. T | 



Seeders, Broadcast (Grain and Grass) 
Semoirs pour semer k la volee (Grain et grami- 

nees ) 

Maquinas de Sembrar Semillas al Vuelo (Granoa 

y Semilla de Yerbas) 
Breitsiimaschinen ( fiir Getreide und Gras) 



Sharpeners and drinders 
Machines i remoudre et it aiguiaer 
Afiladoras y Amoladoras 
Schirfe- und Schleif-Apparate 



Sprayers and Nozzles 
Instruments d'arrosage 
Rociadoras y Boquereles 
Besprengungs-Spritzen und Uebernasen 



DeniiiiK Co.. Thi'. S<Blein, Ohio. . . 
Mvers, P. K. Si Kro.. Axhland. Ohio . 
Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y. . 



an 

3^ Stalk Cutters 
Coupe-chaume 
Cortadoras de Tallos 
Stengel Abschneider 



Street Sprinklers 

Arrosage des rues (Tonneaux pour 1') 

Regadoras de Calle 

Strassen Bespreng-Wagen 

Studebaker Bro*. Mfg. Co., South Bend, In4. 



3a 

2 
8 



Sugar Cultivating Implements 
Sucre ( Instruments pour la culture de la caoae A) 
instrumentos para el Cultivo Azucarero 
Zucker-Animu deriithe 



Threshing Machinery 
Machines k battre 
Maquinaria de Trillar 
Dresch Maschinen 



Tire Setters 

Machines k fixer les bandes de roues 

Maquinas de Poner Llantas 

Maacltinen zum Aufsetzen von dummiretfea 

Standard Tire Setter Co., Keokuk, Iowa 



Tread Powers ( Horse, Dog, Sheep. Etc. ) 
Machines k utiliser I'^nergie de la 

(Cheval, Chien, Mouton, etc.) 

Motores de Pisada ( para Calmllo, Perro, Caraaee, 

etc.) 
Kraft-Tretmaschinen (Pferde, Hunde, Schaft^ 

u. s. w ) 



Trucks (Hand Warehouse) 
Tl^CS ( Kmmagasinage 4 bras> 
Carretillas de Mano para almacAn 
Transport Handwageo ( fiir Waarenha 

Lanaing Wheelliarrow Oo. Lansing, Mieh. . 



D 



Wacoiu (Business) 
Cbarettes (d'affaires) 
Garros (para negocios) 
Wagen (Gescbaftswagen) 



Wasons and Buck- Wagons 
Charrettes et charrettes ik lessive 
Carretones y Carretas 
Wagen und Bockwagen 

Ohio V»lley W»gon Co., The, Marietta, Ohio . . . 

Wagons and Carts ( Farm) 
WagonneU et charrettes (Ferme) 
Carretones y Carretas (para Hacienda) 
Landwirthschaftliche Wagen und Karren 



Export Implement Age 



Well Tools and Drilling Machinery 
Outils pour puits et machines k forer 
InstrumentoA para Abrir Pozos y Maquinarla 

para Horadar 
Brunnen->.Werkzeug und Bohr-Maschlnen 



Wheels and Wheel Materials 
Roues et articles pour roues 
Ruedas y Materiaies para Ruedaa 
Rader und Rader material len 



Wheelbarrows 
Brouettes 
Carretillas 
5chiebe karren 

LBMing WbeelbtuTow Oo., Lansing, Mich. 



Windmills (Towers and Tanks) 
Moulins k vent (Tours et reservoirs) 
Molinos de Viento (Torres y Tanques) 
Windmtihlen (Tburm- und Biitten) 



MsraeilleBHrg. Co., Marseille*, 111 

U. S. Wind Bncine and Fump Co., BaUvia, III. 



. «) 



Laarine Wheelbarrow Co., Laneinic, Mich. . . 
Studebaker Broa. Mfg. Co.. South Bend, Ind. 



20 



Weeders 

5«rcloirs m^caniques 
Desyerbadoraa 
JkU Maschinen 

standard Harrow Co., Utloa, N. T. 



Wheels (Carriage) 

Roues ( Voiture ) 

Ruedas (Carruaje) 

Rader ( Kalescheu und Wagen) 



Wood Sawing Machinery 
Bois (Machines Si scierlc) 
Maquinaria para Aserar Madera 
Holzsage-Maschinen 



MarseilleeMfg Oo, Marselllea. Ill 

U. a. Wind Engine and Pump Co., Bataria, III. 



4 
85 



Alphabetical List of Advertisers. 

Annonces par ordre Alphab^tique. 

Usta AlfaMtica de las casas que se Anundan en esta Revista. 

Alphabetisch ^eordnetes Inh&lts-Verzeichnis von Inserenten. 



Fairfield Rubber Co., The, Fairfield, Conn 6 "1900" Washer Co., Binghamton, N. Y 31 



Ohio Cultivator Co., The, Bellevne, Ohio .... 3« 



Bradley Mfg. Co., Darid, Braoiey, 11.. . 
Bucber & Oibbs Plow Co., Canton, Ohio 



Patch, A. H., CUrksTille, Tann 6 

Potter Co., Moi^an, Fii>hkill-oa-HadM)n, K. \. . 3 



Kelly Co., The O. 8 , Springfiald, Ohio M 



Chadbonm A Coldwell Mfg. Co., Newburgli, N. Y. 1 

Clipper Lawn Mower Co., Dixon, 111 6 

Collins Plow Co., Quinoy, 111 29 



LaiMing Wheelbarrow Co., Laniing, Micl> 



Columbtis Bolt Works, ColombtiB, Ohio> 36 Leffd & Co., James, Springfield, Ohio 



T)apflon A Wolf, Oneida, N. V. . . 
Deere Plow Co., John, Moline, 111. 
DemingCo., The, Salem, Ohio . . . 



3 

31 
35 



Ertel Oa., Geo., Qniney, HI. 



MaTMilles Mfg. Co., Marseilles, 111. . 
Moline Plow Co., Moline, 111. ... 
Monitor Drill Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Morgan A Wright, Chicago, III. . . . 
Myers A Bro., F. £., AsUasd, Ohi* . 



29 

39 SilTer Mfg. Co., The, Salem, Ohio 36 

South Bend Chilled Plow Co., South Bend, Ind. . 1 a 

Sprout, Waldron A Co., Muney, Pa. 3 

Standard Harrow Co., The. Utica, N. Y 

Standard Tire Setter Co,, Keokuk, Iowa 3 

Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Co., South Bend, Ind. . . . 36 
^ Superior Drill Co., Springfield, Ohio 

• 

31 

. 1 

t U, 8. Wind Engins and Pump Co., BataTUt, 111. . 36 




Export Implement Age 



Machinery for Grinding all Kinds of Grain 
Machines a moudre tous genres de grains 
Maquinaria para moler todas glase de granos 
Maschinerie zum Mahlen aller Getreidesorten 



Write for one of our booklets which gives a full description of French Burr and 
Attrition, Feeil and Meal Mills, Cotton Seed and Linseed Oil Cake Mills, Emer>' 
Rock Mills, Cotton, Ear and Ore Crushers, Magnetic Separators, Corn Shellers, etc. 

Ecrivez pourun pamphlet contenant description d^taill^e de moulins k meules 
de France et A frottement, de moulins pour grains de cotton et de tourteauz de lin, 
de moulins h pierre d'^meri, de broyeurs d'^pis et de min^rais, de moulins mag- 
n^tiques, d'dcosseurs, etc. 

Escrtbasenos pidiendo uno de nuestros libritos, en que se da una completa 
descripcion de nuestros Molinos de Piedra Francesa y de Roce, para Pienso y para 
Harina, Molinos de Semillas de Algo<l<'>ii, y para moler Tortas de Aceite de Semil- 
las de Linaza, Molinos para Roca de Esmenl, Trituradoras de Algod6n, Mazorcas 
y Minerales, Separedoras Magn^ticas, Desgranadoras de Maiz, etc. 

Man verlange eines unserer Biichlein, das voile Beschreibung unserer franzo- 
sischen Mahlsteine und Reibevorrichtung enthalt, wie auch aller Futter-Vonjch 
tungen, Mehl-Mvihlen, Baumwollensaamen- und Leintilsaamen Kuchen-Miihlen, 
Schmirgel-Bergmiihlen, Baumwollen-, Aehren- und Erzzerstiickelungs-Mascbinen, 
magnetiscbe Separatoren, Korn-Enthiilsemaschinen, u. s. w. 

SPROUT, WALDRON & CO. 



Drawer M. 



IVl U IN C Y, P A.., U. S. A. 



The Standard Harrow Co. 



UTICA, N. Y., U. S. A. 




ABERDEEN, SR. 

SPRING-TOOTH 

HARROW 

Unequalled Strength 

No Clogging 

Reverdble Points 
•n TMth 



THE STANDARD LINE includes one and two-section Spring- 
Tooth Harrows and all styles and sizes of Spike-tooth and 
Disc Harrows, Cultivating Implements, Potato Harvesters, 
Potato Sprayers, etc., and is one of the most favorably 
known lines in the leading agricultural countries. 

We guarantee prompt service for all export orders. 
Our factory is only five hours' ride from New York City. 

WRITE IN YOUR OWN LANGUAGE FOR CATALOGUE F 



ZIG ZAG STEEL 
SPIKE-TOOTH HARROW 

20-Teoth Sections 
H-inch TMth 




EASY RIDING 

This two-wheeler is our leading 
epecialty for export. 

We equip it with RUBBER TIRES. 
if desired, put on with two wires. The work, 
like the job itself, is sold under our positive 
guarantee. 

LET US SEND YOU TBE PtICES 




Dapson 6 Wolf 

ONEIDA. NEW YORK, U. S. A. 



WHOLESALE MAKKRS OP Z^ 



FINE CARRIAGES 



ii 



l'CI9' 



POTTER'S' 
SPRING BRAKE BLOCKS 

Have Led the Market for Nineteen Years, and HIa 

ADJUSTABLE SPRING BRAKE 

la a Winner From the Start 
Equally satisfactory for steel or rub{)er tired vehicles. 

NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 

The Morgan Potter Co. ?S":t: 




Start the cKe^ Year ^ght 



by cAd'oertiswg in the 



Export Implement cAge 




Write for %ites And Special Locations. 
We may be able to Uvor you. zAd- 
drtss inquiries to 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

1010 Mrch S>rtri, PHILADELPHIA 






I 



Export Implement Age 




KEW PROCESS DUSTLESS CVXINDER CORN SHEIXBR 

For husked or unhusked corn, made in thrtre sizes, capacities ranging from 
400 to 1.300 bushels per hour 



CTCtOWB COMBINATION FORCE FEED 
CORN SHUU.ER 

All sizes and styles for horse power or enfftne. 



PUMPING JACKS 



^:MMM0M mMBJuM 






Extend your trade 
beyond tlie seas 



AMERICAN manufactures are not only in demand, 
but in many cases are given the preference in 
foreign countries. Especially is this true of Agri- 
cultural Machinery, Farm Supplies, Vehicles and Hard- 
ware Specialties. If you are manufacturing any of these 
goods voice it abroad and make the world your field. You 
can do it just as easily as you can secure home trade if 
you'll talk through the 

Export Implement Age 

IT REACHES ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES 
WRITE US FOR ADVERTISING RATES 



Export Implement Age 



Superior Grain Drills 



Semoirs Superieurs de Qrains. Manu- 
factures en une grande vari^t^ de dimensions 
pour Grains seulement on pour Grains et Fer- 
tilisants mdlang^s, avec Disque, Houe et See 
creusant les sillons. Nous manufacturons des 
modfi'ea sp^ciaux de Semoirs de Grains pour 
I'Euiftpc, I'Australie, I'Amerique du Sud et 
le Sud de I'Afrique. Demandez les Catalogues 
descriptifs illustres. 

Sembradoras Superiores de Qranos. Se 

fabrican de mucliostamaiiosde sembrar Granos 
s6la 6 combinada con Fertilizador, con sur- 
cadores de Disco, de Azad6n 6 Zapatillas. 
Nosotros fabricamos Sembradoras de tipos 
especiales para Europa, Australia, Sud America 
y el Africa del Sur. Euviese per un Catllogo 
descriptivo ilustrado. 

"Superior" Qetreiderillen. Wird in viel- 
seitiger Auswahl von Grossen hergestellt: Ein- 
fache Getreiderillen und Kombinationen von 
Getreide und Pflugrillen mil Scheiben, Hauen 
und Schuh-Lockerungs Vorrichtungen. Wir 
fabriziren besondere Arten von Getreiderillen 
fiir Europa, Australien, Siid-Amerika und Siid- 
Afrika. Man verlange illustrirte beschreibende 
Kataloge. 

We manufacture special types of 
Grain Drills for Europe, Australia, 
South America and South Africa 



Made in a large variety o! sizes in Plain Grain 
and combined Grain and Fertilizer, with Disc. 
Hoe and Shoe furrow openers $ $ J) 4> 




THE SUPERIOR DRILL CO., Springfield, 0., U.S.A 



THE FAIRFIELD RUBBER CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Carriage Cloth, Imitation Leather, Etc. 

FAIRFIELD, CONN., U. S. A. 

We believe you will 6nd our cloths more desirable fabrics than h«»e been presented 
for your consiaeration. 

Not only do we offer our lines as superior to any, but some are special with us. 

We warrant all our goods in every manner, and in all climates. 

All we ask is a trial of our productions, as we know the result will be in our fa»or. 

Our many years' connection with the foreign trade places us in a position to know 
fully as to their wants, and the large orders we receive from that field convinces us that 
the high standard at which wc have kept our goods is appreciated. We refer with 
pleasure to any leading Export house in New York as to the merit of our cloths. 

Send for quotations through any Kiport house, or write us direrl. 

When ordering goods in our line, ask for goods made by 

The rAirfield Rubber Co. 




GblPPER UAWN 
MOWER GO. RL?~?S 



TTHE MOWER that will lilll 
\^ all (be Weeds In your Lawns. 

If you keep the weeds cut 
so they do not go to seed, and 
cut your grass without breaking 
the stnalf feeders of roots, the 
grass will become thick and the 
weeds will disappear. 

THE CLIPPER WILL DO IT 
Ask Your Dealer for Them 



The Export Implement Age 

is an independent journal devoted exclusively to the Export 
Trade in Agricultural Machinery, Pumps, Wind Mills, Farm 
Tools, Dairy Supplies and Hardware Specialties. 

Advertising Rates Furnished Upon Application 



BladHawkll 




GRINDS 

Corn, Wheat. 
Rye. Rice. 
Coffee, 
Spices. Etc. 



InsUntly Adjusied to 
Grind Fine or Coarse. 



WILL DO GOOD WORK and LAST 

Orlndlng Plates are of the Hardest and Strongest 
Metals. Can be replaced at slight cost. 

I'.icked In barrels rif 1 >eaih. Gross welirht, 240 lt«.; 
net. 2i)4 Ih*. Mi-a-linMiicnt 6H idttir \tv\. 

Am Mm PATCH fMakor, 
' C larksvlllB, Tann., U. S. A. 

Order Ihrouth any Reliable Commission Hoose. 



PATCH'S PATENT 

Black Hdwk (orn Sheller 



Wet. 
15 lbs. 




SHELLS 

FAST. 

SHELLS 

CLEAN. 
SHELLS 

EASILY. 



Bowaro of 
ImltatlonB 



Capacllr 
810 12 
buiheit 
ear corn 
per 
hear. 



Packed 10 In a barrel. Crosa, 180 Ib«.; 
Net, ISO lbs. Measurement i,% cubic llrt. 
MADE ONLY BY 

AU DATm CLARKSVILl.E, 
. H. rAldl. TENNn U.S.A. 



Export Implement Age 



Unequilled 
Facilities 
for Prompt 
Handlint ol 
Export Business 




SHANGHAI KIDD 
DISC CULTIVATOR 



Forty-six inches from lowest point of arch to the ground. 
A.liustable in wiilth from 4S to 72 inches. Popular for culti- 
vating Corn, Cane, Tobacco, etc. Packed for export, weighs 
830 pounds. Occupies 25 cubic feet of space. 

STALK CUTTERS, WALKING AND RIDING 
PLOWS, DISC PLOWS, DISC HARROWS. 
PIPE-LEVER HARROWS. CORN PLANT- 
ERS AND DRILLS. LISTERS, COTTON 
PLANTERS, CULTIVATORS— BEET 
SEEDERS. CULTIVATORS atid PULLERS 



nOLINE PLOW CO 



MOLINE, ILL, U. S. A. 



FOREIGN 

I. 4 J. DRYSDALE 4 CO. 

Sole Agents for Argentine 
Buenos Ayrei, South America 



AGCNCieS: 

NALCONESS 4 CO. 

Sole Agents for South Africa 
East London, South Africa 




a fail <\e nous 
!)oiriil aujoiir 
Ri»t-mrnl. 



t T Vr ADC biiildinK hay. straw, wool, cotton and corn fodder preaae.s should .«■;»">"'>' m'!^' 
37 T Lf/iKd „» exerts, and we claim that our nrrsses are the simplest, easiest draught on 
the tram aud the smoothest balers on the market to-ilay. 

t)ur prrssrs will bale from lo to ih tons a day in hay. 
Our presses will bale from lo to i.i tons a day in straw. 
_. . ^m _„„z_. que nous construisons des presses ft foin A paille, & lalne. 4 coton. i 

UepUlS J/ anneeS ("ourrage de mai», nou» avons Indubitablement acquis une experience qui 
us des experts, et nous nhisitons jias i dire <|ne nos presses sonl les plus simples qui 
iirdhui sur le ni,ircht et celles qui fatiguent le moins I'attelage et fonctionnent le plus 
Nos presses emballoltent de lo & |8 tonnes de foin par jour. 
Nos presses emliallottent de lo 4 i.s tonnes de paille par jour. 

rk .^. Am. ^T ik9(<%« que constniinios prensas para heno.paja, lana, algod6n yforraje de 

UeSpUeS ae J/ anOS ,„„i^ tenemos que ser expertos en ese raino, y por lo lanto reclamamoa 
que nuestras prensas son las mSs simples y las mis livianas para el acarreo por parejas de 
caballos. y las enfardad.iiloras mejorrs que ezisten hoy en el mercado. 

Nuestras prensas enfardan de lo it iS toneladas de heno por dia. 

Nuestras prensas enfardan de lo 4 15 toneladas de paja por dla. 

t f I.U.,. ununterbrochener Fabrikation von lleupressen. strohpressen.Wolle- und Baumwollen- 

J/ janre ,,ressen wie auch Maisfutler-f ressen, sollte uns wahrlich in den Stand gesetxt hatien, 

Fiperten dieser Branche (jeworden 7.11 sein; wir heanspruchen deshalb fiir nnsere Fresaen. data aic die einfachaten in Ko°*' .„., ,„,j_ 
^ini (Tespann den leichtesiru Zug haben und »un. Haiballiren die vorziiislichsten Dienale letaten, Unsere Preiaen sindlm SUnde letria 
l8"Tonnengehalt" Heu und 10 bis i.'i "Tonnengehnlt" Stroh tkglich zu emballiren. 








in Konatruktion sind. 



FRONT VIKW 

VfH DH H.^CH 

TISTA DHL FRFNTR 

VORDKRANSICHT 



Catalogue free 

Catalogue franco .sur demande 

Catalogo (iratis 

Kataloge frel 



Our '• Qem " Full Circle 



We make a line of both Full Circle and Half Circle Presses 
f. o. b. cars New York City, on our tlem Full Circle Balers, properly crated for export: 
Net Weight. Cross Weight. S|MCe 



2x i« Baler . . 2,650 ( 1.457 Kilos) 3700 
X 18 B«ler . . 2,77s <i.'iJ6 Kilos) , . . i»x> . 
wcaa Baler, . 2,975 {1.656 Kilos) ■ ■ • • 4,«» ■ 



11 J cubic feet 

.171 cubic feet , 

. I JO cubic feet . 



Prices. 
. fjiSJS (/44 16 10) 
. aiH.oo (/45 8. 41 
. 221.50 (,^"46. 3. o) 



Muestra Prensa "Qem" Circulo Entero 



Uosotros fabricamos un surtidocompleto de prensas tanto de medio circulo como de cjrealo 

entero. I.os precios de embarquc de la Prensa "Gem" son franco A bordo de los carroa 

hasta New York, y se empaquetan con seguridad para exportarlas. 



Precio. 
$215 »5 (/■44 iSioi 
. 218.00 (^45- 8. 4 



Notre presse "aem" & cercie entier 



Noua fabrlquons (in Rssortiment de presses a dcmi-cercle et 4 cercie entier. 
rrix4e *o» presses r.ein- A cercie entier, mises en wagon A New York et convenablement 

emballtespour lexportalion: 
Poidsnel. Poidahrut. Kspace. Prix. 

I4»i» 3 h«3 ( I,4'i7 kilos) , . .3 7°« ■ . 115 pieds cubes. , $J15 aj U:44 i* 10) 
T - J — ^ (i,5j6kilo») . . . . 3.!*oo . . . . 171 pieds cubes , . . JiR.oo ( / 45 s. 4) 
J 975 (i.63<'kilo») . . . .4000. . . . ijopieds cuV«s . 221,50 ( ,i 46, 3. i) 



16 X 18 
171 



Peso Bruto. Neto. Kspacio. 

Prensa 14 X 18 . . 2,6.<,o ( 1,457 Kilos) . . . .3,7'0, , . . ii5pi*8ci'ibicos . 

Prensa 16x18. . 2.775 (1,^26 Kilos '( , ■ • -3.800. . . . 171 pits ciSbicos . 

Prensa 17 s 23. . 2,975 (1,(136 Kilos) , . . .4,000. . . . 1 30 pits cubicos . 

Unsere Voll-Zirkel ••Qem" Pres5e. 

Wir fabriniren ein Assortiment von VoU- und Ifalbzirkel-Presaei.. 
Preiae unserer VolUirkel EraballagePressen, frei Board New York, fertig filr d«l 
Kxportvcrsand verpackt: 
Nettogewicht. Bruttogewicht. Rauminhalt. Preise. 

14 xiR Presse. . 2.6v> (1.457 K<lo) 3.7« • • • . 115 Kubikfuss . . , $215.25 (,^44 

161 18 Presae , . 2,775 (1.52* Kilo) j 800 .... 171 Kubikfuss. . . 218.00 K£^S. 

17 X 31 Presse . , 2,975 (1,636 Kilo) 4.000 .... 120 Kubikfuss . . . ait.jo KjQijk- 



ytvaae 17 X }i . . J.975 (1.636 xiiosj . . . . 4 «« . . . i^w >„<;«. ,.u./i.-. . .......-,« \,i.-— j- -; 

GEO ERTEL CO. - 59Z Kentucky Street. Quincy, 111., U. S. A. 



16,1.) 



Export Implement Age 



Vol. XV. 



Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. X., November, 1906. 



No. 2 



Convention of American Manu' 
facturers of Implements 



Our readers in all cuiiiUrics will W inter- 
cstnl in kintwiiij,; wliat the .Xatiunal .\>Micia- 
linn of .Xj^-^ricuUiiral hr.pk'iiKiil and \ chicle 
.Mainifacturcrs are endeavoring' In accnmplisli 
hv orj;aiiization uurk. and we will tlurefure 
repriiduce two or three <'\ the more important 
pajjcrs which were read at the ihirlcciith aii- 
mial convention recently held in Chicago. 

It must be understood that the .\ssociatiun 
is not in any sense of the word a Trust, nor 
tloes it seek in the slijjhtest detjree to control 
prices, hut it is composed of the leadinij manu- 
facturers of a;4ricnltural implements ami 
vehicle manufacturers who market their out- 
put ihrouj^h the johhers and retail dealers, antl 
the ohject of the .Xs.xociation is to |)romote 
the hest interests of the trade in all lef^itimate 
wavs. The annual address of the president. 
.Mr. C. !•'. lluhlein. of tlie firm of 1'.. I", Avery 
& Sons. I.ouisville. Ky., T. S. A., covers quite 
comprehensively the ground of .\ssoci:ition 
work, and we re]irodiice it in full as follows: 

The President's Address 

Gentlemen of the i'l'ici-iitiou: 

Surelv it is with unusual satisfaction that 
we meet to-dav in aimu.il convention in this 
ijreat city, the birthplace of our \-.>ociation. 
Mere. (hiriiijLj the Worlds l-'air year of |S«J3, 
this organization Ik-^mii in the form of a tem- 
porary as.sociation for the purpose of oppos- 
ing certain unfair le}j;islation which would have 
seriously crippled our industries. Its purjxise 
sticccssfully accomplished, other ])roblems ap- 
|)eared to demand attention, which led the prc- 
iiininary orj,;ani7.ation to devtl'ij) into om- 
vij,'orous, permanent Association. Nvlnch held 
its first and second annual conventions in this 
lilv in iS<i4 and iS<)5 respectivi 1\ . Since 
then we have held ten annual conventions, 
.North. South. I-'.ast and West. e\er\ where 
hospitably entertained, ami year by year 
stren.ulhenintif the ties that bind us to each 
other and to i>\ir A-.si.ri.ition. .\fter ten years 
of wandering:, \se are now especi.iUy liai)py 
to meet at headquarters, 

W'c rejoice that many of the founders of 
the Association are with us to-day. and that 
the\ have tlirouj^h all these years contiimed to 
^dve the .\ssoci;ition the iHinfil of their active 
co-operation. The trade owe'- them a lastin;^ 
debt <<i gratitude for their wim- planniiv^ at 
the start and tluir convt.int >upport evi r since. 
Trior to the formation of this .\>sociatioii our 
industries were much like a mass of clay, a 
blow left the imprint. Now. as a result of 
this orfjani/ation, nur indu-trie-. are sumewhal 
like a block of stone, a blow at any part is a 
>hock felt by the whole body. More to-day 
than ever before \vc realize that an injury to 



one is the concern of all. There was need 
for the (.r<,janization when it was formed, and 
it is needed now. 

Aims of the Association 

( )ur etVorts have been devoted toward jiro- 
motinjj sound business methods and policies, 
and securing a recognition of our just dues in 
our various trade relations. ;\ll of our work 
has favored fair and manly competition amon^ 
ourselves, and the principle of "live and let 




MR. C. F. HUHLEIN 

R<tirin)! President of th« National Aisociation of Agricultural 

Implement and Vehicle Manufacturer! 

live" within and without the organization. 
We have never attcnqited to fix prices nor to 
stifle competition. .\s a nsult, the condition 
and prestige of our industries have been im- 
liroved and the influence of our Association 
is acknowledged to be of threat benefit to our 
trade. 

It is well here lo recall some of the prin 
ci])les for which this .Association stands, and 
for which we have labored, -\mont: tluxsc arc. 
namely : 

1-irst- The protection and promotion of the 
interests of our members. 

Second — I'osterin^ the interests of .\meri- 
cin afrriculture and atrricnltnrists. 

Third — Safeiruardinu the business rights of 
lei;itimate merchants, the reunlar dealers, who 
handle our products. 

I'ourth — /•■(')• reason.ible freight and passen- 

i.;A'r rates, and Ui^aiiisl rebates or favdritism liv 

common carriers to any interest, ureal or small. 

Fifth — I'ersistent oi)I>osition to State lei,dsla- 



tion which unjustly discriminates against the 
citizens of miIkt States, 

Sixth — .\ consular service based on the 
merit system as opjiosed to the sjxiils system. 

Seventh — Reclamation .and reservation of 
the ptiblic lands in the arid and semi-arid dis- 
tricts solely in the interest of actual settlers 
and home builders. 

b'or these and other principles directly re- 
lated to (,nr industry we have striven and shall 
continue to strive. 

W'c shall not indulge in any claim-all pol- 
ice. W'c freely admit that \vc have not accom- 
plished all we have atleini)ted. and that in 
some of our successes other organizations have 
contributed, and are entitled to a share o£ the 
credit. 

The total expense to our membiTship o{ 
conducting this Association from the begin- 
ning through the thirteen years of its exis- 
tence, has Irxii less than STio.ooo, an average 
expense i>f less than $5,000 per year, and no 
member can doubt that the outlay has been 
rtturnc«l to us in benefits many times over. 
Trade Conditions 

The condition of our industry to-ilay is one 
.>t nnusual interest and imixirtance to .ill. 

When our .\ssiH-iation was formed our in- 
dustrv was in the deiiths of depression. Cradu- 
allv better conditions developed, and for the 
main part of the past ten years we have had 
a series of record-breaking experiences, largely 
i.f ;i most favorable character. Our factories 
continue now as for several years past, almost 
without exception, crowiled with orders, and 
it is more difficult to obtain the raw materials 
,ind the labor with which to execute orders 
ih.in to obtain the orders themselves. For 
s. \eral years past the wealth pnxluction of the 
farms of the I nitetl States has maintained the 
highest vahus ever attained in this or in any 
other count rv. As a result, our customers, 
the de.ders, .and their custt>mers. the fanners, 
have hail a si ries of most prosperous years. 
These conditions existing ti^day, in ctjnnection 
with a sound and jirosperous condition of gen- 
eral business ihroughont the country, make the 
jirospeets for the immediate future very en- 
couraging. Intknibtedly the generality of in- 
dustries represented in this Association are in 
the most subst.antial and pros|K'rous condition 
in their historv ; yet there has probably never 
been a time when our membership was more 
earnestly concerned alKHit problems that seem 
ti( con tp 'lit u- as w\ move forward. We are 
here to make a deliberate examination of these 
problems and to try to arrive at n clearer under- 
siandini; of tlie situation surrounding our in- 
terests.^ l! i~ an old maxim that matters are 
rarel\ .1- uo..d or as bad as they seem, and it 
may be well to recall this at the present junc- 
ture. 

While LjeiHTal conditions are so favoralile. 
;mil whik^we are making extraordinary sales 
in volume, we realize that oiilv by extreme 
vigilance and prudence, coupled with streintous 
, Ifiirts. have we lieen .ible during these latter 
\ears to secure a n.irrow margin of profit, and 
said m.irgin of profit, without the unusual vol- 



8 



Export Implement Age 



ume of current sales woiiM hardly have yielded 
an ordinary ajjgrcgate profit. As prudent men, 
therefore, vvc must consider what would \yc our 
status under these con<lilii)ns slicnild, by rea- 
son of crop failures or other causes, the cur- 
rent lar^c volume of sales he reduced. In a 
nut shell, the increased co.sts of our raw mater- 
ials, of our labor an<l exinnses of doin^ l)usi- 
ness for several years past have not been 
accompanied by a corresponding rise in the 
selling prices of our jjroducts. We have 
shouldered more than our share of the in- 
creased cost of manufacturing ruir go<ids, and 
we are here to consider how this situation may 
be bettered. No volume of business, how- 
ever large, can be largo enough to be remun- 
erative unless transacted ui>on a sound basis 
after thorough knowledge of all the items f)f 
cost entering into the got>«ls and the expenses 
of doing business, with sufhcient provision for 
the usual contingencies. The present situa- 
tion particularly demands the most careful 
and unceasing work in the cost-calculating de- 
partment. Tlien, sure of our costs, and resist- 
ing all temptation to engage ui unhealthy com- 
petition, retnembering tliat the nature of our 
business requires the using of large amounts 
of capital in proportion to the business done, 
we must so conduct f>ur respective concerns 
that a more adequate compensation if jxissible 
may be returned to us for tlie capital and risk 
and efftJrts employed. 

The Tariff and Reciprocity 

The principal raw materials used by our 
memlx-rs are steel, iron, lumber and leather, 
and the advanced prices ruling for these pro- 
ducts during recent years have drawn imr 
.'ittention to the relation of tiie tariff to these 
advanced prices. Some of our members feel 
that a lowering of the taritT on the materials 
referred to is justified and wouUI give us 
needed relief, and that we should demand a 
reduction acci >rdingly. 

The general expressions of interest on this 
subject, and the suggestion of many of our 
members that some attentiim be paid to it at 
this convention is my ajxMogy for this refer- 
ence to it. 

Conservative men in the iron and steel trade> 
admit that the tariff on the iron and steel is 
excessive ami could be redirced without harm- 
ing any legitimate interest, and advise that 
the reduction be made now while the trade is 
so favorably situated, that the reduction would 
not be seriously felt. 

I believe with others, that there is nothing 
sacred about the tariflf schedules, and assum- 
ing that the present schedules were warranted 
when enacted, we have reason to believe that 
as far as they relate to iron, steel, hiiles. leather 
and lumber, the circumstances of to-day admit 
of some reductions. 

Wherever it is a question whether goids 
shall be made in this country or abroad. 1 
favor such a tariff as within reason sliall in- 
sure the goods being nnnie in this country. 

As supporters of decent protection to every 
American industry, our fir.^t concern is to 
keep the mills and factories of this country 
busy and of protecting our home market — the 
best in the world — but that protection should 
stop at reasonable limits. 

Wherever, on the other hand, the present 
tariflf absolutely probits imports and is a shel- 
ter for extortion in the home market we 
should demand its reduction to reasonable 



rates. Tt is the excesses of the tariff and not 
the protective principle that should be re- 
moved. 

Vet, however, disturbed some of us may be 
conceniing the present high i)rices of raw ma- 
terials, and the relation, actual or supposed, of 
the t.iritf to these prices, we should not for- 
get that the years of tariff agitation in the 
pa.st have usually been years of depression in 
liusiness, and furthermore that the years when 
raw materials in our lines were lowest, the 
condition of our own industries and of busi- 
ness generally was far less satisfactory than 
at |)resent. Mindful of these experiences, I 
would certainly not recommend any agitati<in 
that might prove more harmful tlian helpful 
to our interests as well as to the general inter- 
ests of the country. 

Let us try to be candid in this matter. One 
of the very first efforts maile by this Associa- 
tion was to oppose legislation that threatened 
the admission of implements into this country 
free of duty from Canada. The tariff on im- 
plements is now about 25 per cent. If tariff 
revi.sion is entered upon this duty will, of 
course, receive attention along with other 
schedules, and as consistent and fair men. and 




MR. H. E. MILES 
Pr«ud«nt-<l<ct of the National AuocUtion of Agricultural 
implement %nd Vcfitcle Manufacturers 



we nuist admit that any i>iir!ion of it found 
to be excessive shotdd likewise he renioxfd. 

Wo desire fair e<>n-iili r.ition, nni\ nothjuji; 
more. 

The question of the taritT is a ne\er-ending 
one; and dei)recating any radical tearing up 
of present conditions or violent ro\ isinn oi 
any taritT laws, 1 .aL^rce in tin- view |ironinl- 
gated by tliosi' who ;iro working more 
especially for .\nierican reciprocal tarilYs. 
namely, that we might well .iiKocate as an 
efTectual means of taking the taritT out of par- 
tisan politics, the cstablislinieni of a )iornian- 
ent. non-partisan commission charged witli the 
dutv of stud\ing constanllv tlu- interests of 
our connnerce and the wilian- of piodiu-er and 
eon-uiner alike, and making ircornmendations 
from time to time to the IVesident and Con- 
gress. The findings of such a commission 



would hardly be ignored by our lawmakers or 
the people. 

The Export Trade 

The export trade in American farm imple- 
ments, like the home trade, is increasing from 
year to year. In 1S93, when our AsseKriation 
was formed, the exports of farm implements 
were five million dollars; iti Kpo the exports 
wore sixteen million dollars ; last year twenty 
million dollars, and for the fiscal year just 
ended twenty-four million dollars. N'otwith- 
standing this steady exf)ansion of our export 
trade, some of the members are concenie<l 
about its future, and urge that reciiirocity 
agreements with various countries nmst be 
immediately arranged or the trade will suffer. 
Our Association has frequently recorded its 
approval of the reciprocity doctrine, and it 
is to be regretted that little progress has been 
made in the enactment of reciprocity agree- 
ments. 

I have made considerable investigation of 
the rei)eatod charges that implements are ex- 
lK)rted at lower prices than are given the home 
trade. I can find only exceptional and insig- 
nificant instances of this sort, and it is in no 
sense a general i)racticc. Free and unbridled 
competition keeps prices in the home market 
down, ami there would be no inducement or 
r<K>m to make lower ])riccs abroad, .\pparent 
instances of lower prices for export goods 
than at home in our line of gmxls are almo.st 
invariably traceable la corresponding <liffor- 
ences in quality f>r pattern. 

Competition Must Be Fostered 

.\mong the problems about which the trade 
generally is now concerned are the operations 
of a certain tremendous interest which in re- 
cent years has exteuiled its line of manufacture 
into additional classes of ginids. Whether we 
like it or not, we must admit tli.nt there is a 
continued tendency toward the centralizing of 
large interests. Such concerns will in time 
survive or fall, acconling to their merits or 
demerits. 

The welfare of our members .md of the 
country reijuiros that no single interest nor 
combination of interests, nor indeed anv small 
numlier of excessively large interests, should 
make and control the implement and vehicle 
output ()f this coimtry. As far as our in- 
Ihunce gm-s, therefore, let it be frankly in 
lavor of wholesome competition and against 
any centralized control in our lines of g<Tods. 

The wisdom of this convention could be 
exerted as a medium of informing oursclvis 
more fully of the actual situation. We must 
have a more tliorouijh nnderst.anding than now 
exists of the condition of the entire held in 
which we operate, l.et us remember that per- 
severance is more jtrevailing than force, and 
that many things which cannot be overcome 
.It sii^ht yield themselves when taken up little 
by little. 

The great ini|)rovements in mu- lines of 
L;oods which h.ive ma<le .Nmericm iinple- 
nients and vehicles the best and most desir- 
able in the world are the outgrowth of the 
free and spirited conquiition ;nnong the hun- 
dreds of mannfacturcrs within tjie rniled 
Sl.ile-.. Tile s.inie Competition has likewise 
broimht and kept prices down to the lowest 
limits. 

We should make the appeal to public sen- 



Export Implement Age 



i) 



timent to foster this competition. That is 
one of the duties and privileges of this Asso- 
ciation. 

1 have given earnest consideration to the 
question, and am unable to suggest any solution 
except perseverance in conducting our individ- 
ual concerns on the most correct and thorough 
business principles, and an appeal for our just 
share of the business on that ground. 

Public opinion is one i>f the mightiest forces 
in this republic, and public opinion righteously 
directed will effectually do its part. We need 
but to do ours. 

Public Lands and Irrigation 

The cultivation of the soil is the source of 
all trade in agricultural implements. Every 
new acre redeemed for agriculture creates the 
necessity for the implements with which to till 
it. The great national movement for the re- 
clamation of the arid lands by irrigation an<l of 
the swamp, and overflowed lands by drainage 
holds vast possibilities of trade expansion 
for all manufacturers of implements and 
vehicles. Already jjrojects have been approv- 
ed for construction under the National Irriga- 
tion Act that will reclaim over a million acres 
of arid land antl the money is set apart in the 
treasury of the I'nited States to build these 
great irrigation systems. 

r.ut there is danger ahead in this irrigation 
and drainage movement. It was ai)j)roved by 
the i)eople at largo untler the iKdief that the 
foundation for such a national policy shoulil 
be a public land system uiuler which all that 
remains of the jmblic domain that is avail- 
able for agriculture would be reserved for 
bona ti<le settlers and home builders. Thai 
expectation has not been realized. 

The President, in his message to Congress. 
and the Public Lands Commission by the 
President, have urgently recommen<lod the 
repeal of the Timber and Stone .\ct. and radi- 
cal moditications of the Desert Land .\cl. and 
the Commutation Clause of the Homestead 
Act, but Congress has done nothing to carry 
out these recommendations. Its failure to 
act is evidence of the strength of the influence 
in the West, whoso sympathies are with the 
lan<l speculator rather than with the settler. 
I'niess the commercial interests of the country 
can bo awakened to this peril, there is great 
danger that the speculative interests may pre- 
vail to such an extent as to endanger the whole 
irrigation and drainage movement. 

It would seem useless for the peoi)lo of the 
West to clamor for increased ap|)ropriati<.>ns 
lor irrigation or drainage until Congress has 
demonstrated that it can legislate solely in the 
interest of the bona fide home maker, and has 
enacted the laws necessary to carry into effect 
the recommenilations of the Public Lands 
Commission. The underl\ing dittienlty setins 
to be that the great majority of the people are 
not interested in the land (|uestion. They do 
not a]>preciate how much our future commer- 
cial prosperity and social stability depends on 
spreading o\ir rapidly increasing |ioi)nlation all 
over the land, instead of packing them more 
closelv inti> the ci>n'^osted cities. 

It is of f,ar reaching imiiortanee to the busi- 
ness interests of the country that by every 
possible means the peeiplo should be educated 
and encouraged to make their homes on the 
laud, and that every wage worker should live 
in a Ilomecroft rather than in a Hat or in a 
tenement. The small but intetisivoly culiivatoil 



farm and the suburban Acre Home should be 
our national ideal of the environment for 
human life that will best promote business 
prosperity as well as safeguard our political 
institutions from the manifold dangers threat- 
cno<l by our already overgrowni cities. 

Work of the Year 

.\s to the .Association's work for the past 
vear, 1 shall not detract from the freshness of 
reports soon to be submitted by qut>ting from 
them here, but commend them to your very 
l)est attention. 

Our gratitude is due to the chairman of the 
Executive Committee and all of the members 
thereof. They have devoted themselves to the 
work devolving upon them with great zeal and 
fidelity. The secretary and other officers, as 
well as the membership generally have 
rosixinded loyally to every call made upon 
them, and are likewise entitled tu the thanks 
of the Association. 

What We Are Here For 

Wo come now to reason together for the 
gotnl of our particular trades. The recent 




MR. F. E. MYERS 

Chairman Committee on Foreign Commerce and Ei-President 

of the National Anoclation of Agricultural Implement and 

Vehicle Manufacturer* 



statistics of the expansion of the busim s^ and 
of the general wealth of our country are ^tu 
jiendous. and we njoiee in them as patriotic 
citizens should. ( )ur country has been termed 
the world's greatest foixl storelunise, and 
therefore the world's greatest workshop. An- 
other has rightly said that the daily lo.if of 
bread of every family on the globe is ])rovided 
at a reduced cost because of the industry, in- 
genuity and enterprise of the implement and 
vehicle manufacturers of the I'liited States in 
providing labor-saving inqilements lor the 
farm. 

The report of the I'.xeentive Committee, 
whose chairman. II. I*.. .Mih-. of the Racine- 
Sattley Mfg. Co., Racine, Wis,. I . S. .\., was 
elected president of the organization to suc- 
ceed Mr. Ilublein, touche<l upon some im- 
portant subjects, and was as follows: 



Executive Committee Report 

Mr. President and Members of the Associa- 
tion: 

On behalf of the Executive Committee, I 
have the honor to rcix)rt as follows : 

The committee has used its best endeavor 
to care for the interests of the Association 
along time-honored and accustomed ways, and 
in so doing has been greatly helped and guided 
by the work of its predecessors. 

The work of the various special committees 
will be made known to you by the respective 
chairmen, it has been efficient and commen- 
<lable and merits our grateful endorsement. 

b'ach year has its special opportunities and 
obligations. I therefore mention four accom- 
plishments as pertaining particularly to the 
work of this year. I do this chronologically 
without seeking to estimate the relative impor- 
tance, nor in any way to imply that these ac- 
complishments are of greater or less merit than 
the work not mentioned. They are brought to 
your attentii>n simply as peculiar in a measure 
to the work of the present year. 

A new secretary has been employed, who 
gives to the Association his undivided atten- 
tion. Thus have we fulfilled the recommenda- 
tions of many preceding officers and commit- 
tees. A word is due Secretary San ford both 
in explanation and in approval. He is well 
educated, is trained in the law and quite widely 
ex|)erienced. It is impossible for any officer 
of considerable ability to manifest that ability 
in behalf of an Association like this ade- 
(juately and efficiently in the first year. In this 
respect it is almost unfortunate that some of 
our officers for higher and better roa.sons serve 
the .Association for ofu- year only. The bc-st 
efficiency is scarcely jxjssible. It is for the 
.\ss(K-iation and the succeeding executive com- 
mittee to determine to what extent efforts 
shall bo made to offset this liy taxing the sec- 
retary ami trying him out. as it were, in the 
lierfiirmance of more and more important 
work. 

There are s<»me associations which exercise 
through particular officers and committees a 
very thorough oversight of the secretary and 
subject to such oversight get from him a very 
great deal of otTectivo work, and 1 commend 
t() your consiiloration the advisability of our 
so doing. 

.\u insurance company has been organized 
pursuant to recommendatory resolution at our 
last convention. For any successful under- 
taking there must not only be ample oppor- 
tunity by way of margin and profit in the in- 
diviilual transaction, but there must be char- 
actor and ability in the management, and we 
most particularly congratulate the Associati(Mi 
on the fact that the insurance committee has 
been able to entrust the organization and tnan- 
agoment of the new company to Mr. John W. 
\\ aters. It is certainly of great moment that 
in Mr. Waters we have a man as capable and 
as sure of dcciiled success in this under-- 
laking as we could in any reason desire. His 
very long training in important pt>sitions with 
the greatest and most helpful insurance organ- 
ization known to the American manufacturer 
warrants our expecting from him and our 
Implement and Vehicle Manufacturers' 
Mutual Insurance Co. not only safe and g<XMl 
insurance, but general advice and help in the 
entire insurance problem as it presents itself 
to us severally, and this helpful advice in such 



la 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



II 



measure as \\ ill far exceed the probable 30 per 
cent, saviu}; uii the particular jmlicies he 
writes. 

I apolojjize lor addiufj; tliis nuuh in the 
report which is to fulldw tmni the lusurauce 
CouuuitUe. 1 do so in the lielief that special 
coiuniendatioii is due that ciminuttee and its 
chairman for the present happy situation. 

Another particularly important accomplisli- 
mcnt of tlic year is found in the work of the 
Committee of .\ttorneys and l.itij^atiou. it 
would be improi)er tor us not especially to tes- 
tify the appreciation of the h'xecutive Commit- 
tee of the work t>f this special couunittee and 
to note the i)articular devotion and cnurat^e of 
its chairman in so carinj; for the work that the 
members have testifie<l by large voluntary sub- 
scriptions and otherwise their n\nst luarty 
interest and ai)i)rovaI. 

Another miilertaking of the year has iieen 
the study throuj;h special committees of the 
steel situation, ami considerinj;; with our 
friends, the ])roducer>. nur particular needs in 
that direction. The interests of tlmse wiio pro- 
duce for us our materials are very closely allied 
to our own. We are in a large .sense partners 
logically and of necessits ; they must sell and 
we must buy. They nnist sell so that we can 
buy and then ourselves sell. The situation has 
been somewhat critical in respect of many of 
our materials. How far the action of the sjjc- 
cial contmittee. which in general i> known to 
you, was ])ro|>ir and how far you care to en- 
dorse or to further such work is for y<iu to de- 
cide. Whatever else, sucli work cannot iu' 
pro|)erly conducted except upon a high plane 
of fair dealing and an appreciation of the in- 
terests of all concerned whether seller or buy- 
er, and it is impossible iu our opinion that it 
ever will be conducted otlurwisi'. 

The ])roducers of uur materials can never 
with any propriil\ criticise us for acting in a 
collective capa>ii\ . Scarcely any material we 
use can be mentioned but it is, to our positive 
knowledge. otTered us oul\ bs ]K)oIs and com- 
binations. The sellers make it very manifest 
that they IkuIi recognize and act uim)u the prin- 
ciple of co-operative action, and in so doing 
may be said fairly to recommend to us that we 
do the same as the only u]>-to-date ami proper 
way. 

.\ ladv once seeing a vit\ \ouug boy skat- 
ing marvelousK well upon the ice, said: ".My 
little man. how did \ou ever learii to >k;iti s, 1 
Wonderfully well'" lie answered: ' I'.y gel- 
ting up. nnnu, every time I tumbled down." 
Some (»f \onr ottuirs havt.' tried to skate indil- 
ferently well. ;md in liie brief time allotted 
them have at times possibly been getting up 
after tumbles. N'otw ithstamliug this, -onu - 
thing has been accomplished to the ad\:int,ige 
of the .\ssociation, and the chairman voices the 
united belief of the Executive Committee and 
a great share of the membership in making the 
one princi|»;il recommendation for the \e;ir to 
come — that we think little of these mistaki^ 
and mure and more of the possibilities ot united 
action, and In further etYori and experience 
.'dotig these lines lnok forward ci>ntidentl\ to 
• lays nut remote when the .\ssociation sh.ill 
have such (louer, .and Ik' of such benetit to ii> 
members, as will be inc,i!culabl\ helpful, ;uid 
will make u- think of the days just past, by 
\va\ ot Contrast on! v. 

\\'e have endor-.e<l -nlijects like rici|)nx-ity. 
for instance, at every ciMUeiition. Why should 
we not go deeper into sUi.h questions and study 



by special committees the opportunities of for- 
eign trade; let all our members know that the 
marvelous wheat fields of the Canadian .North- 
west arc some 2,^X)0 miles long and 500 miles 
wide, and iu crying need of our implements; 
that the grain IkU in the .\rgentine is j,(xjo 
miles long and 1 .ouo miles wide. Why shall 
we not study deeply the jxissibility of our in- 
lluencing congressional and other bodies to 
the effect that we shall enjoy a thousand fohl 
greater trade with those countries than now ? 

The National DepartmeiU of ,\griculture 
estimates that last years crop was raised at a 
saving of ^f(S3.<KK).(xx) over the cost of raising 
an e<|ual crop hfty years ago. ( )ur members 
made every tool u.sed in the raising of that 
crop and every wagon that helped to bear that 
crop to market. 

\\ I- oiu'selves, our predecessors. an<l our em- 
ployees, throui^h our inventive skill and exper- 
ience made iK5ssible the saving in a single year 
of that $(xS5,(X)a.(KK), an amount almost ecpial to 
the national debt. We are collectively of great 
national conse(|uence, and it is not meet th.it 
we act singly and alone with scattered effort in 
view of the importance of our undertakings 
and the need not only of serving agriculture 
belter and better in this country, but of reach- 
ing out to foreign helds with trememlous pow- 
er with our accumulated ex|)erience and skill 
to wider and wider markets. .Not only are 
we called t»t these higher and larger duties 
by our own i)articular interests, but e(|ually in 
the interests of our customers, the consumers, 
who de])end ujwm us as responsible in in) in- 
considerable measure for the welfare of the 
3i>.oo:).(XX> of our felkiw -countrymen whose 
lives are <ievote<l to agricultural ])ursuits. 

Many (juestions of interest and moment will 
be brought to your attention. Whatever the 
i|uestions. i>ermit me humbly to suggest that 
you consider them iu that larger light of our 
collective capacity and importance, and our 
duty alike to ourselves, and to that 50 i)er 
ceiU. of the .\merican people who live b\ agri- 
culture and iu the use of our proilucts; and 
with whom our t(Xils and implemeiUs ;ire ,is 
essential and necessary a part of life as the 
band and the eye. 

I suggest that in considering (|uestions of 
general interest, we have no fear whether they 
are entirely germane or of sufficient couse 
(|Uence. It is well sometimes to consi<ler <|Ue- 
tions which thorough study will declare to Ik- 
impr,iitieal and undeservuig e(|ually with those 
which lire praeiie.il and desirsiui;. It mas Ik- 
■IS import.Mit \i> sritle ,ind L;ei oiu of tin- way 
t|uestions which materi;dl\ interfere with 
forceful and right iu'iion, a~ to consider ouK 
those i|uestion> wbicli pii^ve ultimately I" be 
of ]iositive .'lud <lireel ei ru-eru. 

The I{.xeculivt' C'omuutlee m.ike oulv two 
recommendations to \on which will recpiire 
\o\n' ci lUsideriition. being ■.i)<- amendment to 
llu constitution and anotlur to the bv-iaws. 
The amendnniit to the constitution, if voted. 
simpK permits of i'\ecuti\e sessjnns beini; 
:itunded by .iciive members ,,iily. This is a 
simple ]»raclic;il pro]iosition and nffered in the 
thought that it is to the cnuimon interest. There 
are times in :in intimate lel.itions of life ;md 
liusiness when llu- be^l c< Misideration lo each 
interest ret|nires th.ai lach pari\ take- cousul- 
l.itio!! i)rivatcl\ that he m;i\ the clearer and 
sani-h ]H'rceive the interests alike of hiniself 
and 1 libers. 

The amendment to the by-laws simply pre- 



vents hasty action on any subject. A ringing 
report or speech followed by a resolution may 
cause its passage, later to be regretted. If a 
resolution is wh<»lly good and i)ledges our As- 
sociation to an im])ortant policy, it will bear a 
day's delay and thought before pas.sage and 
be the better for such delay ; and so passing, it 
will have a more general a])proval. 
All (li which is respectively submitted. 

The Kxecutive Committee, 

1 1. \'.. W ii.KS, C'luiinnaii. 

The re])ort of the committee on Foreign ) 
Connnerce was presented bv the chairman, .Mr. 
F. !•:. .Myers of the linn of F. Iv .Myers & I'.rn., 
.\shland, ( )hio. I'. S. .\.. and our readers will 
be specially interested in this rejMirt as it dem- 
onstrates the importance given to export tra<lc 
by manufacturers of agricultural implements 
and vehicles in the I'nited States. The reiM)rt 
is as follows: 

Report of Committee on Foreign Com- 
merce 

Mr. I'irsiilriil an,! (iciitU'iiicn of the i'lunrn- 
tidii: 

h'oreign commerce is so closely allied with 
domestic ctHumerce. that we must create im- 
proved tra<le relations with the various for- 
eign countries. ( Hir previous reports were 
studied, and ])roved instructive. Infortu- 
natily, however, last years re|M>rt was given 
late. ;md was not discussed as expected. We 
have Ikcu impressed wilh the imi>oriance to 
the extern of referring to some of the ]>rinci- 
pal features, ami most respectfully urge your 
carefid deliberation. 

The I nited States is the "youngest" among 
the earth's ruiing nations; the best ability and 
brawn of the nation and of foreign countries 
are our inventors, mamtfacturers and artisans. 

< 'ur numerous foreign citizens recommend (Hir 
implements, and urge their native dealers to 
bu\ them. We nutst e<|ualize conditions in 
some way ami adopt the broadest possible 
metlnMls by subsi<lies. or otherwise, so as to 
l>lace us on a basis that will enable us to com- 
pete with other nations, and. as far as possi- 
ble, transport our wares at the lowest ruling 
shipping rates and conditions, and attain the 
conntiercial and industrial sui)remacv of the 
L;lobe. America should cross either ocean^ 
.Mid ciin(|uer. The all-prevailing and wonder- 
lul res, unci s ,if the western continent will 
cert.iinl\ revohuii ini/e conunercial conditions, 

< lur strength and station in the aligmneiU of 
the n.'ilions is the en\\ ^f other nations ;md 
the arbiter oi the world. Americans coulil 
live ,nid thrixe upon their own products for 
centurK-s. \ii,| as loiii^ as this is trtie .-md we 
are 1.1 ourselves, u e sboidd triumph. ;is wP 
can. in conmiercial e\]>ansiun and develop- 
ment. We are developing rapidlv from atjri- 
enltural ti> commercial industries in a large 
ninnber ^f the oldest-settle<l Sl:iles. 

We stand not ,>nl\ at the be;iil nf the great 
ni.imifacturing nations ,,f the world, hut our 
output equals thai of C.ermam. b'rance and 
the I nited Kingdom combined. We cert.aiidv 
i\<< not need hiL^h proteetive l.irit'f. We e;m 
compete snlistanti.illx with ;nn coinilr\ in tie 
we.rld without piot<rti,>n. While labor is 
cheap in foreign e. .imlries, it is not for the 
Work done. It wi ,-;m work our artisans nine 
and ten hours a da_\ au<l secure results, as we 



I 



I 






do, supported by our reciprocity treaties, why 
should we continue protection? 

Your Chairman, with the observations he 
has made hi foreign coimtries, compared with 
our resources and ability, recommends that 
we take chances with any nation, and also 
recommends a recon.struction of our tariff 
conditions. 

The civilized nations of the worM want the 
product of (nir factories, because e>f its 
acknowledged superiority and construction. 
The market for maimfactured goods in for- 
eign countries is over $4,o(Jo,o<X). The i)ro- 
duction of manufactured gixwls in this conn- 
try has increased three times as fast as its 
|Mipulation. The possibilities of the I'nited 
States have never been so fully realized. We 
are the world's greatest i)roducers of the 
principal manufactured articles. We have 
the world's greatest su])ply of coal and gas 
for the turning of material into the fniished 
pnxluct. We have the greatest supply of capi- 
tal fi>r large production, the be.st machinery, 
the most ingenious workmen, the most suc- 
cessful business men. and the world is our 
market. < )ur demands and the wonderful 
develoi>ment and success cannot be jlcscribed 
within the limits of our brief report. We ipies- 
lion whether its import and value are fairly 
estimated, or whether we have fathomed the 
mvsterious ways of Trovidence. It is our 
ho]>e that this brief recital of industrial <level- 
opment will stir every member of the cou- 
ventioit. If you comprehend, as we hr)i)e you 
can, and will, from the standiK)int of our 
inheritance and opportunities, you will need 
but little additional information. Therefore, 
we do not give statistics. ( )ur purpose iu 
this report is to sectire inspiration, and then 
v«»ur own judgment will tell you what the 
vital «|uesti<»ns are and what the foreign mar- 
kets at'ford. 

Hack of the general growing dem:ind 
we have m;iterial, workmen and capital \u\- 
ecpialled on the globe, and a growing reputa- 
tion for achievement. The t|ueslion before this 
membership is : 

"Do you want foreign trade, and are you 
inclined to supi>ort our |x)sition as outIine«l .^' 

.No subject before the .\merican manufac- 
turer is so vitally imix)rtant as the question: 

"What shall we do. and are we in shajK' to 
go after foreign trade properly?" 

We urge serious deliberation on this ])oinI. 
Do not under any circumstances undertake to 
distribme vour product in foreign fields unless 
vou have the capacity and cajiital. and have 
definite plans so that you can be dejjended upon 
and found worthy e>f the confidence of foreign 
l,i,vers — as the distant foreign buyer must have 
confidence with our systetu <d' cash-with-order 
and vou-nnist buy-of-us. etc. We recommend 
I more liberal treatmetit of customers, reciproc- 
ity and the accunudation of thoroughly reli;d)le 
statistics. This means work, deviation and 
cai)ital. It means that ye>u delegate all. or at 
least a largo jjortion of your establishment, to 
foreign trade, and that you enter the field deter- 
mined to succeed, rnt'orlnn.ately, but very 
few started properly. Some who shipiied nck- 
lesslv were compelled to make ]icrsonal tri])s tn 
s.-ive :tceoiints. and Inckilv, were aw:dsened to 
the needs and |>ossibilities. The ])ro|)osition is 
up to vou. If you conclude to go after it, go 
after it along <lefined lines, which means that 
vou will study the situation and kxik the ground 
over for yourselves, so that you will be a credit, 



instead of a discredit, to (Uir nation. Do not 
copy old and anti(|uated implements, simply to 
supplv what they have already been buying. 
Dealers all over the world look to the .\meri- 
cati manufacturer for something better than 
thev formerly had to accomplish the work. 
W liat vou must know is what the implement is 
intended to accomplish, and be absolutely sure 
that it will <lo it. 

In ilealing with this subject, we must un- 
derstand and consider the character of animal, 
or iH)wer. they have with which to operate the 
implements. When this point is reached, pre- 
jiare carefully descriptions of every detail in 
the language of the buyer, supplying clear illus- 
trations. The indiscriminate ijuoting of prices^ 
to every foreign buyer has caused some of 
the large imi)orting firms to refuse certain 
makes of giKuls on tlie ground of meeting com- 
l)etition that woulil leave no i)rofit. Do not 
i|Uote prices to unknown parties, h'oreign 
houses look upon such methods as resembling 
those of catalogue houses. Write, asking for 
further information as to the wants, and, in 
the meantime, take steps to find out who the 
parties are and their standing. Keep your cus- 
tomers fully advised by u]>-to-date literature of 
all changes made and improvements. .And, 
rather than substitute, cable, if necessary, 
whether the goods can be used with the changes 
or not. Substituting of eirders has been done 
so fre(|uently that foreign buyers have made 
l)rotest to our consuls. ;md many losses have 
iieen .sustained because the parties would not 
receive the goods. This lias done much to 
create a feeling of distrust between the .\meri- 
can manufacturer and the feireign buyer. 'I'ake 
extreme care against errors in ])acking or 
breakage iu transiKirtation. and see that all 
goods are of g»)od quality, carefully made and 
ship|)ed on time. I'niler no circmnsiances un- 
dertake to unloatl anti(|uated or poorly made 
goods, or those of unproven reinitation. 

Favt)rable comment was made by a former 
president on a resolution ofTereil by your chair- 
m:m. which was unanimously jiassed, to the 
effect that conii)etitive manufacturers should 
interest themselves in prohiljiting the ship- 
ment of goods that were known to be inferior, 
not up-to-date construction ami of jxMir mater- 
ial. The manufacturer who iloes this, and im- 
j)Oses on the confidence of foreign buyers, 
should bear the odium. We must inspire con- 
fidence by exercising extreme care, not only in 
furnishing what we claim, but what is ordered. 
and ill ci 'uqtli.mce with llu-ir wish, s ri-LTardless 
I if I atr home customs. 

I'ersou.d investigruion and c.irefid thought 
proMs conclusively that we caimot imi)ose our 
.\merican methods in the difl'erent foreign 
Countries ;my niori' th;m we can compel them 
to .accept our cmrt.-nc\ , Do not nnilertake to 
ride rougli-sliod iiver ancient traditions and 
customs. We recommend a close study .'uid 
familiariis with cousidar and trade reports, 
statistical ;il)siracts. commercial rel.itions ami 
summar\ tables of commerce, jirice. itc, 

N'ou are f.amiliar with tlu' important foreign 
marl els and gener.al conditions, W\' respect- 
fully refer yon to the DepartmeiU <if Com- 
merce. I'rici- Treaties. C'ustonis and Reciprocity 
Kelations with foreign countries, especi.'dly 
Ciib.i. tin- l'liilip|)ine Islands, .\uslralia, tier- 
many, Russia ;in<l I-'rimce. 

,\ notable stej) for the betterment of our con- 
sular service was made when President Roose- 
velt in a special message to Congress reconi- 



meiKlcd the appointment of six special agents 
of the State Dei)artmeut. with the diplomatic 
rank and title of "Commercial Attache," to be 
appoimed preferably from the consular service, 
and to be assigned, subject to transfer at the 
discretion of the Secretary of State, to be sent 
abroad to make a study of the conditions exist- 
ing in foreign countries, to prepare for the 
Department of Ctniimerce and Labor reports 
upon commerce and manufactures of kindreil 
topics, to visit the consulates and examine their 
workings, suggest changes to the Department 
of Stale as would tend to the general improve- 
ment and strengthen the service. 

These agents are to cover a wide scope of 
territory. One is to be sent to Austria and the 
I'lalkan States, (jermany, Switzerlaml. Russia 
and other countries of Northern luirope ; one 
for h' ranee, Italy, I'ortugal. Spain and the other 
countries bordering on the Mediterranean; the 
third for (ireat IJritain and her dependencies; 
the fourth for .Mexico. CeiUral .America and 
the West Indies and South .America; the fifth 
for Asia, mori' particularly Asiatic Russia, 
Chin.i and Japan, and the sixth tf> be held in 
reserve for siKcial service and particular mis- 
sions to any part of the world. 

t »ur rejjresentatives in the ccmsular service 
are recognizeil by foreign naticms as our busi- 
ness agents. :uid as such, they should be the 
n-.ost capable men that we can secure. Much 
has Iu'en done in late years to raise the stand- 
ard of efficiency, but that there is still room 
lor improvement will not l>e (piestioned. 

.\s evidence i»f the attention paid to the 
securing of siiecially trained representatives in 
the cousidar service of foreign nations, it may 
not be inopportune to refer here to the (juali- 
fications necessary to secure appointment in 
(ireat I'.ritain. 

It is absolutely necessary that Knglish be 
understood perfectly. The candidate must also 
speak l-'rench. and at least one other language, 
Sp.inish or (ierman, and be able to sjK-ak them 
lluently. He nutst also iH)ssess a thorough 
knowledge of I'.ritish and commercial law relat- 
ing to shipping, negotiable instruments, bills of 
exchange, promissory notes, contracts for the 
carriage of g<x)ds. marine insurance, etc. 

(iermany also has a similar course of train- 
ing for her representatives in the service. The 
(ierman cimisuI sjieaks the language of the 
country to which he is accredited like a native, 
:ind in addition. I'rench and Knglish. 

This thorough course of training undoubt- 
i.lh acconius for the large foreign trade of 
ibe-e two countries, and the gocnls marked. 
".Maile in k'ngland " or "Made in Germany, " on 
the wharves nf the countries all over the civi- 
lized world. 

In iSoo ue sIoihI at the bottom of the list 
of the four great mamifacluring nations, 
namelv: The rnited Kingdom. France, Ger- 
manv and the Tnited States, I-*orty-five years 
later we stand ;U the bead of the list ; our man- 
ufactured pro<lnct equals that of the other 
L^reat nations combined. 

To retain our position, au'l increase corres- 
pi.tidiiii^h. we must lotik to the countries of 
Asia. ,\frica. South .and Central .America. 
Mexico ;md .\iistralia. who Ikivc no well devel- 
oped mannfaclnring interests. 

We are inclined to urge on Congress the 

need of enceniraging .American shipbuibling, 

or, at least, the owing of shipping interests by 

Americans. There is no denying the fact that 

(Continued on page 14) 



( 



12 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 

FOR CIRCULATION IN FOREIGN COUNTBIKS ONLY. 

Ab independent Journal devoted exclueively to the Export 

Trade in Agricultural Machinery, Pumpi, Wind 

Millc, Farm Tools, Dairy Suppliea, and 

Hardware Specialtiea. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 



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WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 

loio Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



Aim publishers of "The Implement Age" and 
"The American Fertilizer." 



Copyrighted, 1906, by Ware Bros. Company. 



Agent Tor New Zealand, Richard Hill. Matlock House, Uaven- 
p(Mt, AttckUmd, Mew Zealand. Price, 8«, td, poMpaid. 



Vol. XV. Philadelphia. Pa., I. S. A., November, 1906. No. 2 



Under no circumstances do we allow commiS' 
slons to advertising agents. 



The American itnplement manufacturers 
leanu'il hm^^ as^o the necessity of fimling out 
what the farmers in foreif^n countries want. 
and tluii >.ii|)]>l\ iiiij it. .XnuTican-inade a|jri- 
cultural iiupleiiKiits f<ir e.\|x>rt trade are suit 
able for the rejjion in which they are to l)e used. 



BASIS OF TRADE 

.Anierican a^rieiilt\n;il and veliicle manufac- 
turers are seeking,' trade in the Soutli .XiiHrican 
countries, as everywhere else, on the merits of 
their gtKxis and on their aliihty to satisfy fully 
the re(|uiretnents of the traile and agricultural 
communities on a nmrc economical basis than 
can 1)C done by an\ ft "iir competitors. I'niess 
the circumstances are very unusual, buyers 
should secure their ijikxIs in the chea]K'St mar- 
kets, keejiinj.^ in mind always the merits «>l 
the goo<ls. 



RECIPROCITY 

( )n September InI the iniiiiimiin tarili Male 
of Spain became o|R'rative un i^ixids frmn 
the United States, and in return, Spain secured 
reductions in dtitie> un their art^ols, wines, 
spirit^ and \\<>rk> nt" art -eiit I" the I nited 
States. I'.oth countries will pnitit by this funii 
of reciprocity. 



workmen employed on the East Coast exten- 
sion work were cauyht in the gale, and most 
of them were sunk. /\bout 50 men, floating 
on logs and rafts, were picked up at sea near 
the liahama coast. The steamer St. Lucie 
was crushed by the waves, and 35 persons were 
lost. Great devastalron was wrought by the 
same storm in Salvador, and several small 
town> were >\\epl away by tloods. 



A TROPICAL HURRICANE 

A tropical hurricane swept across Cuba on 
the night of ( )ctober iHtli, and wrought con- 
siderable havoc, especially in the western i>ro- 
vinces. .\bout 20 1i\e>. were lo--t. aivl tlii- looses 
of propiTtN are e-liniated at from ."^i ,1)00.1 > hi 
to S^.ooo.fxxj. The same storm struck the 
Florida coast, and caused great loss of life 
and pro|ierty. I'.lliotts Key was submerged by 
a tidal wave, and the entire pojnilatinn of about 
250 was engulfeil. Ten barges crowded with 



MRS. JEFFERSON DAVIS 

.Mrs. Jeti'er>on Davis, widow of the jjresi- 
denl of the Southern Confederacy, died ( »cto- 
ber if)tli, aged So. She was \ arina Howell 
when in 1845 she married .\lr. Divis. She was 
his devoted comi)anion through his political 
career at Washington, 1847-61. as ]jresident of 
the Confederate States iSTil-Oj, iluring the 
second year of his imprisonnient at l-'ortress 
Monroe, and until his death in iXSij. She pub- 
lished a memoir of her husband in iSyo. 



CANADIAN FISCAL YEAR 

An otiticial Canadian aiiiunmcement changes 
the fiscal year for the Dominion from the 12 
months ending June 30th, to that ending 
March 31st. This act came into force on July 
1st, with the proviso that the fiscal year t(K)6-7 
shall consist of the nine months only ending 
March 31st, 1907. 



OUR NATIONAL BEVERAGE BILL 

A nalioii.il trade niag.iziiie estimates that 
the I "nited States spent la<t year $220.0iX),(X)!) 
for non-alcoholic thinks and .Si ,3J4,(X)(),0(Xi for 
alcoholic drinks. The figures apportioned to 
the various classes are: I'or ci>coa, S^.oDo.ooo; 
for tea. $52,ooo.c>T(i ; for coffee, $i02,ooo.oo<j; 
for wines .$</),(V)o.O(X); for whisky, $437.00(5,- 
i«N», ,ind for beer. $77 1. 0(3o.nf>o. 



EXPOSITION IN INDIA 

Consul-(iener,il William H. Michael n|)ori- 
from Calcutta on tradi- lopii-. .,f India, as i'A- 
lou-^: 

The annotmcement of the annual industrial 
and .'ii.;ricultural exhibition to be held in Cal- 
cutta in December, H^V), has just been issued. 
It appears from the rules aiicl regulations that 
the exhibits will be confined to productions of 
India and adjacent I'.riti.sh possessions except 
iinj)lemeuts or machines of foreign manufac- 
ture, which in the opinion of the exhibit 
authorities are likely tn promote or divclop In 
dian industries. 

Tlu' amiouncenieiU will be of interest oid\ lo 
.Vmerican m.imifacturers of implements and 
machines falling within the lUscrijition above. 
Tile time is ton -.liorl tor Amerii-an manntac- 
tun r> to pre|iart' exhibits in the I'nitt'd State- 
and sjiip for this exposition. Those manufac- 
turers, however, who have implements and 
machinery alreail\- in India b.ive abnudaiue of 
time to prepare ;md install exliil)its, Nniericin 
mamu'acturers mi^bt instrnet their a.m'nt^ ;md 
the houses handling tlnir goods to prepare 
exhibits and install thetii a> extdn^ive Annii 
ran exhibits, l''or txample. tIuT<' are .ii^enls 
and houses in Calcnit;i that liaiiille .\nn rir.in 
goods who. if they were directed bv the Ameri- 
can manufacturers, wmild be able to get to- 
Lielher and prepare an exhibit of various lines 
of articles that would be advauta.geous to 
.\merican trade with India. 



THE COMING RAILWAY 

From time to time we hear of projected 
electric railways to be distinguished by speeds 
of one hundred miles an hour or more. The 
success of such plans will depend wholly 011 
their financial backing. The possibility of such 
speeds was amply proved by the celebrated 
llerlin-Zosseii experiments, and as soon as 
sucii a road will pay we shall doubtless have 
it. 'J'hat we shall be able to ride at this speed 
very suon is the opinion of the editorial writer 
in The hicctrical Rcvicik; who notes that the 
attention of railway men has i)een teiuiwrarily 
distracted from the high-speed road by the 
consi<leration of electric terminal facilities in 
large cities, lie writes: 

"It has been shown pretty conclusively that 
there is now no physical reason why such 
speeds may nul be attained and held, so that 
the problem has resolved itself into one of 
securing sufticient safety; that is to say, o£ 
Iniilding a suitable roadbeil and of devising a 
suitable .system of controlling the trains. The 
electric motor furnishes the means by which 
any speed which the roadbed or the car itself 
will stand can be maintained indefinitely. 

■'.\side freim the design of the roadbed, the 
method of controlling the trains therefore be- 
comes the next in importance. As has been 
.saitl. it is obvious thai some extension of the 
block system must be employed in which the 
blocks are longer and the safety devices much 
n.ore complete than anything in use to-day. 
» 'ne plan would be to divide the road into long 
blocks, each block ending at a stopping point, 
and to allow no train to start from one station 
until the preceding train had left the one ahead. 
Another plan recently proiKised contemplates 
dividing the road into shorter blm-ks with in- 
termediate blocks each long enough to enable 
a train to be brought to a stop on it. The 
power supplieil to these blocks is to be con- 
trolled b\ the train 011 the next block ahead, 
and is to be cut ofT automatically from these 
intermediate blocks until there is no train in 
the block ahead. 

"The interesting feature about these plans 
is the fact that the very means which makes 
it possible for us to attain such high speeds is 
the means which will enable us to make use of 
them. The electric motor is the only driving 
iiKchanism considered for such high speeds, 
and the lUclric railway .system is one which 
rcadil\ ad;iptN itsell to automatic control, t >n 
such a ro.id, not only would the signals be 
oper.'ited more or less automatically by llu' 
irains tlieni--el\ es. but the --aletv dexices which 
would be nece-.'>ar\ for the road would also 
be cemlrolled tiectricalls . There would be no 
ilil'ticulty in h.iving the power sU])plied to one 
will lie lilocl, cut oti automat icalh l)\ the jires 
flue of a train on anoilur part oi ihe road, a 
iialure diiticnlt to i>litain if ans other motive 
]iouer \k' Used. 

■"The high-speed road is more than a prob- 
able devel<"ij)nHtit in r;ii1i"o,idiiig, and that it 
will lie pureh electiical there ^eems at pres- 
<nt to be no doubt. It is because the power 
is supplied to the moving train from a sta- 
tionary power hon>~e that -uch ^pe(iN may be 
inaintained, and the movement of the Irains 
may be controlled automatically." 



I 






Export Implement Age 



13 



m 



A CURIOUS COLLECTION 

I'ncle Sam, like many another onlerly 
housekeeper, gets puzzled, betimes, as to the 
proper »lisposition and care of much of his fur- 
niture. The preservation of the Patent Office 
models, as a single instance, costs the Gov- 
ernment many thousand dollars in the rental 
of buildings to store them. 

This collection is an interesting and curious 
one. Some, through age or accident, are past 
any i)ossible usefulness, but most of the Patent 
( )fifice models either have been or are likely 
to be of great importance. As a recoril oi pal 
ented inventions they are ot i;re,u value, 
especially in patent litigation, as many suits of 
the (lav give evidence. 

Speaking in favor of the proper preserva- 
tion of the modeks, tlic Scicntitic American 
says : 

It will be remembered, on the one hand, 
that this collection of models is not a complete 
cxhiltit of all the patents granted. All models 
prior to 1S36 were burned, and only a few- 
have been restored. In the ratenl ( ififice fire 
of 1X77, some 86.000 additional models were 
burned, leaving al)out 137,000 models. ( )n the 
other hand, the models remaining and now on 
exhibition in the Union I'.uilding represent 
some of the most imiM^rtant ei)ochs of progress 
which have marked the growth of modern civ- 
ilization, and it is the only exhibit of the kind 
in existence. Mere are to be found the sewing 
machines of Howe. Wilson, Singer. C.rover iv 
r.aker. Wilcox & C.ibbs. and others. The Ihnve 
machine in 1846 for the first time placed the 
eye of the needle in the point instead of the 
heel, and this, with the four-motion feed of 
Wilson, gave the first jiractical success to sew- 
ing bv machinerv. Here also are Morse's tele- 
graid'is patents, 1832-1840; the Hell telephone 
patented in |87(), the l-.dison phonograph pat- 
ented in 1878. l-".dison's electric lamp, patented 
in 1880. the House printing telegraph of 1846, 
the r.ain chemical telegraph of 1848. Dr. 
Page's electro-magnetic engine patented in 
1834 and his induction coil of 18^.8, Channing 
& l''armer's fire-alarm telegraph of 1837. l**li 
Whitnev's cotton gin of 1794, the P.lanchard 
lathe of 1820, Thurber's typewriter of 1843, 
and many others. 

.Abraham Uincoln's namt i> among those 
who have secured patents His invention was 
a "Means for Lifting \ es^^els (her Shoals" 
and was patented May 22, 184M. The inven- 
tions of women are grouped in a case by them- 
selves. A description of these says : 

"Sally Rosenthall invented a p<Kket sewing 
machine, which she could take along with her 
when visiting, and thus improve each shining 
hour with \ni\\\ work and gossip, Mary Car- 
penter invented a machine for sewm- straw 
hats, and is re])Uted to have made much nionex 
out of it. Margaret Ixni-lit invented a feed in- 
machine for making paper bags, and is crcl- 
ited with considerahh- profit therefrom, 
iM-.mces Dunham wa- the inventor of a m.i 
chine for making honeycomb, shr.wdly reco-- 
ni/ing the assistance this would render the 
bees.^ Not ,ill of the women, however, have 
confine.! themselves to line- of feminine 
thouuht. Marv MoiU-onur\. with the mem 
ory of the Civil War fresh bef.Te her. in- 
vented in l8«)4 a very mechanical doi.blc-hull 
construction of war vessel, and Sarai; Mather 



in 1845 devised a submarine telescope, while 
Mary Woodard in 1849, probably with an eye 
to the comfort of a baldheaded spouse, invent- 
ed a fan to be attached to a rocker, so as to 
keep ofY the flies as well as fan the occupant." 

Many amusing mo<lels are to be found in 
this curious collection, one being a plow gun. 
the beam of the plow being fashioned as a gun. 
Whether this invention came from the brain 
of a belligerent farmer or from that of an agri- 
cultural soldier, the record does not sa\ . A 
jiatent for an aerial car, to be drawn by live 
eagles, was once secured. 

"An industrious man who attempted to fol- 
low out I'Vanklin's custom of rising early, in 
1833 patented a bedstead adapted to throw the 
slugtianl on the floor at getliug-up time. A 
I'.eau P.rummell in i8<y() patented a self-tii)pmg 
hat which makes a polite salutation. Here, loo, 
a model was dispensed with. A tender-hearted 
man in late years has patented an eyeglass for 
chickens, another in 1834 nateuted a tapeworm 
trap, which was to be swallowed and the traj- 
then removed. A recent inventor coats the 
dead bodv with glass for preserving it, another 
has an electric device for slopping runaway 
horses. Another attaches a parachute lo a 
man's head and weights to his feet, so that he 
mav jump out of the window in time of fire 
and land safelv. -A lover of feminine beauty 
has provided a dimple maker. An auti-snor- 
ing device is supplied by one whose trials are 
thus expressed with mute eWiuence. An anti- 
scratchiug device for chickens was the basis 
of an application for a patent by a lady in 1863. 
but was never issued. .\n illuminated keyhole 
surroundeil bv luminous paint which shines r.i 
night was the subject of another patent, unex 
emplified, however, by a model. This enable^ 
the uusteadv man to find the keyhole. .\ cheek 



AMERICAN BEET SUGAR 

The sugar consumption in the United States 
awakens the undivided attention of European 
sugar interests. No country in the world 
shows such a phenomenal increase in consump- 
tion as America. It amounts to more than 
\oo per cent, within the last twenty years, 
while the increase in population during the 
same period was only 50 per cent. Though the 
.\mericaii domestic production has increased 
in twenty years from 100,000 tons, in round 
figures, to over 6oo,ooo tons, there have been 
imported within the last five years only 2,000- 
(XK) tons per year. Statistically, the sugar con- 
sumption of the United States has risen to 
2, 300.00 tons per year, which is nearly one- 
fit'th of the entire world's consumption. 

The .\mericau beet sugar intlustry d(K's not 
begin to supply this increase, despite heroic 
efforts on t!ie part of those interested in beet 
sugar, and the necessity for imports will con- 
tinue to exist for a long time. For this 
reason it will largely depend ui>ou th6 
settlement of the Cuban affairs to what 
extent the luiropean beet sugar men 
will be called upon to supply part of the 
American import. 

.Another factor which gave steadiness to 
rising jtrices on the European continent during 
the rci)ort jicriod was that the visible supply 
at 1 lamburg has suffered further considerable 
decrease. While revised figures show that 
this supiily. as given in the last review, was 
too higli by about 200.000 sacks, even with this 
deduction the supply has gone down to 600,- 
000 sacks, and it api>ears that shipments are 
seriiMislv interfered with by low water in the 
rivers contributary to Hamburg as German 
shipiiing jM)int to transatlantic ports. Thus the 



expander, ahair parter, and an electric lamp to Hamburg exporters are throvyn upon railroad 
be swallowed so as to illuminate the interior transportation, the cost of which is imt con- 
anatomy have all been patented, and many ducivc to profitable business.— .f»i. Sui:.iir In- 
..i.,r.. ininsiiirr inst.Tnces mitrht be found." dus(r\. 



more amusing instances might be found.' 



EXPORTS OF AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 



SEPTRMBBR- 



NINK MONTHS ENDING SBPTBMBKR 



ARTICLKS ANI> COUNfRIBS 



I'iOS 



i<w6 



1905 



Mowers and reapers, and parts of . . . . % 408,923 

Plows and cuftivalors, and parts of ... . '43.959 

All otlier, and parts of 52'i373 

Total |l,o74,25.S 

Exported to— , ^ „ ^ 

United Kingdom I » qxx 

Belgium ,^^,^ 

J:^""^*" 4.4>*^ 

Germany j j^^n 

Italy ,''^^o 

Netherlands 22 826 ' 

R^'ssia^ • ■ i4',S98 

Other Europe . . 2^^026 

British North America "lo 6s- 

>'"*<=« 16:197 ' 

^^^^ : S37.23S 

ArgenUna ^'g 2^$ 

»«'>' 16,08 

Chile • ■ ; • 2s,8o2 

tlther South America ^' ^^ 

British East Indies 70-64 

British Australasia j'iss 

Philippine Islands Z'^lf, 

< ither Asia and Oceania ig'qio 

British Africa ^'i^^ 

All other Africa ^'J^ 

Other Countries 

To'al ' * 1.074,255 



10.546 (10,469,753 
147,401 2,475.851 
659.974 6,i3.s,.So2 



I 9.«95.476 I 10,430,743 
2,534.634 2.960,340 
5.037.395 7.100,522 



( i,ofn,92i 1 19.081,406 ' $17,467,505 l».49».6«>5 



1 30,829 


6,134 


I2,I2.S 


4.698 


2,585 


2,<>47 


I3.,S90 


31.5.^1 


3'5.467 


36.085 


4,827 


375.574 


4.635 


37,056 


22,439 


1,864 


67,680 


1,407 


IV21" 


'4..S39 


4,196 


1,100 



$ i,659.9*'7 

2I2,6.S4 

2, 93", 773 

1.231,52' 

131.726 

224,78' 
2, 95 ',76.8 
'.240,983 

2,.S84.251 

281,681 

'05,750 

3. 1 55. '78 

38.767 

223.577 
98,294 
5'.43' 
1,104,282 
20,605 
^9,610 

382.044 
92,722 
18,071 



903. '54 

172,133 

2,664,545 

',197.736 

234.244 

196,495 

3,764.476 

1,098,671 

'.329.75" 

3I5.7'4 

19.3.904 

3,608.989 

152.38" 
200,075 
182,661 

40,866 
627,424 

28,042 
106.468 
322,904 
'05534 

21,340 



I 1,003,921 $19,081,406 1 117,467,505 



931.093 

25'.44i 
2,926,073 
1,755.650 
359. '59 
512 219 
3,4'2,739 
1,418,085 

2,484,035 

407. '35 

101,909 

3,502,01 1 

69,109 

35 '.780 

288,544 

5 ',833 

886,295 

49.823 

367.213 

272,612 

130,413 
22.434 



120,491,605 



14 



Export Implement Age 



FORTY STORY BUILDING 

W'Ik'ii till- .still V Irl,mii \>> hi' ciiculatfd. a 
ku months ajjjo. that tht- Sin.i,'cr M aim fact ui- 
iiif4 to., proposi'd to put up an a<l<htii)n to 
thiir (ifVicv huililini; in \\\\ ^'l>rk Cily whiii) 
shonlil havr over 40 sturii> and roach to a 
hoij^ht of oviT (xxi feet, it was Lrtmrallv 
thoni^dit that if this were not ahoj^etluT a 
Sunday supplenunt yarn, the new huildiny 
would |irohahly ho notliiu!; niori- than some 
sort of a freak lower. Ihit now the arcliitect's 
designs are made ])nl)lie and the enyineer's c.il- 
eulations and strain-estimates have hecomc 
pul)he ])roperty and it appears that the propo- 
sition is not onI\ ipiite a soher one, hut tliat 
it is actually to he carrie<l out unless Sfime iin- 
jjrohahle ohstaoic should arise. 

It is a little difficult for one who is familiar 
with the chanties in the New ^ ork sky-line in 
recent years to realize that the olYice-huildini;s 
which dwarfed the dominatinji I'roduee I'.x- 
change tower are in turn to Ik- made to look in- 
significant. If this new structure is to he 
followeil hy others of its ilk the office huildin^s 
of twenty years ayo will soon l<K)k like wtHid- 
shetls, and one will have to look at least twice 
to find the docks alonj; the water front, at all. 

It seems that the new addition io the Sinu'cr 
biiildin^j is to \w an atTair with a llroadway 
frontafje of 76 feet, and with only 14 stories in 
its eastern end. to correspond with the pres- 
ent structure, I'ut from the western end is to 
rise the hiijher |)ortiou ahont 70 feet stpiari- 
antl s(|nirtinjj upward _'7 stories above the roof 
of the rest of the huildin;;. It is ohvitmsls im- 
possible to make much else than a towt-r of 
such a conslruclion. hul the (k>iL;iis indicate 
that frmn an .irchitectnr.il point of \ icu it will 
not he half h.'id. and wi- are told in its defense 
from pr.ictical viewpoints that it will h.ive a 
total area of over «>' .■ acres, m.ikinii: it piix-.i- 
hle for it to jj;ive .satisfactorv "I't'u e h. m^ju^ f, ,r 
about 6.ocT(> people. And with office space at 
its present prices in Neu \ ork this means 
something; in the \\a\ of revenue. 

Siructnrallx tin- new IniildiiiL; offer-. -, .im 
interestini: fe.iltires. In realitv this lower-iike 
strnclure i> made up of four separate towtrs 
IJ feet s(|uari' and V' Icel a]i,irt lionud tivui'lher 
at each floor, and lacli ^iparate tnwer luin- 
so huilt as to he self->iipportin^. Tlie tut.il 
weight of the tower alone is atiout j^imx) tons, 
hut cariiiL,' ft<r tin- weight is a -iniple m.itter 
comparcil with the ]>r' "visions that must he 
made against the .action of wind pre-sure I'nr 
not only is it necessarx lt> pro\ nle ,ii;.tin-i ,ni 
estimated maximum wind ])resMne of _V' 
pounds per square foot over the emire outer 
surface, hut c;dc>il;ition> must he ni.ide |>ro- 
viditifj fur tile literal -liiftins,,' of the weight of 
the huildini:^ due ti. tlii> pressure, producins^ 
a liftintj motion nn the windw.ird side and a 
downward [iris>\ue on ilu- leew.ird side, 

( tf course the steel frame t\jte of construc- 



tion is the one .iilopted and the figures showing 
the work to he done hy some of the main col- 
umns are astonishing. The total <lead weight 
at the toot of one of the m.ain columns will he 
jXt).2 tons rei>reseining the weight of steel- 
work .ind masonry it supports. In addition to 
this. pro\ision is made for an incrt'ase of (.0 
per cent, for the maximum live load, includ- 
ing furniture, fittings ;ind occupants. This 
anunints to 1 :(i.(i tons and makes the comhined 
dead and live loail of each column 4_'i).S ton>. 
To this must he added an estimated down- 
ward wind pressure of 75S.S tons giving an 
average loatl ;it the hase of the colunnis of 
i,i7')'i. Some of the more important cohiinns 
ha\e a load even greater than this. The total 
inaximinn lift on the windward side of the 
hnilding is estimated at 470 tuns on a single 
column, ami this is provided for hv anchoring 
the Columns to the caissons. 

The husiness section of New ^ cirk Citv has 
long ajjo ceased to have an\ very troublesome 
architectural morality, and the engineering 
side of the (piestion is (piite practicable, so that 
the oidy theorem remaining for demonstration 
b> the Singer building is the simple tttie as to 
whether it will pay. If it proves to be a pro 
fitable investment there is in;mv a man now 
living who will some day l<Mik down on its roof 
from his airy office and marvel that so .short a 
time ago men ha<l so sterile |)owers of imagin- 
iition as to hud .inything noieworthv in a mere 
41 si,,t\ ~1iani\. — ( (////(/(ivv/'ii/ . ////rr((((. 



CONVENTION OF AMERICAN 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

IMPLEMENTS 

I Continueil from pa^e 1 1 ) 
this ii.iiiitrs is not enjoying tlit' foreign trade 
tli.il It should. We cainiot refr.iin from urging 
•ipon our members greater efforts and more 
attention to this subject. ( tur mamifacttiring 
capacity has increased enornionslv. justifving 
the consideration we mo>t respectfullv solicit 
lo this report of your committi'e. 

Respectfully submitted. 
I'. I'", Ms Iks. i'luiniiiiiii, 
(.'it \s !•'.. \\ HUM \N. 
C. < I. \\n\\ I I s 

K. R. Ki \M., 

.\, 1'.. I" MMill \H. 



Tln' matter of taritV wa- discussed h\ the 
A— , ,ei:iii..n with deep interest. The senliineiii 
of the memhers is th.ii the laritV schedule 
should he readjusted ,iiiil with s|ncial reference 
to steel and iron. The f.-llowing resolution 
w as adojited : 

R|-.S< )|A I-.|). That We ia\..r prompt i.iriif 
revision along such lines as uill cause the least 
disturhiince of present biisiiuss mnditii.ns, and 
the l-*.xecuiive (."ouimiltee is luTeh\ instructed 
t'l ,aei in ,ice. .ril.itu'e with this re-, .hil ii .n. 

rile (.'on\enti>in spi-nt three da\s in C'hic.iun 
listening to reports and discus.ing (|uesii,ms 
of trade interest. 

.\n eIalM)rate proi^rani ..f . ni, riainuient was 
provided and the memhev- ;m,| their ladies 
particiiiated in local sight seeing exciir-i.Mi-. 
theatre parties and finally a grand baiu|uet 



concluding the ])roceedings. The following 
new officers were elected : 

I 'resident — Mr. II, I'*,. Miles, ])resident of 
Racine-Sattley Co,, Racine. Wis, 

Treasurer — .Mr, J. I!, I'lartholomew, ])resi- 
dent of .\very .Mfg. Co., IVoria, 111. 
\ ici:-iM<i:siiiKNTs: 

.Mr. W. .\. Riimely. .M . Rumely Co., I,a 
I'orte. Ind. 

II. -M, Wallis, I. I. Case I'low Co., Racuie, 
Wis, 

-Mr, C, C. Rowley, Aspinwall .Mfg, Co., 
lackson. Mich. 

.Mr. I). W. Spencer, Johnson Harvester Co,, 
llatavia, X, V, 

-Mr. R. S. lUich, A. lUichs Sons Co., Kliza- 
hethtown. Pa. 

.Mr, .\. K. Mayer. International Harvester 
Co,. Chicago. 111. 

.Mr. W, R, Harrison. W. R. Harrison Mfg. 
Co., .Massillon, < )hio. 

.Mr. S. 1). I'orter, .\cme Harvesting Ma- 
chine Co.. IVoria. III. 

.Mr. T. IS, Carson, I'.ettendorf .Metal Wheel 
Co.. 1 >avenport. Iowa. 

.Mr. A. II. Patch. Clarksville. Tenn. 

.Mr. K. P. Curtis, Richardsoti .Mfg. Co.. 
Worcester, Mass. 

Mr. b»s. W'. .Moon. jos. W'. Moon Uuggv 
Co.. St. I.ouis. .Mo. 

Mr. H. ,M, Wade. C. S. Wind l-.ngine and 
Pump Co., Ilatavia. 111. 

i:Xi:ClTI\ 1; Co.\! .M ITTKK. 

.Mr. Newell Sanders, chairman. 

.Mr. S. I'*.. Swayne. Robinson & C<>., Rich 
iiond, Ind.. three years. 

.Mr. H. .\l. Kimiex, Winona Wagon Co., 
Winona, .Miim.. three years. 

.Mr. !•'. C. lohiison. .\merican Seeding .M;i- 
chine Co.. Springfield. ( )hio, three vears. 

Mr. .\. I. Ilrosseau. C.ale .Mfg. Co., Albion, 
.^lich., two vears. 



Roses discovcreil in tombs containing I'.gxp- 
tian imtmmies often have their color jierfect, 
even thi.ugh m;iny of those found must be 
mole th;m three thousand vears old. 



The smallest sheep in the World i- the tiny 
iJreton sheeii. It is Unt small to be proJitable 
to raise, for it e.tnnot have much w<hjI. and as 
for eating, why, a hungry man could eat .almost 
a whole sheep at a single meal. 



In .\fric.a the telegraph service freipiently 
suiters interrui>tion because of gir.itTes becom- 
ing iiitaiiuled b\ their necks in the wires \'M- 
|)hants, too. ;ire at times res|)ousil)le. This dis- 
turbance has occurred on the \ ictoria I'alls 
line six tinu-s. 



.\ twelve horse power four-c\ lindered petrol 
motor in .\iiierica recently r.an (ight\-se\en 
miles ,in two gallons ,,f petrol. The weight of 
the ear was fifteen hnn.lred p.Minds. Anoiln i 
car i<lentic;ill\ the same oiilv ran hftv-seveu 
miles ,,n the s.inie allowance of fuel. 



Several trained Scotch cllies have been 
Used by the Cernians in their southwest Afri- 
can campaign, but, .iccaahng t,. rc|.orts re 
ceived at I'.erliu, the .lo-s h;,ve proved an utter 
bnltire. .\pparentK the .animals lose their 
>cii-e ,,| .inell .after thex have been in the 
fropies fur any length of time. 



Export Implement Age 



IS 



o» 



Export Implement Age 

rOUB LA CIRCULATION A L'tTRAN&ER EXCLUSIVEMHNT. 

Journal Indtpendant exclnslTemeot coniacr< aus inttrtts da 

commerce d'exportation des machines agricoles. pompca, 

moulins & vent, outils de fermes, fournitures pour 

crtaieriea et article* spteiauz de quincailleric. 



Pbiz d'Abonnemkmt 



Ob ma, fraoc de port 



5 franca 



Priire de nons adrexser une traite aur New York 
ou un mundat-poate international 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHEKS 
1010 Arcb Street, Philadelptila, Pa., U. S. A. 

l4i mftme malaon public: "The Implement Age," "The 
American Fertilizer," "The Carriage Monthly" et "The 
Vehicle Dealer." 

Tons droit! r6aerv£a. Ware Broa. Co., 1906. 



vol. XV. Philadelptaie, Btata-Cnia, Norembre, 1906. No. 1 

Dans le Repertoire d'adresses A Pusage des 
cbeteurs, dans la premiere partie de ce livre nous 
donnons les renseiiniements en fran^ais; nous 
avons recours k ce moyen afin de faciliter la cor- 
respondance avec les malsons qui font insurer des 
•nnonces dans ce Journal. 

Exposition de la Nouvelle Z^lande 

L'exposition intemationale de la Nouvelle 
Zelande qui s'ouvrira en novembre prochain 
promct d'etre le plus important evenement de 
ce genre qui ait jamais en lieu dans la Poly- 
nesie. 

L'espace reserve a l'exposition comprend 1 14 
acres, et tout semble indiquer que cette super- 
ficie tout entiere sera occupee par les edifices 
qui sont necessaires pour completer les attrac- 
tions de l'exposition. 



Scies SAns dents 

D'apres la revue Cosmos, I'emploi pour le 
sciage des metaux de disques de fer circulaires, 
tournant avec une grande rapidite mais ne por- 
tant pas de dents a la circonference, s'est re- 
pandu dans beausoup d'ateliers. Entre autres 
endroits ou ces scies sans dents sont en usage, 
on cite la celebre fabrique de canons Krupp, 
ou Ton scie quelquefois de cette fagon des 
plaques de blindage. Le procede n'est pas une 
decouverte nouvelle. Des 1824, Barrier et 
CoUadon, a Geneve, experimentaient avec des 
disques de fer animes d'une grande vitesse 
de rotation. lis trouverent que lorsqu'un 
disque d'environ 7 pouces de diametre toumait 
avec une vitesse peripherique de 10 metres par 
seconde et qu'on vint a le mettre en contact, 
par pression, avec un outil d'acier, il pouvait 
etre coupe, mais que I'outil, a son tour, etait 
endommage. A une vitesse de 60 mitres par 
seconde, le disque de fer coupait meme du 
quartz et de I'agate. 



L'exposition intemationale de la 
Nouvelle Zelande 

L'exposition intemationale de la Nouvelle 
Zelande qui se tiendra a Christchurch du ler 
novembre 1906 au 15 avril 1907, outre qu'elle 
offrira d'excellents specimens des grandes in- 
dustries et des ressources de la colonie — mines 
d'or et de charbon, bois de construction debites, 
congelation de la viande, travail du bois, etc., 
— ne manquera pas d'interesser sous bien d'au- 
tres rapports les visiteurs etrangers. On pourra 
y admirer de belles cours ou seront exposes 
des specimens de I'histoire naturelle unique de 
la Nouvelle Zelande, I'aquarium de la marine, 
la splendide exposition que fera le gouveme- 
ment des mineraux qui abondent dans le pays, 
des jardins de fougeres oil seront representes 
les magnifiques paysages de la colonie, et le 
pays des geysers en miniature qui contiendra 
des imitations habiles des geysers types, des 
sources d'eau bouillante et des fumaroiles de 
la zone thermale. Se rendant compte de I'in- 
teret manifeste par le monde exterieur pour 
tout ce qui concerne les Maoris, le gouverne- 
ment de la colonie a pris des dispositions pour 
obtenir une exposition aussi complete que pos- 
sible de la vie pittoiesque des arts particuliers, 
des ceremonies, des amusements, et de I'anci- 
enne gloire militaire des habitants indigenes 
de la Nouvell Zelande. Dans ce but on etablit 
sur les terrains l'exposition un village qui occu- 
pera une superficie de plusieurs acres et qui 
imitera les villages habites jadis par les tribus 
maoris. Ce village sera habite par des families 
de Maoris de North Island, on y trouvera un 
certain nombre de personnes du fameux pays 
de rirewcra, le dernier asile des arts et des 
coutumes des anciens Maoris. Le village avec 
ses hauts murs palissades, ses immenses statues 
en bois, les maisons curieusement decorees, 
ses magasins de provisions sculptes, ses fours 
de terre, etc., sera une replique exacte des de- 
meures des anciens Maoris ; il offrira de plus 
un gros modele des vieux forts sur collines ou 
"pas," avec les divers travaux de defense, rem- 
parts, citadelle, tour d'observation. Dans le 
village on trouvera des Maoris, vetus de leur^ 
costumes de lin, occupes aux travaux et aux 
passe-temps de Icurs ancetres, tissant des ve- 
tements de lin, fabriquant des paillassons et 
des paniers, sculptant des statues et des armcs 
dans du bois, coupant et polissant le "pou- 



cimens du splendidement decore canot de 
guerre ou "waka-taua." 

Outre les expositions faites par les residents 
du village, il y aura des danses de guerre et 
autres attractions offertes par les visiteurs des 
diverses tribus de North Island. C'est dans 
I'arene destinee aux sports, dans le pare, que 
se donneront ces spectacles; ce sera I'une des 
dernieres occasions que Ton aura de voir les 
emouvantes parades de g^ierre de cette celebre 
race guerriere. Les ethnologistes trouveront 
nn interet tout particulier dans les quelques 
survivants pur sang du peuple Maori, les abo- 
rigenes jadis nombreux des iles Chatham, que 
Ton amenera a l'exposition et qui resideront 
dans le village. 

Non seulement le peuple maori'sera repr^ 
sente, mais nombre de leurs cousins de la Poly- 
nesie, les habitants du groupe d'iles Cook et des 
iles et atolls adjacents de la grande mer du 
Sud, aujourd'hui sous las juridiction de la 
Nouvelle Zelande, occuperont un village ty- 
pique d'une ile de la mer du Sud avec tons les 
accessoires capables de donner une idee de leur 
vie dans leurs demeures tropicales. Us appor- 
teront leurs canots et donneront des spectacles 
de leurs occupation, de leurs ceremonies et de 
leurs fetes. 

Les visiteurs de l'exposition beneficieront 
non seulement d'un sejour d'ete dans une ville 
salubre et belle, mais pourront voir a peu de 
frais les principales merveilles de la colonie 
et les lieux ou les habitants prennent leurs va- 
cances. Les compagnies de chemins de fer et 
de bateaux a vapeur oflfrent des prix reduits 
aux voyageurs se rendant a l'exposition. On 
facilitera autant que possible a ceux-ci non 
seulement la visite de l'exposition, mais encore 
de la merveilleuse region du Rotorua Geyser- 
land, de la grandiose region alpestre de South 
Island, des magnifiques lacs du sud, des remar- 
quables canons de Pare national du Fiordland, 
de la cote occidentale avec ses lacs, ses forets 
et ses enormes glaciers, et des nombreuses au- 
tres regions pittoresques de la colonie. 



Toutes les personnes dont on trouve les 
annonces dans cette revue se feront un plaisir 
d'envoyer leurs catalogues et circulaires a tous 
ceux qui desirent se rensigner sur les produits 
qu'elles fabriquent. On pent se procurer ainsi 
des renseignements precieux sur les demiers 



et les meilleurs types de machines produits; 
namu" ou pierre verte, la pierre pr^cieuse de pyjg^ \\ arrive souvent que des relations eta- 
I'age de pierre. Sur un lac voisin se trouvera blies de cette faQon durent de longues annecs 
une flotte de canots maoris, y compris des spe- et sont une source de gros profits reciproques. 



Fritee de mentionner ce journal en ecrivant aux penonnei qui y iont ina^er dei annonces. 



14 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



IS 



FORTY STORY BUILDING 

Win 11 llir ^tui\ lirL;;iii |i> \k lirciilati'il, a 
liw iiiMiitli^ at;i>, tliat llio Sinyvr Mannfai-nir- 
iii!^ C""., iini]iiiM'il til )int (i]i an adililinii I'l 
lluir i'fUii- liuililiiiL; in \< \\ Nmk City wliitli 
slimijil lia\i.' iiMT 40 >ii,rii'- anil n-acli In a 
lu'iiiltl 'if iiM'i ' II « 1 lirl, it wa'^ i^cturalK 
tl)iinL;lil iliat il lln^ wcir imi alli iLit'llitr a 
Snni|a\' ^n|i|i!itnrnt \arn, tlif new hnililmu; 
unnM |iriilia!il\ lir nnilnnL; nmrr than sunu- 
siirl III' a irraiN tnwir. I'.nt n^w ilu' arcliiii il - 
<l«.">«ii;n-> ari' niaiK- imiMk' anil tlir m'^inri 1 - ral 
rtilaliiiii'^ am! ^irain-c^iiniati-^ Iiasc Ihiuhh- 
](iitilif |)iii|Hrt\ ami it apjHar^ tlial ilic |iiii]>ii 
•~iliiin i'- nut niiK i|niii.- a ^nlicr unr. Imt that 
it is actnalls I'' hi' raiTinl nul nnlr-s snuic ini- 
priihalili.' iilisiai'f ^hnulil arise. 

Il is a htiii- liil'lii-nh fur nm- whn is familiar 
witli thi- chants m thr \i\\ \i>v\s sk\ hnc in 
rfCiMit Mais 111 irah/c iliat thr <<U\<.-v liiiil'hnii-^ 
uhicli ilwarfi-il the ilnniinatiiiL; I'liMhuc l'.\'- 
I'lianm- tmsi-r aro in turn tuhr inaiif tn Imik in- 
si^iiiiticant. If tlii~ m\\ -tnuimc is in hr 
fiilliiwril li\ iilhiTs "f i|s ill., till- I iliii-c hnililiiii^s 
«if t\\<-'ni\ \i'ars au" ^^ih si .1 in Imik likr wimil 
sh<-i|s. am! niu' will ha\i' ni Im'k at Kasi twin 
til tnid tlu- ilmks aliin;4 lIu- water Hunt, at ,»I1. 

It soiMiis that tlu- new aililitii>n in the Sini.;rr 
hnililiny is tn hr an altaiv with a I'lruailw a\ 
fmntaL;!- "f ~< • i'l'. aihl uith milv 14 s|i,ru-s in 
its tasicrn end, in inrrespunil with the jiirs- 
i-iil structure. I'lUl ffnin the western emi is tn 
risi' tlu higher imriinii almul 711 leit sijuari 
aiul si|uirtiiiu; u)i\\aril j~ stniu-ahn\e ihe rnni 
nf the ri'st nf the hiiiliHuj^. It is nhxmn-I, im 
Iinssihk- t<> make iiuioli else than a nwci ni 
sueli a cnnstnictimi. hut the ilesi^ns inilie.iie 
that frnni an arehiteiiural ))ninl oi view it will 
Hdt ho hall hail, ami N\e are Inkl in its ileleiisi 
friiin praetieal view|inints ihat it will lia\e a 
total area <>i nver >i' j aeres, niakini; it |iiis~i 
hie jnr it tn ;^i\i' satisiaetnrs nt'tu'e linii-iii.; Inr 
ahnut li.in^i |)eii|ile. Alul \\'\\h nlVlc'e -paee at 
its t)resent priees in New N nrk this niean- 
snnieihinu; in the was nt revenue. 

St rnei inalh ihe new huililiiiL; nUei-. -.'H,. 
interestmu; ftature-. In realilv tin- tnwer \\\.< 
structure is inaile up nf fnur separate tnwer- 
I _• tiet s(|u,ire and V < leet a)iari h, lund ti luiellu 1 
at each llnnr. and each -iparati tnwi-r Iuuil; 
sn hnilt ,1- In \)v seif-sii|i|inriini.;. The tntal 
weight lit the tn\\er aliiiie i- almiil .'^.oihi inn-, 
hut caring fur tin- wei^hi i- a -iniple ni.iiii 1 
cninpared wiih the priwisinti- that mn-l in 
made a^ain-t the aciinii nf wind pre--nre l-'ni 
mil iinl\ is it necessars tn pinsidi- ,i^am-l an 
i-stiinatid maxanum wind |ire--nri ni ^i 1 
IMiunds pt'i' sijuari fnni n,,i ihe entire nun r 
surface-, hut calcuiatiniis nni-l he niade ]iin 
xidiu,^ fur the literal shifting nf the weit:hi nf 
the Imildiiiu; due tn this jires^nre, jirndncin:^ 
a liftini^' nuniijii mi iIu- wiiulward si,l,- and a 
dnwnward pressure <>]) ihc leeward side. 

< H cniirse the steel- frame tvpe nf cni)-,iruc- 



linn is the niu- a<lnpled and llu- t"ii;iires shnwiii.ij 
the wnrk In he dnne h\ suim- nf ihe main I'nl 
uiniis are asinnishinL;. The idal dead wei',,;lit 
at the flint nf line ni the main cnlnmiis will he 
Ji^il.-' Iniis re]ire-entinL; the \\eiL;ht i>i steel 
Wnrk and masniuv it sn|i]inn-. In additinn tn 
this. ]irn\isinii i- made fni- an nieii:i-e nf ' h 1 
per cent. ini- die niaximiiin li\e Inad, incliid 
iiiL; Inrniinii. rntiii'.^- and necn|i,ni|s. Tin- 
anintmis in i^^i .1 , inii- .nid mal.i - ihe cnii'hiin d 
dead and li\e Inad n| lach cnli!;:ni .jJn.X i.iii-. 
Tn this inusi he adi'ed an e-innaled dnwn- 
ward Wind pressure "\ 7,s>-!>^ iniis ;^i\in- an 
.i\eraL;e Inad at the hase <<{ the cnhnnns n| 
\.\~<i'>- .^niiie n| ihe iiinit- impnrtaiit cnluiiin- 
have a Inad i \en ^re.iler than this. The inial 
nia\inniin lift mi llu windw.inl -idc nf llu 
hnildiiiL; i- esiinialed at 17- 1 1 ii- mi a siu-^Ie 
cnlnmii, and ihi- i- pi-n\i,li,i i', 1 1,\ anchnrinL; 
the Cnhnnns in the caissniis. 

The Inisim-s srciinn nf \i\\ \ . ■vl. t'it\ h.i- 
ImiL; a^^n ci a-i d tn ha\e aM>, -.i r\ irnuhh-sniiu 
an-hitecturrd innraiii\, and ihe 1 ii-ineerinL: 
side 111 the i|m -linii i- i|iii|,- prai licahle, s,, ihal 
ihe niilv tlu-nreni remainin:^ fnr di nii iiisi r.aiinn 

h\ the ."sini^el hllilihllL; i- '11. .;!i ]i|c niie a- In 

w hither il vv ill pa* , h -1 pi ■ i\ , - u> In ,1 pin 
tilahli ni\i-in.ent tlieie I- iM.nu a man iinw 
li\ in- w III . w ill -miie ,\;\\ Innk dnwn mi it- n h .f 
irniii his ,111 \ nitiee ,(nil ni.trsu thai -n -hurl a 
lime a^n n m h,|,l sn -n nl, p. ,\ 1 ; , nf imai^in 
alimi a- in lind anvthini; nnawnitln in a nuia 
41 s|nv\ shaiilv .- ( 'i'///;//i-)i'/,r' . /;»,T/ci;. 



CONVENTION OF AMERICAN 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

IMPLEMENTS 

I Continued from pajje 1 1 1 
thi.s cminli-N i- lint eiijnvin;; llu fnrei-n Iradi 
that il shi.nild. Wecaniuit refrain frmu m-^niL: 
upmi niir menihers t,M-eatcr eth.n, and iimn 
altenlinn tn this snhiect. < Mir m.inul'actnrini; 
ca])acit\ has iiiciaasid 1 nn;in..ii,K . ius|if\in^; 
the cmisidi-ralimt wi n, >: :,-.M,irn|K -nlirji 
In ihi- repi at nf \ . : 

K' -!■' ' ; ■! !> -Ul.:i,;iled, 

I I ' h ri;- 1 luiiiiintii, 

til \- I-' \\ III I'M \\ 

C. (. u.. 

\<. \< \> 

.\. I'.. I' \K ,|,- 



Tlle mailer nf larilV wa 
\-- icialii III W ilh deep in- ■ 
lit the niemhi rs js ih,,- 
-hniiM !„■ readiiishd .up 
In sUel ;ind irmi. Tli. , 
w a- .Ilk ipled : 

KI-'Si M.\ l-:i). Thai w. I., 
re\ i-inii almi- -nch lim - ,1- - 
di-linh.ince nf pn siiii Im- 1.. 
the I'.Ni. em l\ e (1 inimitlei ; 

II I ai'i in ,icci iidance \\ ith li 

'I he (.'muenlimi -pent thii 
lisienin;;- tn repnrls and ili- 

I I I tradt- inten st, 
\ii elahnrah pn-m-am ni , •;!, , lamiuenl was 

pinxidi'd and ihe memlui- .,,i.l ih,.ir ladie- 
parlicipated in Incal -i^^h; „ , ^.^ , xciir-mn- 
theatic piartics and linalK a -.^i.and haiupiei 



-id 1a the 

he -elltinii 111 
•itV sehednle 



' lH'inipi lanll 

' .in-e the 1( ,|si 

'I iidiiti .11-. ail,! 

■'^ lll-!MI,i,',l 

;i:..n. 
■ .i\ - in i'hicau. • 

--ilVU' UUestinHs 



mcluflin,cf the pmciTiliii.us. The fnllnwinc^ 
new nCficers were eUett-d : 

I 'resilient— .Mr. II. !•.. .Miles, president nf 
K'aciiu -Saltlev l."n.. Kaciiie. \\ is. 

Treasurer— -.Mr. J. 11. riarthulmnew , presi- 
dent I if \\er\ .Mfi;. Co.. IVnria. 111. 
\ n i:-i'K'i;siim:\ Is ; 

.Mr. W . .\. Kiimelx. .\l. Rumels (.'n., La 
I'mie. Ind. 

II. \l. Wallis. I, I. Ta-e I 'Inw C<>.. Kaciiie. 

Wis. 

dr. ('. (1. Unw le\ , Nsiiinwall .Mfi^;. (.'... . 
iack-mi, .Mich. 

.Mr. I). W . S]ieiici 1. Inhusmi I lar\esier l"n., 
i;,iia\ la. .'\. ^ . 

Mr. I\. S. I'.nch, \. I'.nch'- Smi- (.'n.. l-'.li/,i- 
hilhlnwn. I'a. 

Mr. \. !•*.. .\!a\er. Inlernatimial llaisester 
(.'1... fhica-n. 111. ' 

Mr W. R. Ilarrisnn. W . K. Ilarris,,,, M f-. 

* n . M.l-sillnll, < Ihin. 

.Mr. S. I). I'nrier. Acme llarvesiin.^ .Ma- 
chine I'n.. 1 'emia. III. 

Mr. r. 1;. (."ai-mi. I'.i lUndnrf .Metal V\ heel 
<....! ia\ eiipi .rl. h iw a. 

^Ir. \. II. I'.nch, riark-vilK-. Teiui. 
Mr. I-'. I'. Cunis, Richanlsnn .\lf- t.'. ... 
\\ nrcisi, 1-, Mas- 
Mr. Ins. \\ . \|n..11. jus. W .Mnmi I'.Ujri^V 
('".. Si. I.nin-, Mn. 

Mr. II, .M Wade. I . S. W ind h'.n-im and 
I'limp (.'n.. I'.alavia. III. 

I. Ml I ll\ I I nM \| I 1 III. 

.Mr, \ewell .-sail. lev-, chairman. 

.Mr. S. I-'.. Sw.ivnc. I\..hin-n|i ,\ (',,., Rich 
n I iiul. hid., lluei \ ear-. 

Mr. II. .^1. Kiniu'x. \\ inmi,i \\ aumi ('•'.. 
\\ m. .na. Minn., ilnee \ears. 

Mr. I-', r. Inhiis.iii, \inerican Seeding; .Ma 
clmii C,,,, .^priiu^ilield. 1 >hin. ihree \ear-. 

Mr. \. I I'll-.,--, .an. ( '.ale .\lf-, e'n.. Alhmn, 

Mich., tWn \ e.ll-. 

Rl .-e- ili-cn\ I ii-i'i HI tninli> enuiainiiiL; I u ^ '■ 
iian miimiiur- ..fiin ha\e their cnlnr |.iii ,i, 

1 Mil llinii-h main ^'i llm-e fniind raisi he 
"I'Te than ihiee ilimi-and \ears nld,. 



Ihe -m.i;le-i -lu ep in the wnrld i llie 1 ;n 

I'llelnll -heep. Il i- inn -mall Ii> Ik- prntililhie 

In rai-e, Inr il cammt have much wnnl. and .1- 
lnr e.ilin^, w h\ . a huii^rv man ci aild e.il .ilm-.-' 
a w Imli -heeji ai ,1 -inu;le uu-al. 

In \lnia llu h leL^r.aph -1 r\ ici fieiiuniK' 
-iillei- inierrnpiimi iHcan-i ..f -ir.ilfi- ' 
in- 1 nt.in^led h\ their neck- III llu wii, 
phaiils, i.,n, ;ir,- .11 time- re-pniisihle. This di- 
Inrh.ance h.i- nccnrred nii tlu \ uinria l-'all- 

;lie -!\ lime-. 



\ IweUc l|..r-e p.iwer fnnr-c\ liiulered ii.ln ' 
ii:nlnr 111 Ami rica receiiily r;m ei-hi\ -i\i:. 
mi!. - mi u.,n uallnii- ..f |ulrii|. The wei-hl ni 
the c,ir wa- lilleeii hundred pniinds. \nnli, . 
car !.|, iiiica'lx ilii -,am,' .mh r.an jifi 
'I'lles ,.11 ill,. ,ame .illnwaiiee nl fuel. 



Seser.il trained Scntch ciilli<-s h.iM In . n 
ii-ed h\ tin- Cirn'.nis in their sniilluvesl Xfri 
can c-unpai-..:!!. Imi, accnnliim in repuri- re 
ci i\ed at I'.erlin. the dn-- ha\t^ prnvcl ,m nm i 
lailure. Appareiiilv the .■niimals j.i-i tlu-t 
MUse n! s|||, 1) after llii\ ha\e he. n in iIh 
li'ipic- Inr :iii\ len-ili . .f time. 



m 



Export Implement Age 

POUK LA CIRCULATION A u'fTRANGHR EXCLeSlVKMKN I . 



L'exposition Internationale de I& 
Nouvelle Zelande 

L'exposition intcriiationale de la XouvcHe 

Journal independant exctusivetnent consacr* «uic intfreis du 7,;iQnflf> nni c*> tipnrln a riiricfrlinr/'li /In ir.r 

commerceVrrxportatiou des machines aKricole»,ponip«», AUailUe qiU SC lienUra a V^IinStCnurtn (lU ICf 
moulins & vent, oulils de fermes, founiitures pour , , ., , ,, 

crimeries et articles spteiaux de quincaillerie. IlOveillbrC I9OO all I5 avnl I9O7, OUtrC qu clle 



Prix i>'Abonnemeht 



On an, franc de port 



Priire de nous BdrcMer une traite »nr New York 
ou un mandat-poste international 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 
1010 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A 



La nterae maison public; "The Implement Age," 
American Kertilizer," "The Carriage Monthly" et 
Vehicle Dealer." 

Tons droits Ttfervia. Ware Bros. Co., 1906. 



vol. XV. Philmdclpbie, Stat>-Unis, Novembre, 1906. No. i 



otfrira d'cxcelleiits spt-ciinens des grandes in- 
s franca (lustrics et (Ics rcssourccs de la colonie — mines 
d'or et de charbon, bois de construction dcbites, 
congelation de la viandc, travail du bois, etc., 
— ne manqiiera pas d'interesser sous bien d'au- 
tres rapports les visiteurs etrangers. On pourra 
y admirer de belles cours oil senmt exposes 
des spticinicns de I'histoire naturelie unique de 
la Nouvelle Ztilande, I'aquariuin dc la marine, 
la splcndidc exposition que fera Ic gouverne- 



•The 
•The 



cimeiis du splendidenient decore canot de 
guerre ou "waka-taua." 

Outre les expositions faites par les residents 
llu village, il y auia <los danscs de guerre et 
autres attractions offcrtes par les visiteurs des 
(livcrses tribiis de North Island. C'est dans 
rarcuc dcstinee aux sports, dans le pare, que 
SC dninierout ces spectacles; ce sera Tune des 
ikruicres occasions que Ton aura dc voir les 
emnuvantcs parades de guerre de cette celebre 
race gucrricre. I,cs ethnologistes trouvcront 
un inttiret tout particulier dans les qucl(|ues 
survivants pur sang du peuple Maori, les abo- 
rigenes jadis noinbreux des iles Chatham, que 
Inn aniencra a l'exposition et qui resideront 



Dans le Repertoire d'adresses h fusage des 
cheteurs, dans la premiere partie de ce livre nous 
donnons les renselgnements en fran^ais ; nous 
avons recours iL ce moyen afln de faciliter la cor- 



ment des niineraux qui abondent dans le pays, ''''"^ village. 



des jardins de fougeres oil seront representes 
les magnifiques paysages de la colonie, et le 
pays des geysers en miniature qui contiendra 



respondance avec les maisons qui font inserer des des imitations liabilcs des geysers types, des 

•nnonces dans ce Journal. sources d'eau bouillante et dts fumarolles de 

= " . .. — — la zone thermale. Se rendant coinpte de I'in- 

Exposition de la Nouvelle Zelande teret manifeste par le monde exterieur pour 



Non seulement le peuple maori sera repre- 
scnte, niais nonibrc de Icurs cousins de la Poly- 
nesie, les habitants du groupe d'iles Cook et des 
iles et atolls adjacents de la grande mer du 
Sud, aujourd'hui sous las juridiction de la 
Nouvelle Ztldande, occuperont un village ty- 
piquc d'une ile <le la mer du Sud avec tons les 
accessoires capables de donner une idee de leur 
vie dans Icurs denicures tropicales. lis appor- 



L'exposition internationale de la Nouvelle tout ce qui concerne les Maoris, le gouverne- 

Zelande qui s'ouvrira en novembre prochain nient de la colonie a pris des dispositions pour 

promct d'etre le plus important evenement de obtenir une exposition aussi complete que pos- *^''°"* ''="''' ^''"''^^ ct donneront des spectacles 

ce genre qui ait jamais en lieu dans la Poly- sible de la vie pittoresque des arts jiarticuliers, 

nesie. des ceremonies, des amusements, ct de I'anci- 

L'espace reserve a l'exposition comprend 114 enne gloire militaire des habitants indigenes 

acres, et tout semble indiquer que cette super- de la Nouvell Zelande. Dans ce but on titablit 

ficie tout entiere sera occupee par les edifices sur les terrains l'exposition un village qui occu- 

qui sont necessaires pour completer les attrac- pera une superficie de plusieurs acres et qui 

tions de Texposition. imitera les villages habites jadis par les tribus 

maoris. Ce village sera habitc par des families 

Scies sans dents je Maoris de North Island, on y trouvera un 

D'apres la revue Cosmos, I'emploi pour le ^^^j^j^^ ^^^^^^^j^j.^ ^^ personnes du faineux pays 

sciage des metaux de disques de fer circulaires, ^^ pirewera, le dernier asile des arts et des 

tournant avec une grande rapidite mais ne por- ^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^-^^^^^ ^^^,^{5. Le village avec 



tant pas de dents a la circonference, s'est re- 
pandu dans beausoup d'ateliers. F.ntre autres 
endroits oil ces scies sans dents sont en usage, 
on cite la celebre fabriquc de canons Krupp, 
oil Ton scie quelquefois de cette fagon des 
plaques de blindage. Le procede n'est pas une 
decouverte nouvelle. Des 1824. Darrier et 
Colladon, a Geneve, experimentaient avec des 
disques de fer animes d'une grande vitesse 
de rotation. Us trouverent que lorsqu'un 
disque d'environ 7 pouces de diametre tournait 
avec une vitesse peripherique de 10 metres par 



ses hauts murs palissades, ses immenses statues 
en bois, les maisons curieusement decorees, 
ses magasins de provisions sculptes, ses fours 
de terre, etc., sera une replique exacte des de- 
meures des anciens Maoris ; il offrira de plus 
un gros modele des vieux forts sur collines ou 
"pas," avec les divers travaux de defense, rem- 
parts, citadelle, tour d'observation. Dans le 
village on trouvera des Maoris, vetus de leur% 
costumes de lin, occuptis aux travaux et aux 



de leurs occupation, de leurs ceremonies et dc 
leurs fetes. 

I^s visiteurs dc l'exposition beneficieront 
non seulement d'un sejour d'cte dans une ville 
salubre et belle, mais pourront voir a peu de 
frais les principals mervcilles de la colonie 
et les lieux oil les habitants prcnnent leurs va- 
cances. Les compagnies de chemins de fer et 
de bateaux a vapeur oflfrent des prix reduits 
aux voyageurs se rendant a l'exposition. On 
facilitera autant que possible a ceux-ci non 
seulement la visite de Texposition, mais encore 
de la merveilleuse region du Rotorua Geyser- 
land, de la grandiose region alpcstre de South 
Island, des magnifiques lacs du sud, des reitiar- 
quabks canons de Pare national du Fiordland, 
dc la ciitc occidentale avec ses lacs, ses forets 
et ses eiinrmcs glaciers, et des nombreuses au- 
tres regions pittoresques de la colonie. 



Toutcs les personnes dont on trouve les 
annonccs dans cette revue se feront un plaisir 
d'envoyer leurs catalogues et circulaires a tous 
passe-temps de leurs ancetres, tissant des ve- ^^^^ ^^j desirent se rensigner sur les produits 
tements de lin, fabriquant des paillassons et ^y-gUgs fabriquent On pent se procurer ainsi 
seconde et qu'on vint a le mettre en contact, ^^^ ^^^.^^^^ ^^^,p^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^ ^^ j.^ armes ^,^^ rcnceignements precieux sur les derniers 
par pression, avec "«\«"t'|/;^<='"' .»' P°";^^!; dans du bois, coupant et polissant le "pou- ^^ ,^^ ^^j,,^^,^, ^yp,, ^^^ ^^.^ines produits: 



etre coupe, mais que I'outil, a son tour, etatt 
endommage. A une vitesse de 60 metres par 



namu" ou pierre verte, la pierre precieuse de pyjg^ ^\ arrive souvent que des relations eta- 
seconde le disque de fer coupait meme du I'age de pierre. Sur un lac voisin se trouvera blies de cette fagon durent de longues annees 
quartz et de I'agate. ""« flo"c de canots maoris, y compris des spe- et sont une source de gros profits reciproques. 

pri^e de mentionner ce iournal en ecrivant aux personnel qui y font ins^er des annonces. 



INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



|6 



Export Implement Age 



Une langue universelle 

M. J. L. liorgerhutif, i)rofi'sseiir a la \\ esiern 
Reserve L'niversity, expose dans la Coiistitn- 
tion d' Atlanta, les titres que pent avoir I'Espe- 
ranto a devciiir une lanjjue universelle. Apres 
une courte allusion aiix autres langues ayant 
brigue les honnouis ile I'universalite, M. Bor- 
gerhoflf s'exprinie ainsi : 

Le dernier essai, un essai qui a des chances 
d'etre final, est riCs])erantu, ainsi api>ele par 
son auUur, le Dr. Zanieiihof, un nie<lecin 
russe, c|ui, sous ce pseudonynie, a public des 
articles scientifiques avant de devenir fanieux 
coninic invenleur d'uiie langue artificielle. 

Zanienliof, cunune scs predecesseurs, £ut 
frappc de I'aboudance inutile d'idionies qui di- 
visent les habitants de la terrc et rendent les 
relations internationales si tlifficiles, sans comp- 
ter qu'ils sont une source inepuisable ile inalen- 
tenilus et d'inimitie entre les nations. 

11 se convainquit egalcment que si les lan- 
g^Ks universellcs cxi^tantcs n'avaient pas at- 
teint leur but, c'etait qu'elles etaient trop diffi- 
ciles — pres<iue aussi difficiles que les langues 
nalurollcs. La cause de leur difficulte se trou- 
vait dans la graniniairc qui etait trop compli- 
quee, et dans le vocabulairc qui etait beaucoup 
trop varif. ].*.■ Hr. /aniculiot composa une 
granunaire (|iii o<t la ^iiuplicilc menie; et il 
obtint ce resultat en rcjetant loules les regies 
(|ui ne sont i)as striclenient necessaires pour la 
construction d'une plirase logique, et en elinii- 
nant toutcs les exceptions. 1 a> (juelques prin- 
cipes granimaticaux restants jicuvcnt s'appren- 
dre en une denii-heure. 

J'uis il se preoccupa dti v(xalMilaire. ti' qui 
rend si difficile I'acquisition d un vocabulaire 
etrangor cc-it la dixorsiti- dci racines, le grand 
notnlin <k- nint- ditTcrcutv. I'rencns im ex- 
cir.fi!!' i'. ti- 1.1 lanc;iH- ;inL;lrii-.i- : piiiir fxjiriiner 
U> 'li\ t.'r--(.'s iiU-t's NUL;u;iiit-'-- ]iar niif oi inception 
<Il- ninrl.nn a: iliail ini'irn. in die (Monriri, 
<lca'll\ (qui can^c la ninrti, ilcathly (inortel. 
fatal), mortal (niontl), lo kill (tui-rt; to 
nnirdfr {connnt-ltre un nieurtrci, tn a--a>-i- 
nati' ( .f^-a-^-^iiKT I, to cninniit •■uicidc i ^e sui- 
cidiT). til fiinmiit JMniici'lo i CDnuuettrc nn 
honnciik'i, v\c. 'Jut-l luxe encnuihrant <le ra- 
cinc-, et quel t.iu"oura5.:enKMU jiour I'etr.in^er 
qui tlfsiio .i|i]>rinilie retie lan^ne! 

Et pourtant Tanqlais est I'une <lcs jilus fa- 
ciles de toutes !cs l.ingues curopccnnes. Com- 
ment diminuer ce nomhre dc racines fut le 
grand problenie que >e proposa Zanienhof. 11 
choisit done une scule ratine jiarmi un grand 



nouii)re. et au moyen d'uu systeme de .suffixes niorla (niorlelj, uiorti, (niorir), morte (mor- 



el de prefixes, il contraignit cette racine a rem- 
jilir les fonctions de toutes les autres. 

De cette favcuu le dictionnaire esperanto ne 
contient que deux inilles racines environ, et ce 
petit nouibre est cependaut suffisant pour for- 
mer, par derivation, un vocabulaire assez volu- 
niineux jxjur faire face a tons le besoins. 



tcllement), mortano (riiomme mourant), 
mortanta (mourant), niortigi (causer la mort 
ou tuer), mortigo (meutre), mortiganto 
(meurtrier), mortiga (portant la mort), 
nialmorta (vivant), senmorta (iumortel), 
>eiunorto ( inmortalite), etc. ' 

La conjugaison des verbes, qui est la grosse 



Mais ce qui simplifie encore la (juestion c'est jiierre d"achop[)emcnt dans ! ^ude de toutes les 

que Zanienhof choisit ses deux mille racines langes natnrelles, ne presente pas la moindre 

de telle fai;on qu'elles apparaissent familieres difficulte en Esperanto. Et tout d'abord, il n'y 

a tonies les pcrsomus in-truiti - k eivilisation a pas de verbes irreguliers ; puis, il n'y a qu'unc 

e\noi,i.einie ; ce resultat fut uliunu on choisis- terminaison pour chaque temps; enfin, le nom- 

sant d'abord des termcs (|ui mhu deja d'un lne des temps est reduit au strict minimum; 

usage universel, conune sfiort, toilet, train: il n"y a guere que les temps du passe, du pre- 

jniis en prenant des mots conununs a <leux ou sent, du futur et du con<litionnel. 
trois de-. (iriucipales langues. et enfin en ajou- L'infiniiif de tons les verbes se terniine en 

taut a celles-ci un petit nonil)re de racines qui "i," le present se termine toujours en "as, " le 

ne sont pas internationales, mais judicieuse- passe, toujours en "is," le conditionnel, tou- 

ment empruntecs a di\ei> idiomes de sorte que jours en "us," ces terminaisons sont les memes 

chacun, qu'il suit slave, teuton ou latin, trouve au singulier et au pluriel. 
a Tcsperauto un asi)ect fauiilicr. lui resume, I'Esperanto est la plus facile de 

11 y a environ trente suffixes et line demi- toutes les langues; tout ce qu'il faut, pour la 

douzainc de i.iillxes: ils ont des significations lire et I'ecrire, c'est de bien connaitre les quel- 

|>arfaiteiucnt definies. et une in'is qu'ils sont ques. jjrincipes granmiaticanx. dont la plupart 

eonnus, imue ]eis,inne nnniie dune liste des ont ete expliques ci-dessus, dc savoir les trente 

racines simples ]iitn eoniixiser son vocabulaire et quelques suffixes et la demi-dozaine de pre- 

])res(|ue i/(/ libitniii, et k-s nuanei - ie> plus tie- lixes ,1, ,nt nous avoiis dcja parlc, d'etre muni 

licate-. iietnent rire parfaitcnient i endues. entin d'mi dictionnaire donnant les deux mille 



je doi.- dire que Ic trait le plus remarrpi.ible 
de ri'.speranto, un trail qui ne >e trouve si pro- 
nonce dans aucun itliome nainrel. c'1-,1 de i>ou- 
voir former dc nouveaux innis iks ,|ne le niot- 
racine est donne, et il taui -e rappeler que dans 
la majorite des cas n ,. im r~t deja 

connu. 

Le <lenxienie trait frappant ili ri''>iH'ranlo. 
e e^t l.i siinplifite el l.'i re-ulanii- de lont le 
mi'iani-nie gr.nniualic.d : .inwi s, mnivent d'tni 
all. .rd facile lieiiN ]ianie- es^riiiielk'- d'une lan^ 
L;iie — le \ ■ le.aliulaire el le ire- -inipk nuca- 
liisinc i\\u f.k'l exprimir cl.ininuni tnutes 
Ir^ idei/s a '.<-■ \ I 'Cabulaire. 

I'miiiiw de I'niueau k nmi "ileatli" (innrtj 
ciininie e\einpk' ; le 11101 ;acine est "niorl" 



racine- (pie la ]>lupart de nous connaissent 
deja. 

'I'onte persiinne pi.-sedanl quekjue tcinlure 
de latin ei d'alleiuand et la connaissance de 
1 anglais, pent ecrire tme lettre en esperanto 
|iiinr .lin-i dire des le debut; au fait, une per- 
snnne qui anrait quelque don naturel pour 
letnde lies l.nigues pent niemc lire et ecrire 
-an- I .,-,,, kr prealablement ces connaissances, 
iMiurvu qn'ellc soil numie d'un dictionnaire. 

I'liur p.irkr l,i langue, il faut, rcla va sans 
.lire. (|nilque pratique l.a clin.se n'a rien de 
ditheilc. i.iiurt;.nt nnc pratique de quelques 
inoi-. ,-t indispensable punr j^arler ;ivec facilite. 
(,\nx que la question iuteresse dnivent former 
\in dull It s(. reunir dans k- but de converser. 



(ijue nmis tronvi.ns ,l,iii- lan-lais "mortar). La iirnnonciation t st .-nissj facile (pie le reste 

Xou- r.ippelant (pi'en Lsp.-r.nn. . i.ms les nonis de la lan,i;iie. 

se terniinent 11 ■•,'." t-.tv- k- idiectils en "a," Ce lani;a;<e .ntiticiel va-t-il devenir d'un 

le- .idverhes en ■e." les intinitits in "i." que usage r.-cl ;■' .\[. Horgerhoft nous montre qu'il 

les coutrairos -iiin lornies an niovon du pre- sc ri p;uid dii nioins rapidemcnt. En juin 190^ 

fixe "nial. " (|ue le prefixe ■-en" signifie sans; il n'y avait qu'une poignee d'Esperantistes en 

que le suffixe "aut" marque I'agent (corre- Amerique. L'ne annee plus tard, il y avait 

siioiidant a I'anglais "ing," au fram^ais "ant") cinquante clubs, la plupart dans les colleges, 

et que lo suffixe "ig" signifie causer, nous obte- Dans toutc I'Europe la langue a des centaines 

nons de la racine ci dessns; niorto (mort). de mille d'adherents, Trois mille Esperantis- 



Export Implement Age 



17 



tes, representant quinze pays differents, etaient 
presents au Congres de Boulogne-sur-mer, en 
aout 1905. 



La balance du commerce. *^i^s d^-""x sommes. Ce qu'il est exactement, 

Par balance du commerce entre nations on personne ne I'a jamais trouve et personne ne 
entend I'exces de nos ventes aux pays etran- »« trouvera jamais. 



gers sur nos achats quand la balance penche en 
notre faveur, et Tyice versa quand il en est au- 
trement: elle signifie, daiis tons les cas, la 
tliflference entre nos ventes et nos achats. Cette 



Puis, (juand des marchandises sont enregis- 
troes pour I'exportation, la valour qu'on leur 
suppose est la valeur courante de ces mar- 
chaiulises dans ce pays; or, cette valeur, du 
moins dans biens des cas, est de beaucoup su- 



i 

r 



balance du commerce, d' apres le rapport officiel perieure aux prix auxquels ces memes mar- 



l> 



Quelques mots a propos sur les pompes 

De nombreux negociants en quincaillerie et 
en machines, taut a I'etranger qu'aux Etats- 
Unis. ont trouve que les pompes et les outils 

de bonne qualite pour le maniement du foin r , ,• . . 

etaient des articles qu'ils avaient avantage a Pour I'annee prenant fin au 30 jum i<;o6, chandises se vendent dans les pays etrangers. 
posseder dans leur stock de marchandises. s'elevait. en chiflfres ronds, a 517 millions de C'est uti fait nolo.re qu'une portion considera- 

. . e ■ ^ ^ 1 11 11 1 „•.,„ ^,.rr,:Aroc ^nn^c pile '''^^ '1*^ ""* ex])ortations se vend a 1 etranger a 

Que les fabricants sont prets a faire tout ce dollars. Pour les cmq dermeres annees, eiie i b 

qui depend d'eux jwur aider aux negociants a conslitue la sommc colossale de 2 milliards 800 

s'assurer leur part de benefices, est un fait que millions de dollars. Si cette balance est une 

ce j«jurnal n'a point laisse ignorer a ses lee- ^.^,ose reelle, les pays etrangers nous doivent 2 

teurs. milliards 800 millions de dollars que, comme 

MM. F. E. Myers & Bro., d'Ashland, nation, nous devrions pouvoir obtenir quand 

(Ohio), dont les bureaux d'exportation sont a „uus les voudrions, tout comme nous tirons sur 

New York, B-21 Produce Exchange, publient l.^ balance de notre compte a la banque toutes 

a ce sujet une brochure interessante, intitulee j^g fois que nous avons besoin d'argent. Nous 

"Points on Pumps" et qui a surtout pour but „e devrions pas avoir le moindre ennui au sujet 

de fournir d'utiles renseignements aux ache- ,]g I'argent quand nous avons a notre credit 

teurs et aux marcbands qui achetent ou ven- j,„^ pareille somme dans les banques de I'an- 

dent des pompes. ' cien monde. Les reelles balances de commerce 

M^L Myers s'eflforcent de convaincre les ^g reglent par le payment ou especes sonnantes, 

negociants de I'avantage qu'il y a a Iwnier ses g,^ ^r. < )r, il appert, d'apres la memc autorite, 

eflforts a la vente d'une seule bonne categoric ^^^y^ I'annee derniere nous uavous re>,u en or 

de marchandises: c'est, a leur avis, le meilleur .jye ^(, millions de dollars, et cela est evidem- 

moyen de s'assurer les plus gros benefices. mem tout ce qui nous revient. parce que, 

De cette fatjon on a a dcbourser moins d'ar- comme on le sail bien, nous ne nous faisons pas 

gent, on en perd moins sur les i>ieces detachees faute d'emprunter de grosses sommes d'argent 

non vendues, 'a confusion en matiere d'impri- ^ I'etranger. Les chemins de fer, en effet, 

mes est moindre, les employes, n'ayant a s'oc- ayant besoin de prets a longue echeance sont aux termiers (|ue la dite balance du commerce 

cuper que d'une categoric de marchandises, alios les chercher en Europe, ces trois ou quatre soil iM.ur nous ou contre nous. La reelle ba- 

en connaissent mieux les <letails, les prix peu- Verniers mois. II est done evident que cette lance du commerce, qui se mesure a I'exces des 

vent ctrc maintenus assez eleves pour assurer prctendue balance du commerce n'est qu'un importaiion.s de I'or pent avoir do riuifKirtance. 

d'honnetos profits, on se cree ainsi, enfin, une l,ochet d'cnfant que Ton met entre les mains et elle on a. 

idente commerciale qui assure la stabilite du .i^s fermiers et d'autres ;\mericains pour leur II est bien reniarquable que I'Angleterre ait 

commerce et tju'il est difficile de vous faire faire sentir qu'ils deviennent riches, qu'ils sont eonnn un laisonnablc degre de prosperite pen- 

n^riWe. *^" plcine pro.sperite. ,|ant de longne- .unues ,i\cc la rpetendue ba- 

Outre les suggestions generales sur les i )n pent demander ce que devicnt cet exces lance dn coninierce toujours contre elle. 

snii]ii'-e des ventes snr les achats. II est mani- 
feste (pi'il ti'v ;' d'autre e\ces reel que I'exces 
dos iniportati<ins en or -nr k-s cxportations, 
soil ,V' iiiillioiis de dollars au lieu de 318 mil- 
linns, ( hie ilevitnt done cello balance supixisee 
el (|iie pout-il y avoir d'orrone dans la thoorie 
d'ajiros laquelle cos balinccs -un calcnkes," 

Tout d'abord. la pretcndue balance du com- 
merce ne tient nullement compte de I'argent 
le]>onse par les touristes en Europe en exces 



nn ])rix bien infericur au prix aincricain, quel- 
quofois parce (jue les manufacturiers, comme 
nos marchands nationaux, ont un surplus de 
ni'irchandises qu'ils uc peuvent pas vendre ici 
et (ju'ils vendent ailleurs pour le prix qu'ils 
en peuvent trouver. I^es manufacturiers font 
souvent de I'Europe le lieu de decliarge pour 
leur surplus. Puis, aussi, les marchandises im- 
portees sont evaluces a aussi bas prix que pos- 
sible, ]iarce que nombre de nos droits de dou- 
ane sont des droits aJ . valorem et que moins 
le jirix auipiel olles sont enregistrees a I'etran- 
uer est eleve, moins elles ont de droits d'entree 
a pa\ eren arrivant dans ce pays. 

Troisieinemont enfin, la balance du com- 
merce ne tient nullement comjjte des ventes 
d'obligations et d'actions aux pays etrangers, 
ni de lour revonte a ce pays, ni des obligations 
d'autres nations vendues aux Etats-Unis. 

Cost jiourquoi il n'importe absolument pas 



ponqws. la bnxrhure contient les gravures de 
nombreuscs pieces on mecanismcs importants 
que Ton rencontro dans les produits de MM. 
Myers. Elle sera eiivoyee franco a tout nego- 
ciant (pii en fera la demande, 

Los capitaux places dans les manufactures 
americaincs, en i<,>04. se sont elcves, d'apres 
les derniers chitfros du Bureau de recense- 
ment. a i.'.CiS^.jd^.dj.vl""'"'^- Ce chif?re rep- 
resente une augmentation de 41 pour cent en 
cinq ans. Quant aux produits des manufac- 
tures, ils ont augnientc. dans le meme inter- 



.\clielam pk'.s en .ipparence (|n'e11e no vend 
elle deviont d'annee en anm-e jilus riclio, pour 
la liiinne r,ns. m que les )ilacomonts en obliga- 
tions, en actions, d.ins les entreprises des man- 
ufacturier- dans d'autres jiays, Ini apportent 
un tlot iiiinlerronipu do dividcndcs, il'intcrets 
et de protits. 



Les oiivriors de ferme se font d'annee en 
de' l-argcnt apporte par les emigrants. Get annee plus rares en Amerique, et cependant 
excos, d'aucuus Fevaluent a too millions de doL les agriculteurs americains produisent chaque 
valle de 30 pour cent, leur valeur totale lars annuellement. d'autres a 400 millions. II annee davantage. Le travail se fait 4 I'aide de 
s'eleJant en 1904 a 14,802.. 47,087 dollars. tient evidemment le milieu quelque part entre niacliinos modernes amencaines. 



. Pri^« de mentionner ce iouroal en ecrivant aux personnel qui y font ins^er des annoncet. 



Pri^re de mentionner ce journal en ecrivant aux personnes qui y font insurer des annonces. 



i8 



Export Implement Ace 



Une source d'energie nouvelle pour 
la ferine 

A III lire iiHH|iK' d'clablissfincnts gigan- 

1cs<|iR> .IciK-rgic hydni-c-lectrique, ce n'est 

drinlinairo que les installations qui impliquent 

Ics plus (litticiks pn.hlenies ile Tart do I'inge- 
nicur (<u qui surpassenl inuti.-. K-s autres en 



(Ic I'cau (hi ruisseau d'environ dix fois la quan- Machines-outils am^ricaines 

tite nonnale n'a produit aucun changeinent M. Brittain, consul des Etats-Unis, ecrit de 
appreciable dans le voltage. Vingt-cinq lanipes Kiel (Allemagne) ce qui suit : "Les fabricants 
de lo Ixmgies dans la niaison et 8 dans la aHemands et franqais de machines-outils ad- 
grange fonrnissent un excellent eclairage. Un ^^^^^^^^^ Pexcellence dn produit americain et 

calorilere de 4,000 watts, qui a reniplace I'ordi- ,^ ,, , .. t u • . .. 1 

^ ' . s efforcent d obtenir de nos fabricants tous les 
naiii- ptiile a charbon, niaintient la temperature 



dimensions qui at.ireut laiteuiiun et les com- .le .leux ehambres qui ont respectivement 16 renseignements possibles. Au cours d'une 
aires. Tar maniere <le contraste rClcctri- pjeds de long snr 13 dc large et 7^2 de haut conversation recente avec le mecanicien en chef 



menl 



,u/ ll'orlJ attire raltenlion de ses lectcurs sur ^.^ ,^ pj^as de long stn- u de large et 7,' !> de de la fabrique de machines outils la plus vaste 

une installation d'etiergie et d'eclairage elec- i,;jjn cliacune d'elles ayant deux fenetres, a d' Alsace-Lorraine, on me montra un catalogue 

tritpics dans une ferme situee a Tinterieur de ^,„(. temperature d'environ 75 degres Fahren- elegamment illustre et imprime sur papier 

IVtal dc New Y.Mk, laquelle est probablemcnt ,,,.;, ^„a„^i i^ temperature oxterieur est a envi- ^^^^^^icain. Le mecanicien me dit qu'il faisait 

la settle de son espece aux F.tat-ruis; assure- ,.,,„ ^^.^^y l'u moteur d'uu deini-clicval ac- 



nicnt il ne saurait y en avoir beaucoup dc sem- tioimc recrcmcusc, la 1>aratte et la nieule a 



une collection des catalogues des prmcipaux 

, . . . . .-1 ■. ., , , •. fabricants americains de machines outils, et 

blablcs. SI tant est qu d y en ait aucune. aiguiser. ce moteur rclativement grand etant 

Dans la ferme en question passe un cours n.-cessaire pour donner au lourd cylindre de inirodusait dans ses catalogues allemands les 
d'eau qui debite normalement 4.000 pieds IWremcuse une vitesse <le 7.400 re v. Unions trails plus attrayants des catalogues amen- 
cubes par minute, et c'est sur le bord de ce par minute. On se propose, de plus, de laire cains. 11 dit que les Americains occupent le 
ruisseau que s ctrouve I'installation unique la cuisine a I'ekctricite et de fournir de I'ener- premier rang dans la fabrication des machines- 
d't-nergie electrique. On a etabli un petit bar- gie a toutes les machines de la ferme auxquelles outils, par suite de leur parfaite connaissance 
rage qui a treute-six pieds de large, les murs il est possible de I'appliqucr. des qu'on pourra de la partie et de Icur aptitude a faire voir 
et la i»latc-forme sont en beton et supportent un apporter les modifications necessaires a la leurs machines sous le mcilleur jour possible, 
plancher d'hemlock de 4 pouces .IV-paisseur source de force electrique. "'On me fit part d'une visite en Amerique par 
repeisant sur un solide bati dc bois. Celui-ci ^ette nouvelle installation a deja etc I'objet Tacheteur en chef de la plus vaste usine a 
est cncastre dans les murs et la plate-forme a'un grand nombrc de deniandes de renseigne- machines-outils de France. Cc monsieur dit 
auxquels il est fixe par des boulons. In tablier ,„ents de la part des fenniers aux aguets du qu'il visita aux Etats-Unis cinquante-deux fa- 
de planches doubles recoit la chute d'eau iiui progres, car il y a beaucoup d'endroits dans le briques de machines-outils et tut exception- 
passe par-dessus le barrage et previent I'ero- pays ou de faibles sources d'energie hydrau- "ellement charme de I'accueil courtois qu'il re- 
si,,!, de. nHu>. Comme la hauteur de chute Hquc— de dix a cinquante chevaux-vapcur— «;ut partout. Avant de visiter plusieurs des 
n'cM que de 4 pieds et demi. il fallut installer pourraicnt etre utilisees et sur Icsquelles pour- "sines qui lui etaient le mieux connues, il leur 
une roue hyilraulique relativemcnt grande, du raient se faire des installations semblables. II donna dc petites commandes, croyant que cela 
type a axe vertical de 30 pouces. qui doit four- ^.^t intercssant de noter que tout recemment l»i servirait d'introduction et lui donnerait 
nir 17 chcvaux vapeur et demi a 113 revolu- „„c petite industrie manufacturiere a etc eta- fjuelques avantages speciaux, mais il trouva 
lions par minute .sous la hauteur de chute de 4 blie dans le voisinage. de sorte que voila une '!"« I'appat etait tout a fait inutile. Comme 
pieds et demi. L'energic cngendree par cette demonstration nouvelle et peut-etre exageree resultat de cette visite en Amerique, on me dit 
roue est transmise par une paire d'engrenagcs ,ic ndee du "retour a la terre," qui doit en- H"^' '^i compagnie franqaise donnera de 
coniques. n-unis par une courroic a une gene- raser laffluencc dans les villes. Cette instal- grosses commandes a plusieurs maisons ameri- 
ratrice de u Kil<»\\ait- ct demi a J30 volts ct latjon est peut-etre le point de depart de caincs. 

I, nm nvohuii Ills par minute. In cable d'alu- fcrnics "clectrifiees" devenant <les centres in- 'hi parlc beaucoup de la repugnance de 

illinium iiiiu i'^ole. teiulu sur des traverses mon- dustricls aussi bicn qu'agricoles, quelque petits 

tees <;ur de> poteaux de ccdres espaces d envi- ^t modestcs qu'ils puisseiit etre. 
<le la ceiuratrice auv li.itimcnts dc la ferme. 



a une di-tance de 1.51X) pieds. Les niur-. de la 
fosse de la roue qui siij^ptTtent eiralement le 
bief et celui-ci, a -"U tmir. les lutitnents dc la 
source d'eiierL;ie. sont en betcm ; ils >ont cons- 
truiis sur un bon tondenient de gra- 



1 \lleuiaiid a montrer ses machines a des in- 
conmis, surtout quand ces inconnus viennent 
de I'etranger. Ici des soi-disants acheteurs 
sont souvent traites avec soupgon et Ton refuse 
souvcnt tie les laisser entrer, ou bien si on les 



T'liuc's Ics pcr^onnes qui font insercr des an- 
niMKo- dans "ri^xpurt Implement Age" ont laisse franchir les portes. on ne leur montre 



) 



uii coniniercc cxterieur etabli, et Ton pent leur que quelque machines. I^a personne qui me 

ecrire dans n'importe quelle langue. Toutes fournit ccs renseignements dit que meme un 

vicr. Le fund de la ios«e e>t reconvert les demandes de rensignenients et toutes les ..xiiert ne saurait obtenir quelques connais 

d'un plancher pour empecher <pie le gra- commandes seront I'objct d'une prompte atten- sauces secretes en traversant un atelier. Les 

vier ne soit entrainc par Teau. \'oila lion. II est important que les demandes de manufacturiers gagnent beaucoup a trailer 

environ cinq mois que cette source d'ener- renseignements soient parfaitemeiit definies, avec courtoisie les pretendus acheteurs. Je 

gie fonctionnc, nuit et jour ; elle ne reclame de rpie la nature du renseignement desire soit in- me suis laisse dire que les etablissements 

soins que deux ou trois fois par semaine et ne diquee avec precision; on s'evite ainsi une Krupp ont I'intention de faire cette annee de 

possede aucun regulateur. Une augmentation perle de temps et bien des ennuis. grosses commandes de machines-outils. 

Pr^e de mentionner ce iournaJ en ecrivant aux personnel qui y font insurer des annoncei. 



Export implement Age 



19 



Export Implement Age 

rARA CIRCULAR EN EL EXTRANJERO SOLAMBNTE. 

I^Mico independiente. dedicado exclusivamente al fomento 

'^de come. code exportacV,,. c;i. .nu-iuinar.a para la Agn- 

cultura y Ifccl.eiia*, bonibas, iiiolmos de yiento, 

aperos de labranza >• siiminislros a coitijos. 

haciendas, iiiEenios de hacer azucar, 

sitiosde labor etc. 



Frecio db Suscripci6n: 
f^ un afio, porte franco 



1 P««o 



Reaitasc por giro sobre Nueva York 6 por librania 
postal internacional. 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 

loio Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa., E.U. del N.A. 

La niioma firma publica el •Implement Age" el American 
••pertiliier," el "Carriage Monthly" y el "Vehiclr Dealer. 

piopiedad legaliza<la por Ware Broa. Co. en 1506. 



Tomo XV. Filadelfia. B. V. de N. A , Noviembre de 19 ■-. 



No. 3 



En el DIrectorio para Compradores, en ia pri- 
mera parte, hallaran nuestros iectores los In- 
formes en el idioma espanol, a fin de que puedan 
entablas una correspondencla mas satisfactoria 
con nuestros anunciantes. 



Los trabajadores de canifio esleasean mas 
y m.^s cada ano en los Estados Unidos, y sin 
embargo, los hacendados americanos estan 
produciendu mas y mas cada aiio. Hacen los 
trabajos con las modcrnas maquinas agricolas 
de manufactura americana. 



Nuestros anunciantes tendran gusto en 
remitir sus catalogos y circulares a los que 
deseen in formes sobre sus respectivos pro- 
ductos. Muchos y muy utiles datos se pueden 
obtener en ellos con respecto a las mas mo- 
dernas y eficaces ma(iuinas agricolas que hoy 
se fabrican, y a menudo se puede establecer 
relaciones que continuen por muchos anos y 
sean mutuamcnte provechosas. 



Todos los que se anuncian en la "Export 
Implement Age" tienen establecido un negocio 
de cxportaciones, y se les puede escribir cartas 
en cualquicr idioma. To<ios los pedidos de 
mcrcancias 6 de in formes recibiran pronta y 
esmerada atencion. Es importante que las 
indagaciones se hagan en terminos claros y 
precisos sobre la clase de in forme que se 
necesita, para evitar perdida de ticmpo y 
molestia. 



EnseHanza del Arbitraie 

En un discurso recientemente pronunciado, 
Mr. H. P. Faunce. presidente de la Universi- 
dad Brown, una dc las instituciones docentes 
representativas de America, abogo por la 
ensefianza sistematica en las escuelas publicas 
de los principios del arbitraje en los negocios 



y las cuestioiies interuacionales el Presidente 

Faunce dijo : 

Ningi'm gran movimiento es permanente 
mientras no sc coloque sobre la base de la 
educacion. Todo \o que entra en la nieiite 
del publico por medio de las escuelas entra 
conio la luz del sol y la lluvia en las fibras 
de la ciiciu.i. Vn movimiento universal esta 
h.iy en operacion, el objeto del cual es. no la 
reforma de la naturaleza hnmana. no el dcs- 
baiKlamiento de Ins ejercitos y armadas, sino 
simplemeiite el estableciiniento de mejores 
niedios que el de la guerra para arreglar 6 
«lecidir las disputas que tienen que existir 
mientras iluren las naciones. 

Crandcs rcsultados se han obtenlilo ya. Fl 
arbitraje se lia substituido ya a la guerra en 
la mayor parte de los casos. I,a guerra es 
ya la exccpcion y no la regla en las con- 
tiendas interuacionales. No es una verdad el 
dicho que "en tiempo de paz debemos prepa- 
rarmos para la guerra," sino mas bien que "en 
tiempo de paz debemos preparamos para hacer 
imposible la guerra." 

En todo el mundo civilizado esta extendicn- 
dosc la concepcion dc la irracionali<lad y 
futilidad de la guerra. lleinos llegado a 
realizar que la simultana descarga dc pistolas 
a cincucnta pasos por dos antagonistas no es 
un medio mas cficaz para decidir quien tiene 
la justicia que el dc confiar la decision a un 
tiro de los dados. 

Ciiando se rcconocio lo ab-urdo (pu era --e 
le .lio un golpe de muertc al duelo. El tiempo 
veiidra con seguridad en (|ue los duelos inter- 
uacionales scran en la opinion internacional 
un medio muy estupido dc dirimir las diferen- 

cias. 

Que podcmos hacer en las escuelas publicas .' 
Podemos inculcar el alto principio de que los 
hombrcs racionales. cuando dificrcn en cual- 
quier punto dcbcn apclar a la razc'jn y no a 
la fucrza. Ya nuestros muchachos dc escuela 
lo hacen asi en los ejercicios 6 juegos atleticos, 
estando acostumbrados a aceptar las dccisiones 
del juez arbitro 6 el arbitrador sin jeremequiar 
iii quejarse. El campo atletico conduce direc- 
tamente al arbitraje en gran escala. 

Totlemos eiisefiar en nuestras escuelas que 
la paz tiene sus victorias no menos gloriosas 
que las de la guerra. Estamos aprendiendo 
h glorificar un nuevo tipo de hcroismo— el 
heroismo del misionero de la ciudad, de los 
hombrcs y mujeras que dedican sus vidas a 
la obra de elevar las condiciones sociales de 
nuestras grandes ciudades. Este nuevo herois- 



mo se debc ensenar en nuestras escuelas 

publicas. 

I'odemos inculcar la fralernida.l humana en 
toilas las clases de nuestras escuelas y en todos 
los estudios (|ue alii se ensenan. Potlemos 
deiuostrar que los antagonismos dc las razas 
son infundados y brutales ; <pic cada una de 
las difereiites razas pagan su contribiicion a 
la civilizacion moderna. HI uUimo discurso de 
[ubn Hay apelaba a este punto de vista, y 
r.comendaba a todos los hombres y mujeres 
en posiciones *lc responsabilidad que hiciesen 
un diligente csfnerzo para inculcar el nietodo 
.kl arliitraje como substituto de las utilidades 
de la guerra. 



Ese "Balance Comercial" 

Tor "balance comercial" se da a entender 
entre las naciones se da a entender el exceso 
de nuestras ventas a los paises extranjeros 
sobre nuestras compras a los mismos. cuando 
es favorable el balance, y vice versa cuando es 
lo contrario; en todos casos es la difercncia 
entre las ventas y las compras. Este balance 
comercial, segun el infornie oficial del ano que 
termino el 30 de Junio de 1900. fue, en nu- 
meros redondos $517,000,000.00. Durante los 
iiltimos cinco anos esc balance acumula la 
enorisima suma de $2,880,000,000.00. Si esc 
balance fucsc una cosa real y verdadera, los 
liaises extranjeros nos deberian esos $2,800,- 
(X)o.(XX>.oo, los ciiales, como nacion, cuando los 
neccsitasemos, girariamos, del mismo modo que 
giramos nuestros cheques contra nuestros 
bancos ca<la vez que neccsitamos dinero. No 
(lebcriamos tcner dificultad algiin.i con respecto 
a dinero cuando hay a nuestro credito una suma 
tan enormc como esta en los bancos del Antiguo 
Miindo. Los verdaderos balances comerciales 
se saldan con el pago en oro. Parece, sin 
embargo, segun la misma autoridad, que el 
ano pasado solamente $36,000,000.00 recibi- 
mos en oro. y esto evidentemente es todo lo 
que iio< cnrrespondc. porque. como cs bicn 
sabido. no cstainos libres de contraer cm- 
prestitos en el cxtranjero. En realidad. nues- 
tros ferro-carriles. que requieren grandes 
emprestitos a largos Plazos, han tenido durante 
los ultimos dos 6 tres meses, que ir a reali- 
zarlos en Europa. Evidentemente pues este 
llamado balance de comcrcio es como la 
niaruga de un nino de pecho puesta en las 
manos de los hacendados y otros para haccrles 
creer que estan enriqueciendose y gozando de 
buenos teimpos. 

Se nos preguntara que se hace de este 



Hiiase el Favor de Menuonar el Nombre de e.te Peri6dico Cuando .e Conte.te i5 lo. Anundo.. 



i8 



Export Implement Age 



Une source d'energie nouvelle pour 
la {erme 

A notrc t-pcxiuf d etablisscments gigan- 
tes(iues d'cncrgic liydro-t-lectrique, ce n'est 
dordinaire que les installations qui impliquent 
Ics plus (Hfficilcs pn.hlenics de Tart de I'inge- 
nicur ou qui purpasscnt toutes les autres en 
dimensions qui attircnt I'attention et les com- 
mentaircs. Par nianiere de contraste {'Electri- 
cal World attire I'attention de ses Iccteurs sur 
une installation d'cnergie et d'eclairage elec- 
triipies dans une fcrnie situee a I'interieur de 
I etat de New York, laquelle est probablement 
la seule de son espece aux Etats-Unis ; assure- 
ment il ne saurait y en avoir beaucoup de sem- 
blables, si tant est qu'il y en ait aucune. 

Dans la fcrme en question passe un cours 
d'eau qui debite normalement 4,000 pieds 
cubes par minute, et c'est sur le bord de ce 
ruisseau que s etrouve I'installation unique 
d'energie electrique. On a etabli un petit bar- 
rage qui a trente-six pieds de large, les murs 
et la plate-forme sont en beton et supportent un 
plancher d'hemlock de 4 pouccs d'epaisseur 
reposant sur un solide bati de bois. Celui-ci 
est encastrc dans les murs et la plate- forme 
auxquels il est fixe par des boulons. Un tablier 
de planches doubles re(;oit la chute d'eau qui 
passe par-dessus le barrage et previent I'ero- 
sion des nuirs. Comme la hauteur de chute 
n'est que de 4 pieds et demi, il fallut installer 
une roue hydraulique relativement grande, du 
type a axe vertical de 30 pouces, qui doit four- 
nir 17 chevaux vapeur et demi a 113 revolu- 
tions par minute sous la hauteur de chute de 4 
pieds et demi. L'energie engendree par cette 
roue est transmise par une paire d'engrenages 
coniques. rcunis par une courroie a une gene- 
ratrice de 12 Kilowatts et demi a 250 volts et 
t.ioo revolutions par minute. Un cable d'alu- 
miniimi non isole, tendu sur des traverses mon- 
tees sur des poteaux de cedres espaces d'envi- 
de la generatrice auv batiments de la ferme, 
a une distance de 1.500 pieds. I as murs <le la 
fosse de la roue qui supportent egalement le 
bief et celui-ci. a son tour, les batiments de la 
source d'cnergie, sont en beton; ils sont cons- 
truits sur nn bon fondcment de gra- 
vier. Le fond de la fosse est reconvert 
d'un plancher pour empechcr que le gra- 
vier ne soit entraine par I'eau. \'oila 
environ cinq mois que cette source d'ener- 
gie fonctionne, nuit et jour ; elle ne reclame de 
soins que deux ou trois fois par semaine et ne 
possede aucun regulateur. Une augmentation 



de I'eau du ruisseau d'environ dix fois la quan- 
tite normale n'a produit aucun changement 
appriVMable dans le voltage. Vingt-cinq lampes 
de 16 b<5ugies dans la mai.son et 8 dans la 
grange fournissent un excellent cclairage. Un 
calorifere de 4,000 watts, qui a remplace 1 'ordi- 
naire poele il charbon, maintient la temi)erature 
de deux chambrcs qui ont respectivement 16 
pieds dc long sur 13 de large et 7>4 de haut 
It 13 pieds dc long sur 12 de large et 7^2 de 
haut, chacunc d'elles ayant <leux fenetres, a 
une temperature d'environ 75 degres Fahren- 
heit quand la temperature extcrieur est a envi- 
ron zero. Un motcur d'un demi-cheval ac- 
tioiuie I't'cremeuse, la baratte ct la meule a 
aiguiser, ce motcur relativement grand etant 
nt^essaire pour donner au lourd cylindre de 
recremeuse une vitesse de 7.400 revolutions 
par minute. On se propose, de plus, de faire 
la cuisine a I'clcctricite et de fournir de l'ener- 
gie a toutes les machines de la ferme auxquelles 
il est possible de Tappliquer, des qu'on pourra 
apporter les modifications necessaires a la 
source de force electrique. 

Cette nouvelle installation a deja ete I'objet 
d'un grand nombre dc demandes de renseigne- 
ments de la part des fermiers aux aguets du 
progres, car il y a beaucoup d'endroits dans le 
pays ou de faibles sources d'energie hydrau- 
lique — de dix a cinquante chevaux-vapeur — 
pourraient etre utilisees et sur lesquelles pour- 
raient se faire des installations semblables. II 
est interessant de noter que tout recemment 
ime petite industrie manufacturiere a ete eta- 
blie dans le voisinage, de sorte que voila une 
demonstration nouvelle et peut-etre exageree 
de I'idee du "retour a la tcrrc," qui doit en- 
rayer I'affluence dans les villes. Cette instal- 
lation est peut-etre le point de depart de 
fermes "electrifiees" devenant des centres in- 
dustriels aussi bien qu'agricoles, quelque petits 
et modestes qu'ils puissent etre. 



Toutes les personnes qui font inserer des an- 
nonces dans "I'Export Implement Age" ont 
im commerce exterieur etabli, et Ton pent leur 
ecrire dans n'importe quelle langue. Toutes 
les demandes de rensignements et toutes les 
commandes seront I'objet d'une prompte atten- 
tion. II est important que les demandes de 
renseignements soient parfaitement definies, 
que la nature du renseignement desire soit in- 
diquee avec precision ; on s'evite ainsi une 
perte de temps et bien des ennuis. 



Machines-outils am^ricaines 

M. Brittain, consul des Etats-Unis, ecrit de 
Kiel (Allemagne) ce qui suit: "Les fabricants 
allemands et fran<;ais de machines-outils ad- 
mettent I'excellence du produit americain et 
s'efforcent d'obtenir de nos fabricants tous les 
renseignements possibles. Au cours d'une 
conversation recente avec le mecanicien en chef 
de la fabrique de machines outils la plus vaste 
d'Alsace-Lorraine, on me montra un catalogue 
elegamment illustre et itnprime sur papier 
americain. I-,e mecanicien me dit qu'il faisait 
une collection des catalogues des principaux 
fabricants americains de machines outils, et 
introdusait dans ses catalogues allemands les 
traits plus attrayants des catalogues ameri- 
cains. II dit que les Americains occupent le 
premier rang dans la fabrication des machines- 
outils, par suite de leur parfaite connaissance 
de la partie et de leur aptitude a faire voir 
leurs machines sous le meilleur jour possible. 
•'On me fit part d'une visite en Amerique par 
I'achcteur en chef de la plus vaste usine a 
machines-outils de France. <"e monsieur dit 
qu'il visita aux Etats-Unis cinquante-deux fa- 
briques de machines-outils et fut exception- 
nellement charme de I'accueil courtois qu'il re- 
<;ut partout. Avant de visiter plusieurs des 
usines qui lui etaient le mieux connues, il leur 
donna de petites commandes, croyant que cela 
lui servirait d'introduction et lui donnerait 
quelques avantages speciaux, mais il trouva 
que I'appat etait tout a fait inutile. Comme 
resultat de cette visite en Amerique, on me dit 
que la compagnie frangaise donnera de 
grosses commandes a plusieurs maisons aineri 
caines. 

On parle beaucoup de la repugnance ' 
r.Mlemand a montrer ses machines a des 11 
connus, surtout quand ces inconnus viennen 
de I'etranger. Ici des soi-disants acheteur 
sont souvent trait^s avec soupgon et Ton refu- 
souvent de les laisser entrer, ou bien si on If- 
laisse franchir les portes, on ne leur mom c 
que quelque machines. La personne qui f 
fournit ces renseignements dit que meme ' 
expert ne .saurait obtenir quelques conna 
sances secretes en traversant un atelier. I '■ 
manufacturiers gagnent beaucoup a trailer 
avec courtoisie les pretendus achetcurs. Je 
me suis laisse dire que les etablissemcnts 
Krupp ont I'intention de faire cette annee dc 
grosses commandes de machines-outils. 



*:i 



Export implement Age 



>9 



Export Impleivient Aqe 

FARA CIRCULAR EN BL EXTRANJERO SOLAMBNTE. 

tiKlAdlco indfpendienle, dedicado exdusivamente al fomento 

"del comerc^Vde ^portac.on c. n.aqu.nar.a para l.i Agri- 

culiura y IKherias. boinbas, i.ml.nos de yienlo, 

aperos de Ubrania y suminisuos i cortijos, 

haciendas, inRenios de hacer azQcar, 

sitios de labor etc. 



Precio de Suscripci6n: 
tm SB aCo, porte franco 



1 P« 



Remitaic por giro sobre Nueva York 6 por libranza 
postal internacional. 



r 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 

loio Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa., E.U. del N.A. 

La mi»»ni« firma publica el "Implement Age" el American 
"FertiUaer," el "Carriage .Monthly" y el "VehiclK IJtaler. 

pnipiedad legalixada por Ware Broa. Co. en i^>. 



Tomo XV. Flladelfia, B. V. de M. A., Noviembre de i^. No. 2 



En el DIrectorio para Compradores, eo la prl- 
mera parte, hallaran nuestros lectores lo« In- 
formes en el idioma espaiiol, a fin de que puedan 
entablas una correspondencia mas satisfactoria 
con nuestros anunciantes. 



Los trabaj adores dc campo esleascan mas 
y mas cada ano en los Estados Unidos, y sin 
embargo, los hacendados ainericanos estan 
produciendo mas y mas cada aiio. Hacen los 
trabajos con las modernas maquinas agricolas 
de manufactura americana. 



Nuestros anunciantes tendran gusto en 
rcmitir sus catalogos y circulares a los que 
deseen in formes sobre sus respectivos pro- 
ductos. Muchos y muy utiles datoi se pueden 
obtener en ellos con respecto a las mas mo- 
dernas y eficaces maquinas agricolas que hoy 
se fabrican, y a menudo se puede establecer 
relaciones que continuen por muchos aiios y 
scan mutuamente provechosas. 



Todos los que se anuncian en la "Export 
Implement Age" tienen establecido un negocio 
de exportaciones, y se les puede escribir cartas 
en cualquicr idioma. Todos los pedidos de 
mercancias 6 de informes recibiran pronta y 
esmerada atencion. Es importante que las 
indagaciones se hagan en terminos claros y 
precisos sobre la clasc de informe que se 
neccsita, para evitar perdida de tiempo y 
molestia. 



CnseHanza del Arbitraje 

En un discurso recientemente pronunciado, 
Mr. H. P. Faunce, presidente de la Universi- 
dad Brown, una de las instituciones docentes 
representativas de America, abogo por la 
ensenanza sistematica en las escuelas p6blicas 
de los principios del arbitraje en los negocios 



y las cuestiones internacionalcs el Presidente 

Faunce dijo : 

Ningi'in gran movimiento es permanente 
mientras no se colo<)ue sobre la base de la 
cducacion. To<lo lo que entra en la mcntc 
del pi'iblico por medio de las escuelas entra 
como la luz del sol y la lluvia en las fibras 
dc la encina. Un movimiento universal esta 
hoy en opcracion, el objeto del cual es, no la 
reforma de la naturaleza humana. no cl <les- 
bandamiento dc los ejercitos y armadas, sino 
simpleimntc el establecimiento de mejores 
medios que el de la guerra para arreglar 6 
decidir las disputas que tienen que existir 
mientras duren las naciones. 

Grandes resultados se ban obtenido ya. El 
arbitraje se ha substituido ya a la guerra en 
la mayor parte de los casos. La guerra es 
ya la cxcepcion y no la regla en las con- 
tiendas internacionales. No es una verdad el 
dicho que "en tiempo de paz debemos prepa- 
rarmos para la guerra," sino mas bien que "en 
tiempo de paz debemos preparamos para hacer 
imposible la guerra." 

En todo cl mundo cfvillzado esta exiendien- 
dose la concepcion de la irracionalidad y 
futilidad de la guerra. Hemos llegado a 
realizar que la simultana descarga de pistolas 
a cincuenta pasos por dos antagonistas no es 
un medio mas eficaz para decidir quien tiene 
la justicia que el de confiar la decision a un 
tiro de los dados. 

Cuando se rcconocio lo absurdo (|ue era se 
le ili.) un golpe de muerte al tluelo. El tiempo 
vendra con seguridad en que los duelos inter- 
nacionales seran en la opinion internacional 
un medio muy esti'ipido de dirimir las diferen- 

cias. 

Que podemos hacer en las escuelas publicas .•' 
Podemos inculcar el alto principio de que los 
hombres racionalcs, cuando difieren en cual- 
quier punto deben apelar a la razon y no a 
la fuerza. Ya nuestros muchachos dc escuela 
lo hacen asi en los ejercicios 6 juegos atleticos. 
estando acostumbrados a accptar las decisiones 
del juez arbitro 6 el arbitrador sin jeremequiar 
ni quejarse. El campo atletico conduce direc- 
tamente al arbitraje en gran escala. 

Podemos enseiiar en nuestras escuelas que 
la paz tiene sus victorias no menos gloriosas 
que las de la guerra. Estamos aprendiendo 
a glorificar un nuevo tipo de heroismo— «! 
heroismo del misionero de la ciudad. de los 
hombres y mujeras que dedican sus vidas a 
la obra de elevar las condiciones .sociales de 
nuestras grandes ciudades. Este nuevo herois- 



mo se debc ensenar en nuestras escuelas 
publicas. 

Podemos inculcar la fraternidad humana en 
t.Klas las clases de nuestras escuelas y en todos 
los cstudios que alii se ensenan. Podemos 
demostrar que los antagonismos de las razas 
son infundados y brutales ; que cada una de 
las difercntcs razas pagan su contribucion a 
la civilizacion modcrna. El ultimo discurso de 
John Hay apelaba a este punto dc vista, y 
rocomcndaba a todos los hombres y mujeres 
en posiciones de rcsponsabilidad que hiciesen 
un diligcnte csfucrzo para inculcar el metodo 
del arbitraje como substituto de las utilidades 
dc la guerra. 



Ese "Balance Comercial" 

Por "balance comercial" se da a entender 
cut re las naciones se da a entender el exceso 
de nuestras ventas a los paises extranjeros 
sobre nuestras compras a los mismos. cuando 
es favorable el balance, y vice versa cuando es 
lo contrario; en todos casos es la diferencia 
entrc las ventas y las compras. Este balance 
comercial, segun el informe oficial del afio que 
termino el 30 de Junio de 1900. fue, en nii- 
meros redondos $517,000,000.00. Durante los 
ultimos cinco aiios ese balance acumula la 
enorisima suma de $2,880,000,000.00. Si ese 
balance fuesc una cosa real y verdadera, los 
paises extranjeros nos deberian esos $2,800,- 
000,000.00, los cuales, como nacion, cuando los 
necesitasemos, girariamos, del mismo modo que 
giramos nuestros cheques contra nuestros 
hancos cada vcz que necesitamos dinero. No 
deberiamos tener dificultad alguna con respecto 
a dinero cuando hay a nuestro credito una suma 
tan enorme como esta en los bancos del Antiguo 
Mundo. Los verdaderos balances comerciales 
se saldan con el pago en oro. Parece, sin 
embargo, segun la misma autoridad, que el 
aiio pasado solamente $36,000,000.00 recibi- 
mos en oro, y esto evidentemente es todo lo 
que nos corresponde, porque, como es bien 
sabido. no estamos libres de contraer em- 
prestitos en el extranjero. En realidad, nues- 
tros ferro-carriles, que requieren grandes 
emprestitos a largos Plazos, ban tenido durante 
los ultimos dos 6 tres meses, que ir a reali- 
zarlos en Europa. Evidentemente pues este 
llamado balance de comercio es como la 
maruga de un nifio de pecho puesta en las 
manos de los hacendados y otros para hacerles 
creer que estan enriqueciendose y gozando de 
buenos teimpos. 

Se nos preguntara que se hace de este 



Pr^e de mentionner ce iournal en ecrivant aux personnel qui y font int^er dei annonces. 



HttMe el r»vor d. M.ncion« el Nombre d. e... Peri«dico Cu.ndo « Conterte i lo. A.undo.. 



INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



ao 



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siipuvslu oxcfSK (k' mu'stras venta^ sitbro 
nuctras coiiipras? Manifiestanicntc no hay 
mas vcnlailero cxccso i|uc d incdido por cl 
mcncioiiailo arriba do $36,000,000.00. en vcz 
dc $3i8,txx>,ooo.oo. Se iircguntara tanibiin : 
cntdiicfs (|iK' cs lit- tso supucsto balance, y ciial 
es la falta tic la icmia se^;un la cual sc calculan 
est>s balance-^ ? 

V.n priilur luijar cl balance coincrcial asi 
Uaniado no tuiua en cucnta cl <lincro gastado 
pi if intcstros numeroslsinios viajcrus en 
Kurniia cu cxccso del dincro traulo ;u|ni pol- 
ios iiiniif;ianlc>. Este cxceso se calcula enlie 
$iU).()OO.ixx) y $400,<XK).ooo al ano, y cs evi- 
dcntcincntc cl prninedio de anibas snnias. 

¥.\\ segundo lugar. cnando se evah'ian las 
mcrcancias para la cxportacion se les pone 
cl valor corricnlc acpii, y en niuchos cases per 
lo nicnos ese valor cs nuiy superior a los 
precios a que las niisinas mercancias se venden 
en los i>aiscs extranjeros. Es un beclio 
notorio que nna parte niuy considerable dc 
las nuTcancias tpic ex|Kirtamos se venden en 
los paiscs cxtranjertis a precios constderable- 
mcntc mas bajos que los precios aniericanos, 
algunas veces putijue nuestros manufacturcros 
y comcrciaiucs liencn im sobrante de protluc- 
to> (iiH- 110 i>iicdeii rcalizar aqni. y los envian 
a otros paiscs .1 que sc vendan a cualquir precio 
que sc i)ueda conscguir. Nuestros nianulac- 
turcros hnccii de Europa a mcnudo cl nci- 
piiiiii ill >u- prodnctos sobrante^. I'm "iia 
|.:iiu la- mcrcancias que imporlamos se valuan 
a lo> precios ni.i> hajos que es posible. porque 
niuclios dc nucstn- .Urccbos de importaoion 
sc imixmcn ad valorem, y mientras mas bajos 
son ins jirccios .-t que sc facturan en el extran- 
jcrn. nunor es cl dorccho aduanero que pagan 
al niirar en e-lc i'ai<. 

V.n tcrccr luuar cl lialanic ci'iucrcial no 
loni.i tn cucnta las miuu.- dc nuc--iros h>\h>- 
\ ~ a los |iai-c- cxiranit-nx. ni de s\i« 

rcvciii.i- 1 csic iiais. ni lo- liiMi'i-- de otras 
nacioiu - vin.liiliis a li-- l-'.sta-l"-^ I'nidn-. 

lie I'kIi. c-io re-ulta que i"'C" 1'- niiji'Tta 
a nuestros liaccndados que el balance de 
coinercio a>i Uamado sea en ia\"r i> en contra 
de Hos. .11'- I'.l verdadcro balance Ci.niercia! 
medido por l.i ditcrcucia rntre las iniporta 
cionc.s \ las e\i><irtacioues de oro ])ucde str > 
es inqnirtante. 

Cosa muy notable cs ipic la In^laterra por 
muchos anos haya pvado continuaniente un 
motlerado grado de prosperttlad con el balance 
comercial asi llaniado en ?u contra. Com- 



prand<j apareiUeineiUc mas de io que vcnde, 
se bace, sin eniliarj;o. nias rica cada ano. por 
la raz(')n de que sus inversiones en bonos, 
acciones, y enipresas de sus manufacturcros 
en otros jiaiscs le tracn constantemente una 
corriente de dividendos, intereses y "^anancias. 



Las Perdidas Causadaspor Incendios 
en los Cstados Unidos 

Xo lia dejado de hacer una impresion en 
cl animo del pueblo americano la destruccion 
dc vidas y haciendas causadas por los incendios 
en los Estados Unidos. especialinente durante 
los nltimos trcinta y cinco anos. En la ijran 
conflaKracion de Cbicaj^o. ocurrida en 1.^71. 
se quemaron nnicho mas de trcs millas cuadra- 
das de edificios, causando mia perdida de mas 
de $190,000,000 de pesos en propiedades y 
doscientas cincuenta vida-. a-i como la ruina 
lie cincuenta y -.is companias <le seguros. El 
gran incendio dc Boston en 1872 arraso 6, 
"acres" de terreno. con una jtcrdida <le S80,- 
000,000. Ed fuego dc Jacksrmville, Florida, 
en looi, destruyo propiedades por valor dc 
mas de $10,000,000; el do I'aiterson, N. ].. en 
nioj. causi'i una perdida de $8,000,000. El 
gran incendio dc Raltimorc en n>04 destruyo 
140 "acns" de cditicios valnados en $50,000,- 
000: v aliora la cat.aslrofc de San Francisco 
de Calitoruia ha cau'^ad.. nna perdida que sc 
calcula en mas de Sji" ■..«■.- 0. Solo esta 
lisia es bastante cstUfK-nda para ]>riMhicir una 
profimila impresion: f>cro i-sta lejos de com- 
jilctar la historia de las perdidas que ba 
causado el tucgo a los Esi.idos Unidos en cl 
periiHlo de tienqm mcncionado. Un gran 
uumcro lie oir^w incendio? de mcnnr im]»irtati- 
cia. v tuci,'!!- de edit'i'-:' - iiidividnp.les ban 
aiuneina.di ' afin tra- ar 1- de-- 

lnu-e'''ne-, liasta tnu . m \- h-- 

ill 'as cr,ni|ianias lU- snyir in un trttal 

■ le i-nrilidas ncnrridas iii ]■ - i -;,idi)s Unidos 
por eiecti' de I's incendii's ,1, >_' V).000.000 en 
un SI.],, afio, I'l iuia perdida jmr tennino medio 
de So^o.iMK^ cada dia. 

l.as ]H'rdiilas ma-ii -naila- iiof el I'uego en 
]■•- I'stailos Unidiis annalmente entre 1870 y 
iS.'<ii i\]v lir Si «■>.( « » >.i n » ■ aiirnxiinadanientc ; 
iniri' i8S») V iS. , .i.ono.oiit"* ; y entre 

iSiiii ' }iiOO el ]Hi>nnii;ii anual flic de $150,- 
(BKiiKK). ( >. para mosirar m.is claramente lo 
cstupriiili) lie esta constante Sangria de los 
inmensos recursos del pais no tencmos que 
hacer mas que citar Ins guarismos de las 
perilidas causadas por el fuego tabulados por 



la Junta Nacional de las Companias de 
Seguros contra el Fuego. Durante los iiltimos 
veinte y cinco anos propiedades por valor de 
$3,500,000,000 han sido devoradas por ese 
podcroso elemcnto. Se puede tener mas clara 
idea de esc gran total, comparandolo con la 
deuda nacional de los Estados Unidos. la cual 
cuando llego a su mayor altura, el primero 
de Julio de 18O6, ascendia a un total de — 
$2,733.236,173— /• ^'- Reitag, Engineer 
Magacine. 



Las Estadones de las Cosechas del Mundo 

Ed tiempo de la siembra, el de la florecencia 
\ el dc la cosecha del fruto niarchan en inter- 
minable proccsion al rededor de nuestro globo. 
Sc esta cosecb;mdo en la tierra durante todo 
el ano. del mismo modo que cs siempre de dia 
en alguna parte y de noche en alguna otra 
])arte del mundo. 

Encro ve terminar las cosechas en la mayor 
parte dc los distritos de Australia y Nueva 
/elandia, mientras que cl pueblo de Chile y 
otriis paises de la parte meridional de Sud 
America esta empezando a recoger el fruto de 
sus trabajos. 

I'.l .\lto Egipto y la India cmpiezan y con- 
tinuan coscchando durante los meses de 
l-"ebrcro \ M.'irzn. 

F-'.u Abril ^e cxticnde el numero con las 
..Mcli.is de Siria, Cbipre, la costa de Egipto, 
Mexico, Cuba. Persia y el .•\sia Menor. 

In Mayo sc cosecha en el Asia Central, 
Persia, .\rgel, .Marruccos. el Sur de Texas 
j-lorida. ibina y cl JapiHi. 

junio trae las cosechas de California, 
« trei^i.n. el Sur de los Estados Unidos, Espana, 
]'■ rtii:,'.-d. Italia. Hnngria Rumania, Turquia, 
i,.s K,!:i,liis ,K1 Danubio, el Sur de Erancia, 
I in cia \ Sicilia. 

lulin \e las cosechas de Inglatcrra, Xe- 
lir.isia Suiza, Iowa. Minnesota, cl .Mto 
I aiiail.i, el Xorie de brancia, Meinania, 
\us!r;a \ I 'oliini;t. 

In \_;i.sj,, i-iintimian las cosechas en las 
l>las r.ritanicas, bVancia, Alcmania, I'.elgica, 
llolanda. Manitoba, cl r.,iio Canada. Dina- 
marca y Rusia. 

En Sci>tiemlin s^ ensirlKi m l-'.scocia, el Sur 
dc Succia y X'orncga, asi como en las frias 
lsla= d.l Mar del Xorte. 

< ktubrc cs el mes de cosechar A maiz en 
.\nicrica, y las verduras resistentes en el Norte 
de Suecia, Noruega e Irlanda. 

En Xoviembre se cmpicza a cosechar en el 
Sur del Africa. Tatagonia y cl Sur de Aus- 
tralia. 



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31 



• 



Retrancas de Vehiculo 

Hace diez y nueve afios que Morgan Potter, 
de Fishkill-on-Hudson, N. Y., U. S. A., hizo 
poner a cierto nt!imero de vehiculos sus re- 
trancas de resorte, las cuales estan aim rin- 
diendo un buen servicio, sin haber requerido 
durante ese tiempo ningunas reparacioones, 
exceptuando la usual renovacion de las zapatil- 
las de desgaste, y ocasionalmente nn nuevo 
resorte espiral. Algunas de csas retrancas 
han sobrevivido al vehiculo, a que se le puso 
primero, y servido para otro carreton. Mr. 
Potter ha tenido la buena suerte de ver sus 
bloques de retranca de resorte usados extensa- 
mente en todos los Estados Unidos, desde el 
Estado de Maine hasta el de California, y muy 
generalmente por casi todos los fabricantes 
de carruajes y carretones. Grandes cantidades 
de esos bloques de resorte se exportan tambien 
para Europa y otros paises extranjeros. in- 
cluycndo a Australia. Nueva Zelandia y las 
Islas Hawaii. 

Mr. Potter cree que las me j ores retrancas no 
son bastante buenas ni aun para los carretones 
mas baratos, y que toda retranca que no 
erfrene bien, en todo tiempo, ya este ligera 6 
pesadamcnte cargado el vehiculo, es mas que 
im'itil, y una perdida del dinero que ha costado. 
Durante todos esos diez y nueve afios, como 
fabricantc cxclusivo de esos bloques de re- 
tranca dc resorte. "Potter," ba considerado 
comn de primera inqjortancia la calidad, y 
solo matcrialcs de primera dasc cmplea para 
cada una de sus partes. 

La |)arte mecanica ha sido siempre del mas 
alto grado de cxcclcncia. y jamas ha ahorrado 
gasto alguno para procurarse la maquinaria 
mas perfecciona<la para ese trabajo especial. 
Muchas mcjoras se han hecho de cuando en 
cuando al bloque de retranca "Potter," origi- 
nal, v bov como antes no tienc esc articulo 
rival en cl mcrcado. Comprendiendo. sin 
embargo, la uccesidad i\c algo mcjor para cl 
conexion con los bliKpies dc resorte de Potter, 
ha pucsto recientcmentc en el mcrcado mia 
retranca de resorte ajtistable que se fabrica de 
varios estilos 6 pesos. I, a nueva retranca se 
somctii) diariamcnte el ano pasado a las mas 
duras pruebas y sc ha hallado que sirve en 
cualquiera contingcncia, y que es lo que hace 
mucho tiempo sc necesitaba. Se garantiza 
completamente cada una de esas retrancas. y 
con el mayor gusto se cuviara una muestra 
para ensayo a cualquiera persona rcsponsable 
que la solicite. Pronto se publicara nn mtevo 



catalogo que ilustrara la nueva retranca con 
sus varias partes ajustables, que contendra 
tambien toda la serie de los bloques de retranca 
de resorte, patente de Potter, que se fabrican 
hoy de varios estilos, y de catorce ttamanos 
adaptables a las llantas, bien sean de acero 6 
de caucho. Se puede obtener un ejemplar de 
este catalogo, dirigiendose a "Morgan Potter. 
Eishkill-on-Hudson. N. Y., U. S. A." 



minerales y platanos guineos. La baja mas 
inq)ortantc fue la del precio del azucar, que 
ascendio en 1906 a 60 millones de pesos; la 
del tabaco a 13^^ millones; la de los cigar ros 
y cigarrillos a 4 millones, la de los minerales 
dc hierro a 2 millones, y la de los bananos a 
nn millon de pesos. 



Nuestro Comercio Con Cuba 

El comercio de los Estados Unidos con Cuba 
duraiue el ultimo ano fiscal fue mayor que cl 
de ningun ano anterior de relaciones comcr- 
ciales entre esta Repiiblica y aquclla isla. 
Esto es particularmente verdad con respecto 
a nuestras cxportaciones. Nuestras importa- 
ciones de ariuella isla fueron ligeramente 
menores que en 1905, a causa de la baja en el 
precio dc los azucares ; pcro nuestras cxporta- 
ciones para esa isla fueron un 25 por cicnto 
mayores que en 1905 75 por ciento mayores 
jpie en KX>4. y 120 ix)r ciento mayores que 

en 1903. 

El aumento de nuestras cxportaciones para 

Cuba durante los ultimos pocos anos ha sido 

nuiy rapido. Nuestras cxportaciones para esa 

isla no llego munca a un valor de 20 millones 

dc pesos hasta 1893, ano en que ascendieron 

a 24 millones. En 1894 fueron 20 millones. 

Lut:-go, durante el pcriodo de la guerra, 

bajaron a 8 millones y un cuarto de millon; 

pero en ii>oo volvieron a pasar dc 20 millones: 

26 y medio millones de pesos durante aquel 

ano. En 1903, volvieron ii bajar a poco menos 

de 22 millones ; en 1904 subieron a 27 millones. 

en K)05 a 28 millones. y en n><><' a $47,- 

7(.3.('k^8. 

l-d atuncnto de im|K>rtaciones cs mucho 
menos notable. .\ntes dc l8<)5 las im- 
|Mirtacioues dc los Estados Unidos pro- 
cedentes de Cuh:\ Ibictuaron en lui periodo 
de 20 anos entre 50 v 75 millones de 
V en iS<)3 a "S millones. l-'.n I1M15 las inipor- 
taeiiinrs fueii>n ligeramente tuavorrs que en 
1874. babicndo llegado el tutjil <le nuestras 
importacioues proccilentes de Cidia en nio? "^ 
.SS(i, V)4.2V) I'll !'>'<'>. cl ano fiscal (|uc acaba 
dc tcrmiiiar, el valor de las importaciones de 
Cuba llego a uu tmal de $84,070,831, im ligero 
descenso iomi>aradas con las de 1905. 

Esta ligcria dimiuucion en el valor de 
nuestras iinportaeinnes ilr ])ri«cedeucia ctibana 
se dcbe unicatnente a la baja en cl precio del 
azucar, el tabaco, los cigarros, cigarrillos. 



Aumento del Comercio Extraniero 

El comercio de los Estados LTnidos con el 
cxtranjero ba crecido con mucho mayor 
rajiiilez (pie su poblacion durante la ultima 
dccada. Los complctos datos estadisticos pre- 
scntados por la Oficina de Estadisticas del 
Dcpartamcnto de Comercio y Trabajo nos 
enscfia que mientras la poblacion de esta Re- 
lii'iblica solo ha aumentado un 20 por ciento 
desde 1890, las importaciones han crecido en 
el mismo periodo de tiempo un 57 por ciento, 
y nuestras cxportaciones 109 por ciento. Las 
dases dc importaciones que mayor aumento 
ac\isan son las de manufacturas y materiales 
para nuestras manufacturas; su aumento es 
de 95 ix>r ciento. En las cxportaciones, per 
otra parte, las mayores ganancias han sido en • 
la cxportacion dc prodnctos agricolas y 
fahriUs, Los prodnctos agricolas exportados 
durante la ultima decada acusan un aumento 
de 70 por cicnto y las manufacturas de 163 
]X)r cictuo. 

Ed aumento ha sido en el comercio con todas 
las grandes divisiones del numdo, pero 
especialmcnte marcado en el comercio con el 
.Asia y la Oceania. Las imjMjrtaciones pro- 
cedcntcs de Europa acusan un aumento de 50 
I)or cicnto; las procedentes del Canada un 80 
por ciento; las de Sud America un 30 por 
ciento y las del Africa un 13 por ciento. 
Nuestras cxportaciones para Europa acusan 
un aumento de 78 por ciento ; para el Canada 
de 104 por cicnto; para Sud .\merica de 
107 poT citnito; para el Asia y la Oceania de 
_>32 por ciento, y para el Africa de 4» por 
ciento. 

Tambien ban (Kurrido alguims cambios 
notables en las rutas que ba seguido ese 
amncnto de trafico. Comparando las con- 
diciones de \'i^<'' cn las de 1806. los puertos 
del Atlautico :icusan un aumento de 329 
dc 42 millones en imix>rtaciones y de 110 en 
cxportaciones, y los puertos del Pacifico un 
aumento de 17 en importaciones, y de 57 
millones eu cxjiortaciones ; la frontera del 
norte > lo> puertos de los Lafeos un aumento 
dc 42 millones en importaciones y de no 
cxportaciones; mientras que los puertos in- 
teriores tm aumento de 9 millones en importa- 
ciones. 



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23 



La Exposicion Internacionekl de la 
Nueva Zelandia 

La exposiridn Iiiteniacional de la Nueva 
Zclatulia. (|ik- ^c altrira en Christchurch 
el I dc Ni)vitnil)R' de m;<>ii y contimiara hasta 
el 15 dc Aliril dc n»<)7, adcnias vie scr ttna 
excelentc dcnu)straci<in cii K^'indc escala dc 
las grandcs iiidu-^nias y rocnrsos de csa 
colonia: sii'^ cxplotaciuii dc ininas de oro 
y de cartwin dc piedra sus graiides ascrradcros 
de maderas, sus cstahlccimicntos de rcfrigera- 
cion y conjiclamiciito dc carnes, sus fabricas 
de lana, etc.. ten<lra muchas cosas de especial 
interes para los visitadorcs de otros paiscs. 
Entrc estas se hallaran hcrmosos patios que 
ilustran la singular historia natural dc Nueva 
Zelandia. cl gran acuarium del Dcnartamcnto 
maritino. la csi)lcndida exhibicion que presenta 
el (jobierno consistente en minerales de los 
cualcs ningun pais cs tan ric<i, el helecbal. 
conipucsto flc jardines con cjcmplares de los 
muchisinios bermosos hclcchos quQ dan fama 
& Nueva Zelandia, las galerias dc artes, en 
que se ilustran 1<>> niaravillosamcnte bellos 
paisajes de la colonia. y contiencn un modelo 
mecanico en operacion de la tierra de los 
geisers, con geisers tipicos 6 manantialcs 
arrojan<lo agua hirviendo, y los fumarolos 6 
agujeros arrojando vapores volcanicos de la 
zona termal de la Rotorna. 

Realizauflo el interes que se toma en cl 
mundo . Niciior por tmlo lo que concicrnc a 
la raza Maori, el Gobierno de la colonia ba 
hecbo arreglos para ofrcccr una exbibicion 
tan completa como sea posible, de la pintoresca 
vida, las pcculiarcs artcs, cercmonias y divrr 
siones y la antigua gloria militar dc los habi- 
tantes indigenas dc Nueva Zelandia. Con 
estc objiii. -i i^ta onstruyendo un pueblccito 
• rwJeado por luia empalizada que contiene un 
area de varios "acres" de tierra. semejante a los 
que habitaban las tribus Maoris en sus ticmpos 
primitives/ Esta en los mismos terrcnos clc 
la i:xi)osici6n. !*.m- ].ucblecito sera ocnpado 
por familias Maori> dc la Tsla del Norte, 
incluyendo un numero de gentcs del fanioso 
pais Irewera. que es el ultimo asilo del saber. 
artcs y costumbrcs .kl licmpo vicjo de los 
Maoris. El pueblccito con sus altas murallas 
de empaizado, sus gigantcscas entalladas 
figuras. sus habitaciones curiosamente decora- 
das, sus entalladas tiendas de comestibles, sus 
homos de barro, etc., seran una completa 
reproduccion de los hogarcs de los antiguos 
Maoris, v en su recinto se hallara un modelo 



en gran escala de los antiguos fuertes en col- 
lados, con sus obras de defensa. platafornia 
anuirallada, ciudadela y atalya. En cl pue- 
blccito se hallara a los Maoris ataviados con 
sus vcstidos dc canamo, ocupados en cl 
cjcrcicio dc las artes y pasatiempos de sus 
anlcctsorcs, tcjien<lo la ropa de canamo, y 
pctatcs y canastos, csculpicndo figuras y arma« 
<lc madera, cortando y polimentando el "po- 
manui" o piedra vcrde, la piedra joya de la 
Edad dc ricdra. 1mi un i)cqucno lago con- 
tigui> babra una tlotilla dc canoas, incluyendo 
tumlclos de la imponentemcnte decorada 
"waka-taua" 6 canoa de guerra. 

Adcmas de las exhibicioncs hechas por los 
residentes del pueblccito. babra bailes gucrre- 
ros v otras reprcsentacioncs o funciones dadas 
por numcrf)sas partidas visitadora*; dc las 
dit'ercntcs tribus <le la Isla <lcl Norlc. Estas 
se daran en la vasta arena del panpic destinaila 
a los sports y ofreceran ima de las itltimas 
oportunidades de |)rescnciar los excitantes 
espectaculos gucrreros dc i -1 t cclcbrc y aguer- 
rida raza. I'articularnuntc intcrcsantc para 
los etnologistas ser.-i la prescncia <lc los poros 
supervivienles de pura sangre rpie quedan del 
pueblo Maori. l<>s en un tiemj)© numerosos 
aborigcnes ilc las Islas Chatham los cuales se 
llevaran a la Exposicion y residiran en el 
nativo pueblccito. 

No solo el pueblo Maori Estara bien repre- 
-cntada, sino que tambicn cierto numero de 
siis primos polinesios. los islenns del grupo dc 
Cook e islas adyaccntcs <kl Cran Mar del Snr 
pertenecientes hoy .i la n" i-'ilirciiiu ilr X\i< \a 
Zelandia. nctiparan un tipicu pueblccito con 
todo'- los .icccsorios fjiu' ilustren su vida \ su*- 
hogarcs tropicaces. l.lcvaran ronsigo su> 
canf>a^ v exhibiran su^ .K:npaci'»ncs. cere 
rtionias v fcstivadadcs 

I. OS visitadorcs de csa Exposicion no sola- 
nicnte gozar.an de una rcsidencia vcraniega 
en nna sana v bcUisma ciudad, sino que pmlran 
vcr las ],nnci]ialcs maravillas y lugarcs dc 
ncKo dc la Colonia a poca costa Se reducin'i 
cl precio <lc los pasajes en bu(pic< costeros y 
ferro-carrilcs de pasajeros. y tanto ;'t estos 
como a los vapores se ban becho conccsioncs 
para que puedan vtajar de ida y vuelta a todas 
partes de csas islas. Se proveera toda clase 
de facilidades a los visitadorcs, no solo para 
asistir a las exhibicioncs de la Exposicion. 
sino para visitar la maravillosa region de la 
Rotorna Gcyserland, el gran Distrito Alpino 
fie la Isla del Sur, los bellisimos lagos del Sur, 



los sorprendente fiords del Parque Nacional 
de Eiordland, la costa occidental con sus lagos 
y sclvas y sus grandcs ventisqueros y otros 
ninncrosos distritos de sublimes paisajes de la 
(.'oloiiia. 



La Fuerza del Terrem6to 

El terremoto de San Erancisco se sintio en 
la China. En el observatorio de Zika-wei, 
en Shanghai, se registro aqitel terrible terre- 
moto en los seismografos. Los choques 
fueron bastante fuertes alii, y duraron mas 
de luia hora y treinta y cuatro minutos. IvOS 
primcros transmitidos por la masa de nuestro 
glolx) empezaron a las 9 y 35 minutos de la 
n.Khe. la bora de la costa de la China. Las 
primcras grandcs oleadas se propagaron a lo 
largo de la costa en un arco de circulo mayor y 
fueron sentidos a las 9.55.57. Las uUimas 
vibracioncs de amplitud desccndcnte dejo sus 
vestigios a las 10.31.35 de la noche. y los 
ultimos ligeros movimiemlos <le la tierra 
expiraron a las 10.31.35 <le la noche, y los 
ultimos ligeros movimiemlos de la tierra 
cxpiraron a las 11.09.44 del 18 <le Abril. Esos 
rcgistros prometen ser datos muy valiosos 
para determinar la vclocidad <le la propagacion 
de las ondnlaciones sai.smiticas conecting them 
con las obscrvaciones de la bora exacta hasta 
un segiindo de la ocurrcncia en San Francisco. 



Abisinia 

La parte mas interesante del Continente 
mgro es Abisinia. Alii las bestias del campo 
V las flores de los firados desde la region medi- 
t.rranca se encuentran con el Africa tropical. 
\lli las monhatias coronadas de nicve reticnen 
la cabra silvestrc- ; alii bay tambien un |)erro 
anonialo pectdiar v en las ticrras bajas del 
i«st, lui oso salvaje Varios de los ciervos 
s <los o ties 1 species de moiios son originarios 
(1. \l(i<itiia, .isi como numerosos pajaros runos 
mantos peces, dos 6 tres reptiles y un gran 
numero de plantas. Sus razas humanas son 
(Ic varios tipos y de muy diversas proceden- 
lias. !|ue liablan diferentes Icnguas, algunas 
(k ellas que aun no han sido clasificadas. En 
rl extremo sudoeste hay tipos de la raza negra 
V en el sudcste y el sur de la hermosa raza 
Cala-hamitic 6 Somala. En el norte se hallan 
lf»s de las razas Hamitic y Semita y restos dc 
los antiguos gricgos 6 colonias egipcias, asi 
como judios de color atesado cuyo origen 
parecc rcmontarse a la epoca que precedi6 4 
la destrucci6n de Jerusalen. La historia de 
Abisinia se remonta a mil anos antes de la 
Era Cristiana. 




I 



Export Implement Age 

MUR FUR'a AUILAND IKSTIMMT. 

Bin anabbilneises Blati, das ausschliesislich d«m F.xpoithandcl 

in iBiidwiitschaltllclicn Masi lilm-ii, I'umpcn, VVind- 

motoren unil samnitlichrn Artikein der Laiid- 

und MilchwirtKhaUKCwidmet lit. 



AaONNKMKNTS-PRBIS : 

FOr cin Jahr, porto(rel ... 



Wt.A-tS 



Gclder kAnnen per Tratteauf New York oder durch Inter- 
nationaie PoaUnweiiung uberiandt werden. 

WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISMEKS 

1010 Arch Street, 

Philadelphia, Pa., Varalalgt* StaaUa von Nord'Amarika. 

Ton deractben VerUcMntUtt werden ferner herauuBCfrhen' 

"Th« Implemral Age fhe American Fertilixrr " "The 

Carriage Monthly" und "The Vehicle Dealer." 

Verlaguccht (copyright) von Ware Broa. Co., 1906. 



Band XV. PblUdelphIa, Terelnigte SUatco, Nov. 1906. lio, • 



Ini Pirmenverzeichnis fUr Kiufer das im eraten 
Thell dieses Blattes wiedergeseben ist, werden 
unscre geebrten Leser die betreffenden Waaren* 
•rtikel In deutscher Sprache wicdergeseben 
flnden. Es geschleht dies um Ihnen die Mog- 
llchkelt zu Kel>en, mit unseren Inserenten ieichter 
korrespondlren zu kdnnen. 



Der Thatsache ungeachtet, dass das V'erlan- 
gen nach Earmarlx'itern jahrlich in .\nierika 
grosser wird, proiluziren amerikanische Land- 
wirthe nichtsdestoweniger mehr und niehr in 
jedem Jahre. Und die .\rbeit wird vermittelst 
in Amerika gcbauter Maschinen hergestcUt. 



Jeder unserer Inserenten ist gcrne erlwjtig 
Kataloge und Cirkulare an event. Kaufer zu 
senden, soUten diesclljen sich mit ihrcn 
verschiedenen Fabrikationcn vertraut zu 
nnchen wiinschcn oder andcrc Mitteilung vcr- 
langen. In der Weise kann viel we rt voile 
Information erhalten werden, nicht allein mit 
Bezugnahnie auf «lie nicKlernsten und besten 
Maschinengattungen, auch geschiiftlichc 
Anrcgung Hesse sich hierduch ins I.,eben rtifcn 
welchc sich von jahrelangcr Dauer erwei.seii 
und finanziellen Profit verursachen diirfte. 



I "I 
I V \ 



.\lle Inserenten des "Export Imimemk.nt 
Acr" sind Besitzer wohlbekannter F;xpf)rt- 
geschjifte. Briefschaften kdnnen deshalb in 
jeder Sprache an sie gerichtet werden. Anfra- 
gen sowohl als Bestellungen mit welchen 
dieselben betraut werden, erhalten prompte 
Erledigung. Es ist. jedoch. wichtig, dass 
event. Anfragcn Ix'stimnit und klar mit 
Beztig auf das Gewiinschte gestellt werden, 
denn durch solche Vorsicht kann viel Zcit 
und VerdruBS erspurt bleiben. 



Unterricht in Arbitration 

In einer kiirzlich gehaltenen Ansprache 
befiirwortete Hcrr 11. 1'. Faunce. Trasidcut 
der Brown Universitiit, eine der reprasenta- 
tiven Ivchranstalten .Anierika's, <Ien systema- 
tischcn Unterricht in den C.rundsiitzen der 
.\rbitrafion in Geschafts- und internationalen 
.\ngelegeidieiten, in <lcii \dlksscbulen, Priisi- 
dent l'*aunce sagte : 

"Keinc grosse llewegung ist permanent, 
bis sic auf <lie Basis des I'nterrichts gcslellt 
ist. Wa.s immer durch <lic Schulen in ileii 
Volk.ssinn cimlringt, dringt als Sonnenscliein 
und Regcn in die Fa.scrn der Eiche. Eine, 
die ganze Welt beriihrcnde Bewcgung ict 
gegcnwartig im Ciangc, cine Bewegung welche 
nicht <lie Reformation der mcnschlichcn 
N'atur, n<x'h die Auflosung sammtlichcr 
;\micen und Elotten liezweckt, scjndcrn ein- 
fach die Einfiihrung Ix'sserer Mittel, als <len 
Krieg zur Bcilegung der Streitigkciten, welchc 
unvenneidlich sind, so lange cs Nationcn gibt. 

Grosse Resultate sind bereits erzielt worden. 
Arbitration hat in der Mehrzahl der Eiillc 
<lie Stelle von Krieg cingcnommen. Im Falle 
von internationalen Streitigkeileii ist Krieg 
jclzt die Ausnahinc, nicht die Rcgel. Es ist 
nicht richtig, dass man sich "in Ericdenszeit 
auf Krieg vorljereite," sondern vielmchr, dass 
wir uns in Friedenszciten darauf vorliereiten, 
dai Krieg unmoglich zu machen. 

In der gaiizcn Welt kommt man immer 
mehr zu der ICrkenntniss der Wi<lersinnigkeit 
und der .\utzlosigkeit des Krieges. Wir sind 
zu der Einsicht gelangt, dass das gleichzeitige 
Abschicsscn von Pistolen auf fiinfzig Schritt 
Distanz ebcnsowcnig dazu angethan ist, 
Gercchtigkeit zu iichaffen, wie «la» Aufwerfen 
von Pennies o<lcr das Wiirfelspel. 

"Als der Duellant absurd wurde. war das 
Dtiell todt. Zweifellos naht die Zeit heran, 
in welcher das inteniationale Duell, angesichts 
internationaler Meinung, als eine durchaus 
stupide Manicr zur Beilegung von Differenzcn 
erscheinen wird. 

"Wa-s konncn wir in den ofTcntlichen 
Schulen Ihun? Wir konnen das verniinftige 
Prinzip einflossen, dass verniinftige Manner, 
wenn sie DifTeretizen haben, an die Vernunft 
un<l nicht an die (iewalt eppelliren soUten. 
Unscre .Schuljugend thut dies l)ereitB in ihren 
athletischen Spielen. Sie ist <laran gewohnt. 
die Entscheidungen der LTnparteiischen ohne 
Murren und Norgein zu acceptiren. Da» 



atliletische Feld bildet eine dirckte Schule fur 
.\rbitration in grossvm Masstnbe. 

"Wir konnen in unsern Schulen lehrcn, dasi 
der Friede seine Siege hat, nicht weniger 
glanzend als der Krieg. Wir lernen, eine 
ueiif An Heroi.snnts zu riihmcn — den Herois- 
iiuis der Manner und I'Vauen, welche ihr 
Lelun ilcr llcbuiig iler .si>cialen Zustiiiule im 
llerzen unserer Grossstjidte widinen. Diescr 
iieuore I leroismus muss in unsern Volkschulen 
gelehrt werden, 

"Wir konnen das Gefuhl der Zusammeg- 
gehiirigkeit, der Hruderschaft der Menschen 
in jeder Klasse unserer Schulen, in jedem 
l^hrfache einflos.sen, Wir konen zcigen, dass 
Rasscnhass grundlos und brutal i.st. Jedc 
eiiizelne der verschiedenen Rassen tragt ihr 
eigenes Theilchcn zur Civilisation bei. Die 
letzte Rede von John Hay war ein Appell ftir 
diesen Ciesicbtspunkf ; ftir ernstliches Bestre- 
Im'ii seitens aller Manner und Frauen in 
verantwortlichen Stelhuigen das Schieds- 
gerichtsvarfaliren als einen Ersatp lyr de» 
Krieg zu Infiirvvorten," 



Das Schwanken industrlell«r 
Konditionen 

Die Veranderuiigen welche auf deni Gebiete 
des Industriereiches der Welt stattfinden sind 
wohl kaum weniger interessant als das 
Schwanken anf deni Gebiete das nach politi- 
scher Wellherrschaft sirebt. Wiihrend sie im 
Fortschritt begriffen sin<l, sind diese Zustiinde 
weniger ersichtlicb. doch crscheine»i sie aus- 
nahmswrisc m;ichtigcr, wenn man sie nach 
finer langverstrichenen Zeitperiode wieder 
einnial in Augcnschcin nimmt. In ebendieser 
Besiehung hat ein Statistiker des Handelsund 
Arboitsniinisteriunis gar interessante I)ct» 
zussammengestcllt. 

Noch vor fiinfundzwanzig Jahrcn war F,ng- 
lands Ilerrschaft in der Eisen- und Baum- 
wollenfabrikation nnbestritten. Ileute aber 
hat die amerikanische Eisenproduktion die der 
brttischen weit iiberschritten. Belgische Fab- 
rikanten untcrkaufen den englischen in der 
Struktureisen Branche. Dcutschland hat sich 
als ganz l)edcutender Konkurrent Englands ii» 
der Herstellung von Eiscn und Stahl entwick- 
elt. Seine SchifTswerften nehmen Kontrakt 
nach Krmtrakt von den SchifTsbauem Clyde's 
und I Wl fast's weg, ja die grossten in den letz- 
ten paar Jahren gebauten Schiflfe kommen aus 
deutschcn Schiflfsbauwerften. 



HigMC •! Tavor de Mencionar el Nombrc de eite Peri6dico Cuando se Conteste ^ lot Anundot. 



Et wfod gebeten, sich bei eveatueller BMniwoHttttg in dNMm Blatte enthaltcner AnsdgM auf atete ZeitKhrift 



BuwolUa. 



22 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



23 



La Exposicion Internacional de la 
Nueva Zelandia 

I.a i'Xi»i-;iM!i 111!' rnaciiMiril dc la Nucva 

Zclaiidia. i|m- -«' il'iira en Cliristclinrcli 

cl I <le Xiivuniltn -Ir I'K'i' y cnntinuara liasla 

fl 15 (U; AlHi! 'k' i</"7. ailcMiias Ac -( r una 

excckuli .Kni(.-iraci..n vn ^rando cscala (k- 

las i^ranik- iiidn'^ina^ \ n'ourso^ di- i-sa 

cnli.nia: -n- < \pl, ii.k'i.'.ii <\c niinas (k' ofM 

V do carlii'm 'k- j.irdra -ti- .L;randc^ asi-rraik^ro-^ 

lit- niaikra-. mi~ rMaM.'ciinit.nt(i> dc rcfri^cra- 

cii'in V ci'ir^ilamii'Mti. <W carnes. sU'^ fakricas 

dc lana, cU-. tcndra nnKdia- c<)sas dc e^)iccial 

intcrcs para )'•- vi-uad-rc- iW (ilm-^ |)aisc?. 

Entrc c^I.'i- sc liallarati licrninsu^ |. alios que 

ilu>tran la -ini^ular ki-tnria natural dc N'licva 

Zelandia. < 



■ran acuarium del nc;'artamcnto 



maritino. ! 1 < -jik iidida cxIiihici.Mi unc jircscnta 
cl (luhicniM CMti-i-iintc en inincralcs dc los 
cualcs nin-un pai- c.-^ lan ric ., cl hclcchal. 
compiu'str. .Ic iar.lincs con cjcniiilarcs <lc lo'^ 
mucliisini.- in rninMis lu k.chos r|nt; dan fama 
a Xucva Zelandia. la- -alenas dc artcs. en 
que sc ilnstran ]"- niaravil!.».iniente hcllos; 
paisajc- de la c 'l-nia. v CMnlienen nn nvulcl.t 
mccanici. en ..iTraeinn de la lierra dc los 
tjeisers. i-mi uei'-n- lipiens 11 luanantialcs 
arrojan.l- a-na liirviendo, y Ins tumarolos n 
agujeni- arrojandii vapi>re> volcanicns dc la 
zona tcrinal dc la Rotorna. 

Realizan.l.. cl intcrcs que sc tonia en cl 
munik- exteri-r |Mtr todo lo que cnncicrnc a 
la raza Maori, el C.ohicrno dc la colonia ha 
hcclio arrcglos para ofrcccr una exhihicion 
tan completa como sea posible. dc la pintoresca 
vida, las pccnliarcs artcs, cereinonias y diver 
sioncs y la anti^ua i^doria inilitar dc los hal>i- 
tantci indiijena- de Xucva Zelandia. Con 
estc i>1>iet>. se e-ia ,;. .n-truvcndo nn pnchlccito 
■ rodeade, p,.r una eniiiali/a.la que conticnc nn 
arca.lcvari.--acrc-"dc lierra. scmejanle a l<>s 
que lial.ital.an las trilnis Maoris en sns ticnip<- 
priniiti\"-. k'-'a en b - niisnius tcrrcnns de 
la I'.\posioi<')n. l'.-<- laiehkcitu sera nciq>;tdi> 
pr,r lamilias Maoris dr I:i Isla del Xe,rtc, 
inclnvcndo tni lumicro de uento del tani>.>(i 
pais Ircwera, ipie e. el uliun.. asilo del saber. 
art<- V cMuml.K- del licinpo vicjo dc lus 
Maoris, l-'.l j.ucblccitn ron sus alias niurallas 
de cmpaizado, sus oi-antcscas entalladas 
figuras. sus habitacioiics curiosanientc decora- 
das, sus entalladas tiendas de comestibles, sus 
homos de barro. etc., seran una completa 
reproduccion fie los hogarcs de los antipfuos 
Maoris, v en su recinto sc hallara nn mixlelo 



m '^r.m cscala <lc los antijjuos tucrtes en col- 
la(k)s, con sus obras de defeusa. plataforma 
.imurallada. ciudadela y atalya, Kn el pue- 
blccito sc ballara a los Maoris alaviados con 
stis vesti(k>s <lc cafiamo. (K'upados en cl 
iqercicii) de las artcs \ pasatiempos dc sus 
.anleeisnres. tcjicndo la ropa de canamo, y 
petates y canasto-, ( seulpiendc) fii,niras y annas 
• le niadcra, cortando y polimentando el "po- 
nianui" (t piedra verde. l;i picdra joya de la 
I-al.id de I'icdra. k'.n tui jnqncno lai^o con- 
lii;no liakra una llolilla dc caiinas. incluycndo 
niodeliiv de la imponentcniente ilec^rada 
"w .ika-taua o canoa dc L;uerra. 

Adcni.'is dc las exliihicinnes lucbas jxir lo- 
residciUcs del pucblecilo. liakra krnk- -turre 
IKS V r)tr,i> representacioncs n luncione< dada- 
pdi nninenis.is ji.irtidas visitadoras lie la- 
<Iil'erentes tribns de la Jsla del Xnrie k'.sta- 
-e daraii en la vast.i anna del pan|uc dcsiinada 
a Ins -port- \ .'iriceran inia de las ultimas 
n|Kirtnnidadcs de prcscnciar 1"- cxcitantcs 
cspectaculiis yncrreroR clc e-M eek hrc y a.^ucr- 
rida r.i/a. I'articularinentc interesante para 
1,1- etnolDL^istas sera la ]iresenci:i dc los poro- 
-iijiervivienies .ic |nira -aii'^re (|uc <|ucdan de! 
puekl<i Ma'Ti. 1"- en t\n lienipo nunu m-os 
aboriircnes de la- l-ki- (batham los cnales se 
llcvaran a la k'.xii'.-ieioii v residiran en el 
iiativo pueblccitfi. 

Xi. solo d pueblo .M,i..ri I*,s|;ira bien rejire 
-cntada. sino (jue tanibien cicrlo miniero de 
-us primos polinesios. los islefios del fjrupo de 
(nnU c islas adyaoentes del Gran Mar <lel Sur 
pertenccientes ho\ a i.i luii-iluiion ik \'iu\a 
Zelandia, ociiparan in\ ti]>ii-o pncblceiio eon 
todos los acce.sorjos qnc ilu^lrct) sn vida \ s\is 
1io<,rares trupicaces. l.kvaran e<>nsi'.:i. sn> 
eano;i- \ exbibiran -n- ■ .eup;iei>>ncs, cere 
nionia- \ lestivadaiks 

I.o- visitadorcs dc e-a l-.xposicion no s,,l.i 
nunle -o/ar.in ile una residcncia vcranieija 
en una -ana v bcliisni;i cindad, -nio ipie poilr.m 
\er 1.1- )iruicii>a!cs inaravilla- y lui:arcs dc 
recree. ilc la C'olonia a poea oeista Sc reducira 
el prccio dc los pa-ajc- en bnques costeros y 
fcrro-carriles dc pasajcrci-. y lanio a c^tos 
)ino a los vaixircs sc ban hccho concesiones 
ara que pucdan viajar de ida y vuclta a toda« 
partes de csas islas. ?e provcera toda clase 
dc f.icilidades a los visitailores, no solo para 
asistir a las exhibiciones de la Kxposicion. 
sino para visilar la maravillosa region de la 
Rotorua (kyserland, el tjran Distrito Alpine 
de la Isla del Sur. los bellisimos lagos del Sur, 



los sorprendente fiords del Parque Nacional 
de I-'iordland, la costa occidental con sus lagos 
y sclvas y sus grandes ventisqueros y otros 
inmierosos distritos dc sublimes paisajes de la 

(. 'ilonia. 



La Fuerza del Terremoto 

l-:i terremoto de San Francisco se sintio en 
la ebina. Hn el observatorio de Zika-wei, 
en Shangbai, se rcL,dstn') aquel terrible terre- 
moto en los seismografos. Los cheques 
I'ueron bastante fuertcs alii, y duraron mas 
de >uia bora y treinta y cuatro minutos. I^s 
prnneros transmilidos por la masa de nuestro 
-IoIki empezaron a las 9 y 35 minutos .le la 
n.H-bc, la bora de la costa dc la China. Las 
prinicras grandes oleadas se propagaron a lo 
laruo de la costa en un arco de circulo mayor y 
mer.>n scntidos a las 9.55.57. Las ultimas 
vibraciones dc amplitud descendcnte dejo sus 
vcstigios a las 10.31.35 de la noche, y los 
ultimos ligeros movimiemlos dc la tierra 
expiraron a las 10.31.35 de la noche, y los 
nliinio- li^cros movimiemlos dc la tierra 
, xpn-,iron a las il.o<>.44 del iS de .\.bril. Rso* 
■e-istros promcteii -or daio- nniy valiosos 
].ara determinar la vclocidad dc la propag.acion 
dc las ondulaciones saismiticas conecting them 
c<in las observaciones de la bora exacta hasta 
nn scgundo de la octirrencia en San Francisco. 



CD 

U.l 



Abisinia 

La parte mas interesante <lel Continente 
nei^ro es Abisinia. Alii las bestias del campo 
V las tlores de los prados desde la region medi- 
terranea se encucntran eon cl Africa tropical. 
\lli las monhaiias coronadas de nieve retienen 
la eabr.i silvestre ; alii hay tambien un perro 
.uioni.do peculiar v en las ticrras bajas vlel 
iK-ii nn 0-0 salvaje. X'arios de los ciervos 
\ ,1,,- ,, tK- is])ccies dc monos son originarios 
lie Nkisinia. .isi conio mnnerosos pajaros runos 
enantos pcccs, ilos 6 trcs reptiles y un gran 
ininicro de plantas, Sus razas bumanas son 
de varios tipos y dc muy diversas proceden- 
iias. (pic bablan diferentcs lenguas, algnnas 
de ellas que aun no ban sido clasificadas. En 
il extreme sudoeste hay tipos de la raza negra 
\ en el "iudeste y cl sur de la hermosa raza 
Cal.'i-hamitir 6 Somala F.n el norte se hallan 
los de las razas Hamitic y Semita y restos de 
los antiguos grieges 6 colonias egipcias, asi 
como judios de color atesado cuyo origen 
parccc rcmontarse a la epoca que precedi6 a 
la dcstniccion de Jerusalen. La historia de 
Abisinia se remonta a mil anos antes de la 
Era Cristiana. 




I \U 



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NUR FUR'S AUSLAND BESTIMMT. 

Bin onabhangiges Blatt, das ausschliesslich dem Rxporthandel 

in laiidwirtschaftlichen Maschiin'ii, I'imipen, VViiid- 

motoren und sammtlichen Artikclti dc-r Laiid- 

und Milchwinschaft gewidmet ist. 



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Gelder konnen per Tratteauf New York oder durch intcr- 
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Von derselben V'erlagsaostalt werden ferner heraiisgegebeti' 

"The Implement Age" •■ rhe American Hertilixer " "The 

Carriage Monthly" und "The Vehicle Dealei." 

Verlagsrecht (copyright) von Ware Broa. Co., i<^. 



Band XV. Philadelphia, Vereinigte Staaten, Nov. 1906. Nn 1 



Im Firmenverzeichnis fiir Kiiufer das im ersten 
Theil dieses Blattes wiedergegeben ist, werden 
unsere geehrten Leser die betreffenden Waaren- 
•rtikel in deutscher Spractie wiedergegeben 
flnden. Es geschleht dies um ilinen die Mog- 
llchkeit zu geben, mit unseren Inserenten leichter 
korrespondiren zu konnen. 



Der Thatsache ungcachtet, dass das \'erlan- 
gen nach Farmarbeilern jahrlicb in Amerika 
grosser wird, produziren amerikanische Land- 
wirthe nicbtsdestoueniger mehr und mebr in 
jcdem Jahre. I nd die .\rbcit wird vermittelst 
in Amerika gebauter Maschinen hcrgestellt. 



Jeder unserer Inserenten ist tjeriie erbolig 
Kataloge und Cirkularc an event. Kiiufer zu 
senden, sollten ilicsell)en sich mit ihren 
vcrschicflenen Fabrikatiotien vcrtraut zu 
machen wiinschen «xler andere Mitteilung ver- 
langen. In der W'cisc kann viel wertvolle 
Infonnation erhalten werden, nicht allein mit 
Bezugnahme auf die imxlernstcn und besten 
Maschinengattungen. auch geschaftliche 
Anregung liesse sich bicrduch ins Leben rnfen 
welchc sich von jahrelanger Dauer crweiscn 
und finanziellen Profit vcrursachen diirfte. 



.Nile Inserenten dcs "Export ImplEmKnt 
Ar.F," sind Resitzer wohlbekannter Export- 
geschafte. Brief schaf ten konnen deshalb in 
jeder Sprache an sie gerichtet werden. Anfra- 
gen sowohl als Bestellungen mit wclchen 
dieselben betraut werden. erhalten promptc 
Erlcdigung. I'.s ist. icdf>ch. wichtig, dass 
event, Anfragcn iHstiinnit und klar mit 
Bezug auf das C.ewunschte gestellt werden, 
denn durch solche Vorsicht kann viel Zeit 
und X'erdruss erspart bleiben. 



Unterricht in Arbitration 

In ciner kiirzlich gehaltenen .Ansprachc 
befiirwortete Ilerr IL I'. Faunce, Prasident 
der r.rovvn I'niversitat, eine der reprasenta- 
tiven I^'hranstalten Amerika's, den systema- 
tischen I'nterricht in den (irundsiitzen der 
Arbitration in (jcscbafts- und intcrnationalcn 
Angelegenheiten, in den \olksschulcn. IVJisi- 
dcnt Faunce sajjtc : 

"Ixeinc c;ri)ssc ISewegung ist permanent, 
bis sic auf die liasis des Unterrichls gestellt 
ist. Was immcr durch die Schulen in den 
\ olkssinn cindringt, dringt als Sonnenschein 
und Rcgcn in die Fascrn der Eiche. Eine. 
die ganzc Welt beriihrende Bewegung ist 
gegenvviirtig im (jange, eine Bewegung wclche 
niclit die Reformation der menschlichen 
Xatur, noch ilie AufUisung sammtlicher 
Armeen und Motten l>ezweckt, sondcrn ein- 
fach die I'.infiihrung besserer Mittel, als den 
Krieg znr Ueilegung der Streitigkeiten. welche 
unvermcidlich sind, so lange es Xationen gibt. 
Grosse Resultate sind bereits crziclt worden. 
Arbitration hat in der Mehrzabl der Fiille 
die Stclle von Krieg eingenomnun. Im Falle 
von internationalcn StreitiKkcitcn ist Krieg 
jctzt die Ausnahine, nicht die Kegel. Es ist 
nicht richtig, ilass man sich "in I'rietlenszeit 
auf Krieg vorbereite," sondern viclmchr, dass 
wir uns in Friedcnszeiten darauf vorbereiten, 
<len Krieg unnioglich zu machen. 

In iler ganzen Welt kommt man immer 
mehr zu der Erkenntniss der \Vi«lersinnigkeit 
und der Xutzlosigkeit des Kricges. Wir sind 
zu der Einsicbt gelangt, dass das gleichzeitige 
,\bschicssen von Pistolen auf fiinfzig Schritt 
Distanz el)cnsowenig dazu angethan ist. 
C.ereehtigkeit zu schaflfen, wie das Antwcrfen 
von I'ennies o<Icr das Wiirfelspel. 

"Als ficr Duellant absurd wunk. w.ir das 
Duell todt. Zweifellos naht die Zeit heran, 
in welcher das internationale Duell, angesichts 
internal i< dialer .Meinnng. als eine durehaus 
stupide Manier zur l?eilegung von Diflferenzen 
erscheinen wird. 

"Was konnen wir in den otTentlichen 
Schulen thnn!' Wir k«Snnen das vcmiinftige 
I'rinzip einllossen, dass verniinftige Manner. 
wcnn sic DilTerenzen haben, an die V'ernunft 
uikI nicht an die Gewalt eppelliren sollten. 
I'nscre Schuljugend thut dies bereits in ihren 
atbletischen Spielen. Sie ist daran gewohnt. 
die P'ntscbeidungen der Lnparteiischen ohne 
.Murreii und Xorgeln zu acceptiren. Das 



atbletische Feld bildet cine direkte Schule fiir 
Arbitration in grossem Masstabe. 

"Wir konnen in unsern Schulen lehren, dass 
der l-'riedc seine Siege hat, nicht weniger 
glanzend als der Krieg. Wir Icrncn, eine 
ncnc Art Ileroismns zu riihmcn — den Herois- 
nius der Mjinncr und b'raueii, welche ihr 
Lcbcn der Ilcbung der socialen Zustiinde im 
llerzen unserer Grossstadte widmen. Dieser 
neuere lleroismus muss in unsern Volkschulcn 
gelehrt werden. 

"Wir konnen das Gefiibl der Zusammeg- 
geluirigkeit. der I'.rutlerschaft der Menschen 
in jeder Klasse unserer Schulen, in jedem 
Lchrfache einflossen. Wir konen zeigen, dass 
Rasscnhass grundlos und brutal ist. Jede 
oinzelne der verschiedcnen Rassen triigt ihr 
cigcnes Theilchen zur Civilisation bei. Die 
letztc Rcdc voii John Hay war ein Appcll fur 
<Iiescn (k'sichtspunkt ; fiir efnstliches Bestre- 
bm seitcns aller Manner und Frauen in 
verantwortliehen Stellungen das Schieds- 
gerichtsvarfahren als einen Ersatz fiir 
Krieg zu befijrworten." 



Das Schwanken industrieller 
Konditionen 

Die \'eranderungen welche auf dem Gebiete 
des Industriereiches der Welt .stattfinden sind 
wohl kaum weniger interessant als das 
Schwanken auf dem Gebiete das nach politi- 
scher Weltherrschaft strebt. Wahrend sie im 
P'^ortschritt begrifTen sind. sind diesc Zustiinde 
weniger crsichtlich. doch erscheinen sie aus- 
nabmsweise machtiger, wenn man sie nach 
einer langverstrichenen Zeitperiode wieder 
einmal in Augenschcin nimmt. In ebendieser 
Resiehung hat ein Statistiker dcs Handelsund 
Arbeitsministeriums gar interessantc Dcta 
zussammengestellt. 

N'ocb vor fiinfundzwanzig Jahren war Eng- 
lands Herrschaft in der Eiscn- und Baum- 
wollcnfabrikation unbcstritten. Heute aber 
hat <iie amerikanische Eisenproduktion die der 
britischcn weit iibcrschritten. Belgische Fab- 
rikanten unterkaufen den englischcn in der 
Struktureisen Branche. Deutschland hat sich 
als ganz bedeutender Konkurrent Englands in 
der Herstcllung von Eisen und Stahl entwick- 
elt. Seine Schiffswerften nehmen Kontrakt 
nach Kontrakt von den SchiflFsbauern Clyde's 
und Belfast's weg, ja die grossten in den letz- 
ten paar Jahren gebauten SchiflFe kommcn aus 
deutschen Schiflfsbauwerften. 



Higftse el Favor de Mendonar el Nombre de e>te Peri6dico Cuando $e Contette A los Anundot. 



Et wird gebeten, >ich bei eventueUer Beantwortung in diesem Blatte enthaltener Anxeitfen ««* *«»« ^eitichrift beziehen «u wollvti. 



INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



24 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



25 



Cine Universal Sprache 

Professor J. L. BorgerliofF, von der Western 
Reserve Universitat, spricht in dtr "Atlanta 
Constitution" iihcr die Anspriiche des Espe- 
Vanto als Wcitsprache. Nacli kurzcm Hinwcis 
auf andcrc sich bcwcrbcnde Sprachen sagt er : 
"Der letzte \ersuch und dor t-inzige, 
welcher die Probe zu bestehen verspricht, ist 
Esperanto, so benannt von seinein Erfinder, 
Dr. ZamenhoflF, einem russischen Arzte, det: 
unter diesem Pseudonym wissenchaftliche 
Arlikel verofTentlichte, ebe cr als Erfinder 
einer Kunstsprache zur i'.oruhmtheit wurde. 

Dcni Dr. Zanienliof ficl, wie seinen Vorgan- 
geni auf deinselben Gebiete der zwecklose 
Reiclithutn an Idionien auf. welche die Bewoh- 
ner der Erde trennen und die intemationalen 
Bezichungen so schwierig gestalten, wahrend 
sie zu gleicher Zeit eine so ausgiebige Quelle 
von Missvcrstiindflissen und Feindseligkeit 
unter den Nationen bilden. 

Er war auch der Ueberzeugung, dass der 
Grund. weshalb die existirenden Universal 
Sprachen ihren Zweck nicht erreicht hatten, 
das war, dass sic zu schwierig warcn, fast so 
schwierig wic die Natur?prachen. Der Grund 
ihrer Schw ierigkeit lag in der Grammatik. 
welche zu kf)mplicirt, und in dem Vokabu- 
lariuni, welches zu umfangreich war. Er 
entwarf deshalb eine Grammatik. welche die 
Einfachlu-it selber wurde. Dieses erreichte 
er dadurch, dass er alle zur Konstruktion eines 
logischen Satzes nicht absolut benothigten 
Regcln bei Seite sctzte und alle Ausnahinen 
eliminirte. Die wcnigen iibrigbleibenden 
Gnnidsatzc kminen in einer halben Stunde 
erlernt werden. 

Scitie nachste S<irge war das Vokabularium. 
Was das Erlcrnen eines fremden Vokabu- 
lariums deni Schitler so schwcr niacht, ist die 
Mannigfaltigkeit der Stammworter. die grosse 
Zalil <lcr vcrschiedenen Wdrter. Im Eng- 
li^ciioii l)eispichveisc haben wir, um die ver 
schiedcnen von dem Begriffe des '[\u\,^ aus- 
gehendcn Ideen zum Ausdruck zu liringen, 
die Wiirter: dead, to die. deadly and deathly, 
mortal, to kill, to murder, to assassinate, to 
suicide, to committ homicide, etc. Was fiir 
cin schwerfatiipcr Ivuxus an Stammvvortcrn 
und wie enlmuthigend fiir den Auslander. 
welcher diese Sprachen 711 erlernen wiinscht. 

Und daliei ist die euirlisclic Sprache eine der 
leichtesten unter alien curopiiischen Zungen. 
Die Rcducirung diescr Zahl von Stamm- 
wortern war das jLfrosse Problem, welches 



Zomenhoff zu losen hatte. Er nahm eines aus 
einer Anzahl, und mittelst eines Systems von 
Suffixen und Priifixen brachte er es fertig, 
dass dies eine Stanunwort fiir alle anderen 
seinen Dienst thun mus.ste. So kam es, dass 
■■l\speranto-W6rterbuch" nur ungefahr zwei- 
tausfiid Stammworter enthiclt, und doch sind 
sie hinreichend, um vermittelst Ableitungen 
cin fiir alle Zwecke hinreichendcs Vokabu- 
larium zu bilden. 

Aber um die Sache noch einfachcr zu 
niachcn. waliUe er zweitausend Stammworter 
in soldier Weise aus, dass sic alien gebildeten 
Personen der europaischen Civilisation be- 
kannt erscheinen, indcm er zuerst solche 
Ausdriicke aussuchte, die schon in universa- 
lem Gebrauch sind, wie Sport, Toilet, Train : 
dann. indem cr Worter natim, die zwei odcr 
drei der llauptsprachcn gemeinsam sind, und 
schliesslich indem er diescn cine kleine Anzahl 
von intemationalen Stammwortern hinzufugte, 
aber mit Bedacht aus verschiedenen Idiomen 
aussuchte, sodass irgend Jtmandem, sei er 
Teutone, Slave oder I Kleiner, das Esperanto 
bekannt erscheint. 

Die Suffixe ziihlen ungefahr dretssig tind 
die Pratixe ein han)es Hundert ; sie haben gut 
definirte Bedeulungen, und wenn man sie 
einmal kennt, kann irgend tine Person, die 
mit einer Liste der cinfachen Stammworter 
ver.sehcn ist, .sein eigene* X'okabularium in 
nahczu cndloser Ausdehnung niachen, sodass 
auch <iic fcinsten Schattirungen der Ansicht 
zum Ausdruck gebracht werden kfinnen. 

Als die bemerkenswerthcste Eigenthumlich- 
keit des Esficranto und eine, welche keine 
Natursprache in sfilclum tirade besitzt. 
niiichtv icli ilirc Fahigkeit iler Piildung neuer 
WOrtc. sobald <las SchliisM-lwurt L^cgeben i^i. 
.iiiiiiiin 11. und man -, illti' ilt~sf,j i'iiii;tilenk 
^cin, das- bi'i der ,Maii>rii.it xrin l*"allen 'las 
Slamniwiirt -elinn bikannt i^t. Das zweite 
autlallende (.'liaraetoristiknin i-t die Kinfacli- 
hcit und Rei^clniassi^kcii .1.^ ij^an/en gram- 
niatikalischen Sv-trni-. >'■ -ind zwei liaupt- 
sacldichc 'riicilc limr Siuaihe leicht sich 
anzneiyncii. d.is \ okabidariuni nnd das sehr 
einfache S\stein, ditrch welches das X'okabu- 
larinni >. rwcitert wird. um alle Idecn zum 
Ausdruck zu bringen. 

I'm wieder das Wnrt death als lleispiel zu 
lulinien, das Stammwort ist "nmrt" (welches 
wir in dem englischen mortal haben). Einge- 
d<nk dessen. dass iin Esperanto alle Haupt- 
worier mit "o" eindigen, alle Adjektive mit 



"a," die Adverbien mit "e," die Infinitive mit 
"i," dq^s die gegentheilige Bedeutung durch 
das prafix "mal" ausgedriickt wird, dass das 
Prafix "sen" ohne bedeutet, dass das Suffix 
"ant" die Handlung bezeichnet, ahnlich wie 
beim englischen "iug," "nd dass das Suffix 
"ig" die Ursache bezeichnet, erhalten wir von 
obigem Stammwort: morto, death; morta, 
mortal; morti, to die; morte, mortally; mor- 
tano, the dying man ; mortanta, dying ; mor- ^ j 
tigi, to cause death, or kill; mortigo, murder; 
mortiganto, murderer; mortiga, death dealing; 
malmorta, living; senmorta, immortal; sen- 
morto, immortality, etc. Zu gut Deutsch also ; 
"morto," der Tod ; "morta," totlich ; "morti," 
sterben; "morte," sterblich ; "morti," Sterben; 
"mortano," der Sterbende; "mortanta," ster- 
bend; "mortigi," Tod verusachend ; oder zu 
toten ; "mortigo," der Mord ; "mortiganto," der 
Morder; "mortiga," zum Tode gehorend; 
"malmorte," lebend; "senmorta," unsterblich; 
"senmorto," die Unsterblichkeit, u. s. w. 

Die Konjugation der Zeitworter, welche 
der grosse Stein des Anstosscs beim Studium 
aller Natu. -sprachen ist, bietet absolut keine 
Schwierigkeit beim Esperanto. Zum ersten 
gicbi e- doit keine unregelmassigen Zeit- 
worter. Zweitens hat man nur eine Endung 
fiir jede Zeitform. Drittcns ist. die Zahl der 
Zcitformen auf ein striktes Minimum be- 
schriinkt, auf Vergangenheit, Zukunft. und 
Konditional. Der Infinitiv aller Zeitworter 
endigt mit "i," das Prascnz immer mit "is," 
das Konditional immer mit "us," und diese 
hjidungcn blcibcn sich gleich im Singular und 
Plural. 

.Mies in .illem gcnommen, i.st Esperanto die 
leielitole aller Sprachen; alles. was man zum 
l.esin und Schreiben braucht. ist ein Bekannt- 
-oin mil den wenigen grammatikalischen 
I'.nuidsittzen. von denen die meisten in obigem 
erkliirt worden sind, eine Kenntnis der einigen 
drcissig Suffixe imd des halben Dutzend Pra- 
hxe. sowie cin Worterbuch. welches die 
zweitausend Stammworter giebt, von denen 
vicle den meisten unter uns schon bekannt ^\ 
sind. 

Irgend Tcmand mit der oherflachlichsten 
Kenntnis von I.Atein und Deutsch und einer 
Kenntnis des Englischen kann gleich von 
vornhcrein einen Brief in EsperaiUo schreiben ; 
thatsachlich kann eine Person mit etwas 
Talent fur Sprachen solches thun, ohne .solche 
\ Oikenntnisse zu besitzen, wenn er nur ein 
W ortcrbuch hat. 

Was das Sprechen anbeta-ifFt, so ist das 



» • 






natiirlich Sache der Uebung. Leicht genug 
ist es, doch ist eine Uebung von einigen 
Monaten unerlasslich, wenn man fliessend 
sprechen will. Die fiir das Esperanto sich 
Interessirenden soUten einen Klub bilden und 
behufs Konversation Sitzungen abhalten. Die 
Aussprache ist so leicht, wie der Re.st der 
Sprache. 

Wird diese Sprache nun wirklich in Ge- 
brauch kommen? Professor BorgeroflF sagt 
uns, dass sie sich wenigstens rapide aus- 
breitet. Im Juni 1905 gab es nur eine Hand- 
voll Esperantisten in Amerika. Ein Jahr 
spiiter bestanden schon fiinfzig Klubs dia 
meisten mit KoUegien verbunden. Paris bietet 
ungefahr zwanzig freie oflfentliche I^hrkurse. 
In ganz Europa verbreitet. hat die Sprache 
Hunderttausende von Anhangern. Dreitau- 
send Esperantisten. welche fiinfzchn ver- 
schiedene I^ander vertraten, wohnten dem 
Kongress in Boulogne- sur — Mer im August. 
1905. bei. 



f I 



Abyssinien 

Der interessanteste Teil des dunklen Kon- 
tinentes ist unzweifelhaft Abyssinien. Hier 
sind sowohl die Tiere des Fcldes sowie die 
Blumen der ^Viesen der mittellandischen 
Regionen denen des tropischen Afrikas 
gleichartig. Hier in den schneebedeckten 
Bergen verharrt die wilde Ziege, hier ist ein 
eigenartiger nd abirrender Hund, wahrend im 
Tieflande ein wirklich wilder Biir gefunden 
werden kann. Einige Antilopen und zwei bis 
drei Affenarten sind ausschliessliches Eigen- 
tum Abyssiniens. zu denen sich auch zahlreiche 
Vogelsorten, einige Fischarten, zwei bis drei 
Reptilgattungen und namenlose Pflanzen 
anschliessen. Die menschlichen Rassen dort 
sind verschiedenartiger Typen und weitver- 
schiedenen Ursprungs; sie sprechen eine 
Abart von verschiedenartigen Sprachen, von 
denen viele sogar noch nicht klassifizirt worden 
sind. Im aussersten Siiddwesten leben die 
Negertypen, im Siidosten und Siiden bcfinden 
sich die schonen Gala-Hamitiks oder Somala- 
gebiirtigen, im Norden finden wir die Hamiten 
und Seniitcn, sowie Abstammungen der alten 
griechischcn und egyptischen Kolonien; fer- 
ner, dunkelfarbige Juden, deren Abstammung 
uns an die Zeit der Zerstorung Jerusalems 
erinnert. Abessinien hat eine Geschichte die 
eine tauscndjahrige Exi.stenz vor der christ- 
lichen Aera bekundet 



Amerikanische Feuerverluste 

Die Erfahrungen der Vergangenheit 
scheinen nicht gering dem amerikanischen 
VoIke wieder einmal die Lehre einzuscharfen 
wie enorm die Feuerverluste sind. Man rufe 
nur die grosse Feuerbrunst in Chicago in 
1871 ins Gedachtnis zuriick, bei welcher 
Gebaude in einem Raumumfange von drei- 
eindrittel Quadratmeilen eingeiischcrt wurden 
und einen Velust von hundertundneunzig Mil- 
lionen Dollar hervorrief, ganz abgesehen von 
den zweihundertundfiinfzig Menschenopfcrn. 
die dabei ums Leben gekommen und den 
sechsundfiinfzig Lebensversicherungs-Gesell- 
schaften welche dadurch zu Grunde gerichtet 
worden sind. Das Feuer in Boston, in 187J, 
aschertc sechsundfiinfzig Morgen Landes ein 
und beschwor einen Verlust von achtzig Mil- 
lionen Dollar hervor. Das Feuer in Jackson- 
ville, Fla., in 1 90 1, richtete einen Verlust von 
zehn Millionen Dollar an; das in Patterson, 
N. J., in 1902, von acht Millionen Dollar; die 
Feuerbrunst in Baltimore, die eine Aus- 
dehnung von hundertundvierzig Morgen an 
Gebaude einiischerte, ricf einen \'erlust von 
fiinfzig Millionen Dollar hervorrief. Und 
nun die heutige Kalamitiit in San Franzisco 
bei der, wie es heisst, Grundeigentum im 
Betrage von etwa zweihundcrt .Millionen Dol- 
lar zerstort wurde. Wahrlich die obige 
Angabc ist ernstlich genug als Warnungs- 
zeichcn zu dienen, und selbst diese Ziffern 
fiihren noch lange nicht die ganze Liste unser 
nationalen Verschwendung durch Feuer in 
den Vereinigten Staaten an. Viele andere 
Feuersbriinste von geringerer Ausdehnung, 
sowie die Feuerschaden in den verschiedenen 
Gebiiuden, haben jahrlich derart zugenommcn, 
dass in 1904 die Versicherungstabellen einen 
Totalverlust durch PVurer in den \'^ereinigten 
Staaten bis zum Betrage von zweihundert 
drcissig Millionen Dollar aufweisen, event, 
einen taglichen \'erlust vrm etwa 630. GOO 
Dollar. 

In dill SieVizigern belief •^icli der iiilirliche 
Feuerverhist auf etwa scclizig .Millionen Dol- 
lar: in den .Achtzigern, auf ungefahr hundert 
Millionen Dollar, wahrend es sich in dcii 
Xcunzigern bis ant hunderiundfiinfzig .Mil- 
lionen Dollar hinaufschwang. Oder um noch 
genaucr die>en Lastdruck auf den Reichtum 
des Landes anzufuhren und thatsachlich zu 
beweisen bis zu welchem Umfangc sich diese 
Feuerverluste erstecken. sehe man einmal die 
tabellarischen Formen der "National Board of 



Fire Lender writers" (National Feuerver- 
sicherungs-Bchorden) an, die uns die erstaun- 
liche .Mitteilung machcn, dass wahrend der 
letzten fiinfundzwanzig Jahre fiir nicht weniger 
als 3.500.cxx).ooo Dollar Grundeigentum 
durch diese nationale Verschwendung einge- 
biisst wurde. Diese ungeheuerc Ziffer diirfte 
vielleicht besser verstanden werden, wenn 
sie mit der Nationalschuld der Vereinigten 
Staaten verglichen wird, welche ihren hoch- 
sten Punkt am i. Juli 1866 erreichte, als sie 
sich auf etwa 2.733.236.173 Dollar belief. 



Elektrizitat zieht Wasser an 

Ein gar eigenartiger Bcstandtheil der elek- 
trischen Strome, nicht allegemein bekannt, 
bildct die sogen. clektrische "Osmose". Ein 
elektrischer Strom welcher durch den Boden 
fliesst, wird Wasser hervorrufen — langsam 
allerdings und in gar geringen Quantitaten — 
und sich mit demselben in die Richtung des 
negativcn ElektrcKlen fortziehen. Wahrend 
jiingst unternoniniener E.xperimente in Eng- 
land wurde in der Weise Wasser durch 
Glasurrohren die in den Boden eingesetzt 
waren hineingezogen. Es drang durch die 
Rohrwande durch als die Elektrizitat dieselben 
durchstromte. Die "Electrical Review" schlagt 
vor, dass ein derartiges Prinzip wohl ange- 
wendet werden moge, Pflanzen mit Feuch- 
tigkeit zu versehen. Wenn clektrische Strome 
richtig im Boden arrangirt werden konnen, 
wiirden sie das in den Grund angesammelte 
Wasser gut verb rei ten und dassclbe um die 
Wurzeln rundherum kondensiren. 



Postpacket Verbindung mit Peru 

Hiiltgcneral Postmeister Hitchcock hat 
l)ekannt gegeben, dass eine am erten Sep- 
tember zu erciffnende Postpacket- Verbindung 
mit Peru ins Leben gerufen werden werde. 
Packete kiniiun somit von nun ab zwischen 
den Vereinigten Staaten und Peru ausge- 
tauscht werden und zwar diirfen sie nicht 
einen \\ ert von iiber 50 Dollar iibersteigen ; 
nicht mer als 11 Pfund wiegen, nicht langer 
als T,' J Fuss sein, resp. 6 Fuss in Lange 
und I'mfang zusammen betragen. Brief- 
schaften die solche Packete fiir Peru enthalten 
werden in den Hauptpostamtern zu New 
York und San Fransisko angefertigt. Diese 
Erneuerung sollte eine grosse Handelser- 
leichterung mit Peru bilden. 



Et wird gebeten. sich bei eventueller Beantwortuntf in diesem Blatte enthaltener Anzeigen auf diete Zeitschrift beziehen zu wollen. 



CsVird gebeten. sich bei eventueller Beantwortung in diesem Blatte enthaltener Anzeigen auf diese Zeitschrift beaehen zu woUen. 



a6 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



27 



Gewalt des Crdbebens 

Das San Trancisco Erdbebeii wurde in China 
s^ospivt. Der "Zi-ka-wci" Obscrvatoriuni- 
Direktor in Shanpfhai berichtet, dass das grosse 
San Franciso* I-lrdbcbcn vom Erdbcben- 
beschcrtibcr aufficzoicbnct wurde. Die Stosse 
warcn rocht stark nn<l bieltcn ctwas iibcr cine 
Stunde und vit'runddrtissiH; Minutcn an. Das 
erste PrcbniinJir Zittcrn das durch die Erdball- 
niassc transniittirt wunlc. finp[ um tj.35 abends, 
nach chinesiscbi r Kiistenzeit an. Die ersten 
griisseren W'llKn. die auf der IJugenkruste 
eines grossen Zirkels wanderten, w nrden gegen 
9-55-54 gespurt. Die letzten Wellen der 
sinkenden Gestirnwcitc verliessen ihre Spuren 
um 10.31.35 nachts, wahrend die allerletzten 
leichten Ilewegungen des Erdbodcns um 11- 
.09.44 nachts am 18 April total versclnvanden 
Diese Aufzcichiningen versprechen wert voile 
Information zu iiefern in der Festsetzung der 
Forti)t1anzungs-r,csch\vindigkeit der Erdbc- 
benwogen denn die iJeobaehtungen konnen 
exakt bis auf Minute und Sekundc der San 
Francisco Ereignisce geinacht werdn. 



Die verschiedenen Erntei^hreszeiten 
der Welt 

Es existirt in (kr Welt cin iK-stiindiger 
Process der Kime. der P.liitc und der Frucht- 
erzeugung welche niemals aufhiirt — os giebt 
einc bestjindige Erntezeit auf dcm F>dballe 
zu jeder Jahrcszeit.. ganz gcnau \\ ic c> an 
manchem ( )rte stets Sonnenschcin \ni(i an 
anderen Platzen immerw iihrende Finstrenis 
existirt. 

In den allcrmoistcn < )rten .Xustraliens und 
Neu-Seclands sehen wir im Jamiar die Ernte 
ihrer \'ollendung cntgegenschreiten. wahrend 
die Einwohner Chilis unrl andcrer in Siid- 
Amerika befindlicher Lander zu ebender 
Jahreszcit anfangcn die Friichte ihrer .Arbeit 
einzuheimsen. in < )bcrcgypten und Indien 
beginnt die Ernte im I'cJ^ruar und daiurt his 
gegen Ende Miirc. Der April als l'>ntcmonat 
erstrt'okt '^'wh auf muis■^t■ l,.ini!orscliafti-n und 
Sfri'okin, w ic z. I!. Svrit 11. ('\|irus, an der 
egyptischcn Kiiste. Mexico, Culta. Pcrsicn ntid 
Kleinasien. Der Mat gilt als ein gar 
beschaftigter F>ntemonat in Centralasien, 
Persien, .\lgier. Morokko, ini siidlichen Texas, 
Florida, China und Japan. Der .Mi mat Jum 
erzcugt I'.rntcn in Kalifornicn, Oregon, im 
siidlichen Teile der \'ereinigten Staaten, in 
Sprmicn. Portugal. Italien. I'^ngaren. Ruma- 
nien. der Tiirkei. in den Donaustaaten, im 
siidlichen F'rankreich, Griechenland und Sici- 



lien. Die F.rntclandcr die den Jnli fiir seine 
(lahcn veqjUichtet sind, sind : England, der 
Staat Nebraska, die Schvviez, die Staaten Iowa, 
Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Oberkanada, das 
ncirdliche Frankreich, Dutschland, Oester- 
reich und Polcn. Mit der Erntelese wirrl im 
Aui^iist fortgefahren in den britischen Inseln. 
in I'Vankrcich. I'.cigien, Holland, Manitoba, 
im untcren Kanada, in Danemark und Rtiss- 
land. Der Scplcmbr regiert als Erntemonat in 
Schottland, in <lcn siidlichen Teilen von 
Schweden und Xnrwcgcn. smvie auch auf den 
kalten Inseln der Xordsee. Der Oktobcr gilt 
ids Maiserntemonat in .\mcrika imd fiir 
Hartgemiise im Nordcn von Schweden, Xor- 
wcgen und Irland. Im Nox'cmber fiingt die 
Enite in Sud-.\frika, Patagonien. und Stid- 
-Xustralien an, und erstreakt sich bis mitte 
December. 



Ein Seifenfluss 

Es wird berichtet, dass im Washingtor: Te-- 
ritorium ein Seifenfluss existire, wie kein 
ahnlicher anderswo zu finden ist. Sein VVasser 
ist starker und enthiilt weit grossere Mincra!- 
substanzen als das beriihmte Sprudelwas -er 
in Karlsbad. Wenn der Kopf mit dem Flns.«- 
Seifenwasser gewaschen wird. so entstcht cine 
weissc Schicht, die den Schiidel gel c.rig 
rcinigt. Die "Coyboys" reinigen iVrn /i^ttel 
indem sie dieselben einfach in den F"u>s 
werfen. Man erzjihlt von authentischen Faktae 
wo hartnackige Falle von Rheumatisnuts 
und anileren Krankheiten damit volll.onunen 
kurirt worden sind. Gcnannter Fins, ist zwei 
einhalb Meilen lang und drcivler;, -I .Moilc 
breit. 



Neu-Seeland 



Der Gouverneur von N'cv, -Scdand niacht< 
hci der diesjahrigen Parliaments EroflFnung 
in Wellington bekannt. d.'^s die Handei.svcr 
breitung mit den Vereini.^tcn .Staaten \v^>\ 
Kanada cines der Thcnia bildcn wcrde. die 
wahren<I der Session zur Verhandlung 
gelangen solle. .Xuch werden die .Mit- 
glieder ersucht wer<len Vorschliige betreffs 
erneucrtcr I'lcilragc fiir der San {•"rnnzi'-kii 
und \'ancouver Postdienst 7i: ber.'Un Seine 
Rede betonte mit besonderer Sympathie 
die event. Reciprocitiits-Vorschlage mit Aus- 
tralien und drijckte die HofTnung aus, dass 
die bevorstehende Ausstellung N'eu-Seelands 
sich vorteilhaft mit denjenigen der alten Welt 
ausnehmen werde. 



Der Fortschritt in China 

Der Fortschritt in China hat sich jiingst in 
wundersamer wenn nicht in gar cigenartiger 
Weise gezeigt. Die Dorfeinwohner der Pro- 
vinz Fukien hielten vor kurzer Zeit eine 
N'ersammlung ab, bei welcher sie den Ent- 
•^chluss gefasst haben, die Angewohnhcit des 
Opituugebrauches aufzugeben. Auf Anraten 

zweier .Miiuner, die im Hospital zu Fuchau ~ 1 
fiir flas ( )piumrauchen behandelt wurden, 
wurden P>riefe an den Eeiter des betreflFcnden 
Hospitals mit der Bitte gesandt, nach A-iong 
zu komnien und in <ler Sache behiiltlich zu 
sein. Ein Ihief enthielt eine hufliche und 
MTgfaltig ausgearbeitete Vereinbarung, von 
den Dorfiiltesten un<l bedeutendsten Miinnem 
des ( )rtes unterzeichnet, diese lastervolle 
.Angewohnheit bestimmt aufgeben zu wollen. 
Dr. Wilkinson berichtet diesen Fall im "Kir- 
chen Missions .Anzeiger" fiir Juli; er selbst 
besuchte das Dorf, heisst es im gen. .Artikel, 
und fand, dass tatsachlich alle Leute dort sehr 
begierig schienen diese Reform zu adoptiren. 
Eine V'ersammlung der Ilauptiuiinner wurde 
alsdann cinberufen, bei welcher die Laden- 
handler selber iiu Interesse der Sache eintraten 
un«l freimiitig versicherten ilem X'erkauf dieser 
Drogue Einhalt zu tun, alswann fiinfzig Dol- 
lar zur Deckimg der Me<lizinkosten aufge- 
bracht wurden. Letzten Marz wurde die 
Ahnenhalle (les Dorfes in ein Krankenhaus 
nmgewandelt und neunun«lsiebeuzig Patienten 
znr r.ehandlung darin aufgenommen. Eine 
.Missionjirin von einer naheliegenden Missions- 
kirche behandelte neun Frauen fur eben- 
dieselbe Krankheit in einem anderen Hause. 
Die Patienten wurden drei Wochen lang in 
r.ehandlung gehalten, wahrend welcher Zeit 
nnr zwei Insassen ihren Mut verloren und 
lien < »rt verliessen. Tiiglich wurde iTiorgens 
\md aben<ls Gottesdienst abgehaltcn und durch 
das Singen der Chorale und der erbaulichen 
r.ilnlerklarungen wurde das Interesse erhoht, 
crweitert. Die Einformigkeit der Leidenden 
wurde durch Zauberlaternen, <lurch photo- ^)j 
graphische und phonographische Vorstellun- 
t,'cn gelindert. Wie sich das Resultat dieser 
I'.ewegmig gcstalten wird, ist jetzt allerdings 
unnioglich vorauszubestimmen, doch auf 
Ansuchen der Dorfiiltesten und Hauptleiter 
ist vom Mandarin eine Proklamation erlassen 
wurden. derzufolge es in Zukunft verboten 
lilcibt, cincn < )piundaden im besagten IDorfe 
wiedcr zu erofFnen. 



Around the 'Baltic 

Hy Mr. William Ik.n.m.ni.s I!k\a.n, in iht Cumin. im 1 . 



i\ 



r \ 



'I'lle disCUs--ii 111 III llle iluiIKI iiCCtlpicil --II 

mucli space l]i;il I was cimipelled liimiiil fnnn 
that article ;ill meiilinn nf Ivtissia in geiur.il 
;iMi| III St. I 'eteisl'iirg ill jiart icular ; I -liall 
ibeicfiire liei;iii this article with .1 hrii i leier 
ence to the .Nb isci>\ ite empire. Twn and a halt 
\ears ago, when 1 saw Kn>>ia tor the lirsi 
lime. I entered by the way nf \\ ars.iw and 
went to St. IVter.slmrg fi'i'in Moscow. While 
considerable territory was covered, tlie win- 
ter's siKjws made the whole counlrs look bar- 
ren and uninviting. This time oin- cmirsc lay 
through the I'.altic luovinces, and as farming 
\v;is at its height, the cmiiitrs i.veseiiled a nmch 
fairer picture. The cities and villaues tbroiiub 
which we passed were Inisv with lite .nid e.icli 
had its church, for the Russians ari .1 cliurcli 
gf>ing people. 

St. Petersburg is a fascinating city. 'I'lie 
church of St. Isaacs, with its great granite 
monoliths on the outside, its pillars within cov 
ered with mahicbite and lap-ns la/nli. and its 
immense bronze doors, is among the world's 
most imposing places of worship; the ei|\ies 
iriati statue of I'eter the (ifeat is f.-mnius, and 
the art gallery is nl' r.ire merit. kii-si.i s 
bronze> are most excelhiii. .lud lu r stnrcs e\- 
hil»Jt a large assortment of tnrs 

In St. FVtersbnrg 1 found myself, as on iii> 
former visit, admiring the horses, they being, 
upon the whole, the bej.t th.it I have seen sinct 
leaving America. Po»ibly the fact that s, 1 
main- stallions are driven singly and in |iairs 
nia\ account, in part, for the handsome and 
stviish animals seen upon the >triets. but cer 
tain it is that the Uussian hor?.e is .1 splendid 
represeiUative of his breed. There is a lar-t 
park, called the Point, near the city, and in 
the evening this park and the .ipproaches to it 
■ire thronged witli carriages and dmskies, \s 
the sun d<H's not set there at this season .t 
the vear until between nine and ten and is 
followed by a long twilight, the drists are -av 
with life until midnight. We did not ri ach 
our hotel until eleven o'clock, alibnu-b we 
wen .iiiioni; the tirM to leave the p.irk. 

S|ieaking of hirsfs reminds me that the 
Kiis-ian coachman has .-m individiialitv all his 
iiw n. I lis hcadui ar i~ in rnliav. In uiu a -.|U,ilis 
hi.iver with a spoul sli.i|),il crown, hut oiu 
.,1,011 fi.r-ets the hat ill ci niieniiilal ii 'ii ol ih' 
I'oriii. 'i'he skirt of the co,iclim;m'-. coat is \er\ 
full and pleated, and the mmi' sixlish the ei|m|i 
as^e. the liro.idcr is the diuvr. lliuinnniL; at 
the slioiildt rs, his paddiiiLr ur.nliiallv lucre.isis 
until aliiiut tin- Itijis he is ,is broad as tlu Imx 
U|iiiii which he -lis. This paddinu is carriid 
til sucli .111 iMreme that the co;uliinaii s,>me 
limes has III he lifted upi -11 the lio\, and it is 
needless lo sav ih.it he is pr.ict icills helple-s 
as wfll as iisele,s in case of ;m .iccidenl. It 
max he that this siyli- of dvi ~- i- d. -i-ned lor 
,1 wind break for lin-se \vh(» are sealed behind 
till wearer this was one of the explanations 
^i\,.n or ii ma\ he that it, like some other 
f.ishinns HI wearing apparel, h.is im ii.miilalii>ii 
in reason. 

I found to luv disappoiiitnieiit that Tolstov 
is not contributing materially lo the political 



revolution that is l.ikmg plate m l\iisst,i. I'.e- 
m- riMiid throuLiliont the land not onlv 

l,ei;ni-e • >\ llis pllilosophv , hilt also lucailse ol 

Ills fe.irli-s arraignnieiit of the ihs|i,iii-m th.il 
h.is aliluted Russia, he niiuht he a powerlul 
f.actor in giving flirectimi to the poimlar ninxt - 
meiit, hut believing that iiiili\ idiial ri genera- 
tion furnishes the oiil> comiiKte emancipation 
fnnn ,dl I'l.rm- of evil, lie laki- hut little in- 
leresi in what he regards as the smaller and 
less iin]iortant remedies proposed by the diima. 
It remains to lie seen whether it is wiser to 
secun' th.it which is now within reach and 
then ].re-s f.,rward for mher advant.-iges or to 
reject pucennal reforms in tlu' hope of nlti 
match gaining lari^er ones. |'nih.ilil\, the 
liioiieer 111 thought and ill.' praiUcd reji.riner 
will nevi-r he able to ful!) aL;i'e nimn this 
]iiiinl. 

'idle ho.it ride from St. I'etersbnru to Stock 
Imlm is one .if uiisurpasscil beauty. It rei|uins 
about tlnri^ hours t<-> make the inp. -\\\<\ ot 
ili.it time hut two hours are spinl in the o]ien 
-,.! till remainder of the mute being between 
Islands th.it till the 15:dlic and the Gulf of I'in 
land as tlu- st.irs stud the sky. jusl mit of St 
I'eterslmr;.: is Rnssm'. most iuii>ort.(iit iia\.il 
-i.itiou, where we saw ,i number of warslii|is 
and were infoniied that the cri w of one m 
thelil had neeiitls refllsiil to coinpls Willi ,i 
s.iiliiii.: older, .answering th.it it w.is w.iiiiiiL; 
lo sie what the diima would do. 

I'ntil ahoiil a hnndred \ear- .i^o kinlaiid 
was a l>art of the I'.allic I'.mpni oi which 
S\\e<len was the lieail, ami of the three mil 
lion inh.ihitants of l"inland, sunietbinu like 
iwent\ per cent, .are of Swedish descent, .\s 
l!!!-hl 111 . \pecleil. the Swedi-ll eKlllelll w.|s 
not oiilv the otTici.al eUnieiil, iiijoNing t.. a 
large e\t< tit the titles of nobility, hut it i- -ti'I 
the wealthier .and more inlhieiitial ].oriioii. The 
l''inns piopiT are not I ..ipkander-. .is their 
northern position wmild sUi^i^est. luillui an 
lliev in race closely akin to the Slavic or Scan 
dina\i.in popnl.aliou. \s mentioned in tlu' arti- 
I 1, I .n llimuarv. tin n r.uiii' from wi-stirii N-ia 
and .ire i|mie distinci in i.ice ch.iractii i-l ic- 
from their jtreseiil neiuhhors. 'Mux ,n'i|iiiri ij 
from their Swedish coni|uerirs .i iinnlncs- tor 
die public sihool, and the pi rn iil.iui ol illiler 
,ii\ i- miicli lis- in |-'m!.uid than in otln r part- 
iif l\ii-~i.i, iindii ' ' dominion ilu.\ imwill- 
inL;l\' caiii- ni i- 

( hir lio.ii si,,p|,ed ,al llelsin-foi- f, t a lew 
hours, and we had ,in opportiiiiilx lo vi-n the 
priiii-ip.il points of inten -i in the capital ol 
I'inl.ind. It i- ;> substantial and pr- -piroiis 
lookin.- cil\ with lar-i' selmol liou-i -. altrac 
ii\e luihlic hnildinu- and commodious 
chnrrlus. We passed sev i ral sm.all parks 
wheie ihildren were pl.ixini; and when- mini 
eniii- soiiit'orlahlc scats lieckoiml itn xMarx t" 
rest liiiie.ath the sh.ide. I cotil'.-s i,, a par 
ti;dil\ for the small eitv p.irk : it i- iiiiicli belter 
lo b.ive the-i liri.ithin^ sp.ace- -> .'d! 

.ibout tlinm-h denselv jiopiilated -• di.it 

the childnn as well as the adults can find in 
them .1 daily refuge than to h,i\e the entire 
park fund lavished upon sulimhan jiarks which 



can onlv he visited occasionally. It is a pit\ 
that s])ace is not more often reserved hir these 
parks in the laying out of towns, for the 
ground not only beciHues more valuable in 
pn 'portion as these small jiarks .ire the more 
needed, but the oiiening of them in the heart 
of ,1 city brings a large unearned incninent to 
those who own land adjacent to them. 

We .oiild not belji noticing the coiurast l)e- 
tweeii the marki t of 1 lelsingl'ors and those 
which we visited ill Asia. At the former, 
neaih dressed iicas.iuts. men and woiiHii, e\ 
posed for sale from the I'lnl of their carts a 
lionntifnl supply of vegetables, meats, butter, 
c^i^s .-ind cheese. The eggs were st.imped with 
tile name of the owner ami the date of haying, 
the butter was p.ackcd in wrKulen buckets of 
v.arious sizes, and the cheese was of many 
\,iruties. Some of the carts were filled with 
-1,11 ks of bl.ick bread baked in larye tlat cakes. 
Till radishes presented a temptation that I 
wa- mt able to withstand; the fondness for 
them, restr.iined during the months of travel 
iluou-b the ( Irient, overcame me. and at the 
li-k of being thought extravagant. I pur 
ill, 1-1 d live dozen at a gross outlay of about 
!i\i cuts ,nid lived high until the\ were all 

'1 he hinns are rejoicing over the autonomy 
n ceiitiv secured, and they have signalized their 
p.irti.d independence by creating a single par- 
liaiiieiitarv bodv whose represi'utatives are 
I li I nd by the miin' population, male and 
fi male, above the .age of twenty-four. Xo one 
cm nndersinnd the persistency with which the 
l-iiins have struggled for constitutional gov- 
( neeiii without recalling that as a part of 
SvNedeii their Country long enjoyed the right 
to iepresent.it ion in tlie nation's councils. The 
piople have always resented Russian methods. 
,uid onlv a few ye,irs ago the governor general 
s.tii from St. IVtersburg was assassinated by 
a \oung iMtin. who. having tints given expres- 
sion to his nation's hatred of dcsjiotisiu, itnme- 
diattlv look his own life. The death of the 
i;iiveinor was followed by the suspension of 
Mich few privileges as the' people had been cri- 
joviiig. but when last year the whole of Russia 
sremed .about to rise in rebellion, the czar an- 
nounced his willingmess to grant all th:it was 
.asked, and now one can travel through Fin- 
land without being harassed bv soldiers or 
lM>there<l about passports. 

If (."onstaiitinople can claim to be the natural 
ci)iii.il of the eastern hemsiphere, St<x-kholm 
can wiih ciiial justice claim t.» be its natural 
summer res.,rt It is situated at a point where 
a ch.im of l.iki - pMirs its flo*»d into the Baltic, 
,, , ili.ii the ctti/eii- of Sweden's capital have 
tlu 1 1 elioiic- hdweeii tlie fr<-sh water and the 
s.dt. \s the l.ikcs .and tlu' se.i are filled with 
inmin . rahle islands, each faniilv can have one 
f,,, I-. li Sniiimer lioiiics are pn>hahly more 
„,,. ;,, .u .Stockholm, in pniportion to the 

|iopn;,i!i'ii. tli.in ,iii\ where cNc, because during 
the winiiT months, the people live in flats. One 
is immc,li,iiel\ struck with the compactness of 
the itiN iiid with the absence of single dwell- 
iu"s sui rounded In vanh. < Kving to the severe 



cold and the 1 



iiie. dark da\s of winter, the 

people huddle together 111 yrcat blocks and 
thus cconi-nii/e fuel, and tliev are at the same 
lime close to their work. As soon as spring 
oiHus there is a general movement tow.ird 
the islands, and a- we appm.-ichcd Si<x-kholni 
from the r.ahic and left it through the lakes, 
we saw .1 Lrre.it many summer cottages and 



£*wlrd 



gebeten, sich bei eventueller Beaatwortuntf in diesem Blatte enthaltener Anzeigen auf diese Zeitachrift beziehen zu woUen. 



a6 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



37 



Gewftit des Crdbebens 

Das San Francisco Erdbeben wurde in China 
!Eresp^|t. Der "Zi-ka-wei" Observatorium- 
Direktor in Shanghai berichtet, dass das grosse 
San Francisco Erdfieben vom Erdbeben- 
beschereiber aufgczcichnet wurde. Die Stosse 
waren recht stark nnd hielten etwas iiber eine 
Stunde und vicninddrcissig Minutcn an. Das 
erste Preliminar Zittern das durch die Erdball- 
masse transniittirt wurde, fing um y.35 abends, 
nach chinesischcr Kiistenzeit an. Die ersten 
grosseren Wellen, die auf der Bogenkruste 
eines grossen Zirkels wanderten, wurden gegen 
9-55-54 gespurt. Die letzten Wellen der 
sinkenden Gestimweitc verliessen ihre Spuren 
um 10.31.35 nachts, wahrend die allerletzten 
leichten Bewegungen des Erdbodens um 11- 
.09.44 nachts am 18 April total verschwanden 
Diese Aufzeichnungen versprechen wertvolle 
Information zu liefern in der Festsetzung der 
Fortpflanzungs-Geschwindigkeit der Erdbe- 
benwogen denn die Beobaehtungen konnen 
exakt bis auf Minute und Sekunde der San 
Francisco Ereignisee gemacht werdn. 



Die verschiedenen ErntejiLhreszeiten 
der Welt 

Es existirt in der Welt ein bestandiger 
Process der Kime, der Bliite und der Frucht- 
erzeugung welche niemals aufhcirt — es giebt 
eine bestandige Emtezeit auf dcni Erdballe 
zu jeder Jahreszeit,. ganz genau wie es an 
manchem f)rte stets Sonnenschein und an 
anderen Platzen immerwiihrende Finstrenis 
existirt. 

In den allermeisten Orten Australiens und 
Neu-Seelands sehen wir im Jantiar die Emte 
ihrer Vollendung entgegenschreiten. wahrend 
die Einwohner Chilis und andcrer in Sud- 
Anicrika befindlicher Lander zu ebender 
Jalireszeit anfangen die Friichte ihrer Arbeit 
einzuheinisen. In Oberegypten und Indien 
beginnt die Emte im Fehruar und dauert bis 
gegen Ende Miirz. Der April als Emtemonat 
erstreckt sich auf gcwisse Landerschaften und 
Strecken, wie z. P.. Syricn, Cyprus, an der 
egyptischen Kiiste, Mexico, Cuba, Pcrsien und 
Kleinasien. Der Mai gilt als ein gar 
beschaftigter Emtemonat in Centrala.sien, 
Persien, Algier. Morokko, im siidlichen Texas, 
Florida, China und Japan. Der Monat Juni 
erzeugt Emten in Kalifomien, Oregon, im 
siidlichen Teile der Vereinigten Staaten, in 
Spanien, Portugal, Italien, Ungaren, Ruma- 
nien, der Tiirkei, in den Donaustaaten. im 
siidlichen Frankreich, Griechenland und Sici- 



lien. Die Erntelander die den Juli fiir seine 
Gaben verpflichtet sind, sind : England, der 
Staat Nebraska, die Schwiez, die Staaten Iowa, 
Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota. Oberkanada, das 
nordliche Frankreich, Dutschland, Oester- 
reich und Polen. Mit der Erntelese wird im 
August fortgefahren in den britischen Inseln, 
in Frankreich, Belgien, Holland, Manitoba, 
iin unteren Kanada, in Danemark und Russ- 
land. Der Scptembr regiert als Emtemonat in 
Schottland, in den siidlichen Teilen von 
Schweden und Norwegen, sowie auch auf den 
kalten Inseln der Nordsee. Der Oktober gilt 
als Maiscrntemonat in Anicrika und fiir 
Hartgemiise im Norden von Schweden, Nor- 
wegen und Irland. Im November fiingt die 
Emte in Sud-Afrika, Patagonien, und Siid- 
Australien an, und erstreakt sich bis mitte 
December. 



Ein Seifenfluss 

Es wird berichtet, dass im Washing^ton Te-- 
ritoriimi ein Seifenfluss existire, wie kein 
ahnlicher anderswo zu finden ist. Sein Wasser 
ist starker und enthalt weit grossere Mineral- 
substanzen als das berijhmte Sprudelwas^er 
in Karlsbad. Wenn der Kopf mit dem Fliiss- 
Seifenwasser gewaschen wird, so entstcht cine 
weisse Schicht, die den Schadcl gel-Crig 
reinigt. Die "Coyboys" reinigen iVrr i»ittel 
indem sie dieselben einfach in den Fmhs 
werfen. Man erzahlt von authentischen Faktae 
wo hartnackige Falle von Rheumatismus 
und anderen Krankheiten daniit vollK-onnncn 
kurirt worden sind. Genannter Fhiss ist zwei 
einhalb Meilen lang und dreivier; •! .\!cilc 
breit. 



Neu-Seeland 

Der Gouverneur von Nfv.-Sf eland macht'" 
bei der diesjahrigen Parliaments EroflFnung 
in Wellington bekannt, dass die Handeisvcr- 
breitung mit den Vereinigten Staaten' nnd 
Kanada eines der Thema bildcn werdc. die 
wahrend der Session zur Verhandlung 
gelangen solle. Auch wcrden die 'Mit- 
glieder ersucht werden Vorschlage betreflfs 
erneuerter Reitrage fur der San I'r.nnzisko 
und Vancouver Postdienst zu berntcn. Seine 
Rede betonte mit besonderer Sympathie 
die event. Reciprocitats- Vorschlage mit Aus- 
tralien und driickte die Hoffnung aus, dass 
die bevorstehende Ausstellung Neu-Seelands 
sich vorteilhaft mit denjenigen der alten Welt 
ausnehmen werde. 



Der Fortschritt in China 

Der Fortschritt in China hat sich jiingst in 
wundersamer wenn nicht in gar eigenartiger 
W^eise gezeigt. Die Dorfeinwohner der Pro- 
vinz Fukien hielten vor kurzer Zeit eine 
\'ersammlung ab, bei welcher sie den Ent- 
schluss gefasst haben, die Angewohnheit des 
Opiumgebrauches aufzugeben. Auf Anraten 
zweier Miinner, die im Hospital zu Fuchau ") 1 
fiir das Opiumrauchen behandelt wurden, 
wurden Briefe an den Leiter des betrefTenden 
Hospitals mit der Bitte gesandt, nach A-iong 
zu kommen und in der Sache behiilflich zu 
sein. Ein Brief enthielt eine hofliche und 
sorgfaltig ausgearbcitete Vereinbarung, von 
den Dorfaltesten und bedeutendsten Mannem 
des Ortes unterzeichnet, diese lastervolle 
.Angewohnheit bestimmt aufgeben zu wollen. 
Dr. Wilkinson berichtet diesen Fall im "Kir- 
chen Missions Anzeiger" fur Juli ; er selbst 
besuchte das Dorf, heisst es im gen. Artikel, 
und fand, dass tatsachlich alle Lcute dort sehr 
begierig schienen diese Reform zu adoptiren. 
Fine Versammlung der Hauptmanner wurde 
alsdann einberufen, bei welcher die Laden- 
handler selber im Interesse der Sache eintraten 
und freimiitig versicherten dem Verkauf dieser 
Drogue Einhalt zu tun, alswann fiinfzig Dol- 
lar zur Deckung der Medizinkosten aufge- 
bracht wurden. Letzten Miirz wurde die 
Ahnenhalle des Dorfes in ein Krankenhaus 
umgewandelt und neunundsiebenzig Patienten 
zur Rehandlung darin aufgenommen. Eine 
Missionarin von einer naheliegenden Missions- 
kirche behandelte neun Frauen fiir eben- 
<liesell>e Krankheit in einem anderen Hause. 
Die Patienten wurden drei Wochen lang in 
I'.ehandlung gehalten, wahrend welcher Zeit 
luir zwei Insassen ihren Mut verloren und 
lien < )rt verliessen. Taglich wurde morgens 
und al)ends C»ottesdienst abgehalten und durch 
das Singen der Chorale und der erbaulichen 
Bibclerklarungen wurde das Interesse erhoht, 
erweitert. Die Einformigkeit der Leidenden 
wurde durch Zauberlatemen, durch photo- %^ 
graphische und phonographische Vorstellun- 
gen gelindert. Wie sich das Resultat dieser 
Bewegung gestalten wird, ist jetzt allerdings 
immoglich vorauszubestimmen, doch auf 
Ansuchen der Dorfaltesten und Hauptleiter 
ist vom Mandarin eine Proklamation erlassen 
worden, derzufolge es in Zukunft verboten 
bleibt, einen Opiumladen im besagten Dorfe 
wieder zu eroflfnen. 



n 



Around the 'Baltic 

By Mr. William Jknnings Bryan, in The Commmur. 



!!■' 



'I'Ih- (liscus>iiin of tin- duma ()ccui)it.'(l so 
iiiiicli sp.icr that I was coiiipi'lk'd to omit from 
thai artick- all mention of Russia in gcniral 
and to St. I'etcrslnirg in particular; 1 sliall 
thrri-fore bctiin this article with a briif rofcr- 
emv to the Moscovite empire. Two and a lialt 
years ago, when 1 saw Russia for the first 
time, 1 entered by the way of Warsaw and 
weiU to St. Petersburg from Moscow. While 
considerable territory was covered, the win- 
ter's snows made the whole country look bar- 
ren and uninviting. This time our course lay 
through the Baltic provinces, and as farming 
was at its height, the conntry preseiUed a much 
fairer picture. The cities and villaiLjes through 
which we passed were busy with lite .iud lach 
had its church, for the Russians are a tluncli 
going people. 

St. Petersburg is a fascinating city. The 
church of St. Isaacs, with its great granite 
monoliths on the outside, its pillars within cov- 
ered with malachite and lapsus lazuli, and its 
immense bronze doors, is among the world's 
most imposing places of worship: the eques- 
trian statue of Peter the tireat is famous, and 
the art gallery is of rare merit. Russia's 
bronzes are most excellent, antl her stores ex- 
hibit a large assortment of furs. 

In St. Petersburg I found myself, as on iny 
fomier visit, admiring the horses, they being. 
upon the whole, the best that I have seen since 
leaving .\merica. Possibly the fact that so 
many stallions are driven singly and in pairs 
mav account, in part, for the handsome and 
stviish animals seen u]>on the streets, but cer- 
tain it is that the Ru--ian Imrse is a -plendid 
rei)rescntative of his bree.l. There is a largi' 
park, called the Point, near the city, and in 
the evening this park and the a])proaclies \<< n 
are thronged with carriages and droskie^. As 
the sun does not set there at this sea^ou <>i 
the year until between nine and ten and is 
followed by a long twilight, the drives are gay 
with life t'lntil miilnight. We did not reach 
our hotel until eleven o'cli>ck. although we 
were among the first to leave the park. 

Speaking of horses reminds me that the 
Russian coachman has an individualitv all his 
own. Ilis headgear is peculiar. Ikmul; .1 s<|u.iiis 
beaver with a spool-shapeil crown, hut i-iu' 
soon fi-rgets the hat in cotUemvilation of the 
fiirm. The skirt nf the coachman's coat is very 
full and pleated, and the more stylish the equip- 
age, the broader is the driver. Beginning at 
the shoulders, his padding grailnally increases 
imtil about the hips he is as broad as the box 
upon which he sjts. Tliis padding is r.irried 
to such an extreme that the co.ichman sitnie 
limes has to he lifted upon the box. and it is 
needless 1,. say that he is jirartically heliiless 
as well as useless in rase of an aceidciit. It 
mav be that this style of dress is <], smm'd U'V 
a wind break for those who are seated beliind 
the wearer— ^ this was one of the explanations 
jrivcn— or it mav be that it, like some othci 
fashifins in wearing apparel, has iii> foundati'in 
in reason. 

1 found to my disapjHiintmrnt that Tolstoy 
is not contributing materially to the political 



revolmion that is taking pl.iee in Russi,i. I'.e- 
ing revered throughout the land noi only 
because of his philosopli\ . but also because ol 
his fearless arraignment of the despotism that 
has afflicted Russia, he might be a powerful 
factor in giving direction to the jMipular move- 
ment, but believing that individual regenera- 
tion furnishes the only complete emancijiation 
from all forms of evil, lie lakes but little in- 
terest in what he regards as the smaller and 
less im])orlant remedies pro])osed by the duma. 
It remains to he seen whether it is wiser to 
secure that which is ni>w within reach anrl 
then press forward for other advantages or to 
reject jiiecemeal reforms in the hope of ulti- 
matelv gaining larger ones. I'robablv. the 
pioiu-er in thought and the practical refi>rnKT 
will never be able to fully agree ni)on this 
point. 

The boat ride from St. Petersburg to Stock- 
holm is one of unsurpassed beauty. It re(juires 
about thirty hours to make the trip, and f)f 
that time but two hours are spent in the open 
sea. the remain<lcr of the route being between 
islands that till the Baltic and the Gulf of l-'iii- 
land as the stars stud the sky. Just out of St. 
Petersburg is Russia's most important naval 
station, where we saw a number of warshii)s 
aiul were informed that the crew of one of 
them li.i'l Kiiiiily refused to compls with a 
sailing order, answering that it was waiting 
to see what the duma would <lo. 

I'titil .about a hun<lred years ago l-'inland 
w.is a part of the lialtic l-*mpire of which 
Sweden was the head, and of the three mil- 
lion inhabitants of iMuland, something like 
twentv i>er rent, are of Swedish desci'iit. As 
might hi . xpected, the Swedish iliineiit was 
not only the official element, enjoying to a 
kirge extent the titles of nobility, but it is still 
the wealthier and more inlluential portion. The 
l-"iiins projjer are not Laplanders, as their 
northern positiou would suggest, neither are 
thev in race closely ;ikin to the Slavic or Scan- 
dinavi.in ]>opul;uion. .\s mentioned in the arli- 
iK III Ilnuuary, they came from western Asia 
and are rpiite distitict in race characteristics 
from their present neighbors. They ac(|uired 
from their Swedish conqnerers a fondness for 
the ]iul)Iir school, and the yiercentage of illn. r 
aev is mueli less in I'itil.iiid tli.iii in otlur p;irts 
of Russia, iiii'Kr whose dominion they unwill- 
ingly came in 180S. 

( )ur boat sif,|)|ud at llelsingfoi s tor a tew 
hours, and we lia<l ;ui o|iporliiml\ to \isjt th(' 
principal points of interi st in the c.iiutal of 
I'inlan.l. It is a stihstantial .iiid prosperous 
looking citv with lar^e school hoUM-s, attrac- 
tive public buihliiius ami eonimodious 
chiirclus. We passed sixeial small parks 
when' chiMren were plaving ami where mim- 
crous coint'ort,il>lf sciis hiikoiud iln- weary to 
rest beneath the sha.le. 1 confess to a jKir- 
tialitv for the small city park ; it is much better 
ti. have these breathing sp.iri - -, , srallered 
about throu:4h densely popiikited s,iiions that 
the ohihlren as well as the adults can find in 
them a daily refuge than to have the entire 
park fund lavished upon suburban parks which 



can only be visited t)Ccasionally. It is a pit\ 
that space is not more often reserved for these 
parks in the laying out of towns, for the 
ground not oidy becomes more valuable in 
proportion as these small parks are the more 
needed, but the opening of them in the heart 
<<i I city brings a large unearned increment to 
ill. ISC who own land adjacent to them. 

We cotdd not help noticing the contrast be- 
tween the market of Ilelsingfors an<l those 
which we visited in .\sia. At the former, 
neatly dressed peasants, men and women, ex- 
posed for sale from the end of their carts a 
bountiful supply of vegetables, meats, butter, 
eggs and cheese. The eggs were stamped with 
tile name of the owner and the date of laying, 
the butter was packed in wcKvlen buckets of 
various sizes, and the cheese was of many 
varieties. Some of the carts were filled with 
stacks of black bread baked in large fiat cakes. 
The radishes presented a temptation that I 
was not able to withstand; the fondness for 
them, restrained during the months of travel 
through the Orient, overcame me, and at the 
risk of being thought extravagant, I pur- 
chased five dozen at a gross outlay of about 
five cents and lived high until they were all 
gone. 

The Finns arc rejoicing over the autonomy 
recently secured, and they have signalized their 
partial independence by creating a single par- 
liamentary body whose representatives are 
elected by the etuire population, male and 
female, above the age of twenty-four. No one 
can understand the persistency with which the 
I-"inns have struggled for constitutional gov- 
erment w ithoiU recalling that as a part of 
Sweden their country long enjoyed the right 
to representation in the nation's councils. The 
people have always resented Russian methods, 
and only a few ye.irs ago the governor general 
sent from St. Petersburg was assassinated by 
a \oung iMun. who. having thus given expres- 
sion to his nation's hatred of desixjtism. imme- 
diately to<)k his own life. The death of the 
i;oMinor was followed by the suspension of 
such few privileges as the people had been en- 
joving. but when last year the whole of Russia 
sienufl about to rise in rcl>ellion, the czar an- 
nounced his willingness to grant all that vvas 
asked, and now one can travel through Fin- 
land without being harassed by soldiers or 
bothered about passports. 

If Const.antinoplc can claim to be the natural 
capital of the eastern hemsiphere, Stockholm 
can with ecjual justice claim to be its natural 
summer resort. It is situated at a point where 
a chain of Lakes pours its flood into the Baltic, 
s,> th.it the citizens of Sweden's capital have 
their choice between the fresh water and the 
salt. As the hikes and the sea are filled with 
inmmierablc islands, each family can have one 
f.ir itself. Summer homes are probably more 
immerons near Stockholm, in proportion to the 
populatiim. than anywhere else, because during 
the w inter months, the people live in flats. One 
is immcdiait Iv struck with the compactness of 
the city and with the absence of single dwell- 
ings surrounded by yards. < Kving to the severe 
cold and the long, dark days of winter, the 
people huddle together in great blocks and 
thus economize fuel, and they arc at the same 
time close to their work. As soon as spring 
opens there is a general movement toward 
the islands, and as we approached Stockholm 
from the Baltic and left it through the lakes, 
we saw a great many summer cottages and 



£• wM gebeten, uch b«i eventueller B«urtwortung in diesem Blatte enthattener Anzeigen auf diese Z^tachrift beziehen cu woilen. 



INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



28 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



as 



I 



watched the boats carryinR their cargoes of 
passengers to and fro. 

Sweden's lakis arc- v- mnnerous and so large 
that about eight per cent, of her entire area is 
given np to these internal waterways, and they 
probably account for the fact that her people 
ha<l a large domestic conunerce before the era 
of railroads. These lakes are so situated that 
by connecting them by canals water transit has 
been secured between Stockholm on the east 
coast and (.'.othenburg on the west. The boat 
trij) through these lakes and canals is one of 
the most pleasant to be found in I'.uropc. 

The Swedes wh.. have come to the United 
States are such excellent fanners that I was 
surprised to find but twelve \wr cent, of the 
area of Sweilen ilevoted to agriculture and 
fifty-one per cent, described as wi»odland. Only 
tifty-five per cent, of the population is now en- 
gaged in farming, the proportion having fallen 
from seventy-two per cent, ^ince 1H70. while 
tin- i)roiKirtiou engaged in other imlustries has 
risen from fifteen to twenty-seven per cent. 

Lumbering, fishing and shipping each gives 
employment to a large number of men, atid 
iron I'nining. long a leading idustry, is still 
important, although owing to the development 
of mines elsewhere, Sweden tiow furnishes but 
one per cent, of the entire output of ore, as 
against ten per cent, in the eighteenth cen- 
tury. The fact that she had such an abundant 
supply of the raw material earlv gave her a 
consi)icuous place in iron manufactures, and 
the familiarity with this metal may be due to 
the fact that Sweden was (piick to take advan- 
tage of the railrojid. the telegraph and the tele- 
phone. In electrical appliances she now claims 
second place among the nations. .\ large use 
has also been made of the water power with 
which the country abounds, notably at Norr- 
koping where an industrial exiw.sition is now 
in progress. 

We spent a <lay at tin- expoMtion for the 
purpose of gathering information in regard to 
industrial Sweden. W bile the agricultural dis- 
play was not ready, the exhibit of the products 
of the factory was exceedingly interesting. 
The articles shown included metal woi^k of all 
kinds and varieties, from heavy machinery to 
parlor ornaments. In one section canned fruit 
was displayed, in another great rolls of lino- 
leum and oilcloth, and in still another textile 
fabrics. The cloth was especially worthy of 
notice, being of superior quality and of every 
sha<le of color. There was also a complete 
assortment of dairv implements and farm tools. 
So skillful is the Swedish artisan that the In- 
ternational Harvester Company has recently 
established a branch factory at Norrkoping 
and with the aid of Ainerican foremen is pre- 
paring to manufacture reapers and mowers 
there, not only for Sweden but for northern 
Europe. 

In addition to the machine-made exhibits, 
there were specimens of the handwork of peas- 
ants and students. These included many varie- 
ties of needle work, wood carving, and decor- 
ation on leather and bark. Peasant girls in na- 
tive costume presided over these displays and 
gave the visitor a glimpse of the picturesque 
garb now fas disappearing before the prosaic 
dress of the cities. At Skanscn. in the suburbs 
of Stockholm, and at a few of the enterprising 
stores this quaint costume may still be seen, but 
it is not generally worn now even in the coun- 
try. 



There is a gallery at Norrkoping exposition 
where one may see a collection of Swedish and 
Danish art, the pictures not only portraying 
the familiar features and flaxen hair of the 
north, but recalling the long nights and the 
winter scenes of that latitude. 



Sweden was a pioneer in the matter of uni- 
versal education and has at Uppsala a state 
university founded in 1477— fifteen years be- 
fore Columbus sailed for America. She has 
also had a college of medicine for more than 
a hundred years, and her sons have taken high 
rank in all the departments of science. Her 
grammer schools run back to the time of Gus- 
tavus Adolphus, and her common school sys- 
tem is almost as old. She has given to the 
world among other things the Sloyd system 
of teaching, which combines manual training 
with mental instruction. Sweden has shown 
by her prominence in literature, science, art 
and music that the higher altitudes do not 
chill the imagination or repress genius, and 
yet, the country is even more noted for the 
high average of intelligence among the peo- 
ple than for the extraordinary accomplish- 
ments of a few. 

The Swedish language contains so many 
words that resemble the English that the 
Swedish newspaper looks much more familiar 
than the Greek or the Russian, but it is not 
always safe to rely upon the similarity in 
spelling. For instance, "mm" means room 
and when it appears in a window or on a door, 
it is only an innocent announcement that trav- 
elers can find accommodation within. The word 
■'bad" means bath, and "bad rum," therefore, 
is a familiar sign in hotels. 

Sweden has her political problems like all 
the other nations, and just now her people arc 
absorbed in the question of extending the 
suffrage. The upper house is an aristocratic 
body composed of representatives of the weal- 
thier classes. In electing members of thi'^ 
body a rich man's vote counts for more than 
a poor man's vote, it being possible for the 
richest person to have about ten times as many 
votes as the poorest. As might be expected, 
the upper house is conservative and stands in 
the way of some of the reforms proposed by 
the more popular branch. The last ministry 
was a liberal one, but resigned when the upper 
house flefeated the mea.sure for the extension of 
the suffrage. The new ministry has at its 
head Mr. Lindmann, a business man vho 
represents the commercial and conservative ele- 
ment, and his party is willing to accept an ex- 
tension of the franchise provided it is coupled 
with minority representation, the aim being to 
increase the conservative strength in the lower 
house in order to protect the upper house from 
attack. The conservatives fear — and not with- 
out reason — that an overwhelming liberal ma- 
jority in the popular branch would soon en- 
danger the aristocratic character, if not the 
very existence, of the upper house. The situa- 
tion is interesting in that it indicates the 
growth of radicalism in the country. The con- 
servatives recognize this and are prepared to 
make concessions ; they hope to retard the pro- 
gress of the movement but realize that thcv 
can not defeat it entirely. 

Industrial questions are receiving considera- 
tion in Sweden ; laws concerning child labor 
have boon enacted, accident insurance has been 
provided, and an old age pension is being dis- 



cussed. Attention is also being given to the 
housing problem in the cities, to farm allot- 
ments and to the establishment of labor 
bureaus and boards of arbitration. The Goth- 
enburg license system is in operation in Swe- 
den, under which the sale of liquor, where the 
sale is not entirely prohibited, is in the hands 
of semi-official corporations. Whether this 
system is responsible for it or not may be 
open to qucsti<m. but statistics show that there 
has been a large decrease in the sale of bever- 
ages containing a high percentage of alcohol. 

r.y the courtesy of the .Xmerican minister, 
Colonel Graves, I had an opportunity to pay 
my respects to King Oscar II. I was glad 
to do so for two reasons ; first, because so many 
of his former subjects have become American 
citizens; and second, because of the honorable 
part which he played in the recent crisis which 
resulted in the separation of Sweden and Nor- 
way. He is of powerful frame, and though 
seventy-seven years old, would pass for a much 
younger man.' He has a kindly face and rides 
about the citv without a guard. A more ambi- 
tious monarch would have met Norway's de- 
mand with armed resistance, but he, recog- 
nizing that the holding of Norway against 
the will of the people would involve his coun- 
try in perpetual strife, advocated a peaceful 
separation provided the people of Norway 
asked for it in unmistakable terms. 

I'or thirty years he had been the sovereign 
of both, and in his old age he could not bear to 
see the two countries engaged in a bloo'ly con- 
flict. He is just now criticised by some who 
did not become sanguinary until all prospect 
of war was past, but he has the consolation of 
knowing that his critics are not only alive but 
have no dead relatives to mourn. Had he 
plunged his country into war, his critics could 
remind him of vacant chairs at the fireside. 

King ( 'scar has in a most practical way 
proved himself to be a promoter of peace and 
as such deserves the prize provided by that 
great Swedish chemist, Alfred Nobel. By giv- 
ing conspicuous approval to his course, the 
trustees of the Nobel fund may be able to en- 
courage other sovereigns to imitate him. 



A TREMENDOUS FEAT 

After montlis of hard work the engineers 
of the Southern I'acific Railway have succeed- 
ed in damming up the inlet to the Salton Sea, 
in Southern California, and turning the Colo- 
rado river back into its original channel lead- 
ing to the Gulf of California. Thus $25,- 
000,000 worth of property and the homes of 
10,000 are rescued from inundation. The Sal- 
ton Sea is a vast inland body of water created 
during the two years that the river has been 
pouring into the lowlands of the desert. The 
break in the river bank was caused by the dig- 
ging of an irrigation canal. Now the engi 
ncers have completed a concrete dam. supple- 
mented by rock and gravel. 



One of the largest rotary pump plants in 
the world has been erectetl for the Nechcs 
Canal Company, of Beaumont. Texas. This 
plant, which will be used for irrigating pur- 
poses, will discharge at the rate of one hun- 
dred forty thousand gallons a minute or twen- 
ty-three gallons in one-hundredth of a second. 
The impellers are fifty-eight and ..uc half 
inches in diameter and displace two thousand, 
five hundred twelve gallons at each revolution. 



\ 




WE BUILD 



EDoioes ami Boiieis 

From 3 to 50 horse-power, in a 
variety of sizes and styles 
specially well adapted for 
foreign trade. Importers in 
position to handle such goods 
will find it to their interest to 
get our catalog. Prices and 
full information furnished 
promptly on application. 

James Leffel ^ Co. 

Num. 138 
Springfield. Ohio. U. S. A. 



WIR BAUCN 

IflasGtiliieii unii Kessei 

Von 3 bis 50 Pferdekraften in 
eiaer Auswahl von Grossen und 
Sorten, die sich besonders fiir 
den auswartigen Handel hestens 
eignen. Einfuhrhandler 
welcbe in der Lage sind solche 
Waaren zu fiihren, diirften 
finden, dass es sich in ihrem 
Interesse erweisen wird, sich 
unsern Katalog, der Preise, 
voile Beschreibung, usw., ent- 
halt, kommen zu lassen. Der- 
selbe wird franko auf Verlangen 
sofort versandt. 

James Leffel 4 Co. 

Num. 138 
Springrield. Ohio, U. S. A. 



Noui ConitniUont 

m MACHINES A VAPWR 

[1 DE8 mmm 

de la force de 3 ^ 50 chevaux- 
vapeurs et dans une vari^t^ de 
dimensions et de genres sp^- 
cialenient adapt^s d I'industrie 
^trangere. I^es importateurs 
qui ont occasion de s'occuper 
de ces articles trouveront grand 
intdret A obtenirnos catalogues, 
nos prix et de completes in- 
formations qui sont fournies 
prouiptement sur demande. 

James Leffel 4 Co. 

Num. 138 
Springfield, Ohio, U. S. A. 



ANGLE LEG BARROW 

Made to Dump Over the Wheel 




This is one of the very best steel tray, wood frame Barrows 
made. Tray mea.sures on top 29.X36. has heavy rod rolled in 
edge and is made of No. 14 steel. Frame is very heavy, of se- 
lected hard wood, and is thoroly braced and bolted. The steel 
angle legs and braces speak for themselves. Wheel is 16 inches 
_ in diameter, i34x;*8 inch tire, 'j inch spokes, and runs on a yi 

inch wheel bolt held to handles by heavy lug. Weight, per doz., 750 lbs. 

Lansing Wheelbarrow Co. 

Lansing, Mich., U. S. A. 

NEW YORK OFFICE B-21, PRODUCE EXCHANGE 



Quincy 
Beauty 

Riding 
Plows. 

For use with 

Horses or 

Cattle. 



Collins Plow Co. 



::. 




QUINCY, ILL., U.S.A. 



Eli 

Baling 

Presses, 




Medal* and 
Diplomas 
:^^^_^ World's 

Columbian 

^A8i.W«0^0. Exposition. 
^ Chicago. 



Quincy Steel 

Lever 

Harrows 



AU kinds of 



for Steam 
and Horse 
Power. 



«'&.. steel Plows. 




Collins* 

Hardened 

5teel 

Plows 

are the 
BEST. 




Special attention given to Packing of Export Goods. 



IN USE AT PRESENT TlrtE IN 
MANY FOREIGN FIELDS. 



SEND FOR 

CATALOOUBS. 



30 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



31 



A SALT CITY 

In Austrian Poland, in the quiet Carpa- 
thian valley of the \istula. is to be found one 
of the most surprisinjj; nsuUs i>f human labor. 
It is Wielickza's under},rroun<l city, hewn from 
^listenins rock salt. No railroad is permitted 
within miles of this strange town, for the 
peasants fear that the vibrations, caused by 
moving trains, would jar the earth's crust un- 
til it fell in ui)on the busy municipality be- 
neath its surface. 

It has taken a thousand years of patient 
toil, according to a writer in the ScienUfi Anwr- 
ican. to honevcomb an entire city from the 
HKk salt crust. It consists of an intricate con- 
geries of winding streets and dim scintillat- 
ing alleys of pillared churches; diamond and 
ruby staircases, restaurants, railroad stations, 
shrines, statues, moimments, and a thousand 
other wonders— all rough-hewn in the hard, 
sparkling rock-salt crystals which, lit by elec- 
tric lights, ])ine torches, magnesium flashes. 
or thousands of candles, fairly blaze like a 
world of precious stones. 

\isitors to the salt city may be carried down 
in elevators or descen.l by a long, massive, 
staricase, hewn from solid rock. Naturally, 
most people prefer the latter means of en- 
trance, since at every step light as from thous- 
an.ls of gleaming emeralds and rubies flashes 
its greeting. That a semblance of streets 
might have grown in the course of mining 
operations woukl not seem strange, but to tind 
a pillared cathedral, a ballroom, a triumphal 
archway, assembly hall, restaurant, etc., is 
truly astonishing. 

The high altar in the salt 'cathedral' is cun- 
ningly adorned with twisted pillars, and it is 
flanked by salt-hewn statues of St. Stanislaus 
and St. Clement. ( hi the altar steps are carv- 
ed in ruby-red rock-salt effigies of two kneel- 
ing monks, and in the background of the altar 
is a huge salt crucifix, before which stands the 
N'irgin placing the infant Jesus in St. An- 
thonv's arm>. This, the most extraordinary 
church in all the w^rld. coiit.iins a -.alt-hewn 
pulpit. supi>ortcd by salt stat\us of St. Peter 
and St. Paul, and in a niche below stands a 
glistening statue of the good king Augustus 

H. . , 

Not to be outdone by the budders ot the 

cathedral, succeeding generation^ of miners 
hewed out the va>t '-Sallo <le 1 )an'~e." the won- 
derful l.entow ballrwMii, 'lit with enormous 
lusters or chandeliers of wire-hung rock-salt 
crystals of opalescent hues. 

This great ballroom is over three hundred 
fe«;t in length, an<l towers <limly to a height 
of one hundred and ninety feet. Its walls of 
rock-salt glisten and flash with exquisitely- 
bue<l crvstals. and there are symbolical statue^ 
hvre ami there, representii>g- Knowledge, La- 
iKir, Vulcan and Neptune; as well as a Spe- 
cial Throne of State at one end, of course 



hewn in the rock-salt, and kept for the use 
of the aged Emperor Franz Joesph or the Im- 
perial Archdukes. 

A triumphal archway, in salt, forms the 
entrance to the ballroom and on its summit is 
the figure of a miner saluting. 

Whenever an okl working is exhausted or 
closed, or a new street opened in the sub- 
terranean city, the event is celebrated by a 
great ball in the I.entow Saloon. Then it is 
that hundreds of Galican peasant women, 
wives and friends of the workers below, 
quaintly clad as a comic opera chorus, take 
their partners in the vast, rough-hewn salt 
cavern, while shrill pipes, quaint-soundmg 
flutes and sweet violins make merry music as 
the couples whirl in wild Slavonic dance. 

The Kaiser Franz Chamber, named for the 
present ruler, is nearly two hundred feet long 
and one hundred and five feet high, it con- 
tains two immense pyramids with ornamental 
bases, placed there to commemorate a visit of 
the Kmperor and Fmpress many years ago. 
.Ml the little trolley lines and many of the 
principal streets meet at the Central Railroad 
Station. Polish ponies, most of which are 
born blind and have never been on the earth 
at all, draw the cars. 

The platform of this Grand Central Depot 
has seating accommodations for four hundred 
persons, and on holidays its cafes and restau- 
rants are crowded with visitors from the up- 
per world, who eat and drink and enjoy the 
wild music of the miners' orchestra, which 
echoes and reverberates strangely through the 
dim yet sparkling streets. 

Tragedies are not unknown in this curious 
city of salt. Fires have broken out and burned 
until wooden props have given way. letting 
tons of material fall into chambers and streets. 
The strange salt lakes sometimes begin to rise, 
without warning, and drown scores of the 
hardworking miners. Violent explosions of 
carbonated hydrogen occur. 

In spite of all these dangers, some two thous- 
and men work in the salt city, day and night, 
in shifts of eight hours, and make little more 
than twenty cents a day. Children are born 
to these hollow-eyed, bloodless-looking men, 
are christened, grow up and, naturally, follow 
the work of their fathers. Yet the people 
seem happy and to see them on a festive day, 
when the streets are half an inch deep in ruby 
and diamond-flashing salt pebbles and dust ; 
when the Emperor may be on his throne in the 
great Eentow Saloon, and two hundred and 
fifty Slav mu'-icians directing a perfect orgie 
of delights — then indeed one woulrl say the 
citizens of the salt domain luoil no sympathy 
from outsiders. 



EXPORTS OF COTTON 

Cotton is king in the export record of the 
United States fur the fiscal year just ended. 
The total value of raw cotton ex|)orted for the 
first time crossed the 400 million dollar line 
and exceeded by far the value of any other 
article of merchandise sent out of the coun- 
try. The exports of breadstuffs of all kin<ls 
aggregated but iSf'i million dollars, those of 
provisions but 211 millions, an<l those of iron 
and steel manufactures but 161 million dollars. 



lixports of cotton have increased very rap- 
idly in value during the last five years. It was 
not until 1901 that the value of raw cotton 
exported reached 300 million dollars. The 
value of the cotton exports had ranged be- 
tween 200 and 300 millions in most years since 
186*3, in which year it first crossed the 200 
million dollar line; but it was not until 1901 
that it crossed the 300 million dollar line, and 
in a short five years' period it has grown to 
more than 400 millions, or an increase of about | 
33 per cent, in five years. This growth is due 
in part to an increase in the quantity exported, 
but in part also to the advance in price since 
the quantity exported in lyofj was alwut 700 
million pounds less than in 1905, but the value 
21 million dollars more than in 1905. 

The exportation of niaiiufacture<l cotton was 
also larger in 1906 than in any earlier year, 
aggregating practically 53 million dollars, 
against 50 millions in UJ05 and 22^2 millions 
in 1904. The growth in exports of manu- 
factured cotton has been quite as striking as 
that of the raw material. Prior to 1877 ex- 
ports of cotton manufactures had never but 
once amounted to as much as 10 million dol- 
lars, and it was not until 1897 that they passed 
the 20 million dollar line. In it>o2 they were 
}2 millions, in i(>05 practically 50 millions, 
and, as above indicated, in 190O practically 53 
millions. 

luiropc is, of course, our principal customer 
for raw cotton. The L'nited Kingdom t<Hjk 
last year 177 million dollars' worth, Germany 
loi millions, France 45 millions, and Italy 
about 27 millions, while the other countries 
of luirope took about 32 million dollars' worth, 
Japan is also a customer for our raw cotton, 
but very irregular in the quantity bought, 
since she only buys largely of American cot- 
ton when prices are low, relying upon India 
and China in years when American prices are 
high. The value of cotton exported to Japan 
in the fiscal year 1906 was. in rouiul terms. 8 
million dollars, in 19«J5. 17 millions, and in 
1904 less than 3 millions. 

In manufactured cotons, China is by far our 
largest customer. The total value of all cot- 
ton manufacturers exported in the fiscal year 
1906, was as atove indicated, 53 million dol- 
lars in round terms, of which al)out 30 millions 
went to China. Practically all of the cotton 
g(.Mxls sent to China was in the form of cloth, 
tlie total value of cotton cloths export eii to 
China in the year being $29,(141,188, and oi 
other cotton goods ^]-2,HHy. The exports of 
cotton cloths to China in the fiscal 
year i')<i<i exceeded both in quantity 
and value that of any other earlier 
year, the value in H)o6 being about 2 million 
dollars greater than in 1005, and the number 
of Yards .ilioiil 24 millions greater than in 
i</)5. Chinas rank as a purchaser of Ameri- 
can cottons is indicated by the fact that of 
the 711 million yards of cotton cloths ex])orted 
in H/i'). 4V'^ millions went to China, while 
.about 133 million yards went to the ,\nierican 
countries south of the United States, and 25 
millions to Asia other than China, and Ckeania. 
— Stoi'es and Hardware Reporter. 



'U 



Monitor Seeding Machinery 



We make Broadcast Seeders and 
Sowers and Drills 

of all sizes and styles ; with Hoe, Shoe, 
Single and Double Disc Furrow Openers, 
equipped to suit the needs of any and all 
territories. 
We ClaTm to Make the Best Seeding Machines on Earth 
Machines that will produce the best result.s. Space is too limited 
to go into details, but if you will make request we will send 
illustrations and full particulars. 

MONITOR DRILL COMPANY, -«••*,;•••"•' Minneapolis. Minn.. U. S. A. 



■fvj»f('<^»v^i?:^i 



\mm 



"1900" &, WASHING MACHINES 

The "1900" B*ll-lk«rlat Wiskiat Mtchlacs repre- 
sent over twenty-one years' practical experience, 
and, unlike any other washer upon the market, 
<• Ml le»r ani weir Ibe firanl, i">t ios« and 
tumble the gHrnuiit IhrouKh ,t whirl»eel oi waltr. 
thuslorclBt Ibe wiler Ibreafb the (ImsI or ccirMSI 
Itkrlcs, causing the clothes to Income ABSO- 
LUTtLY CLEAN. wilhMt kolMi« n scrubkiat. wllbaal 
w«ar ar l«r, »»t wllbaal Ibe ase al cbenicals. 



Awarded Gold Medal al World** 
Fair, St. Louis. 

■CFERtNCE : Fint Natiaaal Baak al Bia(k*aiaa. N.V. 

Send order* director through export houses. 
lo latter caae send duplicate to us to avoid errors. 




lilualrated Calaloflve Senl Poatpald on Requeal 

The "1900" WASHER COMPANY, Binghamton, N. Y., 0. S. A. 



Do You Want 

Export Trade? 



^ 



AN "AD" IN THE 



»» 



•'Export Implement Age 

an independent journal, devoted exclusively 
to export trade in American Agricultural 
Machinery, Farm Supplies, Vehicles and Ve- 
hicle Materials, Machine Tools, Hardware 
Specialties, Etc., will bring you inquiries. 
Write for rites. 

THE -EXPORT IMPLEMENT AOE" 

1010 ARCH STREET. • PHIIADELPHIA. PA. 




JOHN DEERE PLOWS 

TURN THE SOIL 
THE WORLD OVER 



These plows are the embodimeut of sixty-eight years of 
experience— that is why they are the highest type of perfec- 
tion in the art of plow building. Constructed upon strictly 
scientific principles, of the best materials, by artisans of the 
highest skill, in the largest plow factory in the world. 

Manufactured in all sizes and for all purposes, from a seven- 
inch walking plow to an Engine Ciang turning fourteen feet ol 
soil at one time. 

Exported in Lar^e Quantities to AH 
Parts of ttte Globe 

Boxed compactly for foreign shipment and in most con- 
venient form for handling. 

We solicit correspondence from importers, either direct or 
through American forwarding houses. 



DEERE & CO 

MOLINE, ILL., U. S. A. 



32 



Export Implement Age 



Some Recent Inventions 



The following recent inventions have been 
sixvially rq>-it>d t'-r tlic I'.xroKT iMi-i.i-MiiNT 
\i.i-- h\ Mr. C. IaUov Parker. Solicitor of 
Patents. J>'y «- Street! X. W.. Washington, 
U. C. 

Cotton-Marvesting Machine 

No. 827.288 N. Bowdttch July 3>. «906 

The difficulties atten.ling the harvesting or 
gathering <•( cotton hv other means than by 
han.l liave been such that harvesting machmes 
constructed on the plan of machines for har- 
vesting other material could not be used or 
even utilized in the cotton industry. A radical 
departure fmiii the ilevices used in other part> 
must therefore be made, and a harvesting 
machine to he commercially successful, must 
be able to meet the luvuliar conditions attend- 
ing the harvesting of cotton. 

In carrying out this invention there is pro- 



ment in a vertical direction, a swinging frame 
pivotally mounted upon said main frame for 
movement in a horizontal tlirection, means for 
moving said swinging frame relatively to said 
main frame, a guide-frame pivotally mounteil 



Beet-Blocker and Cotton-Chopper 

No.82«».067 W. F.rrU A..g.2»,>906 

\ beet-blocker and cotton-chopper, com- 
prising a frame, a driven shaft mounted there- 
on a clutch element fast on said shaft, a varia- 
ble-speed gear kx)se and shiftable longitudin- 
ally on said shaft, and having a clutch element 





upon said swinging frame, a reciprocatttry 
saw carrie<l bv said guide- frame and adapted 
to l>e moved thereby from vertical to horizontal 
position, and means for reciprocating said 
saw when in either vertical or horizontal posi- 
tion. • 1 r: 
This machine is the invention of Daniel h. 
Frank, of Crystal River, Florida. 
Plow 

No. 81*. 173. H.Morton M.rch 27, 1 "05 

This plow is particularly designed for turn- 
ing surface furrows and at the same time sub- 
soiling untler said furrows without bringing 
the subsoil to the surface. 

The construction of the implement is ob- 
vious from the illustration. In the operation 




vided a machine mounted upon suitable sup- 
porting-wheels, said wheels having a series 
of cotton-pickers associated directly therewith, 
the machine so constructed that it may be 
moved along a row of cotton-plants, so that the 
pickers will engage the cotton and remove it 
from the plants. 

The machine comprises essentially one or 
more supporting wheels, a series of guides 
carried thercbv, a series of cotton pickers 
wf>rking in said guides, an inclined wheel asso- 
ciate.! with each supporting wheel, a ^"ii"''- 
tion between said pickers and said mclinec 
wheel, means for rotating the inclined whec 
means for rulalinK the inclined wheel 
in unistin with the supix.rting-whecl and suita- 
ble compensating devices for keeping the puk- 
ers in proper position with relation to the 
guides. 

Wood-Sawing Machine 

No.8J.,715 D.E.F,.nk S.pt. 25, .-»06 

This invention is a wood-sawing machine 
which mav be usefully employed for felling 
trees sawing logs or cord-wood, and for other 
nunK>ses to which a wood-sawing machine 
mav be employed, the objects of the mvention 
being to simplify the construction and opera- 
tion of this class of machines, fully described 
and particularly pointed out in the claims. 

A wood-saw'ing machine comprising a pair 
of carrying-wheels, a main frame pivotally 
mounted upon said carrying-wheels for move- 





to engage and disengage the first-mentioned 
clutch element, means to shift said variable- 
speed gear, a chopping element, a shaft to 
operate the same, and a pinion on said shaft 
shiftable radially with reference to the speed- 
gear. 

Corn Planter 

No. 824.176. J.F. & N.P. Divcnnc. June 25. 1906 

The purpose of this invention is to provide 
a corn-planter, in which there is a mechanism 
for rigidly securing the driving-shaft of the 
planter to the traction-wheels and. further, to 
provide means for throwing both of these 
wheels into or out of oi)eration relative to 
the driving-shaft by a foot or other lever from 
the operator's scat. 

In practical operation and assuming that 
two rows have l>een planted and that the driv- 
ing-shaft is secured to the traction-wheels il 
and 12, and the end of the row is reached, the 
operator operates the lever 26 to throw the 



of the plow, the turning-share serves to fur- 
row the surface soil to a suitable depth, and the 
subsoiling-plow, which runs in rear of and 
to a greater depth than the turningshare. serves 
to break up and loosen the subsoil without 
bringing it to the surface. 
Beet-Puller 

NoS29.285 M. W. P»lm«r Auf. 21.1906 

This invention is a beet-plow or puller, hav- 
ing runners adapted to enter the soil under and 
to straddle the beet and pull it bodily upwar<l 



J 




j^^'U 



upon lifter-anns, the machine embodying 
means for shifting the wheels with relation to 
the runners, so that the puller can be readily 
handled and when not in use can be directly 
conveyed from place to place without the 
runners entering the ground. 

The invention also embodies gage-wheels, 
having a swivel-mounting to enable the ma- 
chine to be turned around without tipping or 
lifting the puller around. 



collars 13 and 14 out of engagement with the 
traction-wheels ii and 12, so that these wheels 
can rotate freely on the shaft 10 in making 
the turn, and hence throw the entire device out 
of operative relation with the traction wheels. 
When the next two rows are reached and the 
operator is reafly to throw the operative parts 
of the device into operative relation to the 
traction-wheels, he releases the lever 26, and 
the device is in readiness for full operation. 
How ever, before he commences to operate the 
jilanter on the next two rows he throws the 
gear 32 out of engagement with the gear 31 
and by adjusting the chain 41 places the drop- 
ping mechanism in proper position, so that it 
will operate to drop the com in line with the 
two hills in the preceding rows last planted. 
He then throws the gear 32 into operative re- 
lation with the gear 30 and proceeds with the 
planting. 



>i 



Export Implement Age 



THIS JOURNAL 

is wtcmHively devoted to American agricultural implements 
and machinery, pumpa, windmill.^, farm tools, dairy sup- 
plies and hardware specialties, and it 

REPRESENTS THE OLDEST AND LARGEST 
HOUSES IN AMERICA 

who present their goods throntrh our columns. We pub- 
lish each luonth. Kach issue full of facta. 

One Dollar {Four Shillings) is the subscription price 
for O.NE YEAR (12 issues), which also entitles you to receive 
information by writing us direct, on any subject connected 
with the lines we represent. The Export Implement Aie 
is certainly worthy of your interest and support. 

We should be pleased to place you in communication with 
the manufacturers ot any special class of machinery that you 
desire to purchase, and you may also consider our services 
at your further command. 

Sl^n Enclosed Blank and remit by International 
Money Order to KxfoKT IMPLEMENT AGE. Xo. 1010 Arch St., 
Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



I 



DIESE ZEITSCHRIFT 

ist ausschliesslich amerikanischen laudwirthschaftlichen Ma- 
schinen und Gerathen, .sowie der Fabrikation von I'umpen, 
Windniotoren, Landwirthschafts-Werkzeugen. Molkereiaus- 
stattungen und den diversen Branchen der Stahl- und liisen- 
waaren-Industrie gewidmet. Dieselbe 

VERTRITT DIE ALTESTEN UND DIE BEDEUTENDSTEN 
FIRMEN IN DEN VEREINIGTEN STAATEN 

die ihre Erzeugnis.se durch die Spalten dieses Blattes zur 
Anzeige bringen. Das Blatt erscheint monathch. Jede 
Ausgabe enthalt nur werthvolle Thatsachen. 

EIn Dollar (vier Mark) ist der Alxinneraentspreis pro 
Tahr (12 Ausgaben) fiir dieselbe und jeder Alwnnent ist 
ausserdein Ijerechtigt an uns in seiner Muttersprache zu schret- 
ben und sich Auskunft iiber irgend ein Thema der von uns 
vertreteneu Branchen zu erbitten. Das Export Implement 
Ttae i.st wahrlich Ihrer Unterstiitzung und Hires Interesses 
wiirdig. 

Wir sind gerne crlnitig, Sic mit den Fabrikanten irgend 
welcher Mahchinensorten, fiir die Sie sich interessiren durlten, 
in Verbindung zu .setzen und wird es uns freuen, wenn Sie 
sich unserer Dienste in irgend welcher Weisc bedieneu wollten 

Man unterzeichne das beigefiigte Schema und seiide den 
Bctrag durch "Internationale Geldanweisung " an das 
TvxpoRT Impi.hmknt Age, No. 1010 Arch Street, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CE JOURNAL 

est exclusivement consacrd aux machines et instruments agri- 
coles Amcricains, pompes, moulins a vent, outils de ferme, 
appareils ixjur laiteries, articles speciaux de quincaillerie. 

IL REPRESENTE LES MAISONS AMERIOAINES LES 
PLUS ANCIENNES ET LES PLUS VASTES, 

les quelles offrent leurs produits par I'interm^diaire de nos 
colonnes Le journal est mensuel. Chaque num^ro abonde 
en fails d'utJlitc pratique. 

Abonnement pour un an: Un Dollar (quatre aehellln^a 
ou cinq francs. ) Tout abonnc qui vondra bien nous 6crire 
directement recevra tons les renseignerments qu'il pourra 
desirer sur les matieres dont s'occupe le journal. L' Export 
Implement Tl^e est assurement digue de votre interet et de 
votre concours. 

Nous serions heureux de vous mettre en relations avec les 
fabricants de n'importe quelle categorie de machines que vous 
pouvez desirer vous procurer, et nos services vous sont, 
d'ailleurs, conipletenient acquis. 

Signer le bulletin el'lnelus et envoyer un mandat de 
poste international h 1' Export Implement Agk. No. 1010 
Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa. (Etats-Unis d'Amerique). 






ESTA REVISTA PERIODICA 

se dedica exclusivaraente a los instrumentos y niaquinaria 
agricolas de manufactura norte-americana. bombas, molinos 
de viento, herramientas de hacienda de campo, utensihos para 
lecheria y e.specialidades en ferreterias, y 

REPRESENTA A LAS MAS GRANDES Y ANTIGUAS 

CASAS DE AMERICA, 

que ofrecen sus productos fabriles en nuestras columnas. Se 
publica todos los meses. Cada miniero estd lleuo de hechos. 

Un Peso ( euatro Ghellnes al atio es el precio de la 
MibscriiKion U2 numeros). y la subscriixrion os da derecho 
i. recibir informes. si nos escribfs directamente, .sobre cualqiiier 
asunto relacionado con el ramo de negocios que representanios. 
La Export Implement Ti^e es a la verdad digna de que 
OS iiitereseis por ella y contribuyais a su sostcn. 

Tendremos mucho gusto en poneros tn correspondencia con 
los fabricnntes de cualquiera clase especial de m.aquinana 
,p,o deseeis comprar. y podeis tambicn constderar nuestms 
servicios :i vucstra dispisicion. 

Firmad la Planllla en bianco Inclusa, y remit. 1 
vucstra subscriivion en un (h.o Postal Internacional a la 
Export ImpuhmknT Ack. No. loiu Arch blreet. Philadel- 
phia, I'a., U. S. A. 



No. loio Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



34 



Export Implement Age 



THE STEEL BUSINESS AND ITS 
FUTURE 



Tht-rt- is no iloubt whatever but tliat all 
factors arc niakiiip for the greater prosperity 
of the steel hiisiiuss, and therefore for the 
greater growth of Pittsburgh and the Pitts- 
burgh region in wealtii and population. 

L'ntil a comparatively few years ago the 
steel business was confined to a siuall nuiulier 
of lines, and even yet the uses of steel are 
few as compared to the uses to whicli the 
future will put it. .\t this tiiue the business 
is in a state of great prosperity and has 
attained an enormous i)roduction, yet the 
new uses that arc continually being found for 
the metal give evidence that the (Icmand that 
now exists will be but a small thing as com- 
pared with the demand of the next century. 
As an evidence of this fact it may be cited 
that the steel car is of com])aratively recent 
invention, supplanting the wooden car, and 
a half dozen large companies arc now manu- 
facturing steel cars, or cars that are mostly 
steel, with some wood used. Within the past 
few weeks two single railroad systems have 
placed orders for steel cars that will require 
a vast amount of steel plates in their construc- 
tion. These systems were the Pennsylvania 
railroad and the New York Central lines. The 
contracts they have placed have been for but 
a few hmidred slmrt of 30,000 steel cars of the 
various ty]ies. and in their cimslruction 350,- 
000 tons of steel plates will be usi-d. this not 
taking into consideration the wheels and struc- 
tural steel that will also be needed for frames, 
trucks, etc. Tt has not been very many years 
since such an amount of steel would have been 
regarded with wonderment. 

The rise of the steel car business is largely 
responsible for the increase in the number of 
steel plate mills, the Homestead steel works 
alone having grown from two to three plate 
mills ten years ago to about eight mills rolling 
plates now. 

In a few years the rivers will be traversed, 
not by wooden steamboats pushing wooden 
barges as at present, but Pittsburgh coal and 
other Pittsburgh products will be taken to the 
Southern markets in steel barges pushed by 
tovvboats made of steel. This change is com- 
ing and is being ma<le necessarv' by two great 
factors, one being the increasing scarcity of 
wood tlirough the depiction of the forests, and 
the consequent rise in the price of timfKT and 
saw ed boards, and the second being the greater 
durability of steel, as compared with w(«^. 

.\t the present time it it not unusual to hear 
of several hundred, or perhaps several humlred 
thousand bushels of coal lost in the iMitimn i>t 
the rivers through some river accident — the 
striking of a snag i>r a collision with a bridge 
pier, while the towboats tluinselves arc '■uli- 
ject to various and numerous cn-tly aiciiknts 
of the same nature. 

The great I r strength combined with the 
longer life of the steel Inirgc is making them 
very desirable in spite nf the greater nriginal 
investrnent. anrl the American Bridge Coin 
pany has installed a (lei)artment at its larj^r 
works at Ambridgc for the making of steel 
barges entirely. In addition to this, exjjeri- 
mcnts are about to be made with steel steam 
boats for use on the rivirs. The Jones tV 
Laughlin Steel Company have now onk-rs in 
for the construction of two steamers that will 
be built principally of steel. These will be all 



metal except the decks, and it is stated that 
plans are being prepared for another vessel 
that will be made entirely of steel. With the 
latter many of the costly accidents that now 
occur will i)e impossible.' Kor instance, a steel 
boat will go over one of the dams in high 
water without daiuagc, while a vvoo<Ien bottom 
would be crushed at some part. 

In the older uses of steel there is to be con- 
tinued activity, in railroad work the present 
urgency in the deiuand for steel is not so much 
the result of new work, as is supposed, as it is 
work for replacements. .\ large luunber of the 
railroa<ls have been constructed with rails run- 
ning from f)0 to 80 i)Ounds per yard. These 
have been laid in conjunction with wooden 
bridges across small streams, and the rails have 
Ix-en single spiked. The steel car has been 
largelv resiK>nsible for a radical change in 
these conditions, so that the large Eastern sys- 
tems are now rebuilding their roads and the 
Western roads will in time come more and 
more to the necessity of rebuilding. The elim- 
ination of curves and straightening of tracks is 
also made necessary. 

The steel car is taking the place of the w ood- 
en car, being stronger and making possible 
tlie carrying of a much greater tonnage. As 
the capacity of the car increased the length of 
the train that could be transported with the 
old locomotives decreased, so that to operate 
with the greatest economy larger kxromotives 
l»ccame necessary, and the locomotive works 
have been in receipt of great orders for larger 
motive power. These changes brought train- 
loads of much greater weight, and the tracks 
failed to stand the strain. This became ap- 
parent in the demand for rails of greater 
strength, and now on the main lines nothing 
less than Ko to 100 pound rails arc ntiw being 
laid in reidacing the old and lighter tracks. The 
new heavy rails require a stronger binding to 
the ties and are being double spiked, with the 
results that the spike mills of Pittsburgh are 
months behind in their contracts. The nuich 
greater weight in the trains and tracks has re- 
quired the replacement of the old woe>den 
bridges with bridges of steel, and the structural 
steel workers and structural steel has been 
called into use to build steel bridges to with- 
stand the greater moving Imnkns that pass 
over them. 

Another change in railroad construction is 
in the replacing of woo(l< n tu - with steel. This 
change has not become so general yet as has 
the use of steel cars, heavier locomotives and 
liiavier rails, but also because of the scarcity 
of wo(m1. is sure to become more general in the 
immediate future. The Bessemer railroad of 
the I'nited States Steel CoriKiration is leading 
in this resiKCt. It has been experimenting 
with steel ties for scv.ral >eai>. I'Mrst it tried 
a hollow slab arrangement which was sticcess- 
ful. but is now using a •^ort of steel beam, the 
rail being bolted to the llanges, which are much 
more satisfactory. In fact, these arc now lacing 
laid all along the I'-es-cmer line every time 
wooden ties have t(^ be removed. 

These are but a few of the reasons for the 
continued prosperity and growth of the steel 
industry. This article could he continue<l to a 
gre.it length in a recital of the further uses 
to which steel is now being put and to which 
it will be applic.l in the future, such as the 
manufacture of steel street cars, railway 
coaches, mail cars, etc. The steel business will 



have its occasional set backs, and even panics 
may come, but unless something revolutionary 
occurs and brings forth something to take the 
place of steel nothing can prevent the advance- 
ment of the steel business in the future such 
as will make even the great progress of the 
past seem but very small and insignificant.— 
Mi>nr\. 



The Chinese will eat anything that comes 
out of the sea. All the fishes are goo<l to their 
taste, and are caught with great skill. Sea- 
weeds are used to thicken soups, gravies and 
IHiddings and are highly prized because they 
give tlie relishing llavor of salt, which is a 
luxury to most Chinese peasants. 



The London twopeimy tube is white-washed 
iverv night. After the passenger traffic has 
ceased a car passes through the tube. This car 
carries a huge tank of whitewash and as it 
moves along an electric pump forces the white- 
wash through the web of pipes at the end of 
the car, spraying it over every part of the tun- 
nel. 



It is claimed that a pair of old birds with a 
nest of voung will in the prm-ess of a single 
day's feeding destroy nearly one thousand in- 
sects. Multiply this by the great number of 
insectivorous birds in our fields and forests and 
we can get an approximate idea of the helpful 
protection atTorded by binls to our agricultural 
interests. 



The production of steel and steel products 
last year reached a total value of nearly $700,- 
(Too.oof). .\ total of -207.30.^ workmen were 
employed, and the wages paid amounted to 
$!.V-40i.995- Truly the steel in.lustry is big 
enough to boast about. The product of steel 
rails alone last year was two and a tpiarter 
million tons, valued at $46,000,000. 



The biggest carpet in the worM covers the 
floor of the Lon<lon Olympia, and although it 
measures sixty-three thousand square feet, it 
was only four months in making. It required 
thirty-seven vans — a procession a mile long — 
tf> take it from the factory to the Olympia. Cut 
up. the carpet would cover four hundred thirty- 
seven floors four yanl^ xjuare. 



A more attractive kin<l of Liberty is to greet 
new comers to the shores of the I 'nited States. 
P.artholdi's statue in X( w ^ ork harlKir is to 
be cle.med. rejjaired antl pr^ptrly lighted. 
Parts of the foimdation have never been more 
than temi>orary. Iron cUmrs to the pedestal 
will now be substituted for the old woo<len 
ones, and iron stairs will replace the present 
woo<len structure. 



From San Francisco to Shanghai an ocean 
cable now extends, under American ownership 
and management, and with its landing stations 
all on .\merican territory as far as Manila. 
The completion of the last link, between Ma- 
nila and Shanghai, was celebrated by the ex- 
change of friendly messages between the 
Dowager F.mpress and the Emperor of China 
and President Roosevelt. 



} 



Export Implement Age 



1 



Fif. S'79-No..8'i and 1054 




WeiRht: No. 8'^ 
lb', lbs. I No 



"OHIO" 

CUTTERS 

For cuttiiiK !>«>'. corn, clover, alfalfa, 
chaff or other fodders. 20 diflferent 
sizes, in various styles, weiRhiiiK from 
40 lbs., up to 4,500 lbs. 

Easy running, for hand or power; 
very large capacities; strong rigid con- 
struction; very durable. Machines fur- 
nished to cut any length from Js inch 
up to 1 '2 inches. 

Send for finely illustrated catalog 
with particulars and prices f. o. b,, 
New York. 

The Silver MIg.Co. 

SALEM. OHIO, V. S. A. 




PUMPS 



For All Purposes 




Clgtern and Pitcher Spout Pomps 
Hand and Honae Force Pompa 
Deep Well Pumps and Standarils 
Iron, Brass and Brass-Uned Cylinders 
Windmill 3-Way Pumps and Standards 
Deep Well Power Pumping; Engines 
Artesian Well Brass WorkiuK Barrels 
Hydraulic Rams and PomptnK Motors 



Triplex Power Pumps for every dutr 
Rotary and Double-Acting Pumps 
Power Pumps for All Purposes 
Horse Power Pumps for Various Duties I 
Railroad and Factory Pumps 
SprayiuK Pumps and Nozzles 
Garden and Hand Fire Engines 
IrriKatinK Pumps and Cylinders 



17=1 llroiilway 



Henderson's Full Circle Hand 
Power Cold Tire Setters 



V 



Scientific Hydraulic 
Edge Grip 

Are Labor and Money Sawfs 



KEOKUK 
IOWA 

1 H MORROW Brighton. Ont.,G<n.ral Agent for Canada. U.S.A. 



Manul.i.turtd i V 

THE STANDftRD TIRE SETTER CO., 

r, : I (-i_. r.,n.ral Agent for Cana 




Our General Catalogue in Eng- 
lish, containing 300 pages, will be 
sent to importers upon applica- 
tion. 

We also issue a General Cata- 
logue in Spanish, and a Special 
Catalogue of our Triplex and Deep 
Well Power Pumps. Also one of 
Spray Pumps. 




THE DEMiNG eOMPANY 

STJLEM, OHIO, U. S. A. 

Xew York Sales Office : 3rt and 58 Pine Street 




Send for Advertising Rates 






WIND MILLS 



HalUday Standard. U. S. SoUd Wheel. 
Gem and Comet 

Pumps. Tanks. Feed Mills. Corn Shelleii 
and Wood-Sawing Machines. 



MOLINOS DEVIENTO 



Halladay Universal, Rueda S61ida. U. S 
Asegurador y Cometa 

Bombas. Tanques. Molinos de Forraie. 

Descascaradoras de Maiz 

y Maquinas para aserrar madera. 



MOULINS A VENT 



WINDMOTOREN 



IVlUULIINO M veil I w-^ 

«--- S;^<.„a, .^U^S.^Roue SOU... HMM. S..^- -^ r"" ""• 

PO.P.., R.«rvol., MouUn, . Fou™... '•--"•^^XSe-Jhtr ""•"• 
EsrenoT. de Mm HoU«i«e-Api«.«te. 

e« M&chines pour scier le Bois. 

U. S. Wind Engine and Pump Co. 

BATAVIA. ILLINOIS. U. S. A. 



N 



Export Implement Age 



ft Tfti. 






KELLY'S DUPLEX GRINDING MILL 



; ^6 

k t > . > . 




:FOJR COUjV AJ^D COB: 



Corn ti;!/^ t^e Shucks on and jlll 
Kinds of Grain 

The only Mill that grinds on both sides of the revolving burr, 
giving double the grinding surface of any other Mill made. Made 
in sizes from 4 to 20 horse-power, and to grind from 8 to 50 bushels 
per hour. Liberal arrangements made with agents. Address the 
manufacturers, 

m 0. S. KELLY CO. ^•^•^•'^rf ■;"• °"'° 




># 



o 







Sena 3-eent stamp ito pay poataie) tor our lOOS 
eaTaLOU, with a tull list ol requlrementa In 

Full square, turned head Carriage, ■% A| "■■^^ 
Star Grade Carriage, Tire, Ma- Kill 1 \ 
chine, Plow, Elevator and Stove l#lf k 1 t# 

Axle, Spring Bar, Saddle, Short f| | 1 |% ^ 
Spring and other 1 ■ 1 1 Wr ^ 

PRICES QUOTED ON APPLICATION \M k 1 1 1# 

NUTS, WASHERS, RIVETS, ETC. 


LSED THE WORLD OVER 

STUDEBAKER 

WAGONS, CARRIAGES, HARNESS, 

AIITrkMriRII FC 


FOR BUSINESS USE ANO FOR PLEASURE DRIVING 

Primed MaHer la English or Spanish 

STLDEBAKER BROS. MFG. CO. 

NfW YORK. CHICAGO, SAN fRANCISCO. PORTLAND. ORf.. 
KANSAS CITY. SALT LAKE CITY, DLNVER, DALLAS 

Factory and f «ecullve Ollice.. SOUTH BEND, IND., L. S. A. 


COLUMBUS BOLT WORKS, Columbus, 0., U. S. A. 







Famous Soil Turners 

"Bissell 
Chilled 
Plows 



EXPORT TRADE 




STEEL 

AND 

WOOD 

BEAM 

PATTERNS 



Wood Beam 
Plow 



They do the work and do it long and well. 

They're made for all kinds and conditions of soil. 

They're low in price. 

Large or small orders can be shipped promptly. 

Catalogue in English, German, French and Spanish 
for the asking. 



The Ohio Cultivator Co. - Bellevue, Ohio 






v. 



, EXPORt"* 

IMPLEMENT AOE 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to American Agricultural 

Machinery, Farm Supplies, Vehicles «nd Vehicle 
Materials, Machine Tools, Hard>ytfre. Specialties* Etc. 



•y^-' 



TEXTE FRANCAIS 
Papier Rote 



/' 



TEXTO E5PAlit>t; 
Papel AmarilB 



p£g ; DEi/r5cnt:ii text 

BUue» Papier 




--^ 



Vol. XV. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A., DECEMBER, 1906. 



No. 3 



MORGAN 4 WRIGHT, 



Fnbricanti 
d'Articlei en 



CAOUT= 



CHOUC DE QUALITE SUPERIEURE 

Itandes de Roues pour Automobiles, Bandes 
pour V ohicules, Uourrelets en Her a Cheval. 

TuhPii, Pubani rn Canutchnuc, Paillasiions, KnurrelaKci, 
Kutliiirs pour Aicenneurs, Nallr.s en Caoutchouc corruKe 
^outflrt.« I'ctral pour Machine a Vapeur, Hourrelct pour 
Boutuna de Forte, Anneaux pour Uouicllles a lait. 

ViiiRt (inn^-cs d'«'«iH'tieiicc dans la fiibri(ati<in ilea Articles 
tii c:ioiiUh»uc et lemplKi il'uiie qua itc mptrieiire ile resinc 
de ciKnitch( lie e«.t uiie K>'n»'><^ <l<^ I* <|ii;<lili' de nos articles. 
Nous soUicittius loule-i i!em;iii«lfB d'tnfoi nialiotis. 

MORGAN & WRIGHT • • Chicago, U. S. A. 

'*''"'rchVv«r ''"■ 2M W. 47th street, NEW YORK 





Bandes de Roues pnur Vihiculet- Maa- 
alves ou A Cousalnet— PournI sur 
llevidoirs de n'importe quelle lun- 
Eueur desirce. 




Bandea-Crampons pour Autnmnbiles 



DAVID BRADLEY 



..Piiubli' (<im.. 
StffI Hav Prtss 



KNOWN THE WORLD OVER 



Whipping Attachmrni 



B«ftt jnd Simpiest in con- 

ttruction of Jny 

prcu mAdt 




The David Bradley Baler has very high F,tandmK wtth the foreign trade. It does more than is 
clatfncd for it, and do« perfect work und<r all conditions. Writ* lor literature. Wc anawar cor- 
respondence in any Unguage. 

I.a Prrusa "David Bradlrv" de dolile exc^ntrica dc acero para einhalar Heno ea biea 
conocida rn lodii el tiitiudo. JaniA^ sc desconipofie. y cstd sieiupic lista par * el trabajo. 
H» la nie^or. y »u construcciiOii es mis seiicilla que la ninKuna Dtra prensa jsni&K fabri- 
cada. Tiene un accesorio pnra zurrar. 1 a Hninalailota "David Bradley" ocupa una alia 
posici^n en el conicrcio ealf anjero. Hace mas de lo que sr le atril>uye, v sii trabajo ea 
perfeclo bajo todas las condicionea. Hscribasenos pidieiido nucKtros impresuii. Con- 
testamos la correapondencia en cualqnier idioma. 

I.a Presse A Foin— i double catne de 'David Bradley" est coiinue dans le mondeenHer. 
Kilt M'est jamais en reparations mais tnuioursau travail. Kile est la tneiUeure et la plus 
simple ilans «a construclion ciimpaitc- i toiiteautre pressemanufaclur^c Hlle est niiinie 
dun secoueur A capuchon I.a I'resse i Hoin David Bradley" a d#ja une i$rande reputa- 
tion dans le commerce Stranger. Kile parfail plus qu'elle tie prflend et accomplit son 
travail sous loules circonstances. Adressez nous pour prospectus, circulaires. etc. Noua 
r^ponilons en toutes les l;inuues. 



Made by DAVID BRADLEY MFG. CO.. 



BR4DIEY. III., U. S. A. 



Cable addrea. "YELDARB." Code« used: "A. B.C., ' 4th and 5th editions, 
"A I," "Liebers" and "Our Own." 



A Plow with Reversible 

PoinI and Wing 




N0.9S 



and for this reason a plow thai is a rapid seller 

The farmer appreciates it because il is always ready with a fresh cut- 
ting ed^e. The upper edge is always heitig sharpened while the lower one 
is being used. The matter of reversing them is very quick and simple — no 
wrench being required, and there is no necessity for turning the plow over. 

We highly recommend this Plow lor Clay. Gravel, Stone or a Hard Pan Soil 

For Furtfier Particulars and Prices address 

South Bend Chilled Plow Co. 'r,.""" 



Lawn Mowers 

FOR HORSE 

anZ HAND USE 

Adapted for all markets 
of the world. 



CHADBORN & 
GOLDWELL 
MFG. CO. 

NEWBUR6H 
N.Y. 



U. S. A. 




SESD FOR 
CATALOaUE 
AND PRICES 



Export Implement Age 



Vl 



ImperJBl 



Extension 
Reversible 



Disc Harrow and Cultivator 



Two Machines for One Price 



A JJisc 
Harmw and 

a iJisc 
Culliviitor 
Combined 



Kasily 

cliaiijieil 

friim hi tij 

iiut throw 

ami ill 

wi.lt h 




The Imi)erial Foretruck Harrow has 

j-ifuvtii itsolt one 1)1 ilie inarkuil successes of 
tlic year. Every farmer who sees it ap- 
lirtciates its advantages over tlie tongue 
Harrow. It is easier to work and easiir lor 
the tenin. The wheels are pivoted and turn 
under the frame. 

Both hitch and frame attachments are 
adjnstaltle, permitting of leveling; tip for anv 
depth of cut or any slant of f)lades ,ind short 
ttirns. 



Iii(Us[iensati)e 
for orclianl and 
viiievaril work 



^ra^ 



er^ aiiti fruit 

KTUWf Is 




Built in all si/.es \^ith either solW or cut out 
discs. Write u- fur catalo>;ue and prices. 



Catalogue, Yours, Free. AGENTS WANTED in unoccupied territory. Patent Interlocking Hubs 
prevents Disc turning between spindles and cutting of axle. 

THL BLCHER & GIBBS PLOW CO. ^•-' '''^*»**"*^« E*^^«^«f;.?,^w y^^^^ 



MYERS 



RAItHLI 



PIMPS 



l-i^. iit'j l-ij.' 




m^ \ 



They are adapted for deep well use, or can be used with larger 
cvlinder, pumping greater ((iiantitv of water for wells of the same 
depth, on which a smaller cylinder i< used in .-ounectioti with the 
orditiary j>ttmp. 



F. C. MYERS & BRO. 



ASHI Km 
OHIO 









f«Y 4oat.t 



"-C 



J'jn» 1ft., I'jOf, 



IsBti^n. 



-olinHifi dldcov.rwl An-rlcB «n.l or«n«d ur « nm Vorld to clvtl- 

'•-k'' »n\ dvralopad rwi» 
.r» n rho ttjin (iny oWi«r mturiil 



'^•rs [Usco<«r»i tin "nu 

'**^' *A"K'' cffMS ?".<>r^ for * * 
• • "nl 'no sir. 

ri« dMi«r #10 »urrii»<i ts « pijnr :,,,•. iif-()nr,iti.h»B tht» u « 

' • r »o hl» IcfdUty, lunl of ro'irs* »nnt» t n h<»»t puiB',"THT: "irvRS" 

Kflv« you npd« your murk Ir tht« llrit 

TVtnt ts *'.at »^ ftr* dotrj-, -i'»1 p.r* tt^lf, to .''-ut our pmrk 
»r *v*r;- ^*&r as •Tltliine^d b^ 



TrtF MV-'.. "AT'Hr" Hi'.-'' P'"MPS". 

;•* art, an « lin« 



7hl» Hr* iflnrv* nn ml- . -. « !• • « p'h-< o' 
of "■»,'F'^ T">?VS.S" no^ifr nmchud b;' wn;' ot nr flm. 

Th.y riiivii «n nan? "wrkid' iidvii rstoc" f«cullHP to thi»Pi««l»«» tYJi\ 
til.* mint b« »••« to t« ftrsr'P«clflt«d, 

■"!I>\iF)I tl!Kft,T( i» rn^CR!*, Bt liny uti, 1^ of t),« hnnitli, ♦.:-,' a 

rof.t fO»"r MDii •iiB« or or.oPBf.lrn, 1« onlr on^i of thmn. 

rn.j ar« «»r"ctnll? .dnrt»d for 'j,n>; mil wlidnm uan nnd dMp 
w.llB. 

Wo flp« rr»f'>'".d to cortrHct »!'■ ■»,' 1-rs ' o f • •xclusl*. 
BftXa of thlti lira In nil untKCUpiAd tarrltoiT. 

Do not »«it for r jr trnv*l«r» to chII on you, but writ* ua at 
«, rK a , 

Your r""*^!:* r*! iy *l'!i ordar in«in» profit for you. 



Yoora trtil^. 



P. T. «Y>.Fi.1 * BRO. 
Pa^ 



MT.R.F.Wl^. ^" I 



EXPORT OFFICE 

B 21 Produce Exchange, New York, U. S. A. 



I 



I 






Export Implement Age 



Directory for Buyers. 

The names of firms given below, 
together with the goods mentioned, 
are arranged for the convenience of 
buyers. Their products are given in 
the EngHsh, French, Spanish and 
German languages. These establish- 
ments are among the leading ones in 
the United States, are strictly reliable, 
have extensive facilities and are 
jnv>mpt in transacting business. They 
folly understand the export trade and 
carefully look after all foreign orders. 
The Export Implement Age is kept 
on file in their oGBces, and any mention 
of the journal will be an incentive to 
even greater promptness on tl-?ir |>art 
In obliging you. Inquiries trom for- 
eign buyers desiring information rel- 
ative to American agricultural ma- 
chinery or implements addressed to 
them will be given careful and prompt 
attention. Write in any language 
yon prefer. 



Repertoire a I'Usage des 
Acheteurs 

Les maisons ci-dessous et les pro- 
duits mentionn^s ont ^te classes dans 
cet ordre pour la commodity des ache- 
teurs de langues anglaise, fran9aise, 
espagnole et allemande. Ces ^tablis- 
sements sont parnii les priucipaux des 
Etats-Unis, ils sont absolument 
s^rieux, ils possedent de grandes 
facilites, sont prompts en affaires. 
Ils connaissent k fond le cemmerce 
d'exportation et donnent tous leurs 
soins a I'execution des commandes 
qui leur viennent de I'^tranger. Ils 
conservent une collection de 1'Export 
IMPI.KMKNT Agk dans leurs bureaux, 
et la simple mention de ce journal 
stimuleradavantage encore, si possible, 
leur lele et leur promptitude a obliger 
leurs clients. L' Export Implement 
Age, de son c6t6, donnera une prompte 
attention aux demaudes de ronseigne- 
ments sur machines et instruments 
agricoles americains, que peuvent lui 
adresser les acheteurs de I'etranger. 
Bcrire dans la langue que Ton pr^fere. 



Directorio para los Com- 
pradores. 

I<os nonibres de los articulos que 
fabrican las firmas 6 casas mencionadas 
k continuacion se dan, para conve- 
niencia de los compradores, en los 
idiomas ingles, frances, espafiol y 
alem&n. Esoa establecimientos, que 
»e cuentan entre los principales de los 
Estados Unidos, estaii complt-taniente 
acreditados, son dignos de totla con- 
fianza y tienen las uiayores faeilidades 
para ejecutar y despachar con pronti- 
tud totlos sus negocios. Conocen d 
fondo el comercio de exporlacion y 
atienden con el mayor esniero a todos 
los pedidos (jue recit>en del extranjero. 
Los nfimeros del Export Implkment 
Age se coleccionan en sus oficinas, y 
toda referencia d esta rcvista es un 
incentivo para atender con mayor 
prontitud aun 4 vuestros requeriniien- 
tos. Todos los informes que pidan 
los compradores del extranjero serau 
suministrados a la mayor brevedad 
por esos fabricantes sobre la ma- 
quinaria agricola € instrumentus de 
labranza americanos. Escribidles en 
cualquier idioma que prefir&is. 



Firmen-Verzeichnis fiir 
Kaufer. 

Die Erzeugnisse der unten ge- 
nannten Firmen sind fiir die Bequem- 
lichkeit auslandischer Kaufer in eng- 
lischer, franzosiscber spanischer und 
deutscher, Sprache hier wie<lerge- 
geben. Genannie Ktablissenieiite ge- 
horen zu tlen bedeutendsten in den 
Vereinigten Staaten; siesind in jeder 
Wei.se zuverlassig, besilzen ausge- 
dehnte Facilitaten und erfreuen sich 
eines ehreiivollen Rufes. Alle von 
ihnen unternoninienen Geschafts- 
transaktionen werden in proniptester 
Weisezur Ausfiihrunggebracht. Jeties 
hierin genannte Haus ist mit dem Ex- 
porthandel wohl vertraut und um aus- 
wartige Auftriige eifrig hemiiht. Das 
Export Implement Age wird von 
all diesen Firmen gelesen, dient ihnen 
sozusagen als Informations-Register 
und diirfte somit eine .Angabe dieses 
Journals bei event. Waarenbestellung 
nur zur Anregung grosserer Prompt- 
heit dienen. um p.p. Kaufern in best- 
mtiglicher Weise entgegenkonimen zn 
konnen. Jede auswartige Anfrage 
hinsichtlichamerikanischerlandwirth- 
schaftlicher Maschinen und Gerathe 
wird nicht allein prompte, sondern 
auch stets sorgfaltige Aufmerksamkeit 
erhalten. Interessenten konnen sich 
jeder beliebigen Sprache zur Korre- 
spondenz bedienen. 



Ambulances 
CarroB de hospital 
Kraokenwagen ( Anibulanzen) 



Baling Presses ( Hay, Straw, Etc. ) 
Presses ii foin, paille, etc. 
Prensas de Bmbalar ( Heno. Paja, etc. ) 
Ballen Pressen ( fiir Heu, Strob, u. s. w. ) 

Bmdlry Mf|t. Co., Kaviil. BraUlev. ni 1 

Oolliiia Plow Co.. qiiincv. Ill , 2« 

Brtei Co., Ow>rKe, (juiticy, n: 6 



Beet Implements (Planting, Cultivating and 

Harvesting I 

Betteraves i Instruments pour la culture des i 
Instrumentos para el Cultivo de la Kemolacha 

( Sembradoras, Cultivadoras y Cosechadoras ) 
Riibengerate (zum Pflanzen, Pfliigen und Ernten) 

Moline PlowCo., Molin«, ni g 



Binders, Self (Wheat, Rye, Oats, etc.) 
Lleuses Automatiques (B16, Orge, Avoine, etc.) 
Agavilladoras Automaticas (Trigo, centeno avena 

etc.) 
Selbstbindemaschinen (fiir Weizen, Roggen, Haf-r 



Boilers. 
Chaudieres. 
Calderas. 
Kessel. 

tteffel & Co., 



Carriages 

Voittves 

Carruajes 

Kaleschen und Wagen 

Dapaon A Woir. Oneids. N. V 

itiudebaker Uroa. Mfg. Co., HttuUi Bandi, lad. 



3 

m 



Carriage Cloth 
Wagentuch 
PaAo de carruaje 
Drap de Voiture 

Fairfield Hul)her Co., Th*, FalrftHd, Conn • 



Carriage Materials 
Articles pour voitures 
Materials for Carriages 
Wagen material 



Carts (Riding) 
Charrettes (i si^ge) 
Carretones (de Montar) 
Frachtkarren (Reitkarren) 

Dapaon & Wolf Oneida, .N, Y. 



Jkmra, Sprinirfleld. Ohio 



Cider and Wine Presses 
Pressoirs ik vin et A cidre 
Prensa.4 para Hacer Cidra y Vino 
Keiterapparate fur Wein und Apfelwein 

Lutaing Wheelbarrow Co., \An»\ng, Mich. . . 



Bolts and Nuts. 

Boulons et Serous. 

Pernos y Tuercas. 

Bolzen und Muttem (Mutterbolzen) 

Oolnmbiia Bolt Worka,ColunibiM, Ohio 

Brakes (Vehicle) 
Retrancaa (Vehiculo) 
Frein (de Voiture) 
Bremsen (fiir Pahrzeuge) 

^Mer Co., The Morgmn, Piahkill on Hudaon. N. Y. 



Clothes Washing Machines 
Linge (machines & laver le) 
Maqulnas de Savar Ropa 
Wasche Waschmaschinen 

"1900" WaaherCo., Binnhainton, X. V. 



CmI Shutes 

Charbon (Dalles d) 

Canales para Descargar Carb6n de Piedra 

Kohlen Lade-Rinnen 

Iianains Wheelbarrow Co., I.«n8in(, Mich » 



Corn Crushers 
Mais (Conca.iseurs de) 
Trituradoras de Maiz 
Mais Zerquetschmaschinen 

Spront. Waldron &. Co.. Muncy, Pa | 



Corn Harvesters 
Mais ( Moissonneuses de) 
Cosechadoras de Maiz 
Mais Erntemaschinen 

Btondard Harrow Co., UUoa, N. Y | 



Corn Huskers and Shredders 

Mais (Instrument? k enlever et i d^chirer le* 
bractiies du i 

Desgranadoras y Picadoras de Maiz 

Mais Enthiilsemaschinen und Auswerfapparate 

Bradley Mf|s Co., Oiivi.l. Rra<lley, III 



Com Planters ( Hand) 
Mais (Semoirs de, a main) 
Sembradoras de Maiz (A Mpno) 
Maispflanzer (fiir Haudbetrieb) 

Ohio CuUitrator Co.. The. Bellevue. Ohio . 



SI 



Coal Cars 

Charbon ( wagons pour ) 

Carros para Carb6n de Piedra 

Kohlenwaggons 

I^natng Wba^tMrrow Oo„ LaMlac, Miab. 



Com Planters ( Horse ) 
Mais (Semoirs de, & cheval) 
Sembradoras de Maiz ( para Caballo) 
Mais Pflanzmaschinen (fiir Pferdebetrieb) 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, III. 
MoUne Plow Co.. Molina, III. .... 



Export Implement Age 



Corn Shellers (Hand) 
Mai5 ( Ivt^renoirs de, a main ) 
Descascaradoras de Maiz (de Mano) 
Mais Pflanzmaschinen (fiir Ilaudbetrieb) 

MurHeilleH MfK. Co., Mameille!!, Ill 

Pstch, A. II.. ClarkBvillr, Tenii 

Sprout, \Val<l(oii Ss CN)., Muncy, Pa 

Staiiilard Harrow Cf>., I'tica, N. Y 

U. !4. Wiiul Kiigine and I'unip Co.. Batavla, III. 



4 
5 
3 
8 
3S 



Corn Shellers (Power) 
Mais ( Egrenoirs de), d energie mecanique 
Descascaraduras de Maiz (para Fuerza mec&nica) 
Mais Pflanzmaschinen fiir Pferdebetrieb) 

MameillenMrK. Co., Mampilles.Ill * 

Patch. A II., C;iarkBvillr.Teini 5 

8|iroiil. Waldroii & Co., Miincy, Pa 8 

Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y 8 



Cotton Planters 
Coton (Senioirsde) 
Sembradoras de Algoddn 
Baumwoll Pflanzmaschinen 

Ohio Cultivator 0«i.. The, Bellevuv. Dhio . 



Cultivating Machinery (Hand and O^trden) 
Culture du sol (Intruments {>our la), & main et 

pour le jardiii 
Maquinaria Cultivadora (de Mano y para Huerta) 
Qarten Pfliige i fur Ilaudbetrieb) 

Deere Plow Co.. John. Molina, III 

Moline Plow Co.. Moline. Ill 

Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y 



SI 



Cultivating Machinery i Horse and Field ) 
Culture du sol ( Instruments pour la), 4 cbeval et 

pour le champ 
Maqninaria Cultivadora (de Caballo j para el 

Campo) . 

Bodenkultur tieriite (fiir Pferdebetrieb) 

Rnxllev Mf({. Co , David. Bra<llev, 111. 1 

Deere Plow Co., John. Moline. Ill 31 

MolinePlowCo. Moline, 111 6 

Ohio Cnltivator Co.. The, Bellevue, Ohio 36 

Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y. . • • • 8 



Engines and Boilers (Stationary) 
Machines h vapeur et Chaudieres i fixes) 
Maquinas de Vapor y Calderas ( Pijas) 
Maschinen und Kessel (Stationar) 

LeSel 4k Co., Jaraea, Hprinfifleld, Ohio . , , , 



» 



Engine (Traction and Portable) 

Machines h vapeur ( Pour la traction et transpor- 

tables ) 
MAquinas (De Traccidn y Portitiles) 
Traktions- oder Zugmaschinea und LokomoMlcD 
f 



Feed and Ensilage Cutters 
Coupe-aliments, coupe-ensilage 
Cortadora de Forraje y Ensilaje 
Putter- und Griinfutter (Ensilage) Schnelde- 
maschinen 

MarseilleH Mtg. Co., Mariieilles, III 4 

Silver MfK. Co., Salem Ohio 96 



Feed Mills 

Moulins pour aliments 

Molinos de Frorraje 6 Pienso 

Futtermijhien 

Sprout, Waldron &Co., Muncy, 9% 3 



Files ( Letter and Card ) 

Systemes de classification (lettret et cartes) 
tiuarda-Cartas y Tarjetas 
Skripturenordner (fiir Briefe und Karter) 



Forglngs i Carriage) 
Pieces forgees i Voiture) 
Forjaduras i para carruajes) 
Sctamiedereieii ( Kalescben- ) 



Gardening Tools ( Hand ) 
Jardinage Outils de) a main 
Herramientas de Hortelano (de Mano) 
Qiirtnerei Handwerkzeug 



Grain Cleaning Machinery ( Rice, Coffee, Grain, 

Etc.) 
Grains ( Machines a nettoyer les ) : riz, caf<, grain, 

etc. 
Maquinaria pare Limpiar Granos (Arroz, Omit, 

(iranos, Htc. • 

Qetreide Reinigungsmaschinen (fiir Reis, 
Kaflfee, Korn, u. s. w. j 



Sprout, Waldron & Co., Muncy, Pa. 



Grain Drills 
Grains (Semoirs de) 
Sembradoras de Granos 
Drillmaschinen 

.Monitor Drill Co., Minneafmlia, Minn. 
Hupenor Drill Co., SprinRfteld, Ohio . 



81 



Grain Grinding Mills 
Grains i Moulins h moudre les) 
Molinos para Granos 
Schrotmtihien 

Kelly Co.. The O. .S, .^prinKfleld, Ohio 

Marseilles Mfi{ Co., MarKeille*, 111 

Sprout, Waldron & Co., Muncy, Pa 

U. S. Wind Bnglna and Pump Co., Baterla. III. 



M 
4 
8 



Hand Carts (Push) 

Charrettes k bras 

Carretillas de Mano (de Bmpuje) 

Hand-Schiebekarren 

Brsdley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, HI. . . . 

DeniitiKCo., The, Salem, Ohio 

LanainK Wbeelkarrow Co., lAnatnc, Mioh. 



1 
SB 
29 



Hand Tools (Sbovek Rakes, Hoes, Scythe*, 

Korks, Etc. ) 
Outils ik main (Pelles, r&teauz, houes, faux, four- 

ches, etc. ) 
Herramientas de Mano ( Palas, Rastrillos, Aza- 

dones, Guadaiias. Horquillas, etc. ) 

Handwerkzeug (Scbaufeln, Rechen, Haken, Sen- 
sen, Gabeln, u. s. w. 



Harrows (Disc, Spring-Tooth and Spike-Tooth) 
Herses (a disques, a dents ^lastiques, i dents 
droites) 

Mielgas 6 Rastrillos (de Disco, con Dientea d* 
Resorte y Otros) 

Eggen (mit Scheiben-, Federzahn- und Speichea- 
zahn-V'orrichtung) 



Bradley Mfg. Co , David, Bradley, 111. . . . 
Bucher * Uibhs Plow Co., Canton, Ohio . . 

Collin* Plow Co.. Quincy, 111 

Deere Plow Co., John, Moline, III 

Moline Plow Co., Moline, III 

Ohio Cultivator Co., The, Bellevue, Ohio . . 
Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y' 



1 

3 
2t 
81 

• 



Hay Loaders 
Foin ( Chargeuses de) 
Cargadoras de Heno 
Heu Auflader 

ManeiUeJ Mfg. Co., Maraeillea, Ot 4 



Hay Presses 
Foin I Presses h) 
Prensas para Heno 
Heu Pressen 



Bradley .Mfg. Co , David, Bradley, III i 

Collinn Plow Co.,(iiiincy,Ill ] a 

Ertel Co., Oeorge. Quincy, 111 g 

Ohio Cultivator Co.. The. Bellevue, Ohio ' SS 

Standard Harrow Co., UtiiA. N. T % 



Hay Rakes 
Foin I RAteaux A) 
Rastros para Heno 
Heu Rechen 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, III. 
Moline Plow Co., Moline, III 



Hay Tools ( For Handling Hay) 
Foin f Outils pour la manipulation dn) 
Herramientas para Heno (para Manipular el Heno) 
Heubearbeitungs-Apparate und Werkzeufe 



Myera. V. R, * Bro., Aahland, Ohto 

U.S. Wind Rnirineand PampOo.. BatavU, III. . . , ', 



3 

as 



( 



Export Implement Age 



Hods (Steel and Wood) 

Auges (Acier et bois) 

Artesas de Cargar (de Acero y de Madera) 

Tiinchkiibel ( Morteltroge, aus Stahl und Hols) 

Lansing Wheelbarrow Oo., Lansing, Mich. 29 



Implement Parts (Rake, Teeth, Knife Sections, 

Etc. ) 
Pieces de rechange ( Dents de riteaux, conteanz 

de faucheuses, etc. ) 

Partes de instrumentos (Dientes de Rastrillo, 

Secciones de Cuchilla, Etc. ) 

Theile von Landwirthschaftsgerathen (Rechen- 

zahne, Messertheile, u. s. w. ) 



Incubators 

Conveuses artificielles 

Incubadoras 

Brutmaschinen (Inkubatoren) 

Ertel Co., Qeorge, Quincy, III « 



Lawn Mowers 
Tondeuses de gazon 
Segadoras 6 Cortadoras de Cesped 
Rasen Miihmaschinen 



Clipper lAwn .Mower Co., Dixon, III 

ChiKlhoni iL Coldwell Mfg- Co., Newburgb, N. Y 

Leather ( Imitation) 
Leder (Imitation) 
Cuero (Iwitaci6n) 
Cuir (Imitation) 

niirfield Rubber Co., The, Fairfield, Conn 



Machine Tools 
Machines -outils 
Herramientas Mecanicas 
Maschinen-Werkzeug 

silver Mfg. Co , Salem, Ohio 



Mowers. 
Faucheuses. 
Segadoras. 
Miihmaschinen. 



85 



Mills (Corn and Hominy) 
Moulins (pour n\\\% et bouilie) 
riolinos (para Moler Maiz Fino y Gnieso) 
Miihien (fiir Getreide und indianiaches Reis, 
Hominy) 



Sprout, Waldron & Co., Muncy, Pa. a 

Standard Harrow Co., Utiea, N. Y '. s 



Oil aoth 

Toile Ciree 
Wachstuch 



Plows (Walking, Riding and Disc) 
Charrues (ordinaires, 4 si^ge, 4 disques) 
Arados (de Caminar, de Moatar y de Disco) 
Pfliige (Geh-, Fahr- und Scbeibenpfliige) 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, III. . 
Bucher St Gibhn Plow Co., Canton, Ohio 

Collini Plow Co.. Quincy. Ill 

Deere Plow Co., John, Moline, III. 

Moline Plow Co.. Moline, III 

Ohio Cultivator Co., The. Bellevue, Ohio 

South llend Cliille<l Plow Works, South Bend, Ind 

Standard Harrow Co., Utica. N. T. . . 



1 

2 
20 
31 

6 
3« 

1 

8 



Potato Machinery 

Pommes de terre (Machines pour la culture des) 

Maquinaria para Patatas 

Kartoffel-Maschinen 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, 111. 

Moline Plow <>»., Moline, 111 

Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y. . . 



Pumps, Hand and Power ( Lift, Force and Spray ) 
Pompes, h main, et k energie mecanique ( Pom- 

pes aspirantes, foulantes, pulv^risatrices) 
Bompas de Mano y para Fuerza Mecanica 

( Aspirantes, de Forzar y de Rociar) 
Pumpen, Hand- und Kraftpumpen (Hebe-, 

Druck- und Besprengungs-l'umpen) 



Sleighs 
Traineaux 
Trineos 
Schlitten 

Dapson k. Wolf, Oneida, N. Y. 



Sprayers and Nozzles 
Instruments d'arrosage 
Rociadoras y Boquereles 
Besprengungs-Spritzen und Uebernasen 



DemingCti., Thi', Salem, Ohio. 
Myers, P. K. & Bro.. Axhland, Ohio , 
Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y. . 



35 
2 



DerolngCo.The, Salem. Ohio 88 

Myers, V. E & Bro., Ashland, Ohio 2 

U.S. Wind Engine and Pump Co.. Batavia, III V> Stalk CutterS 

Coupe-chaume 
Cortadoras de Tallos 
Stengel Abschneider 

Moissonneuses. 

Cosechadoras 

Getreide- Miihmaschinen. 



Rollers ( Field or Road ) 
Rouleaux (pour champs et pour route*) 
Rodillos ( para Campo y para Caminos) 
Feid- und Weg-Walzen 



Street Sprinklers 

Arrosage des rues (Tonneaux pour 1') 

Regadoras de Calle 

Strassen Bespreng-Wagen 

Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Co., South Bend, In4. 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, III. . . 
Ijinsing Wheelbarrow Co., lAnning, Mich. 
Ohio Cultivator Co., The, Bellevue, Ohio . 
Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y. . . . 



Rubber Goods 
Articles de caoutchouc 
Articulos de Caucho 
Gummiwaaren 



Rubber Tires 

Gummireifen 

Bandes de roues en caoutchouc 

Llantas de Caucho para Ruedas 

Morgan & Wright, Chicago, III 



I 
29 
36 

S 



Sugar Cultivating Implements 
Sucre I Instruments pour la culture de la canae A) 
instrumentos para el Cultivo Azucarero 
Zucker-Anbau Gerathe 



Threshing Machinery 
Machines ^ battre 
Maquinaria de Trillar 
Dresch Maschinen 



Scrapers ( Road ) 
Ratissoires ( pour routes) 
DragaA ( para Caminos ) 
Strassen Scharr-Maschineo (St 

Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. Y. 



n-Bbener) 



Seeders, Broadcast (Grain and Grass) 
Semoirs pour semer k la vol6e (Grain et gramt- 

n^es) 

Mdquinas de Sembrar Semillas al Vuelo (Granoa 
y Semilla de Yerbas) 

Breitsiimaschinen (fiir Getreide und Graa) 



Tire Setters 

Machines ik fixer les bandes de roue* 

Maquinas de Poner Llantas 

Maschinen zum Aufsetzen von Gummlrelfea 

Standard Tire Setter Co., Keokuk. Iowa 



Tread Powers (Horse, Dog, Sheep, Etc.) 
Machines k utiliser I'^nergie de la marclM 

( Cheval, Chien, Mouton, etc.) 

Motores de PIsada ( para Cal^llo, Perro, Carncco, 

etc.) 

Kraft-Tretmaschinen (Pferde, Hunde, Schafe. 
u. s. w. ) 



Sharpeners and Grinders 
Machines k remoudre et A aJguUer 
Afiladoras y Amoladoras 
Scharfe- und Scbleif-Apparate 



Trucks (Hand Warehouse) 
Trues ( Hmmagasinage 4 brasl 
Carretillas de Mano para almac^n 
Transport Handwagen (fiir Waarenhiiaaer) 



I^naing Wheelbarrow Oo. laanalng, BUoh. 



Export Implement Age 



i 



Wagoas (Business) 
Charettes (d'atlaires) 
Carros (para negocios) 
Wagen (Geschaftswagen) 



Wagons and Buck- Wagons 
Charrettes et charrettes a lessive 
Carretones y Carretas 
Wagen und Bockwagen 

Ohio Valley Wagon Co , The, Marietta, Ohio . 



Well Tools and Drilling Machinery 
Outils pour puits et machines a forer 
lostrumentos para Abrir Pozos y Maquinaria 

para Horadar 
Brunnen-Werkzeug und Bohr-Maschinen 



Wheels and Wheel Materials 
Roues et articles pour roues 
Ruedas y Materiales para Ruedas 
Rader und Riider material ien 



Wagons and Carts ( Farm ) 
Wagonnets et charrettes ( Fernje) 
Carretones y Carretas (para liaciemla) 
Landwirthschaftliche Wagen und Karren 



Lsnaini; Whcellwrrow Co., I^anntnK. Mich. . . 
StudebHker Kro« Mfg. Co., Huuth Heiid, Ind. 



Wheelbarrows 
Brouettes 
Carretillas 
Schiebe karren 

li«nsiiiK Wheelbarrow Co.. Iianaini:, Mich 29 



Windmills (Towers and Tanks) 
Moullns ^ vent (Tours et reservoirs) 
Molinos de Viento (Torres y Tanques) 
Windmiihlen (Thurm- und Biitten) 



MarselllesMfK. Co., Maneillea, III 

U. H. Wind EiiKine and Pump Co., BaUvia. III. 



4 
8fi 



29 
M 



Weeders 

Sarcloirs mecaniques 
Desyerbadoras 
Jiite Maschinen 

standard Harrow C«., Utlca, N. T. 



Wheels (Carriage) 
Roues (Voiture) 
Ruedas (Carruaje) 
( Rader ( Kaleschen und Wagen ) 



Wood Sawing Machinery 
Bois (Machines k scierle) 
Maquinaria para Aserar Madera 
Holzsage-Maschinen 



MarKillaaMfc. Co , Maraelllea. Ill 

U. 8. Wind Bngiineand Pump Co., BaUria, III. 



« 
88 



Alphabetical List of Advertisers. 

Annonces par ordre Alphabetique. 

Lista Alfab^tica de las casas que se Anundan en esta Revista. 

Alphabetisch geordnetes Inhalts-Verzeichnis von Inserenten. 



Fairfield liubher Co., The, Fairfield, Conn. 



•1900" WaaherCo., Binghamton, N. Y 31 



Ohio Cultivator Co., The, Bellevne, Ohio . . 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Braoiey, lli. . 
Bocber & Oibba Plow Co., Canton, Ohio . 



PaWA, A. H., CUrksville, Tenn 

Potter Co., Morgan, Fichkill-ow-Hndfon, N. V, 



36 



5 
3 



Chadbonrn & Cold well Mfg. Co., Newbnrgh, N. Y. 1 

Clipper Lawn Mower Co., Dixon, 111 5 

CollioH Plow Co., Qnincj. Ill : 29 

Colunibas Bolt Works, CohimhuR, Ohio 36 



Kelly Co., The O. 8., Springfiald, Ohio . . 

Lansing Wheelbarrow Co., Lansing, Mich. 
Leflel & Co., Jamee, Springfield, Ohio . . 



36 

29 
29 



napoon & Wolf, Oneida, N. Y. . . 
Deere Plow Co., John, Moline, 111. 
Deming Co., The, Salem, Ohio . . . 



3 
31 
35 



Eriel Oo., Om., Qviney, 111. 



Marseilles Mfg. Co., Marseilles, lU. . 
Moline Plow Co., Moline, 111. . . , 
Monitor Drill Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Morgan & Wright, Chicago, III. . . . 
A Myers & Bro., F. E., AsUand, Obie . 



4 

• 

31 

, 1 

9 



Silver Mfg. Co., The, Salem, Ohio 

South Bend Chilled Plow Co., H*iuth Bend, Ind 

Spront, Waldron & Co., Money, Pa 

Standard Harrow Co., The, Utica. N. T. . . 
Standard Tire Setter Co,, Keoknk, Iowa . . 
Stndebaker Bros. Mfg. Co., Soath Bend, Ind 
Superior Drill Co., Springfield, Ohio . , , . 



36 
1 

S 

s 

3« 



Export Implement Age 



Machinery for Grinding all Kinds of Grain 
Machines a moudre tous genres de grains 
Maquinaria para moler todas glase de granos 
Maschinerie zum Mahlen aller Getreidesorten 




Write for one of our booklets which gives a full description of French Burr and 
Attrition, Feed and Meal Mills, Cotton Seed and Linseed Oil Cake Mills, Emerj- 
Rock Mills, Cotton, Ear and Ore Crushers, Magnetic Separators, Corn Shellers, etc. 

Ecrivez pourun pamphlet cuntenant description d^taill^e de nioulins k meules 
de France et k froltetnent, de moulins pwur grains de cotton et de tourteaux de lin, 
de moulins k pierre d'^meri, de hroyeurs d'^pis et de minerals, de moulms mag- 
n^tiques, d'ecosseurs, etc. 

Escribasenos pidiendo uno de nuestros libritos, en que se da una completa 
descripci<')n de nuestros Molinos de Piedra Francesa y de Roce, para Piensoy para 
Harina, Molinos de Semillas de Algod6n, y para moler Tortas de Aceite de Semil- 
las de Linaza, Molinos para Roca de Esnienl, Trituradoras de Algod6n, Mazorcas 
y Minerales, Separedoras Magn^ticas, Desgranadoras de Maiz, etc. 

Man \erlange eines unserer Biicblein, das voile Beschreibung unserer tratizo- 
sischen Mahlsteine und Reibevorrichtung enthalt, wie auch aller Fuller- Von ich 
tungen, Mehl-Miihlen, Baumwollensaamen- und Leinolsaamen Kucben-Miihlen, 
Schmirgel-Bergmiihlen, Bauniwollen-. Aehren- und Erzzerstiickelungs-Mascbinen, 
magnetiscbe Separatoren, Korn-Enthiilseniaschiiitii, u. s. w. 

SPROUT, WALDRON & CO. 

I. M U IN C V, R A., U. S. A. 



The Standard Harrow Co. 



UTICA, N. Y., U. S. A. 




ABERDEEN, SR. 

SPRING-TOOTH 

HARROW 

Unequalled Strength 

No Clogging 

Revertlble Points 
on Teeth 



THE STANDARD LINE includes one and two-section Spring- 
Tooth Harrows and all styles and sizes of Spike-tooth and 
Disc Harrows, Cultivating Implements, Potato Harvesters, 
Potato Sprayers, etc., and is one of the most favorably 
known lines in the leading agricultural countries. 

We guarantee prompt service for all export orders. 
Our factory is only five hours' ride from New York City. 

WRITE IN YOUR OWN LANGUAGE FOR CATALOGUE F 



ZI6 ZAG STEEL 
SPIKE-TOOTH HARROW 

20-To«lh Section* 
H-lnch Teelh 




EASY RIDING 

This two-wheeler is our leading 
specialty for export. 

We equip it with RUBBER TIRES, 
if desired, put on with two wires. The work, 
like the job itself, is sold under our positive 
guarantee. 

LET US SEND YOU THE PRICES 




Dapson & Wolf 

ONEIDA, NEW YORK, U. 8. A. 

- WMOLBSALe MAKKHS fiF : 



FINE CARRIAGES 



U. S. Wind Engint and rmmp Co., Batavia, IIU 



"POTTER'S" 



I SPRING BRAKE BLOCKS 

Hava Lad tha Markat for Ninataan Yaara, and HIa 

ADJUSTABLE SPRING BRAKE 

la a Winnar Fram tha Start 
Equally •atlsfactery for steel or rubber tired vehlelea. 



NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



The Morgan Potter Co. n^' 



FISHKILL-ON-HUDSON 
YORK, U.S. A. 




Start the iHe'^ Year "Right 



by cAdvertising in the 



Export Implement cAge 



Write for HfLtes And Special Locations. 
We may be able to fa'oor you. cAd- 
dress inquiries to 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

1010 ^rch Slrttl, PHILADELPHIA 






Export Implement Age 





NEW PROCESS DCSTLESS CYLINDER CORN SHEI.I,BR 

For husked or unhusked corn, made in ihrce sizes capacities ransine from 
«0 to 1, 300 bushels per hour 



CYCI.ONE COMBINATION FORCE FEED 
CORN SHi;U,ER 
AH sliM and styles for hor-^e power or enjtlne. 



PUMPING JACKS 



^"^IWeskmUmonCod, "ADAMS' 



Extend your trade 
beyond the seas 



AMERICAN manufactures are not only in demand, 
but in many cases are given the preference in 
foreign countries. Especially is this true of Agri- 
cultural Machinery, Farm Supplies, Vehicles and Hard- 
ware Specialties. If you are manufacturing any of these 
goods voice it abroad and make the world your field. You 
can do it just as easily as you can secure home trade if 
you'll talk through the 



Export Implement Age 

IT REACHES ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES 
WRITE US FOR ADVERTISING RATES 



• • 



I 



Export Implement Age 



Superior Grain Drills 



Semoirs Sup^rieurs de Grains. Manu- 
factures en une gramle variety de dimensions 
pour Grains seulenient on pour Grains et Fer- 
tilisants ni^lang^s, avec Disque, Houe et Soc 
creusant les sillons. Nous manufacturons des 
mod^'es sp^ciaux de Senioirs de Grains pour 
I'Euiapc, I'Australie, I'Amerique du Sud et 
le Sud de I'Afrique. Deinandez les Catalogues 
descriptifs illustres. 

Sembradoras Superiores de tiranos. Se 

fabrican de nuiclios tanianosde sembrar Granos 
861a 6 combinada con Fertilizador, con sur- 
cadores de Disco, de Azad6u 6 Zapatillas. 
Nosotros fabricamos Sembradoras de tipos 
especiales para Kuropa. Australia, Sud America 
y el Africa del Sur. Euviese por un Cat^logo 
descriptive ilustrado. 

••Superior" Qetreiderillen. Wird in viel- 
seitiger Auswahl von Grossen hergestellt: Ein- 
fache Getreiderillen und Kombinationen von 
Getreide und Pflugrillen mil Scheiben, Hauen 
und Schuh-Lockerungs Vorricbtungen. Wir 
fabriziren besondere Arten von Getreiderillen 
fiir Europa, Australien, Siid-Amerika und Siid- 
Afrika. Man verlange itlustrirte beschreibende 
Kataloge. 

We manufacture special types of 
Grain Drills for Europe, Australia, 
South America and South Africa 



Made in a large variety of sizes in Plain Grain 
and combined Grain and Fertilizer, with Disc. 
Hoe and Shoe furrow openers $ $ 5> 4) 




THE SUPERIOR DRILL CO., Springfield, 0., U.S.A. 

DIVISION THE AMERICAN SEEDING MACHINE COMPANY. Incorporated. 






THE FAIRFIELD RUBBER CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Carriage Cloth, Imitation Leather, Etc. 

FAIRFIELD. CONN.. U. S. A. 

We believe you will find our cloths more desirable fabrics th«ii huve been presented 
for your consideration. 

Not only do we offer our lines as superior to any, but some are special with us. 

We warrant all our goods in every manner, and in all climates. 

All we ask is a trial of our productions, as wc know the result will be in our favor. 

Our many years' connection with the foreign trade places us in a position to know 
fully Rs to their wants, and the large orders we receive from that field convinces us that 
the high standard at which we have kept our goods is appreciated. We refer with 
pleasure to any leading Kxport house in New York as to the merit of our cloths. 

Send for quotations through any Export house, or write us direct. 

When ordering goods in our line, ask for goods made by 

The rairfield Rubber Co. 




GUIPPBR LrAWN 
MOWBR GO. KL?.?,":! 



TTHE MOWER that will kill 
Vlr all (be Weeds in your Lawns. 

If you keep the weeds cut 
BO they do not go to seed, and 
cut your grass without breaking 
the small feeders of roots, the 
grass will become thick and the 
weeds will disappear. 

THE CLIPPER WILL DO IT 

Ask Your Dealer for Them 



The Export Implement Age 

is an independent journal devoted exclu.sively to the Export 
Trade in Agricultural Machinery, Pumps, Wind Mills, Farm 
Tools, Dairy Supplies and Hardware Sp>ecialties. 

Advertising Rates Furnished Upon Application 



BlaikHdwkliJll 




InsUnlly Adjusted lo 
Grind Fine or Coarse. 



WILL DO GOOD WORK and LAST 

'irindlng Plates are of the Hardest and Strongest 
.Metals. Can be replaced at slight cost. 

Packed in barrels i.( lie, uh. tinw- weifhi. 2Hill.s.; 
!HM, J(H lbs. .Mt'.t^nriMiifllt »>Ht'ul>ii' (»ft. 

Am Hm rMTCHfMakBr, 

OlarksvlUe, Tenn,, U. S. 4. 



Order through any Reliable Commission House. 



PATCH'S PATENT 

Bidck Hawk (orn Sheller 



Wgt. 
15 lbs 




SHILLB 

FAST. 
SHELLS 

CLEAN. 
SHELLS 

EASILY. 



Bowaro of 
tmltatlanm 



Capacilj 
8 It 12 
busheli 
car cere 
P«r 
boor. 



Packed 10 in a barrol. Gross, 180 Itw.; 
Net, ISO lbs. Meastircment t>Vi cubic iMt. 

MADE ONLY BY 

All DATm CLARKSVILLE, 
. n. rAiv<n. tenn., u.s. a. 



I 



Export Implement Age 



Unequalled 
FacilitieB 
for Prompt 
Handling ol 
Export Business 




SHANGHAI KIDD 
DISC CULTIVATOR 



Forty-six inches from lowest point of arch to the ground 
Adjustable in width from 48 to 72 inches. Popular for culti- 
vatiUK Corn, Cane, Tobacco, etc. Packed for export, weighs 
830 pounds. Occupies 25 cubic feet of space. 

STALK CUTTERS. WALKING AND RIDING 
PLOWS. DISC PLOWS. DISC HARROWS. 
PIPE-LEVER HARROWS. CORN PLANT- 
ERS AND DRILLS. LISTERS. COTTON 
PLANTERS. CULTIVATORS— B E E T 
SEEDERS. CULTIVATORS and PULLERS 



•^v" 



nOLINE PLOW CO 



MOLI NE. ILL. U. S. A. 

FOREIGN AGELNCItS: 

J. 4 J. DRYSDALE 4 CO. MALCOMESS 4 CO. 

R -^!f ^*"** q'*' Arijentine Sole A^ent. for South Afrfc* 

Bueno. Ayrei. South America Eait London, South Afrka 




37 YEARS *"'•''''"<! Iiay straw, wool, cotton and corn foddtr presses should cerUinly make 
.. »-'•»•*«-» usrx,«rtR. and we claim thai our presses are the simplest, easiest draught on 
the itMin Biitl lhe.<irao{>thrsl balers on the market to-day. 

Our presses will bale from lo to is tons a day in hay. 
Our presses will bale from lo to 15 tons a day in straw. 
DepuiS 37 antics ?"* nous conslrulsons des presses a foin. & paille. A laine. ik colon, h 
... . "•'"■fage de mais. nousavons induhitablement acouis une eiD^rience aui 

a fail de nous des cxi>erts. et nous nh6.sitoiis pas i dire que nos presses sont les plus simples qui 
soienl aujourd hui sur le marcht et celles qui finiguent le molns latlelage et ronctionnent le plus 
ais^menl. Nos presses einhalloltent de 10 4 i9 tonnes de foin par jour 

Nos presses emballottent de 10 A 15 tonnes de paille par jour. 

DeSpUeS de 37 aHoS 1"',^°"'"™'"'°»P''ensaspar« heno. paja, lana. algoaan yforrajede 
. "'""'""mosque serexpertosenese rarao. ypor lotanio reclamamos 

21'K.n"** ?* »''^<'"''5"' ,''"? '»* n>i" "imples y las mAs livianas para cl acarreo pot parcjas de 
caballos. y las eiifardada.lora* mejorrs que eiisten hoy en el mercado 

Nuestras preusas enlardan de to A i8 toneladas de heno por dia. 
Nuestras prensas enfardan de lo A 15 toneladas de paja por dia 



FRONT VIBW 

VDE DE PACK 

VISTA DKI. FRHNT8 

▼ORDHRA.VSICHT 

Catalogue free 

Catalogue franco sur demande 

Catalogo (J rat is 

Kataloge trei 



37 Jahre """"'«rbrochener Fabrikation von Heupressen. Rtrohpressen.WolIe- und Baumwollea- 

Z pres.sen, wieauch Maisfulter-Pressen. sollte iins wahrlich in den Stand ceaetxt haben 

KiiMTten dieser Branche (teworden zii sein: wir beanspruchen deshalb fur unsere Preaaen daia si- die 
;rJ?!'-,h.1f."H"""'"^""/"« *"^° """^ ""' HmballirendievorxaKhchsten Die«te leiVtJn Vn 
anengehalfHeuund 10 bisis'Tonnengehalf'Slrohtaglichxu em^Uiren. '^ «■••=" «.n 



Rzperten 

beim <". 

IS "TonncDgeha 




einfachaten in Konstruktion aiad, 
nacre Preaaca liBd im SUnde i* Ms 




Our •• Qem " Full Circle 



^ . , . ^' make a line of both Pull Circle and Half Circle Preaaes 

riMca, f. o. b. cars New York City, on our Gem Hull Circle Balers, properly crated for export: 



Net Weight. Groaa WeiRht. 

z 18 Baler. . 2,650 (i ,457 Kitoa) 3.700. . 

»,775 (i.sa6Kiloa) . . . • ■ 3,800. . 
».975 (1.636 Kilos) 4.000 . . 



2z 18 
X ■• Baler 
wc »2 Baler 



Space 
. II J cubic feet . . 
. 171 cubic feet . , 
. I >o cubic feet . 

Notre pre«se •'Qem" k cercle entier 



Pricea. 

•$»«5»S (^■44 16.10 

• "800 u*i 8 ; 

• »»'-5o (.^46. 3- o) 



:\ 



Nuestra Prensa ••Gem" Circulo Entero 

Wosotroa fabricamoa un suttido completo de prensas tanto de medio circulo como de cir«ai» 
entero. Los pre^ioa de embarque de la Prensa ■Gem" son franco A bordo de los carreT^ 
hasU New York, y ac empaquetan con aeguridad para ezporUrlaa. 
PewiBruto. Neto. Bapado Precio 

Fren« ij x ,g . . ,.650 < 1,457 f I0.I 3,700 .... nj^rtblco. . 

PrenaaitiiiS. . j,77S i,5>6K os) . . .j.goo. . . . i7rpi*sc<Jbicoa . 
(i,636Klloa) . . . .4,000. . . . mpiiacdbicoa . 



Prensa 17 z n . 



J.775 
»,975 



IV. 



l»'5 »5 </'u.it.i*> 
. 118.00 - 

. 111.90 I 



^ . Nous fatniquoos un asaortiment de presses A demi.ceTcle et t, cercle entier 

rrtzto aoa prcaaes "Gem" i cercle entier, miaes en wagOD 1 New York et cooTenableaiaat 

emballiea pour I'eaportation: 
Poida net. Poida brut. Espace priz 

UziJ. .j,650(i.457kik>ij . . . .3,700. . . . 115 pieda cubes . . »»I5.JS ■(.;^44.i6.ia 
■i<«i«. .»,n5(>.5'6kiloa) . . . .3.800. . . . 171 pieds cubes . . . ail.ob /-Js 8 4' 
17ZM. . 1,975 (1,636 kiloa) . . . .4.000. . . . i>o pleda cubca . . . aji.50^46 j. 



•36 Kilos) . 

Unsere VolKZirkel ♦•Qeni" PresM. 

Wir fabrixiren eln A9w>rtiment von Voll- und Halbzirkel-Preaaen. 

rreiae unserer Tollzirkel Bmballage Prrsaen, frei Board New York, ferti« fttrdaa 

Hxportversand verpackt: 

Nettorewichl. Brultogewicht. Ranmlnhalt. Preia*. 

iazi8Preaae. , j.Sjo (1,457 «lo) 3.700 . . . . 115 Kublkfuaa . . ■ f'S-tS {£uti.n\ 

liziSPreaie. , 1.77s h, 516 iUo 3 ioo . . . . 17. Kubikfuaa . . . iiioS aij •• 4> 

1,636X110) 4,000 . . . . 110 Kubikfuaa . . . aii.ao (^4£ ^ i| 



I Preaie 
17 z » Preiae 



1.775 
1.975 



CEO. ERTEL CO. - 592 Kentucky Street. Quiocy. 111., U. S. A. 



Export Implement Age 



Vol. XV. 



Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. X., December, I906. 



No. 



Immensity of American 
Farm Productions 

Report of Secretary of Agriculture Wilson, Showing 

the Progress of Farming in the Lnited 

States During the Year 1905 



( )f all the 8o.cxx),cxK) (uld citizens of these 
I'liiteil States of .\nierica none has Ix'tter right 
to give thanks to-day tlian tlie great .Ameri- 
can fanner. ( )nce again he has proven his 
snpreinacy in the world struggle for the pros- 
|K'ritv cup. 

\ot only has the .\nierican fanner sup- 
nlied the nation with the food it needs, hut he 
has filled the fleets of the oceans with his pro- 
ducts. Xor is there the slightest indication 
of a lapse in his reconl-l)reaking stri<les. If 
anything, the future promises to he greater 
than even the great present. 

Here arc sitine of the things the .Xnurican 
fanner has accomplislied in the jxist year, and 
for which to-day the whole Uepuhlic may join 
in rendering thanks : 

His year's priMlucts reached the stupen<lous 
total of $(),7<)4,(xx),(Kx>. 

He exceeded lii^ prndurts for \')^^^ l)y S483,- 
000.000. 

Of grain he raised 4,688,000.000 hushels, 
1 20,000, OiK) hushels alxive the output of last 
year. 

I'"r(»m his surplus lie loaded the ocean fleets 
with products to a value of $i>7(>,ooo,o:k) — 
enough to Iniilil a high-class railroad half-way 
around the earth. 

He secured a national credit in the world's 
halance sheet in lavnr oi this nation nt $4,^,^- 
()0().(K)(). ( )ther American producei>. all told, 
got a credit of only SJsSt.oxi.ikk). 

M,\i; WIM \l S III I' 1 11; Sl.liiNK. 

I'.very time the ilock ticks off a second dur- 
ing the 10 hums of a uork-day he led nine 
meat-producing animals to the hutcher. 

To the average family he has sui)plieil 1,014 
piiiinds of meat. 

I'.ach family a.^ked fur ovi r mH-tliiril nt ,1 
calf, over two-thirds of a .steer or three-fourths 
of a lami). nearly three-fourths of a sheep and 
two and one-half hogs. He supplied it. 

,\ftcr sui)plyiiig hi^ home market he had 
tme-eighth of his total left over — sufficient to 
feed the United Kingdom of (neat Ilritian or 
the C.ennan I'.mpire for one-half year. 

'I'hesc facts are given by Secretary Wilson, 
of the Department of Agriculture. And he 
of all men knows. They are derived from his 
storehouse of information, gleaned by trained 
men and tahulated and compared hy exj)erts 
in his annual report. No wonder, therefore, 
that the Secretary hursts forth in a paean ol 



thanksgiving for the American fanner's suc- 
cess, in the midst of the facts and figures 
enumerated in his annual rejxjrt : 

"h'or the ahundance that tlie Creator has 
sustained the farmer in supplying, for the 
stability of the national agriculture, and for 
the comforting ])rospect of a iHitent future, 
there are many evidences that the people are 
ready to join in a day of reverent and joyous 
Thanksgiving." 

ih;t\ii,s ol" i'.\kmi;r's wokk. 

Taking the farm products at that point in 
liroductioii at which they ac<|uire commercial 
value, the Secretary makes a number of inter- 
esting coiniiarisons with jiast performances of 
the agricultnri.st. Using the value of the total 
products of the year u/16 — $(3,794.000,000 — 
as a basis, he shows that n<it only did it exceed 
the value of the production of i<>o5 by $483,- 
oi>o,0(Xi, but exceeded the value for 1«)<14 by 
$877.(XK),Ofx>, and that of the census for iK<)<) 

ll\ Sj,077,00(),<ICX). 

.\ simple series of index numlK-rs is readily 
constructed, which shows the progressive 
movement of wealth pnxluction by the fanner. 
The value of the i)rodncts of l8(>() being taken 
;it iiK), tlu' v.due for np^^ stands at IJ5, for 
|i)<)4 .it 1.^1, for l<)r)5 at i_^4, and for kjo'i 
III 144. 

\\ bile the value of all cereals dropped about 
.S4<>,<xK>,(XK» below the total of ii)<)5, and about 
.S I J .< K « >,oo(J bell iw the total of 11)04. tlu' tium- 
liir of bushels for I'ynC}, which was 4.(i88,(mx).- 
iin), wa> 1 jo.noo.iKio bushels above the yield 
III' 11)05, 5(>7,(xy.>,(KX) alxive the yield of l<>04. 
.ind S35.(xx),(xxi biislu'ls :ibove the n ield of 
KHi.V (u'orn rein;iiiis by f.ir the most \aluable 
rriip, and the figure that it may reach this year 
Is .Si .ux),(KKi,ixx) for 2,88i.(KX).r,Ky » bushels — 
perha|)S a little under the value of the tu\t 
largest crop, that nf i<)<)5. 

ll.X.NNKH Vi:.\K I'oK KXl'iiKTS. 

( )n the whole, crop values have been neither 
notabK high nor lo\s in com[>arison with recent 
\ears, but the cro])s are so ni.un in numbir 
that losses meet gains, and the crii])s have been 
111! such a high price level in the general aver- 
age that they have raised the total crop value 
somewhat above nx^.s, aiul the high ])reeeding 
vears. To reach a still higher |M)inl in this 
extraordinarv series of high values tli.in bad 



been touched before is an achievement that 
deserves attention. 

harm products continue to be so far beyond 
the national reiiuirements that the farm still 
overshadows the mill, the factory and the 
workshop in providing exports. With his 
surplus beyond the nation's need, the farmer 
has loaded the fleets oi oceans. These pro- 
ducts were exported to the value of $(>7(),ooo,- 
<xx> during the fiscal year ending June 20. 
n»<y) — enough to build a high-class railroad 
half-way arnund the earth. This is the larg- 
est amount ever reached by agricultural ex- 
]M»rts for this or any other country, and ex- 
ceeded by $J4,cxx5,oo<} the extraordinary value 
of n;t)i, which had previously been the record 
year, t'omuienting on this. Sir. Wilson says: 

■ While the farmer placed to the national 
credit in other countries $43,^.000.000 in njo<). 
other i)roducers, all included, secured a halance 
in favor of this country of only $85.ooo,ocK». 
I )uring the past seventeen years the farmer 
lias built up a balance of trade in foreign 
exchange of agricultural products amounting 
to .Sh.iy>8.(XKVXio. while all other producers 
find themselves at the end of the same period 
with a total on the debtor side of the account 
to the extent of $439,ooo.<xx). 

1 Living priMluced fabulous wealth during 
the \e;ir and having sent to foreign coun- 
trus mil of the wealth of the preceiling yeai 
eiiiiiigli to pay the interest-bearing national 
dibt, tin- farmer may now take account of 
his fanning capital. The large rate of increase 
in its v.ihie since n/X) is not a mere matter 

I if ;i higher price level and higher land values. 
Ill the meantime, the farmer has earned a sur- 
plus income, much of which he has invested 
ill his I'arming e(|uipinent, in buildings, in 
many improvements, in live stock, in machin- 
ery, and in furtherance of the comforts and 
ple.isures of living." 

nviion's mi;\t I'koDrcTios. 

< )f the meat pniiliution of the country the 
Secretary sa\ s : 

"{ jii'ii the t.iniit Is' \;ist herds nl nu-.it ani- 
ni.ils the nation depends for its most expen- 
sive class of foods in various kinds of meat, and 
fur one-third of its ilietary. The figures of 
meat |iriiiluctiiin, which are the result i>f a re- 

II 111 l.iis^e and searching investigation b\ this 
I )ep,irtmeiit. strikingly express the magnitude 

III the hirnuTs occupation, as evidenced by 
oiih iiiir 111 lis branches, and the largeness 
III lis pi 111 irmaiue in national sustenance ami 
exports. 

"in the last census year, n><», 1)^^,502,000 
meat animals were slaughtered and e.xportet!. 
and of i1h-.(. iS.8<x),ooo were cattle, includ- 
ing calves : J4.548,(xx> were sheep, including 
lambs, and over one-half, of 5o,i45.fxx) were 
hogs. l'".ver\ time the cluck ticks a second 
during 10 hours ol' ,1 work-day. the farmer 
drives nine meat anini.ils to the butcher. 

"Such numbers may be better understood 
if they are reiluced to the average of the census 
])rivate family. 4.6 persons. To such a family 
in MKx> the farmer snpplieil 41) pounds of veal. 



8 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



411 poun<ls of beef, 3" po"'i'ls "f lam.). 39 
p<')umls of imilton and 4' '3 1)">"'"1*^ ''[ P^*'"'^- 
including; lard or in all 1.014 pounds of moat, 
amounting to half a ton. 

••if tlic exi)orts had hern consumed at homo 
tlu-y woul.l have ^ivin to each family more 
beef than the forc^joinu by 3" l)'>i"'<l^- '""'■^" 
iK.rk bv ';7 pounds, or altofietlur 147 i.ounds. 
"In the consumption of meat, expressed m 
terms of entire animals, each family asks the 
farmer for over one-third of a calf, over two- 
thirds of a steer or cow. over three-fourths ot 
a lamb nearlv three-fourths of a sheep, and 
two and oiK-half ho^-s. an<l the farmer re- 
siK)nds so liberallv that one-eiKhlh ot his sup- 
ply is left over for the foreigner, it is upon 
th'e sellinji of this surplus in foreign countries 
that the farmer dei)ends for the manitenance 
of ,.rofitable prices for his meat animals. 
KNofoii TO i'i;i:i> <.ki:at ukitain. 
••This fraction of one-eiKdith is small, but il 
becomes remarkablv magnified when it crosses 
the .\tlantic Ocean. The national surplus ot 
meat for one vear. if comi«>se.l of the ditTert-nt 
kinds as actuailv use.l in consumption, is sufti- 
cient to feed eitiier the Lnited KiiiKdom or the 
(k-rman Kmpire for nearly half a year or l)oth 
for nearlv one-fourth of a year. an<l the p«jpu- 
lation of thes two countries in i<>oi was i^S.ooo.- 
000, as com|)ared with a population of 7O.000,- 
000 in this counirv the vear before. 

'•The little fraction of the national product 
of meat which goes to other countries looks 
laree when viewed in another aspect. In the 
worhl's inteniational tra.le in packing-house 
prixlucts and live meat animals the place occu- 
pie.l bv the exports from the I mte.l Mates 
is indicated by ab.ut 40 per cent, ot the 

total value." 

Commenting ..n the increase in acreage un- 
der pnxluction in the country, the rejiort says . 

".Millions upon millions of acres ot tresh 
land have Ix-en coming into pnMluction faster 
than domestic consumption has recpiired. and. 
al times, beyond the takings of imp. .rting coun- 
tries. For nianv years the farmer was threat- 
ened with 4f>-cent wheat. 20-cent corn and 5- 
ceiit cotton, and at times he was face to face 
with the hard conditions implied in these de- 
structive prices. .\ more scientit^c agricul- 
ture would have raised wheat that no one 
wanted to eat. cm t<. store on the farm an< 
perhaps eventually to be used for Juel. and 
cotton not wnrlh the picking. 

Cori.li IMUI'.I.K I'KKSKNT CKtiP. 

"If there were need to <lo so. the cotton 
farmer and planter couhl double the present 
crop of two-t^fths of a bale per acre, and tlie 
feat woul<l need nothing nvre than deiiion- 
Mrate<l aii.l well-underst.HKl principles ot farm 
management. It would Ik- no work of magic 
to multii>lv the production of cotton per acre 
bv three and gel a bale and a <|uarler ; and, 
besides this, the planter has more than three 
times the present actual acreage in cotton read- 
ilv available and awaiting his use. More than 
tlie present area of cotton can thus be grown 
in a three-year crop rotation when the nee.ls 
of the world demand it. 

"In acconlance with principles <lemonstrate<l. 
known and applicable, hints of which have 
been given, the corn crop per acre can be in- 
creased bv one-half within a (luarter of a cen- 
turv and' without anv pretense that the limit 
hasten reached. No wixard^ services are 
neeiled for this, but just e<ltication. I he same 



statement is applicable to wheat. There is no 
sensible reason whv half as much again wheat 
mav not be had from an acre withm less 
than a generation of time. It is only a ques- 
tion of knowledge. ..f education. ..f ^■"Itura' 
svstem and of farm management, all of wlncH 
"learning is and will be at the service of the 
farmer a> he nee<ls il. 

I'OWKKOl" l-.\KMK.KS' NKW CAI'lTAI.- 

••The farmer will not fail the nation if the 
nation does not fail the farmer. He will need 
education to know the powers ot the soil which 
are now hi<lden from him. The prospective 
vearlv exi)enditure of $ i o.o(3().(XX) for edu- 
cational and research work by nation and Mate, 
with such increases as may come froiu time to 
lime must have enormous effects. 1 he tar- 
nier is financiallv in a position now t<. do 
what he could not have done previous to the 
recent vears of his prosjierity. 

"Farmers are using their new capital to 
waste places <.f the land. The river is leveed 
an.l alluvial boltoms subject to overtlow become 
worth huiKlreds of dollars per acre for vege- 
tables ; a marsh is drained by ditches and tiles 
and celerv makes it the most valuable land 
i„ ihe counirv; semi-arid land is constantly 
cultivated so as to make a mulch of hnely-pul- 
verij-ed earth on the surface, and the cn-iis that 
il will grow make the farmer prosperous, 
h'ormerlv there was an abun<lance oi farm 
lalMir and a <learth of farming capital; now 
these conditions are reverse<l an<l labor is 
scarce ami cajiital abundant." 



IMPORTANT NEW VARIETIES 



\t the lnited States experiment stations 
main new varieties of plants are developed bv 
breeding and selection. The recent report ot 
the Secretarv of Agricidture mentions that 
the pr.Mlucli.'.n of a new group of fruits\ the 
cilranges. or hardv oranges, is one of the 
most far-reaching an<l important truiini.hs 
which has ever been achieved as a result of 
carefullv planned breeding experiments. 
Three varieties— the Rusk. Willits and Mor- 
ton— have alrea<lv been nameil. ami trees have 
been distributed to alxmt 2.000 fruit growers 
and nurservmen. principallv in the (ailf States 
and in the States of ( )regon an<l Washington 
Two other new varieties have iKcn produced, 
having large fruits similar in appearance to 
ordinary oranges, and these will be named and 
distributed in the near future, r.oth of these 
varieties are somewhat ditTerent from the sorts 
previously name<l. an<l are believed to possess 
superior merits in certain characters. I'oth arc 
large, hue-appearing acid fruits, and are very 
juicv. Thev will prove valuable, especially 
for culinarv pur])oses an<l in the making of acid 
ilrinks. .'\nother variety has been secured 
which has lairlv go<Ml fruits, and gives proinise 
of utilitv as a hedge plant and lawn tree. 1 lie 
citranuvs are of special value for cultivation m 
regions sliglulv too cojd for the ordinary 

orange. 

Three new varieties of hybrid ]iineai)I>les 
have this vear been distributed to a number 
of good growers, and next year slock of all 
..f the new varieties .leveloped by the Depart- 
ment will be available for distribution. The 
further experinieiits in this field have resulted 
in the .liscoverv ot six more new hybri<ls which 
possess (|ualities that will render them valuable 
for cultivation. These will be placed with 
growers al the earliest |)ossible dale. All ot 



tlie new varieties of pineapples arc superior 
in riavor to the ordinary varieties, and many 
of them have sm(K>th or spineless leaves, a 
(lualitv of consi<lerable value to the grower. 
\ll pineapple growers who have had an ojipor- 
tmiitv to examine and test these hybrids are 
impressed with their superior (|uality and pro- 
mise. , , 
Il has been claimed by entomologists and 
others studving the control of the cotton boll 
weevil that varieties of cotton are needed which 
will mature their entire product very early 
in the season, in order to permit the crop / 
to be harvested and the stalks destroyed early 
in the fall. A new earlv defoliate variety has 
been produced by an agent of the Department, 
working in co-operation with the 'lexas .\gri- 
cullural h'.xperiment Station, which jKissesses 
these (inalilies in marked degree, and which, 
at the same time, is a productive sort 
having fairlv large bolls. This new 
variety, the present season, ripened Us 
fruit and matured earlier than any other of 
the varieties tested in comparison with it. 
among them being the King, which is i.rob- 
ablv the earliest varielv cultivated. 

In the maize breeding experiments great 
a.lvances have been made. ( )ne variety, which 
has been carefully bred in central ( )hio. has. 
for the last four years, shown an average 
yearl) gain of 10 bushels per acre ti> numerous 
farmers, and is giving excellent results. The 
breeding work with sweet maize, having as its 
object the improvemenl of strains for canning 
puriMtses, has Ix'en continued with g<«»l suc- 
cess. 

The most promising features of the oal- 
breeding work are the new hybrids recently 
developed. These are large grained an<l early 
in season, and retain the vigor and size of 
the late-season parent. Selection for disease 
resistance have also been made, and the year's 
experiments have proved that it is possible to 
secure smut-resistant varieties. Much infor- 
mation that will permit of a choice of crop 
plants and plant varieties for alkali lands and 
provide a solid basis for the increase <»f 
resistance by breeding has been obtained. The 
field investigations of crop i)lants in relation 
to alkali are being supplementeil by extensive 
lalioratory experiments. 



AMERICAN INVENTIONS 

lunopean makers of machinery for farms 
mav be interested in a new Ijand. rip and 
eilging saw. recently brought out by J. A. bay 
& I'.gan Co.. of Cincinnati, < >hio. It is a 
new tvpe of an old machine. As a band rip 
saw. it comprises all the features of its prede- 
eessi.r. and is built on the column of that 
machine, with the same wheels an<l devices 
throughout, with an added edging attachment 
feature, which consists of a traveling chain 
in the table ami under the outfeediug roll, ami 
is operated bv a pocket chain and gearing 
from the same shaft that runs the npi)er-feed 
rolls. This traveling chain has ;i vertical ad- 
justment, and can be drojipcd below the sur- 
face of the table to be out of the way for 
ri]iping. The distance between fence and saw- 
blade will a.huit material up to 24 inches 
wide. The rolls mav be raised to receive tim- 
ber \2 inches thick. A cam lever releases. 
moves and clamps tlu' fence, accomphshing the 
adjustment of the fence more (piickly than 
bv anv other means. 






THE BASIS OF PROSPERITY 

The Agricultural Implement and Vehicle Business 
of Kansas City Implements 
and Crop^ 



Comparatively lew persons realize that one 
of the most important industries of the many 
which have ina<le Kansas City more prom- 
inenl in the world than many of her older and 
larger sisters, is one seldom sjioken of. little 
written of, and to the majority of Kansas 
Citv's citizens scarcely known about, says the 
Joiinial of that city. It is the agricultural im- 
plement an<l vehicle business. ... 

To write a storv oi Kansas City's imple- 
ment business would be to write a history ot 
ihe development of the great Southwest, a sec- 
tion of the country that has become famous 
the worid over for its marveious growth. 
Almost with the landing of the first boat at 
the old Westjxirt laiKimg, when a cargo of 
yvagons from M. T.ouis was unloaded. Kan- 
sas Cilv sprang into prominence as a dislrib- 
utiiiL' center for agricultural implements. 

The basis of the uniirecedentcd i)ros])enty 
which has blessed the country, especially the 
West, during the past few years is the won- 
derful crops. Newspaper and magazine arti- 
cles bv the score have been written dtiring the 
oast few months aliout the record-bre.iking 
crops of wheat, corn, cotton, etc.. winch have 
been pnxluced in that p..ition of the trans- 
Niississippi counirv of which Kansas City is 
the ccographical an.l commercial center. 

These stories are true. They are not pipe 
dreams: not fanciful pictures created m the 
brains of over-enthusiastic writers. The 
granaries of the .>outhwest are litera.lv burst- 
big with the crofis which will f^U the banks 
with gold an.l silver when the already over- 
bur.lened railwavs can carry them to market. 
Whv this great prosoerity am.>ng the 
patr..ns of luisban.lrv? They plant the same 
kin.l of see.l in the same kind of soil as they 
did in the (lavs when nearly every farm m the 
West wore a plaster in the shape of a mort- 
gage The seasons have not materially 
changed; it is s.^ietimes to., dry, n..w as it 

was then. , 

The increase of pr-isperitv am-^ng the I arm 
ers is .hie in a large measure t.» tlu- nnpi-vc 
nient in agricultural implements. It is imt so 
„,nch the increase in the price of the farmers 
nnHluct that be m.ikes more money now than 
lormeriv. but rather the decreased cost of pro- 
.incti.Mi'bv reason .-f impiv.yed nnplements^ 
Where one man and a team fonnerU plowed 
two an.l a ball acres of groun.l ui a dav. IHe 
same man will mm . with the a-Mit.-m ..f one 
horse an.l a gang pLnv, turn over five acres ui 
the same time, while ,.n the b,g farm- 1u.> 
,„,n\yilb a traction engine f'^^ 'u.>t.yx; p-.wer 
plow fn.m ,.. to 40 acres m a .lav. 1 he n 
;„„| ,l,ree-r..w cultivator, the m.;.lern bmdcr 
or header, the mamm.>th threshing macbme 
,hc c.rn bin.ler, the busker and shrcl.le, . 
the sheller. the portable elevator, the manure 
spreader, the gasoline engine, the cream sei^ 
.arator. the hav stacker, the bav press, the 
traction engine, have all had thnr P-'^-'t 't, ijot 
onlv en.abling the farmer to ..ouble rrml treWe 
the' output of his f.actnrv (the farm) with.Mit 
materiallv increasing hh operating '''<'^^"^^;- 
but have relieved him of much ;ii^y^»^'^l^l^nr^^ 
Tic has more time to read and study seientiffy 



methods of farming; more tunc f.-r social in- 
tercourse; hence he has <leveloi.e<l a t;iste lot 
more of the comforts ami luxuries .,f lite, an.l 
is able to have them. 

Indirectiv, then, the prosjicnty we are en- 
i..ving is due to the agricultural implement 
business, and Kansas Cilv has t..r many years 
ranke.l first of all the cities of the worl.l as a 
.listributing point for this class of merclian- 
.lise. .\l.>re than 150 concerns manufacturing 
imi.iemcnts an.l vehicles carry sl.aks in Kan- 
sas Cilv. .\m.)iig these are represented the 
largest ' factories in the workl. Here are 
located Ihe largest and best equipped jobbing 
houses ill this line to be found anywhere. .\n 
average of fortv carioads of these g.M..ls ,ire 
shipped daily into the Kansas Citv territory, 
aggregating an annual business of $23,000.- 

o<x>. . -r - 1 

The implenicnl business differs from neaiiy 
all other classes of merchandise. Me.it. flour, 
sugar. iMTots and shoes, cl.ithing. etc.. arc a 
necessarv expense to the purchaser; whereas 
a.'ricnitural imiilemcnts are an investment, by 
means of which the farmer is enabled to in- 
crease his revenue. The more money he 
spends judici.nisly in implements the greater 
are his profits. 

luich vear. in the month of January, tberc 
ongregatcs in Kansas City the largest gather- 
in-, of men engaged in one line of business to 
be''f..uii.l anv place in the Unite.l States. More 
than .^.000 retail dealers in agricultural im- 
pleme'nts and vehicles come here annually t" 
atlcii.l the convention of the Western Retail 
Implement an.l \ehicle Dealers' Association 
The implement district at that time is a verit- 
.able cxiiosition ; no exhibit, even at a worM s 
fair, ever e<pialcd it. To meet the retailers 
bun.lreds of manufacturers come from the 
b'asf. Some of them visit other conventions 
at otiicr jobbing points, but Kansas C itv is the 
"big show" and evervbodv comes. If a new 
imnlement is to be placed on the market it 
will be found first at the annual dealers con- 
vention in Kansas Citv. for the manufacturer 
or inventor knows that here it will be seen by 
■1 lar-cr number of men who deal m imi> e- 
ments than at anv other place in the woH-l. 
If it is .ipproved at the Kansas City cmven- 
tioii its future is assured. 



cylinders, is in rigid c.inncction with the boiler, 
while the forward frame, with the l.)w -pres- 
sure engine, swivels around a vertical pin in 
the center line of the saddle of the rear engine. 
.\ rearward exlen.ling radial frame, bolted to 
the top of the forward engine frame projects 
back to engage this pivot. 

The boiler has a bearing near mi.l-length 
of the forwar.l frame, where a heavy cross- 
•.;iil of the frame pn-vi.les a seat for a trans- 
verse sli.ling iK-aring. The receiver pipe, 
which carries the exhaust ..f the high-pres- 
sure engine forwani to the low-pressure 
cylinders, swivels at the same point as the for- 
war.l frame, and is provide.l with a hip joint. 

The exhaust from the low-pressure cyl- 
in.lers calls f.)r another flexible pipe connec- 
ti(.n; the exhaust stand is rigidly fixed in ihe 
smokebox. and the short connection i)ipe from 
the top of the low-jiressurc cylin.ler casting 
is fitte.l with swiveling and ex|)ansion joints 
to acc.mni.Mlate itself to the lateral incMion of 
the forward frame relative to the b.^iler. Ihe 
pony trucks are pivote.l by radial frames in 

the usual way. 

The fireb.)X is of the P.elpaire type f.»r soft 
c.al. with a slightly curved crown sheet and 
flat sides flaring outward from the crown sheet 
to the mud ring. There are two fired, .ors. 
The d.'iue is a steel casting, and being very 
low, it is fitted with a throttle valve having 
side openings. The main steam pipes are car- 
rie.l from each side of the dome to the high- 
pressure cylin.lers in fr..nt of the rear group 
of driving wheels. 

The high-pressure exhaust is delivered to a 
receiver pipe, extending forward between the 
frames an.l f.>rked to reach the valve chests 
of the l.nv-pressnre cylinders, in front of the 
lea.ling group of ilriving wheels. This \^\[>c 
is .)f flexible construction. Ilalanced shde- 
vilves are used for both high and low-pres- 
sure cylin.lers. Thev are operated by valve 
gear ..f the Walscharert type. The reversing 
gear is oi)erated by a comiiresse.l-air device. 



AMERICAN LOCOMOTIVES 

'\merican l<->c.tmotives are n.ny preferred 
fhronghout the w.iri.l when the eon.liti.-ns tl- \ 
are to met are prescribed uben the loc- 
,n,,ti\,s ,,re ..nlerc.l. The highest point .-t 
,xcellenre has ncentU been reaelie.l m tin 
,-,.„.trn,-tion of l,,eoin..tives ..f yy^.ixn, \,<muU. 
the largest ever built, of which ^i<>,oo ' pMnmis 
rest on the .Iriving wheels. Thesr new l.-o 
„„,liv,s b,,ye ij driying wheels, each measur 
in- 4 feet •• inches, and fmir truck wheels, 
measnrim; J feet o inches. The boders are ab-Mit 
the same in si/e as that ..f the lust one, \\ hH 
a firebox heating surface -d" J-',; s,|nan' teel, 
and a tube heating surface of 5.4.^^ sqn.are leet. 
e;ich !.>com.itive has a steaming eai.acitx ot 
about 2 per cent, greater than its prclecessr.r^ 
The grate area. 78 s.,nare bet. is mci.'ased 
in s.miewb.at larger rati,-. The latter loco 
ni,,tive is, however, d-siuned to carrv a lou.r 
boiler pressure than the otlur. 

The boiler and firebox are e.irn. d well alviyc 
the flames. The latter are of cast stetl. I In 
rear frame, which carries the high ]'vess,ire 



CONTROL THE WATER LEVEL 

Main fact. tries use tanks and reservoirs for 
their water supplv ; a safe and reliable auto- 
uiatic float valve is an essential part of such 
tuik an.l reservoir. The C.<ilden- Anderson 
\alve Specialty Co.. Pittsburgh. Pa., have 
brought out a valve, which is use.l t.. control 
the water level in tanks or reservoirs when the 
suppiv is nn.ler either high or low pressure. 
Tvyo special features of the valve are that it 
„,-,v be instantly a.ljusted t.. operate qmcklv 
,,r slosvlx as .lesire.l. an.l that the valve is 
eushione.l in .opening an-l c1.>sing. The float 
may be swiveled to anv required angle. Ihe 
uater enters under the v.alve or piston and pas- 
s^s tbn-ngli tin ports ami to the f^p of the 

' ( hving to the greater area above the valve, 
the valve is hel.l closed normally, but when 
the lever is oper.it.Ml bv the fl.iat, the auxiliary 
valve ..iKiis a port thnnigh .an auxiliary valve, 
relieving the pressure nu the upper si.le n\ 
tlie yaUe. This presstne .m the t.->p of the valve 
bein.-- reniovod. the presstne un.ler the v.alve 
foia-rs it ui>. opening the outlet, ami the water 
.ab.>ye the valve acts as a cushion while it 
is bein--^ force.l out. an.l as the valve travels 
npw.ar.r the air is .Irawn in thnnigh the air 
ports, which acts as a cushion when the valve 
is closing. 



10 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



II 




I lu- Jamoslown Kxpii>iii"n will 
ickbrati- l\w hiii'liiiK :it Jam.-s- 
town. Virginia. ..n May i.Uli. i<«7. 
of a fiw >i>irc of adviiiuircrs who 
siKceo.k-(l in establishing the tirst 
permanent settlement of English- 
men on the American Contnient. 

I he i<Ua of the exposition orig- 
inated in VifKinia. It almost im- 
meiliately received national sanc- 
tion, liidir an act -I O ingress, 
passed la-t year. President Koose- 
velt has formally proclaimed the 
tercentennial, and invite<l all the 
nations of the world to send <lnr- 
nig the year lyO/ representative 
tUit- of their navies and regi- 
„unl> oi their armi.-. to meet in 
the international marine rendez- 
vons and land manoeuvres. It is 
certain that the nations will send 
their finest and latest ships t- 
Hampton Roads during the com- 
ing year. 

One of the features of the ren- 
dezvous will be various acquatic 
contests between the crews of the 
assembled Ikets. The exploitation 
„f the searchlights and the light- 
„R l,v night will be perhaps the 

clmf -p^-cta'--le "' •''^' ^'^l" "■'"""• 
the mililarv encampment with the 
international drills and evolutions 
will be hardly le- inleresting 

The exposition will be di-lmc- 
tivc in that its chief object will be 
tlu- expounding of history. It will 
held in Hampton R.iadv 1 he 
w.cterway has 1(0 miU- "t pr^uct- 
ed harbor and the gnuind- contain 
upwards of .<(>o acres with a mile 
,,f shnre line on the w.iter. Withm 
a radius of eight miles are the 
cities of Norfolk, Berkley. P-rts- 
ni.uiili. N\wp..rt News. Hampf-n, 
flKul.iis. t,.Rether with the great 
,.rA,in..ii at 1-ortress Monroe, 
all ol whuh are sb-iwii m the ac- 
company mg illustration. 




CoHtttiy of 'Ridgwa^'t" 



FIRST UlRDS-EYE \ \V.\\ ( ) !■ THE j A M E S T < ) W \ i l* U S IT I ( ) X .WD H.VMI'TOX 

BE THE SCENE UE THE GREATl XAVAL REXDEZ\()LS IX HISTORY. 



R().\I)S. WHICH WILL 



i I 



TIGHT BINDING TEXT CUT OFF 



12 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



13 



It 



Export Implement Aqe r,irf^,Tr'!!,!r^"r, 



POR CmCULATION IN FORBICH COUNTRIES ONLY. 

*a IndcpcndcDt Journal devoted exclueively to the Export 

Trade in Agricultural Machinery, Pumps. Wind 

Milla, Farm Tools, Dairy Supplies, and 

Hardware Specialties. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
Postage prepaid .... 4 Shillings 
Por un ano, porte franco - - 1 Peso 
Un an, affranchi . . ■ ■ 5 Francs 
Fiir ein Jahr, portofrei . . 4 Mk. 35 

Please remit by draft on New York or 
International Money Order. 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 
1010 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



Also publishers of "The Implement Age" and 
"The American Hertilizer." 



Copyrighted, 1906, by Ware Bros. Company. 



Agent for New Zealand, Richard Hill, Matlock House, Daven- 
port, Auckland, New Zealand. Price, Us, td. postpaid. 

V«l. XV. Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A., December, 1906. No. 3 



Under no circumstancea do we Mvw coBWils- 
•ions to advertising agents. 



THE YEAR 1907 

The ciiiiiinji year j)ri)iiiiM'> to \)v \hv tjrcatest 
year in coniincrcial or industrial activity 
throu^lmut the entire wurlil. Ami yet, there 
are tf)-«lav upwards of oiu' Iminlri'd million 
people in the world bordering on starvation 
through failure of crops. Kii'^sia an<l China 
are the worst sufferers. This starvation, which 
is a catastrophe is in the nature of an accident 
— an accident of nnfavorahle weather, extend- 
ing over large anas, 'j'lie peo|)le ;ire striving 
their utmost to better their condition. They 
sow and cultivate and reap what comes. They 
toil in shops, factories, mills ami mines for 
such wages a- competition and necissity 
obliges them to accept. 

\\ ithall, they are acctininlating wialth. I >m - 
ing the past \ear nearl\ mie million came lo 
the fnited States t,. Iicitcr tluir condition. 
Machinerv |o f.Kiliiale the l.d>or of ,tI1 pi-iiple 
is being luiiud iiul b\ ihc mills and sliojis 
as iu\tr bi fMr<'. I'.etter laws ,irt' being macleil. 
I'airer rides ,'ire being established between 
man and man. We are approaehiiig. 
slo\vl\, ideal londiiinns ..f jnsiici'. Tlu' 
world is being eibieaud. I'.dne.ition 

makes ibc pinple diss.-itislii'ij witli \ts 
tcrday and iMpefnl for a better to-morrow. 
The gnat governments of the world are 
obliged to Kiid ;i nmre attemi\e ear to what 
the people desire. W bile there is mueb In Ix- 
desired, the people through their energy and 
industr\ are in siglu of better conditions, and 
when the year 1907 is past, the masses will 
feel that they have made one more lierm.ment 
step towards lutter conditions, 'riiis is an age 
of progress, ,-ind all conntrics arc falling into 
the line of march. 



The people of the I'liited States will hold 
an exposition next year near the site of the 
l.mding of the first colimy of settlers, three 
centuries ago. Ivlsewhere will be found a two- 
page view of the grounds aucl some of the 
buildings, and a section of surrounding coun- 
trv. The grounds are on tide water, sur- 
rounde<l by an arm of the ocean, known ;is 
liamptoii Kuads. where, during the (.'ivii War, 
the first battle was fongbt by iron-clad ves- 
sels. There will be much of interest to be 
seen of a character showing the growth of 
the countrv in three centuries. Portions id' 
the lleets of the wt>rld will be present in honor 
of the occasion. 



AMERICAN OPPORTUNITIES 

l'.urope;m count riis are gi\ing special atten- 
tion to the development id' commercial and 
technical e<lucalion on a broad scale, with a 
view of fitting young men abroad to seize 
opportunities in the Inited States. What is 
needed here is young men who have been 
taught along ci>nimercial and technical lines, 
and who are familiar with b'uroi)ean con- 
(Htioiis and re(|niremints to taki' hold of oppor- 
tunities, which are constantly presenting them- 
selves. .\mericans know their own country, 
but they do not know foreign countries or 
foreign oj)portunities as a rule. 

International trade is now the great channel 
of activity. .Ml nations are seeking it. All 
shipyards are busy building ships to carry pro- 
ducts from one country to another. The 
nations of the world are only now becoming 
ac(|uainted with each other. Thi\v are being 
tied together by commercial relations. The 
producing capacity of the people of the world 
is being increase*! and can lie greatly increase<l. 
Industry is supplanting idleness and thrift- 
lessncss. 

This great mo\ement e.ni be siinnilated b\- 
\iiung men who ktiow somelliiiig ot tbi- wants 
of the world ;md win re tlu' needed sti|)|ilics 
e.'in be liest ,nid iliia|ie~| produced, Anurica 
just now oilers t \ee]>tional opportunities lo 
h.uropeans oi special commercial and technical 
ipi.tlifications. I.et them coire. 



A HINT TO EUROPEAN WORKMEN 

With .dniosi ever\(hing as a prodigal gift 
of n.'ilure in the wax of resources and climate, 
the South is ill great need ni oiu' element of 
success, \i/., l.ilior. The er\ has been heard 
for \ears that labor e.imiot be li;id in siiffieiem 
supply to till the fields. ganuT the crops, man 
and woman the factories, and eii.ible the 
mills ;in<l mines to run to full cap.icity. A 
Sontberii eoinentioii largely m.tde up of gov- 
(.■mors of Soulheni States were reeeiitU held 
at Xashville, to take sikIi steps as coukl be 
taken lo iiulucc intelligent I'.urepcan labor to 



come South. Several States have established 
agencies for the same ])uri)ose of inducing 
desirable immigration. The long-established 
obstacles will he overcome, and in time the 
Dcasantry of Europe and its more or less 
skilled lalK)r will learn of the tempting oppor- 
tunities (dTered for homes and remunerative 
employment in the South. Steamship com- 
panies are being induced to establish termini 
along the South Atlantic coast, a wise and far- 
sighted step, which will help to bring the 
labor so much needed. 



INDEPENDENT MANUFACTURERS 

There was a time when .\mericans regarded 
with more or less apprehension the growth of 
migiity combinations of ca|)ital. which became 
known as "Trusts." Within a year or tw(). 
thev have become less threatening umler the 
enactment of restrictive laws and their en- 
forcement, and under the competition of inde- 
pendent concerns, which have found means of 
meeting the power of the.se combinations. 
There is still a great work to do. esi)ecially 
in the domain of agricultural implements, in 
which industry, certain branches are still domi- 
nate<l by great interests. The independent 
manufacturers in all lines are branching out, 
and are gradually getting a stronger foot- 
hold. 

Just now there is a demand for everything 
«»f use that can he made. The great combina- 
tions of capital have by their overixiwering 
attitude, aroused the latent energies of .\meri- 
eans, an<l have si)urred them to ilo their best 
in their own self-protection. The dan.gers to 
which the independents liave been subjected 
have not been without their benefits. Unman 
nature acts only as acted upon. It meets its 
environments. It will meet its present environ- 
ments not altogether by restrictive legislation 
against mighty combinations of wealth, but by 
arousing and organizing latent energies, which 
but for impending dangers might have lain 
di irmanl. 



MORE SHIPS 

American public sentiment is veering around 
in favor of the est.ililisliiiuiit of a powerful 
merchant na\y. Though the outcome of the 
liroposed Subsidy Hill cannot be regarded as 
assured ni la\or of more ships, vet public 
seiitiiiKiil is now more fa\orabl\ disposed to 
govermnenl co-operation in the maintenance 
of shi|) lilies, until they can become self-sup- 
porting. This is in line with the policv of jiro- 
tertion. which has done so mncii to make 
(he government of the I nited States what it 
is, 

l''acilities which m*>re s|ii|,> s\\\\ afford will 
do much to eii.ible the merchants, f.irmers and 
manufacturers of the outside wf)rld to come 
into close touch with the people of the I'nited 
Males, South American countries would prob- 



ably first realize the benefits of such develop- 
ment. The broadening out of international 
trade calls for means to reach other countries. 
The questions at issue have been threshed out 
after years of agitation and the jieople are 
now rcadv to endorse necessary expentlitnres 
to establi.sh steamship lines with the jxirts of 
the world in onler that they can send their 
products direct. 

MECHANICAL APPLIANCES 

iKo progressive manufacturer can afford to 
be out of touch with the ])rogress being inatic 
in the tlevelopinent of mechanical appliances 
fur the more economic doing of work, espe- 
cially as those ai)plianccs are devclopctl in 
the United States. Tin; K.m-okt Im im.i: viknt 
.•\(,K will, fnim month to month, ac(iuainl its 
readers with the latest and more inii>ortant 
inventions and iniprovenients, esi)ecially, along 
the line of progressive agriculture. 

.\ country such as the Inited States with 
its broad and uninterrupted expanse of fer- 
tile land naturally stimulates effort in the direc- 
tion of the better cultivation of the land. Me- 
chanical appliances naturidly followed, and 
their value in increasing the productivity of 
the soil attracted the attention of the tillers 
of the soil in other lands. 

The expt)rtation of imidements has become 
an imjHirtant branch of business, and as agri- 
culturists elsewhere realize that imi)lements 
mean more ])roducts for the same work, they 
are ino<lifying their methods and using ma- 
chines, tools and implements to do what thes 
did beft)re by hand. The agricultural methods 
of the entire worbl will ultimately change 
to those of the Inited States, but owing to 
the different conditions prevailing, it will never 
1k' possible to ado^jt exactly similar methods 
abn>ad as prevail on this side of the .Atlantic. 

THE GAS ENGINE 

The gas engine has l)ecome a very wi<lely 
used machine at home ami abroad. Perhaps, 
no other piece of mechanism has been im- 
prove<l upon so much, and possibly no other 
piece of machinery does its work so well or 
accomjdishes so much for the cost of machine 
and cost of operation. It renders service in 
a great variety of wavs and siipi)laiits much 
laljor. Its reduction in cost has made it avail - 
al)le to tens of tboiisamls of cultivators of the 
soil, as well as to small manufacturers, who 
by its use are able to hold their own against 
stronger concerns. 

Its simplicity of construction and operation 
allows unskilled lab«>r to operate it. and the 
low cost of repairs makes it a safe dependence. 
The gas engine has ilone for agriculture what 
no other jxiwer mechanism has ever di>ne. 
The .\merican makers are luishing this little 
machine in all parts of the world where there 
is sufficient enterprise to profit by it. It ele- 



vates labor by relieving it of much toil. It 
is an ever-rea<ly servant to toil for its owners 
at a small cost, it has a future such as no 
other machine has, not only among farmers, 
but among all users of power un a small scale. 
ICven in large Industrial establishments gas 
engines of two. three or more thousand horse- 
l>ower are now in use and the limit of their 
growth has by no means Ijcen reached. 

A BUSINESS MEN'S CONGRESS 

Over 300 business men, forty-five senators 
and diplomats from foreign countries attended 
the Trans- Mississippi Congress held at Kan- 
sas City, Mo., November 2f>th and 27th. < )ur 
reatlers abroad will be interested in knowing 
what national measures the representative busi- 
ness men of the Inited States are anxious to 
see carried out. 

The Congress endorsed the drainage inves- 
tigations and surveys made by the federal gov- 
ernment, ami favored the encouragement of 
increasetl facilities for the transportation of 
live stock to markets, also the establishment, 
by an act of Congress, of a national department 
of mines and mining. 

,\u appropriation by Congress to further the 
.\laska-Yukon- Pacific exiKJsition to be held in 
Seattle, June i, ujO). The admission of New 
.Mexico to the Lnitm. .\ measure calculated 
to introduce into the financial system of the 
currency the element of Hexibility. An in- 
dorsement of the sugar industry. The con- 
struction of an intercontinental railway be- 
tween North and South America. 

The Congress endorsed a tbopiugb reorga- 



nization of the consular system and requested 
the Congress of the United States to enact 
into law an executive order requiring appoint- 
ments to be based upon exi)erience, ability and 
character, unbiased by political consideration. 

CANADA A TRADING CENTER 

Implements of United States manufacture 
are found in every section of Canada, even 
to the Pacific Coast, and as far northward as 
civilization and farming have crept. Cana<la 
is such a good customer of ours, that there 
seems to be among Canadian people a spirit of 
fairness toward the L nited States, which is 
much more powerful than any law. Tlie 
machinery, marine engines, and tiK>ls, farm- 
ing implements, windmills, In^ilers and engines, 
and hardware of almost every description are 
mostlv .\inerican manufacture, and the imports 
fnnn'the United States lea<l. Considerable 
(|uantities of hardware imi)orted from Eng- 
land have been in reality of .American manu- 
facture. 

.\ certain amount of sales made in this way 
is not credited to the total amount of exports 
of the United States to Canada. The close 
relations that keep Canada and the United 
States together U'cause their geographical 
nearness leads to their similarity of tastes and 
ilesires, which go much further to exjdain the 
Canadian liking for .American wares, and her 
canse(|uently inevitable feeling that British 
goods <lo not (piite .so readily meet her re- 
quirements as well as those of Yankee origin. 



It is i)niposed to establish a Commercial 
.Museum in Calcutta. Iiulia, when the gexxls of 
all countries can be disi)layed. India offers 
a broafi field fi>r .\inerican agricultural imple- 
ments and such a museum wmild open a 
wav fi>r their further intnxluction. 



EXPORTS OF AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 



ARTICUKS AND COUNrRIBS 



OCTOBRR- 
1905 I ^9* 



TBN MONTHS KNDiNG OCTOB8B- 



190S 



Mowers and reaper!, and p«rts of . . . . $ 748,7'* 
Plows and cultivators, and parts of . . . . 161,775 

All other, and parts of 594.<3.S 



163,222 $10,635,368 
170,788 2.589.35« 
7o5,5"7 I 6,709,892 



1 10,644,188 

I 2,696,409 

5.63 '.530 



Total 11.504,622 11.0,^9.517 :| 19.934.618 1118,972,127 



■90* 



Exported to — 
United Kingdom . . . 

Belgium 

France 

Germany 

luly 

Netherlands 

Russia 

Other Europe . 

British North America . 

Meiico 

Cuba 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Chile 

Other South America . 
British Bast Indies . . . 
Briiish Australasia . . . 
Philippine Islands . . 
Other Asia and Oceania 

British Africa 

All other Africa .... 
Other Countries .... 

To»al 



17.3S2 

269 

6,84.. 

12,250 

593 

53.958 

4»,77a 

205,293 

142,876 

40,520 

25.377 

7«5.i64 

7.75« 

SU7ii 

21,382 

4, "4 
31. MO 
26,295 

6.578 

18.142 

2,079 

2,114 



28.1S5 

319 

40,448 

20,853 

2.859 

3.813 
64,400 

14.8*5 
187,249 

51.634 

4.884 

43'.«4i 

15.339 

28,000 

26,990 
8,347 

55.055 
1.394 
7.«93 

38.716 
4.693 
2,380 



; 1,682,982 

213.299 

2,9' 2.137 

1.245.737 

134.841 

225.682 

2.965."3o 

1.256,231 

2,967,007 

304.592 

115.902 

3,664.496 

43.409 

239.4 «6 

«<5,99i 

56.99' 

1,163,428 

2 '.759 

4 '..335 

408.9S6 

95.078 
20,289 



920,536 
172.402 

2,671,385 
1.209.986 

234.837 

250,45 « 

3.807,248 

1.303.964 
1,472,626 

356.234 
219.281 

4.394. '53 
160,131 
251.808 
204,043 

44.980 
658,564 

54.337 
113,046 
341.046 
107.613 

23.454 



$ 10,593,965 
3.131,128 
7.806,019 

I 21.531.122 

959.278 

25 '.760 

2.966.521 

'.776.503 
362.018 
516,032 

3.477.'39 
1,432,910 
2,671.284 

458.769 

106,793 

3.933.252 

84.448 

379.780 

255.534 
60,180 

94 '.350 

5'.2I7 

375, '06 

3 ".328 

'35.'o6 

24.814 



$ 1,504,622 I 1 1.039,517 < '9,934,618 1 18,972,127 ||ai,53«.« 



aa 



14 



Export Implement Age 



MODERN IMPLEMENTS AND , LABOR 



Revolution in Methods of Agriculture— Com- 
parison With Old-Time Modes 
on the Farm 



The introduction of agricultural imple- 
ments ha changcil (he nicthcKls uf agriculture 
so rapidly that unless one stops to consider 
carefully he cannot realize how swift and com- 
plete the revolution has been, says Prot. A. M. 
Soule, in Southern farm Magazine, it is 
only a few years ago since the average farmer 
loaded his farmyard manure on his wagon, 
hauled it to the field and laboriously dis- 
tributed it by hand from the wagon. As a 
rule, two men worked on the wagon. With 
the modern manure spreader one man now 
does the work of two, and with nmch greater 
ease than formerly. One of the most difficult 
and arduous tasks oi the farmer twenty years 
ago was to haul out and distribute the wealth 
of fertilizer accunmlaled during the winter 
season in the farmyard, -lore ground can 
now be uniformly coated with manure in one 
day by one man than was formerly done by 
two or even three laborers, and without in- 
creasing the strain on the horses. Here, then, 
is a practical example of the value of farm 
implements when properly utilized, for a 
manure spreader costing, say, $100 is good 
for many years if judiciously handled, and by 
economizing labor a saving is ert'ected that 
will pay for the machine m the course of 
three or four seasons, and at the same time en- 
able the farmer to manure as many acres oi 
ground as he formerly did with a limited 
amount of labor and less muscular energy 
than was formerly expended. 

ITie silo is one of the most economical insti- 
tutions of the farm. It provides a succulent 
food at all seasons of the year at a moderate 
cost and provides an ideal substitute for 
grass. For a long time the silo made compar- 
atively httle progress. Why? Simply be- 
cause of the labor and expense in endeavoring 
to handle the green corn. With the modern 
corn harvester from six to ten acres of heavy 
corn can be cut and bound into sheaves in a 
day. These sheaves are convenient to handle, 
and can be loaded un truck wagons with 
swiftness and comparative ease. On hauling 
to the barn another modern implement will be 
found in the gasoline engine, which provides 
a simple, safe and economical power. This 
engine, when belled to one of the modern 
silage cutters with blower attachment, will 
elevate and scatter over the silo anywhere 
from eight to fifteen tons of corn per hour for 
ten hours of the day. With the uKHlern self- 
feeder the machines re(|uirc comparatively 
little attention. In other words, one man can 
now do the work 01 two or three with com- 
narativc ease. It is true that tin- m.ikiiig of 
silage often re(|uires extraa labor which is 
i»ftcn hard to obtain at that season, but the 
extra lalK>rcrs are only needed for a few days, 
and then throuph the use of mo<iern machin- 
ery the work of preparing an ideal food ffjr 
365 flays, if need be, is accomplished. With 
a properly-made silage one man can feed too. 
or, for that matter, luider nroper conditions 
500 animals per .ay, again performing the 



i\o doubt the farmer often yuesti. ns 
whether it will pay him to purchase such a 
labor that was done Ly from inree to five men. 
variety of implements. Ihat depends some- 
what on the line of tanning lie is following. 
If he IS a good business man he can utilize the 
implements so that he will make more money 
out of them than he formerly made out of 
ordinary laborers. It will pay him under 
l)resent conditions to have the best and latest 
larm implements on the market, but when he 
gets these, in order to make them fully pro- 
ductive he must give them first-class care 
and attention and handle them skillfully. The 
writer has heard larmers maintain tnat they 
could cut and shock corn as cheaply by hand 
as they could with the corn harvester. II11& 
IS an extremely doubllul proposition. Pro- 
vided it is true, however, the corn harvester 
enables the larnier to do with one man and a 
team what was lorinerly done by lliiee men. 
Hence tiie machine, otlsetling the labor prob- 
lem as it does, makes him comparatively inde- 
pendent and provides him willi the means of 
getting along with his work where he would 
oilier wise have to aiandon it altogether. 

bome will argue mat this increase ot imple- 
ments calls lor more horse-power on the larm, 
and so il does, but this is a matter ot small 
concern lu the farmer, for there is no corner 
on larm live-slock unless the tanner is not 
alive to his opportunities. (Jlhers will say 
thai the purchase and ullilizalion oi a variety 
ol lann implements calls lor skilled mechan- 
ics and the exercise ol higher iiiielligence. 
the first statement is iiol necessarily irue; 
the second is, and it might likewise be said 
mat 11 IS a wise provision ol nature lor any- 
thing that develops intelligence on the farm 
siiouKi mean more skiUlul management and 
larger profits. 

In uie olden days all the grain was sown 
by hand ; one man to scatter tlie seed, another 
lo follow and cover. Now the grain is sown 
with the drill, whether the seed be large or 
sinall, light or heavy. \\ ith the inodeni grain 
drill the operation of seeding is performed 
with expedition, with skill and with the most 
satisfactory results because the grain is uni- 
formly covered an . io brought in contact with 
the moist earth, which insures rapid germina- 
tion. The only limit to the amount of grain 
one man can seed at the oresent lime with 
ino<lern implements is ihe endurance of his 
animals. With the .scarcity of labor the ques- 
tion comes up as lo how the large field of corn 
and cotton can be cullivateu. I'lie larger llie 
fields in the future the better for the tanner, 
because larger areas of land can be handled 
with greater economy. 

In the olden days, uiicn the weeder was 
unknown, corn was laboriously cultivated with 
the single-horse cultivator and then weeded 
out by hand. Now. with satislactory planters 
properly adjusted, tiic com can be placed 
down with comparative uniformity at given 
distances. It is unnece.ssarv any longer to 
thin it out by hand. After the corn is up the 
modern farmer puts his weeuer on the land. 
This implement, with teeth something like 
those of an ordinary horse-rake, may be of 
any desired wi«lth, 'but it should be wide 
enough under any circumstaiues to cover sev- 
eral rows, so that one man in land that has 
been seeded with the corn planter now per- 
forms the work that w^as fonnerlv done by 
several, and dws it more effectually. 



LATE AMERICAN DEVICES 

Foreign importers of vehicles should note 
a device brought out by the Hartford (Conn.) 
Rubber Works. It is a turn buckle for tires 
which enables one to adjust the tire to the rim 
without difficulty, the turn-buckle taking up 
any variation in the diameter of the rim, and 
insuring perfect fit of tire to rim. The pro- 
cesses of altachmenl and detachment are 
greatly facilitated. The device is in principle 
a small wonn gear, made integral with the 
right-and-left threads connecting the two ends 
of the expanding ring in the rim. 

Threads and gear being one piece, no "give" 
is possible to either, and the action of spread- 
ing apart for detaching and drawing together 
for attaching it made positive and effective by 
the s(|uare-end crank wrench filling the center 
opening in the portion below the rim. This 
wrench takes the place of the former round- 
end tuni-buckle key as an additional conveni- 
ence. Care has been taken to give the lurn- 
buckle the most positive location, so that no 
part of it can move from the opening through 
which access is had. When a space shows 
between the ends of the ring it is loose, and 
as soon as the ring is taken off the deflated 
lire may be removed. Conversely, after the 
tire and rim are put hack, the tunibuckic is 
screwed \\\^ and the tire is ready for infla- 
tion. 



AMERICAN FORESTS 

The field of forest planting in the United 
Slates broadens with every year. l'>y far the 
most important part, however, is that of re- 
serve planting. ( )f the 107,000.000 acres of 
forest reserves, vast areas are partly or wholly 
un forested. For planting on the reserves the 
Forest Service must raise its own material. 
Acconling to the report of the Secretary of 
Agriculture six experiment stations are now 
established with an annual capacity of 6.ck».- 
0(X) seedlings, yet to plant one square mile 
recjuires more than 700.000 seedlings. To 
meet the needs of the reserve's i)reparalions for 
planting must he made on a vastly greater 
scale. However, much remains to be done, 
what has been tlone already demonstrates that 
success is within reach. Careful exi)eriments 
are un<ler way to determine the most effective 
and economical methods of treating railroad 
ties, telephone poUs, fence i)osts, etc. Over 
i2,o(X),ooo t<.st> ,,f till- strength of limber were 
made. New woods have Ix'eii brought into 
use, and economy in the use of material has 
been promoted. The e>ta1)lishment of a spe- 
cial lalK)ratory for this work at Washington 
is recommended. 



SUCCESSFUL DATE CULTURE 

The < Lite palms introduced by the Depart- 
ment into .southern California and .Arizona 
( I nited States of America) have home hun- 
dreds of pounds of delicious fruit this year, 
i-.ven the famous Deglet .Voor from the Sahara 
has ripened perfectly in the Salton r.asui. prov- 
ing that this unique desert cidture has passed 
Ironi the stai^e of a pure experiment into that 
of a new industry. 



Till', I'.xi'oKT f.Mri.KMKNT ,\i'.K shoidd be 
in the hainis of every t'oreiu;n dealer. Now 
i'^ tlie time to suhscrilie. 



Export Implement Age 



15 



Export Implement Age 

rOUK LA CIRCULATION k L'iTI ANGER EXCLUSIVEMRNT. 

Journal ind^pendant exclusivemenC consacr^ auz InttrM* du 

commerce d'ezportation des machines agricoleii, pom pet, 

moulins k vent, outila de fermea, fournilures pour 

crimeriea et articles spiciauz de qulncaillerie. 



Prix d'Abonnbmbmt 



25 mille balles de tabac de qualite inferieure, I'adresse— qui peuvent etre contenues dans 

pesant, chacune d'elles, 88 livres. La plupart Ics courriers desormais re<:us aux Etats-Unis 

des cigarettes de I'Egypte sent faites par des et provenant d'autres pays, soient considerees 

C,recs. parce que le papier a cigarettes est trop et traitees comme cartes postales ; et que ces 

cher en Grece. ou le gouvemement en a le cartes postales, lorsque I'affranchissement re- 

monopole. Cela a determine I'emploi d'un pa- quis par les cartes postales dans les courriers 



TJn an, franc de port ... 

Priire de nous adresaer une tralte sur New York 
ou un mandat-poate international. 



S franca 



") WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PtlBLISHERS 
loio Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa., U. 



S. A. 



pier meillcur marche et par suite inferieur 
ainsi que la perte, ix>ur la Grece, d'une Indus- 
trie essenticllement grecque, mais qui est 
passee en Egypte, car la plupart des fabricants 
de cigarettes egyptiennes sont grecs. 



l,a mCme maiaon public: "The Implement Age," "The 
American Fertiliier," "The Carriage Monthly" et "The 
Vehicle Dealer." 

Tons droiu riaervte. Ware Btoa. Co., 1906. 



Vol XV. Philadelphie, SUta-tJnia, Dccembre, 1906. No. 3 



Dans le Repertoire d'adresses A I'usage des 
cheteurs, dans la premiere partie dece livre nous 
donnons les renseignements en fran^ais ; nous 
avons recours k ce moyen afin de faciliter la cor* 
respondance avec les malsons qui font itu^rer des 
annonces dans ce Journal. 



Particul&rit^s des soui-marins 

L'equilibre est presque aussi difficile a main- 
tcnir dans un bateau sous-marin que dans un 
aeroplane. Avec les gros sous-marins mo- 
dernes, dit Sir W. H. White, la plongee s'ef- 
fectue pendant que le navire avance 



internationaux aura ete completement paye, 
soient delivrees aux destinataires sans leur im- 
poser d'autres frais d'affranchissenient. 

George B. Cortelyou, directeur general des 
Posies, Washington (D. C.) 

Ordre No. 1047. 



Saisons des moissons dans le monde entier 

Les saisons des semailles, de la floraison et 

des fruits existent en tout temps sur quelque 

L'avant point du globe. On moissonne sur la terre a 



est deprime par des gouvernails horizontaux lout moment de I'annt-e, de meme que le soleil 

manicuvres par des hommes experimentes et brille toujours quelque part et que I'obscurite 

le vaisseau descend obliquement en avan<;ant, regne toujours quelque part ailleurs. 

La profondeur desiree ayant ete atteinte, le Janvier voit la fin des moissons dans la plu- 

Les fabricants americains d'outils agricoles timonier doit inanceuvrer les gouvernails hori- j,^^j ^j^^ regions de I'Australie et de la Nou- 
se sont depuis longtemps rendu compte de la zontaux de telle fa(;on que le vaisseau s'avance ^,^,1,^. z^ianje, tandis que les habitants du Chili 
necessite de savoir ce dont les agriculteurs des en ligne droite, mais, en rcalite, sa course est ^^ d'autres pays de I'Amerique du Sud corn- 
pays Otrangers ont besoin et de leur fournir ce ondulee, il monte et il descend. II ne doit pas ^encent a peine a recueillir le fruit de leur 
qu'ils desirent. Les outils agricoles de marque y avoir de mouvements d'hommes ou de poids travail. La haul Eg>'pte et I'lnde commencent 
americaine sont toujours appropries a la region ilaris le vaisseau sans compensation immediate ^,^ continuent la moisson durant les mois de 
dans laquelle ils doivent c-tre employes. pour retablir et maintenir l'equilibre, autre- 
ment le sous-marin pent s'enfoncer a une pro- 
Base du commerce fondeur desastreuse. On a trouve que la 
Les fabricants americains de machines agri- manoeuvre a bras etait preferable a la manceu- 
coles et de vehicules s'efforcent de se creer un vre automatique. 



commerce dans les pays de TAmcrique du 
Sud. et ailleurs aussi bien, en ne comptant 
uniquement que sur la qualite de leurs mar- 
chandises et les moyens dont ils disposent 
pour satisfaire aux exigences du commerce et 
des communautes agricoles. Ils sont con 



Ordre sur les cartes postales 

On verra, d'apres la circulaire officielle sui- 
vante, qu'a partir du ler octobre la partie 
gauche du recto de toutes les cartes i)ostalcs. 



fevrier et de mars. 

C'est en avril que se fait la moisson en Syrie, 
dans rile de Chypre, sur la cote de I'Egypte, 
au Mexique, a Cuba, en Perse et en Asie Mi- 
neure. 

Mai est I'epoque de la moisson dans I'Asie 
centrale, la Perse, I'Algerie, le Maroc, le midi 
(111 Texas, la Moride, la Chine et le Japon. 

Jiiin voit f.iirc la moisson en Californie, 
dans roregon, dans le midi des Etats-Unis, 



cartes iilustrees et autres, pourra etre em- 
vaincus que les condiHons qu'ils peuvent offrir P'oy^^ I^"*- >* correspondance aussi bien que ,„ Kspagne, dans le Portugal, en Italie, en 
sont plus avantageuses que celles de leurs 
concurrents. A moins de circonstances tres 



extraordinaires, les acheteurs doivent se pro- 
curer leurs marchandises la oil ils ^leuvent les 
avoir a meilleur marche, en ne perdant jamais 
de vue, cela va sans dire, la qualite. 



le verso de la carte : 

"Comme la Convention postale universelle 
recemment conclue dans la ville de Rome 
( Italic) et devant entrer en vigueur le ler 
octobre 1907. pourvoit a I'admission dans les 
courriers echanges entre les pays de I'Union 



R^olte de tabac grecque 



Hongrie, en Roumanie, en Turquie, dans les 
etals du Danube, dans le midi de la France, en 
Grece et en Sicile. 

C'est en juillet que se fait la moisson en 
Angleterre. dans le Nebraska, en Suisse, dans 
les etats d'lowa, d'lllinois, d'Indiana, de Min- 
nesota, dans le haul Canada, dans le nord de la 



postale, a partir de la dite date, de cartes pos 

tales portant des messages sur la moitie gauche ^.^^^^^ ^^ Allcmagne, en Autriche et en Po- 
M. George Horton, consul a Athcnes, ecrit du recto de la carte aussi bien que sur son ^ ^ 
que la recolte de tabac en Grece, pour 1905, verso; et comme des cartes de ce genre sont 
a ete la plus considerable que la Grice ait ja- aujourd'hui admises, avec I'affranchissement 
mais moissonnee — 198 millions de livres en- applicable aux cartes postales, dans les cour- 
viron. La recolte de la marque Sary a ete riers echanges entre les pays: 
d'environ 1 1 millions de livres. Cette marque // est ordonne par les prhentes que les 
se demande beaucoup pour les cigarettes igyp- cartes postales portant un message a gauche 
tiennes. Alexandrie (Egypte) a en magasin du verso— la mohie droite etant reservee a 



Et la moisson se continue en aout dans les 
lies Britanniques, en France, en Allemagne, en 
lielgique, en Hollande, au Manitoba, dans le 
Bas Canada, en Danemark et en Russie. 

Le nord de I'Ecosse, les regions meridionales 
de la Suede et de la Norvige, ainsi que les iles 



Pi«re de mentionner ce iournal en ecrivant aux personnel qui y font ini&er des annonces. 



M 



Export Implement Age 



MODERN IMPLEMENTS AND LABOR 



Revolution in Metliods of Agriculture— Com- 
parison With Old-Time Modes 
on the Farm 



'I'lic iiitroiliu tiiMi uf agricullural iiiipli-- 
iiicnti^ lia i.li,m.m.(l \\w iik-i1i(ii1> dI' ayriciilinri- 
Mt rapiiJly tliat unkss one stujis tu Cl>ll^icU■r 
carefully he cauiiul realize huw swift and cuin- 
plele the revuliitiuii has been, says I'roi, A. M. 
Sunk-, in SuuHwrn J'ann Mugacinc. It is 
Hilly a few years ago since the average t'arnier 
liiailtil lii> l'arni\aril niainni- mi lii> \\ay<»n, 
hauled it lu the lield and laboriously dis- 
tributed It by hand fnini the wagun. As a 
nile, two men worked on the wagon. With 
the modern manure spreader one man now 
diKs the work of two, and willi nnich greater 
ease than formerly. (Jne of the most diUicult 
and arduous tasks oi the farmer twenty }ears 
ago was to haul out and distribute the wealth 
ol fertilizer accunuilaled during the winter 
season in the farmyard, .lore groun<l can 
now be uniformly coated with manure in one 
day by one man than was formerly done by 
two or even three laborers, and without in- 
creasing the strain on the horses. Here, then, 
is a practical example of the value of farm 
implements when properly utilized, for a 
manure spreader costing, say, Ii>iou is geiod 
for many years if judiciously handled, and by 
economizing lal)or a saving is effected that 
will pay for the machine ni the course of 
three or four seasons, and at the same time en- 
able the farmer to manure as many acres ol 
ground as he formerly did with a limitetl 
amount ol labor and less muscular energ} 
tiian was formerly expended. 

The silo is one of the most economical insti- 
tutions of the farm. It provides a succulent 
food at all seasons of the year at a mo<lerate 
cost and provides an ideal substitute for 
grass. Fiir a long time the sili> made compar- 
atively little progress. Why? Simply be- 
cause of the labor and expense in endeavoring 
to haiullc the green corn. With the modern 
c<irn harvester irom six to ten acres of heavy 
Corn can be cut and bound into sheaves in a 
day. These sheaves are convenient to handle, 
ami can be loaded on truck wagniis with 
swittness ami C(.)mparative ease. On lumliiig 
to the barn another modern implement will be 
fotnid in the gasoline engine, whicli provides 
a sim]ile, safe and econiimical jiower. This 
iiiginc, wlicii lielicd tci line of the niiidern 
silage cutters with limwer attaclinieiii. will 
elevate ami siatter iiver the silo am where 
triiiii ei^lii til tifleeii imis ol cum per Iihui for 
Un hours of the ila\. With the iiiinKtii silf 
feeder iIh' iiiaihiiit - ni|nire lomparalixelx 
littii' atliiitioii. hi i.ilier vsords. om- mail can 
now do llu- work oi two or three with com- 
uarative easf. It is tun.- tlial tlu' niakin- of 
•milage often ni|niri- txtraa lalmr wliitli is 
often hard to olit.iin at that seasim. hut the 
t'Nlra laborers arc only neiileil fur ,i few i!,i\-. 
and then throucli ilic n>e of nionfni niacliin 
try the work of ]in|i;iring an idtal food for 
\i'>^ dass, if iu-e<i In-, i, .1. r. imiilis])cil. With 
a propcrix -m.'iile silme one man can find 10 >. 
or. for that iM.ith r. under nmper condition-, 
500 animals per as, again performing llu- 



Xo doubt the farmer often yuestiv ns 
whether it will pay him to purchase such a 
labor that was done Ly from tnree to live men. 
variety ol implements. 'Ihal depends some- 
what un the inie ol larming ne is followuig. 
If he IS a good business man he can utilize tlie 
implements so that he wjU make more money 
out of them than he formerly made out ol 
ordinary laborers, it will pay him uniler 
IMesenl conditions to have the best and latest 
larm implements on the market, but when he 
gets these, in order to make tliem fully pro- 
Uuctivc he must give them lirst-class care 
and attention and hamlle them skillfully. Ihe 
writer has heard tanners maintain tiiat tliey 
could cut and shock corn as cheaply b) hand 
as they could w ith the corn harvester, l liis 
Is an extremely doubllul proposition, i'ro 
vided it is true, however, liie corn harvester 
eiialjles the larmer to do with one man and a 
team what was lormerly done by tliiec men. 
Hence the machine, ollsetting the labor prob- 
lem as It does, makes him comparatively inde- 
lienuent ami provides him willi the means of 
getting along with his work where he would 
otherwise have to ai andon it altogether. 

bonie will argue tnal this increase ol imple- 
ments calls lor more horse-power on the larm, 
and s,, a does, but this is a matter oi small 
concern lu the larmer, for there is no corner 
on larm live-stock unless the larmer is iiol 
alive to his opportunities. Others will sa) 
that the purcha.se ami ultilizatioii oi a vanet\ 
ol larm miplenients calls lor skilled mechan- 
ics aJid llie exercise ol higher inteUigence. 
Ihe Inst statemeiu is not necessarily true, 
the second is, and it iniglil likewise be said 
mat It is a wise provision ol nature lor any- 
thing that develops intelligence on the larm 
shoui.i mean more skilhul management and 
larger piolits. 

In llie olden days all the grain was sown 
liy lianu ; one man lo scalier ilie seed, anotlKi 
to lollow and cover. Mow the grain is sown 
with the drill, whether the seed be large or 
small, light or heavy. W ith the modern grain 
drill the operation of seeding is perlormeil 
with expedition, with skill and with the most 
satisfactory results because the grain is uni 
formly covered an . i.. broughl in contact with 
the nioisi (.arlh. which insures rapid germina- 
tion, llie oiil\ limit 1,1 [lie amount of grain 
one man can mciI at the uresent time with 
nuMlern implements is the endurance of his 
animals. W illi the scarcity of labor the qiu s 
lion Comes up as to huw the large fielil of corn 
and cotton can lie cullivaleu. I'lie larger the 
fields in the future the heller for the larmer, 
hicansc- lar-i r anas ,,{ land can be haiidleil 
w nil .i;r( all I (11 Mil im\ . 

in the olden iia\s, ulnii iju- wccder w.is 
unknown, corn wa- i.ibi.riously ciilti\alcil with 
the single lioi-<' cnhualor .md then weeiiril 
out liy liiimi, .\ou. uitli s,(i|siactor\ jilaiiuis 
properly a<ljuste.|. i1k com c.ni be pl.iced 
down with comparalive niiiformil\ at gi\eii 
distances. It is nniieccssarx aiiv Ioniser to 
thill it out b\ liand. A tier the n.'rn is up the 
uiiMUrn laniur pin- In- wceucr on ihc land. 
This implemeiii. with tieili somelhing like 
ihoM' of ;in orilinary hursc r.ike. mav be of 
any liesiicd width, hut it slinuld W wide 
enoni;Ii under ;iny circunistanci s to cover sev- 
eral mws, V,, thai ,,iK- niaii in land that has 
1m en sc(ilii| with the Corn planliT imw per- 
forms 111,' work lh;it was fomi.rU ili,iic bv 
sevi r.il. and dm -, ji more elfictuallv. 



LATE AMERICAN DEVICES 

I'oicign importers of \i-hicles should note 
a device brou«;lii out by the liarlford (Conn.) 
Knbher Works. It is a turn buckle for tires 
which enables one t<t adjust the tire to tile rim 
without dirticulty, the turn-buckle taking up 
any v.iriation in the diameter of the rim, and 
insuring perfect fit ni tire to rim. 'i"he pro- 
cesses of attachment and detachment are 
L;reatly facilit:ited. The device is in principle 
a sin;dl worm gear, made integral with the 
right-and-left threads connecting the two ends 
of the eNp.inding ring in the rim. 

Threails aiul gear being one piece, no "give" 
is possible t(j either, and the ;iclioii of sjiread- 
nig a]tart for detaching and ilrawing t.jgether 
lor .itl.iching it made positive and etfeclive bv 
ihe s(|uare-end crank wrench fitting the center 
opening in tiie jiortion lielow the rim. This 
wrench takes the place of the former round- 
end tiirn-huckie key as an ailditional conveni- 
ence. Care has been taken to give the turn- 
buckle the most positive loc.ition. so that no 
part of it can move from the o]iening throut;h 
which access is had. When a space shows 
between the ends of the ring it is loo.se, and 
as stH.n as the ring is taken off the deflated 
lire may be removed. ConverseK, .after the 
tire an<l rim are put b;ick. the turiibncUIr is 
-crew III lip ami the tire i- readv fo)- inll.i- 
lion. 



AMERICAN FORESTS 

The tiel.l of finest planting in the ! ■niled 
."^t.iles broadens with every year, liy far the 
most im]iort:ml |tart. however, is that of re- 
■•(■rve iilanting. ( if the H)7.(kk).<kh» acres of 
imesi reserves, v.isi areas are |iartly or whollv 
niiforested. I'or planting on the reserves the 
loiest SiTvice must raise ils own material. 
\ccoidiiig lo the report of the Secretary of 
\;;ricultnre six experiment stations are now 
1 st.iblished witli an annn.il caii.icity <if h,(yKi,- 
"«> seedlings, yet to plant one sipiare mile 
reijiiires more than 7o().(xhi seedlin),;s, '|"o 
meet the iieeils of the reservis preparations for 
planting must be made on a vastly greater 
sc.ile. However, much remains lobe done, 
what has heiii done already demonstrates that 
succesv iv within reach. Careful experiments 
arc under way to iletermin<- the most effective 
and (conomical meilioi]- ,.| treating railroad 
lus. telephone poles, ft ncc posts, etc. ( )ver 
I J.I K « 1.1 M KM est » of the stn n-th of limber were 

iiiade. .\ew w Is li.ive been blolli^ht in|.i 

Use. ;ini| eciiniimv in the iise of material li;is 
Imii promiiteil. The csiatilislinieiii i.f a sju- 
ct.il l,ilniraliir\ I'l.r tin- work .it W .isliincion 
is n ci immcnded. 



SUCCESSFUL DATE CULTURE 

'I lie d;il( p.ilms inlrodnccd li\ the I )e|.art 
iiieiit into southern Calit'orni.t and Ari/oiia 
i I niled Sl.itcs ol Xnurica 1 li,i\e Imrne hun- 
■ Iriils 111 jiomiils iif ilelicioiis fruit this ve.ir. 
l-.vcii the f.imoii- De-let \oor from the Sali.iia 
lias ripened peifecil\ 111 the Saltoii I'.asin. pro\ 
ing ih.it this uni(|nc desert culturi' lia- passed 
troiii tin- st.ige oj a ]iure e\|ierimcnt into that 
"I a Hew indnstr\ . 



i ill. l''.\foiM Imi'i,i:mi:nt .\r,r, should be 
"I ill'- hands ,,f ivery I'orci-n de.der. N'ow 
is llie time io -nliscriiie. 



.-• 



Export Implement Age 



_^ - A --^ '"''^'^ bailes de tahac de qualite inferieure. 

bXPORT IMPLEMENT AQE pesam, chacuno d'ellcs, 88 livres. La plupart 

POUR LA c.RCMLAT.i.N . i.fTRANi.KR Kxcu s, vKMKNT. <lcs cigarcftcs dc TEgypte sout faltcs par lies 

Journal ind*pendant exclusivement consacr* aiix int^rets du ( ',reCS. parCC flUe Ic paplcr a cigarCtlCS ist tli i]i 
commerce d'exportalion des machines njfricolcs, ponipes, ' "^ 



moulins & vrnt, oiilils de fermcs, fournitiires pour 
crimeries et articles spteiaux de quincaillerie. 



Pbix o'Abonnement 

Vn an, franc de port ... 

Priire de nousadresser une traite »ur New York 
ou un mandat-i>OKte international 



5 francs 



I'.iiiresse — qui peuvciU eire oonteiuies dans 
!c> courricrs de.sormais recus aux Luats-Unis 
ci pnivenant d'autres pays, soient considerees 
el traitees conimc cartes postales; et que ces 
carles postales, lorsque I'affranchisscment re- 
ijuis i)ar Ics cartes postales dans les courriers 
intcrnationaux aura ete complelenient paye, 
soient delivrt:c.i aux destinataires sans leur im- 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHEItS 

loio Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. 

La mtme maiswn public; "The Implrment Affe," 
American I-'ertilizer," "The Cairiage Monthly" et 
Vehicle Dealer." 

Tous droits r£aer«£*. W>re Bros Co., n}o6. 



A. 

■The 
■The 



cher en (".rece. oil le gouverncnient en a Ic 
iiKuiopok. Ccla a determine Femploi d'nn pa- 
pier nieilleur niarche et par suite inlerieur 
ainsi ([ue la jierie. jiour la I'irece. dune indus- 
trie csscnliellement Ljreciine, mais (pii est poser d'autres frais d'alTranchissement. 
passee en I-'.gvine. car la jilupar! des fabricants George B. Cortclyon, directeur general des 
deci^aritie- e:;\ plKime- soiit grecs. Postcs. Washif.gton ( D. C.) 

Ordre No. 1047. 



No 



Vr.l w I'hiladelphie. Htats-tJnla, Decembre, tgafi. 
Dans le Repertoire d'adresses a I'usage des 



Pariicularites des sous-marins 

l/e(iuilil>re est presque aussi diflicile a main- 
ttnir dan- mi bateau .sons-marin que dans un 
aerojilane. .\vec le^ gros sous-marins mo* 



Saisons des tnoissons dans le monde entier 
I*«i sai.sons des semailles, de la tloraison et 



dernc-. dit Sir W . H. White, la plongee s'ef- , des fruits e.xisum en tout temps sur quchiue 
cheteurs, dans la premiere partie dece livre nous fectue iiendanl que le navire avance, I/avant IXiiiU liu globe. < 'n nioissonne sur la terre a 
donnons les renseignements en fran^ais; nous g^j deprime i>ar ilcs i;onvcrnails horizontaux I'mi moment de 1 aniiec, de nieiiie (pie le soleil 
avonsrecours h ce moyen afln de faclliter la cor- ,„3„,^.^,^,j.^:^ j,,^^ ,,,.^ hoinmes cxpcrimcntes ct brille loujours quehiuc part et que lobscurite 

le vaisseau descend oJ)li<iuement en avancant. regne toitjours quclque part ailleurs. 

La |)nd'ondeur desiree ayant ete atteinte. Ic 

Les fabricants aniericains doutils a.gricoles timonier doit maiueuvrer Ics gouvernails hori- 

se sonl ileiuns lon.memp-. rendu coinpic de la zontaux de telle la<on .pie le vaisseau savancc 

necessite .le savoir ce .loni les agriculteurs des ni lignc ilioiic m.iis, <n lealiie. sa cour.sc est 

traimer- out lu ^.oin et de Kur founiir ce ondnlee. il monte el i! descend. 11 ne doit pas 



respondance avec les malsons qui font inserer des 
annonces dans ce journal. 



jiay 

qn'lls desirent. l.es luuils agrid.lcs de marrpic 
americ.iinc sunt ton jours appropries a l.i rei^ion 
dans laquelle ils doi\ent etre em]ilo\es. 



Base du comtnerce 

Les fabricants americains de machines agri- 
coles et de vehiculcs s'efforccnt de se crecr iin vre automatiquc. 
coinmerce dans les pays de rAmerique du 
Sud. et ailleurs aussi bien, en ne cr)mplant 
uniqnement que sur la qnalitt- de Icurs mar- 
chandises ct les nioycns dont ils disposcnt 
pour satisfairj aux exigences du commerce el 
des communautes agricoU- \\< sunt con- 
vaincus que les conditions qn'ils peuvent ofTrir 
sent plus avantageuscs ijuc celles de leiirs 
concurrents. .\ iiKuns de circonstanccs tres 
eNtranrdin.iires. les acheunrs dnivent se pro- 
curer leurs marchandises la 011 ils peiuenl les 
avoir a meilleur marche. en ne ])erdant jamais 
de vue, ccla v.i sans dire, la qualite. 



v avoir de niouvemetUs d'hommes ou dc poids 
dans le vaisse.iu sans compensation immediate 
pour retal)lir ct maintcnir rt-quilibrc, autrc- 
meni le sons-marin pent s'enfoncer a une pro 
foiideur desaslreuse. ( >n a trouve que la 
niameuvre .-'i bras ctait preferable a la mameu- 



Ordre sur les cartes postales 

On vcrra, d'apres la circulaire officielle sui- 
vante, qua i)artir du icr (Ktobrc la partie 
ganche dii recto de toutes les cartes postales, 
c.irtts iilustrec- et .lutres, pourra etre em- 
plovee iionr la correspondance aussi bien (pic 
le verso de la carte : 

■'Comme la t"(mvention ]Kistale nniverselle 
reccmnunt conclue dans la ville de Kome 
(It.iliei et dexant entrcr en vigueiir le ler 
ocloliii H^oj. pourvoit a radmissmn dans les 
courriers (.'changes entre les p.i\s de IT nion 
postale, a f)artir de la dite date, de cartes pos- 
tales portant des messages sur la nioitie gauche 
M. George Horton. consul a Athenes, ecrit du recto dc )a carte aussi bien que sur son 
que la recoltc de tabac en Grece, pour 1905, verso; et comme des cartes de ce genre sont 
a ete la plus cnnsiilerablc que la Grece ait ja- anjourd'hui admiscs, avec rafTranchissement 
niais moissonnee — 1(>8 millions de livres en- applicable aux cartes postales. dans les cour- 
viron. La recolte de la marque Sary a ete riers echang(!s entre les pays: 
d'environ 11 millions de livres. Cette marque // est ordovnc par les presenies que les 

se demande beaucoup pour les cigarettes egyp- cartes postales portant un tnessage a gauche 
tiennes. Alexandrie (Egypte) a en magasin du vcrscT— la moiti*:- droite etant rt^servee a 



Janvier voit In fin des tmjissons dans la plu- 
part des regions de IXustralie et de la .\'ou- 
velle Zelande, tandis que !es habitants du Chili 
I • d'autres pays de I'.Xnierique du Sud com- 
mencent a pi im' a recueillir le fruit de leur 
trav.ail. La haul Lgypte . t I'lmle commencent 
et colli imieiii l;i moisson durant les mois de 
fe\ ricr el de mars. 

Cest en ;ivril ipie se fail la moisson en Syrie, 
dans File de Ch\pre, siir la cote de I'F.gypte, 
.III Mexupie, .1 L uba, en Terse ct en .\sie .Mi- 
neure. 

Mai est rejioque de la moisson dans I'Asie 
ceiiirak. la I'erse. r.\lgt-rie. le Maroc, le midi 
du Texa-. la I'loride, la Chine et le Jajxiii. 

Iiiin \oit faire l.i moisson en Californie. 



i hi 



111 



Ian- 1. 



midi des Ltats 



ni'^ 



Recolte de tabac grecque 



il.llls 

(11 l-.sp;iL;iie. dails le I'ortugal, cii Italic, en 
lloiii^iie, C11 Uoiim.iine. en Turquie, dans les 
eiais ,|u n.muiie. daiis le midi ile la France, en 

I '.reCe Ct eli Sicilc. 

Cest en juillel (pie se fait la moisson en 
.\nyl(ierre, dans le Xebraska, en Suisse, dans 
les elats d'lo',\a. d'lllinoi-. d'Indiana, dc Min- 
ncsiii.i, ilaiis le liaiit Canada, dans le nord de la 
l-'rance. en .ML masque, en \ntriche et en Po- 
loonc. 

1'".t la moisson se continue en aout dans les 
lies nritanni(pi(s, en France, on .Mlemagne, en 
I'.clgique, en Hollande, an Manitoba, dans le 
r.as Canada, en Danemark ct en Russie. 

Le nord de TFcosse, les regions meridionales 
de la Suede et de la Xnrvege, ainsi que les lies 



Pr«re de mentionner ce iournal en ecrivant aux personnel qui y font insurer des annonces. 



INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



) 



l6 



Export Implement Age 



froiilcs (!(.• hi Mer ilii Xord nioissonnent eii iniissance. Ic muscle de la nation ct des pays pdur plus de 4 millions de dollars de produits 



M'|)teinl»r(.-. 

( tctolirc csi Ic iii"i 
mai> I'll AiiR-riijUc. it iii'> it 
tcrro ilaii?. Ic nuid dc Suidc. (.11 Xnrvef^c cl en 
Irlaiide. 

i'.ii novcinbri', la in<ii>>(iii commence dans 
rAtri(|uc (111 Sud. en rata^diiie et dans le midi 
<le ^A^l^tralie. 



etraiif^ers rcccjuimandcnt nos outils, ct pres- 

le la nioisson <lu sent les marcliands des jiays (ju ils haliitcnt de 

■t;iimcs de plcine les acheter. 11 nuns taut etjaliser les cinuli- 

ditioiis de tjuelque fatten et adopter les 

metliiiiles les plus larjjes possible-. ])ar des sub- 



manufactures. La pro<luction des marchan- 
di-es manufacturees dans ce pays, a auj^mente 
irois tOis aussi rapidement que sa population. 
( )n ne > e>i jamais si bien rendu compte de ce 
que ]ieuvent faire les Etats-l'nis. Xous 



Assemblee des fabricants americains 
d'outih agrtcoles 

.\o< kcteiirs de tons les pays aimeront sans 
tinute savoir cc (jue I'Association nationale de- 
fabricants d' mtils afjricoles et de vebiculcs 
s'etTorce d'accom))lir par un travail il'orRanisa- 
tioii; aussi rcproiluirons-nous deux on trois 
des plus iniportants articles qui furent lus a 
la treizieme assemblee annuelle tenue recem- 
nienl a Chicago. 

II taut bien comprendre c|ue TAssociation 
nest nullement un Tru>t et (pi'dlc nc cherche 
pas le moins du monde a commander les prix. 
niais clle est ctjinposee des principaux fabri- 
cants d'outils agricoles et de voiturcs <iui ven- 
(knt leiirs produits par rinterniediaire de 
inarchand- d'occasion et de marchands an 
detail, et le but de 1 '.Association est de develoj)- 
jicr le commerce des macbines agricoles et des 
voitures par tons les moyens legitimes. 

I,c rapport du comite sur le commerce exte- 
rieur ful presonte par le president, .M. F. E. 
Myers, dt la compagnie V. E. Myers & llro.. 
dWsbland. Ohio (Etats-l'nis d'Amerique). ei 
nos lecteurs prindront un interet tout particu- 
lier a ce rapport, car il demontre I'importance 
doniiee au cumnicrce <rexportation ])ar les 
fabricants americains d'outils agricoles et tie 
\ibicule>. \ oici ce rap]X)rt : — 
.Mon-ieiir le I'resident. Messieurs: 

Le commerce exterieiir est si etroitement 
iit an coiii'iierce intt-rieur, tpiil nous faut creer 
de meilleures relations commcrciales avec les 
divers pavs ttraii^i r- .\'os rapports prece- 
dents out ete etudies et out rendu service. Mal- 
beureuseniciu, toutelois. le rajtport le I'anneo 
derniere a ete donne tard et n'a ])as ett!- dis- 
cwtt comnie nous rattentlions. .\ous avons 
senti linqTortancc de ces rappt)rts au point de 
toucher a t]ueli|iies ((uestions essenticlles, que 



«ides ou autrement, de manii-re a nous placer summes les plus grands producteurs du monde 

des principaux articles manufactures. Xous 
avons la jilus grande provision du monde de 
charbon ct de gaz jKUir transformer la matierc 
premiere en prixluit fini. Xous avons les ca- 
pitaux les plus considerables pour la vaste pro- 
.lucticn. les hommes d'affaires les mieux enten- 



siir line base (|ui nous permette de faire con- 
currence aux autres nations et. autant (pie 
possible, de transporter nos marchandises aux 
plus has |)rix i|ue peuveiit otTrir les compa- 
Ljiiies de navigation, et d'atleiiidre a la stipre- 
matie commerciale et industrielle du globe. 



L'Amerique doit traverser les deux oceans ct dus, et le monde est notre niarche. La de- 
I'aire des contpietes. Les merveilleuses res- mantle qui existe pour nos produits, notre de- 
sources du continent occidental revolutionne- velo])]xment. notre succes ne sauraient se dt^- 
ront certainement les conditions comtuerciales. crire dans les limites d'un bref rapport. Xous 
\otre lorce et notre rang parmi les nations doutons (|ue cette etonnante reussite soit esti- 
font lenvie des autre nations ct sont I'arbitre mee a .sa juste valeur, que nous en saisissions 
du monde. Les .\mericains pourraient vivrc toute la portee. ou que nous ayons appro foiidi 
et i)ros|)erer j)en(lant des siecks sur leurs 
propres produits. Kt aussi loii!.;temps que cela 
sera vrai et (lue nous seroii- \rais a nons- 
memes. nous devrions triompher, car nous le 
ponvons, au point de vue de rcxpansion com- 
merciale. Dans nuinbrc des etats les plus 



les voies mysterieuses de la Providence. 

Si vous comprenez notre succes, comme 
nous esperons que vous pouvez le comprendre 
et (|ue vous le comprendrcz en vous pla^ant 
ail point de vue de nos heritages et des occa- 
sions qui nous sont oflfertes, vous n'aurez guere 
anciennement peupl(?s. nos industries agricoles Uci,o\u quon vous en disc davantage. Aussi 
se transforment ra])idement en industries „o„s ne donnons pas de statistiques. Xotre 
conimerciales. ]^^^^ ,ij,„j; (.^. rapport, est de creer des aspira- 

.\t>n seulement nous occupons le baut de tioiis : votre propre jugement vous dira quelles 
lechclle des grandes nations nianufacturie res sont les questions vitalcs et <piels avantage- 
du monde mais. notre production egale celles de 'dTre les marches exterieurs. 
V.Xllemagne. de la France, de la Grande I?re- pmir faire face a la demande cnjissante nous 

tagne reunies. Xous navons certainement avons de;. matieres premieres, les ouvners et 
pas besoins de tarifs tic protection eleves. ,1^.^ capitaux qui, sous le rap|X)rt de labondance 
Xous iKiuvrms faire une concurrence serieuse ^t de la qualite ne redoutent aucune conciir- 
a nimporte tpicl pays du monde sans protec- rencc ; nous avons la reputation de reiissn 
tion. l-'.ncore (|ue la main (rteuvre soit bon toujours. La (|uestion qui se pose aux meni- 
marche a I'etrangcr. elle ne le-t pas si Ion hres de cettt assemblee est celleci :— 



considere le travail (|ui s'\ tail. Si nous pon- 
vons faire travailler nos artisans neuf et dix 
beuics par jour et obtenir les resultats fpie 
nous obtenoiis. et si de plus les traites de re- 
ciprocite nous prt^'tent leur appui. (pi'avons a 
faire davantage de la protection? 

\ Otre "chairman"' fort des observatifius qu'il 



■'\ Hiilez-voiis du commerce exterieur, 0! 
etes-vous tlisj>oses a soutenir la position ([uc 
nous avons prise? " 

I'our le fabricant americain, la question 
soiuante est, assurement plus qu 'aucune autre 
d'une importance vitale: 

■Que ferons-nous?- Sommes-nous en ctat 



a faites dans les pays etrangers ct (lu'il a ,i-,.„,reprendre comme il convient le commerce 

comparees a nos ressources et a notre capacite, exterieur'" 

recommande 'I'oser courir quckiues risques .. , . 

Xous recomniandons que cette (ptestion suit 

1 „-..„„,..„., ca.„,^.,t ^« avec nimporte quelle nation, et recotumande ,. , . , , . ,,,., . . r. ■ 

nous vous recommandons respectucuseiTient de ' ' 1 objet de serteuse dehberations. Pour rien au 

11 I- . ...... i„ r,^:,, -...•.=n^c aiKsi un remaniement de nos tarifs. , . ..... , •. 

vouloir bien discuter avec tout le soin tpi ellcs monde n entreprenez de distribuer vos prcxluits 

demandent. Les nations civilisees du monde veulent les sur les marches exterieurs a moins que vous 

I^s Ktats-rnis sont la plus jeune des prin- produits de nos fabriques a cause de leurs supe- n'ayez les connaissances et les capitaux 

cipak's nations de la terre ; la plus grande riorite reconnue. Le marche i-tranger absorbe requis, que vous n'ayez des projets defi- 

Pri^e de mentionner ce |ournal en ecrivant aux personnel qtti y font tns^er des annoncet. 



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nis. de maniere (pie les acheteurs t^trangers 
puissent compter sur vous, avoir confiance en 
vous — car le client etranger doit avoir confi- 
ance en notre systeme qui exige que le prix 
d'achat soit envoye avec la commande. Nous 
recommandons que les clients soient traites 
avec plus tie generosite, nous recommandons la 
reciprixrite et la compilation de statistiques 
absolument siires. Cela vent dire travail et 
capital, cela vent dire quil faudra s'ccarter des 
chemins battus. Cela vent dire tpie vous 
consacriez t()Ut. oii du moins une large portion 
de votre etablissement au conuuerce exterieur, 
et (jue vous entriez dans la lice resolus a vain- 
cre. Malheurcusement, bien lieu ont com- 
mence comme i! aurait fallu. Quelques-uns, 
ayant exjK-die les marchandises sans preuflre 
les precautions voulues, durent prendre le 
bateau apres ellcs pour seviter des pertes 
f.icheuses. et. dans ces voyages personnels, ils 
eurent du moins le bonheur de se rendre 
compte des besoins des clients ct des occasions 
<pii leur etaient oflfertes. La proposition est 
devant vous : c'est a vous de decider. Si vous 
vous decidez a vous lancer dans le commerce 
exterieure. suivez un plan precis, ce qui veut 
dire (|u'il vous faudra titudier la situation, 
examiner le terrain par vous-meme. de mani- 
ere que vous puissiez faire honneur a notre 
nation au lieu de la discrediter. Xe copiez pas 
des outils anciens et demodes. simplement pour 
fournir aux gens ce tpiils ont coutume da- 
chetcr. Les marchands du monde entier s'attcn- 
dent a ce *|ue le manufacturier americain leur 
fournisse (luelque chose de meilleur que cc 
qu'ils avaient autrefois pour faire le travail. 
Ce (|u'il vous faut savoir, c'est le travail auquel 
I'outil est destine, et il vou^ faut etre absolu- 
ment sur que votre outil jxnirra faire ce tra- 
vail-la. 

Kn etudiant la (piestion. il nous faut com- 
prendre el considerer le caractere tie I'animal 
ou de leiiergie clout les acheteurs disposeni 
IKjur faire fonctionner loutil. Cela etant 
connu, pri'parez avec soin des tkscnptions 
dctaillees de Tuutil dans la langue .le Tacheteur. 
et accompagnez-les tie gravures parfaitement 
Claires. Kn fixant des prix sans disccrnement 
a toiu acheteur etr..ugcr. on a perdu. <lans cer- 
tains cas, la clientele de maisons tlimportation 
considerables qui alleguaient que la concur- 
rence ne leur laisserait aucun profit. Xe fixez 
pas de prix aux personnes que vous ne con- 
naissez pas, Les maisons de commerce 
etrangercs ccnsiderent ce procetle comme 



res.semblant en tons points a ceiix (pu sont en 
u.^agc dans les maisons (pii font du commerce 
par rinterniediaire de catalogues. Kcrivez, 
demandez des renseignements complementaires 
sur les besoins de I'acheteur et. pentlant ce 
temps, faites les demarches necessaires ptiur 
savoir quels sont vos corresiuindants. (luelL 
situation ils occupent. Tenez vos clients con- 
stamment au courant de toutes It- modifica- 
tions, de tons les prefectionnements. Et. plu- 
t(Jt que de les remplacer par dautres. \<.]<- 
graphiez, s'il le faut, pour savoir si les ouiils 
l)euvent sempltiyer. oui on non. avec k-s 
modifications introduites. < )n a si souvcnt 
substitue un autre outil a celui tpii avail ete 
commande tpic des acheteurs t^trangcrs ont 
proteste aupres de nos consuls, et <|ue des 
jK-rtes considerables ont ete la consetpiencc du 
refus des clients d'accepter des produits tpiils 
n'avaient pas conimandes. Ce procedc na pas 
pen c(3ntribuc' a faire naitre un sentiment de 
metiancc entre le manufacturier americain e: 
I'acheteur etranger. Prcnez des precautions 
extremes contre les erreurs dans lemballage 
et contre la casse. et veillez a ce que toutes les 
marchandises soient de bonne tpialite. bien 
faites et expediees a temps. Pour rien an 
monde n'entrcprcnez d'expedier de*. prothuts 
dt^motles. tm mal fabriques, ou dont la valeur 
nest pas prouvee. 

I n ancien president comnientait avec eloges 
line decision presentee par votre ••chairman' 
actuel et votee a I'unanimite. et dapres laquelle 
les manufacturiers devraient s'interesser a 
emj)echer lexpedition. par quelque concurrent, 
de marchandises <|u'on saurait etre de qualite 
inferieure. dune construction defectueuse et 
de mauvaise matiere premiere. Le manufac- 
turier .[Ui fait cela et abuse de la contiance 
(ks acheteurs etrangers. devrait etre I'objet 
de la liaine de tons. II nous faut inspirer 
confiance en prenant un soin extreme de four- 
nir non seulement les outils (jue nous dison- 
foiirnir, mais encore les outils tjue I'on nou^ 
a conimandes. en nous conformant aux tlesirs 
tie nos clients, encore que ces desirs soient 
contraires a nos coutumcs natiotiales. 

Des recherches personnelles et un pen tic 
reflexion prouvent d'une maniere concluante 
(jue nous nc pouvons pas plus imposer nos 
inethodcs aniericaines dans les divers pays 
etrangers que nous pouvons contraindre ces 
pays a accepter notre monnaie. 

X" entreprenez pas de passer lourdement sur 



le corps d'ancitnnes tratlitions et de vieiles 
coutumes. Xous recomniandons d'etutlier 
attentivement les rapports consulaires et ctnn- 
nierciaux, les rt-sumes statisti(|ues. les tableaux 
s(-nimaires tie commerce, les prix. etc. 

\ oils eles familiers ^vec les iiuportants 
niarclus e\teriuirs et leur etat general. -Xous 
vous reiivovons respcctueusemcut au Mmistere 
tlu Commerce, aux traites ties prix. aux raj)- 
ports des tknianes el de reciprocile avec les 
jiavs etrangers. siirtout avec Cuba, les iles 
I'liilippines. lAustralic, rAlleinagne, la Russie 
et la b'rance. 

I ne tlemarche imiKirtante pour I'ameliora- 
tion tk notre service consulaire fut faite tpiand 
k- President Roo.sevelt, dans un message spe- 
cial au Congres, recomniamla la nomination 
de six agents speciaux du Mini.stere de I'lnte- 
rieur. avec Ic rang et le titre diplomatique 
ilAttache commercial, qui devraient l*« 
choisis de preference parmi le personnel consu- 
laire et dont le poste serait designe par le Mi- 
nistre de I'interieur <pti aurait le pouvoir de les 
nommer a discretion a un autre poste. Ces 
agents speciaux seraient envoyes a I'etranger 
p(»ur etudier les conditions commcrciales exis- 
tanies dans les autres pays, pour preparer [ww 
le ministcre .In Commerce et du Travail des 
rapports sur le commerce et les manufactures, 
pour visiter les consulats et examiner leur 
mtj-le de travail, iiour suggerer au Ministere 
.le I'interieur des modifications qui ameliore- 
raient et fortifieraient le service consulaire. 

Ces agents auront a poursuivre leurs recher- 
che> sur une vaste etentlue de territoire. Ainsi 
run d'cux sera charge de lAutriche. des Etats 
l>alkaniques, de rAllemagne, de la Suisse, de 
la Russie et il'autres jwys de lEurope septen- 
trionale: I'autre s'tKCupera de la France, de 
ritalie. du Portugal, de I'Espagne et des autres 
pays riverains de la MetHterranee : le troisieme 
aura la C.rande r.retagne et ses dependances ; 
le (luatneme, k- Mexique, r.Xmerique centrale, 
ks hides occklentales ct I'Amerique du Sud ; 
le cinquieme, I'Asie et plus particulierement 
la Russie asiatique, la Chine et Ic Japon ; le 
sixieme enfin sera tenu en reserve pour un 
M rvice special et des missions particulieres 
dans n'iniix>rte <iiiclle partie du monde. 

Nos representants employes dans le service 
consulaire sont reconnus par les nations etran- 
gercs comnie nos agents daflfaires, ct comme 
tels ils devraient etre les hommes les plus capa- 
bles que nous puissions nous procurer. On a 
fait beaucoup, ces demieres annees, pour ren- 



Prifere de mentionner ce journal en ecrivant aux personnes qui y font insurer des annonces. 



i8 



Export Implement Age 



<lrc k- M-ivicc cniisiilairc \Au> otYuciit". m;ii> 
tiii'il rt'>tc eiici.fL- lK';aiciiU|i a laiii- jitTMiiini- 
ne sanraii en i!outi.T. 

L'tiniiv.c ]ircnvt-- <lc I'l-lTuri i|nc l'"m k-- ]>:\y-^ 
^■tran.m.-i> ixiiir avuir ilaiiN Wuv .-crvict.- cim-ti- 
laire dcs lioinmes speci;Ucniciit ijrcpaiis. il 
n'est pe^n-iirc i)as iiiutik- tk- dire tin mot (k-.^ 
qualificalkiiis necessaires pour it re ailinis dniis 
ce service en (irande Bretagnc : il e-t alisuhi- 
ment nccessair:; i]uc I'anglais soit parfaitenient 
•conipris. I,c can<lidal <loit, de phis, parlor 
fratn^ais el an inuins une autre langue, I'cspa- 
fjiiol (HI raUcniand, et il duit pr.uvoir parlor 
"Ces langucs couramnitnt. II duii eiuini' avui; 
tine ctMinaissance approfondic des lois anglai- 
ses et conimerciales ayant trait a loxpedition 
des niarchandiscs, aiix instruinenls negoci- 
ables, aux Icttres de change, aux billets a 
ordrc. aux contrats pour Ic transiwjrt dts 
niarchandiscs, a I'assurauce iiiaritinie, etc. 

L'AUemagnc a des cours analogues pour ses 
TCpresentants (hi service c-iiisulaire. J.e con- 
sul allemand ]iarle coninie un indigene la 
langue du pays uu i! d. .it remplir ses fonctions 
et, de plus, le francai-; et I'anglais. 

C'est a cette education spi-ciale quo oo^ deux 
pays doivent imhihitahlemciu lour vasie cuin- 
mcrcc cNterienr; snr les quais do toutcs les na- 
tion- civilisees on yoit des marchaudises por- 
taiu la marque de fabriquc anglaisc ou alle- 
niande. 

1 .n i8tx) notig Mom au pied de la lisle des 
qualre grandcs nations manufacturiercs. a 
savoir: la Grande I'.retague. la 1-Vance. I'.Mlo- 
magne et k-s K.tats-l'nis. (Juarante-cinq ans 
plus tard n««u> (»ccupons la tete de la listc . 
notre pmdm'i..n niaunfacturiere egale cellc 
«les autrcs i;rari.k- tiatimi- c imbiut-cs. 

I'mir roteiiir imtre i.o-itinn et pour ausnion- 
ter encore iinire pruihutiun, il iious taut re 
gar.ler aux ,.aN> 'U- 1' A-ie. de r.\irique. .le 
I'Amerique ceiiir/'le, de r.\merique dn Su<i. 
du Mcxiquc et de I'Xiistralie on le- inihi-lrio- 
mannfarturit-res ne sont euchre (pie pen de 

VeIoJ)|ieC-. 

Noil-; avdiis le seiitimeiil fiu'il -trail bun do 
faire sontir au Congres le besoin d'cncoiiragor 
la ciistnirtinn d'une marine maroliand.' 
amcricaJne. ou tout au nioins la (K.-t --ion 
par des Amcricains de naviros marohaiid-. li 
n'y a pas a nior quo le pays neni pos-ode pas Ic 
commerce extorieur qu'il dcvrait. Xous nc 
pouvons nous ompecher de pressor ids mem- 
hres do donncr plus d'attcntion :"i cc sujct. 
Notre puissance maimfacturierc a considera- 



hliin.'iil auKiiunle. oe (|ui ju-tilie iioire re-])ec- 
liieii-o dcinaiiii'- 'li' i I'l-iidre en d n-ideration 
It rapiiort do \otre Connie. 

T'. 1*,. Mver-. "oliairnian." 
T,a question du ta'if a ote di-mtco par 
]'.\-<oeialion ."veo iin profoiid intt'rot. T,o 
sonliiiK'nt ilt- nunihre- o<t (|no U- tarif doit 
i"tro nioilirn- -nrtont en v (\\u touchc le fer 
ct rarior. T.a di'cision suiv;mto a ('tt- ailopttv: 
11 c--t deeidi'- que nou- fa\oii-on- !a iironi|it<' 
revision du tarif. de facon pourtant a troubler 
le moin- po>sil)le I'elat pn-sout des affaires, ot 
lo Comite exocutif reoojt rbarqfo par la pre- 
-enli' d'agir en rons('<inonco do retfo derision. 
T,'a-«ombl{^o i^a — :' M-.,i- '..ui- ., (I'l.i-o a 
eoontor de- rap]iort< et a discutor do« ques- 
tions de commerce. Toutefoi- le- divertisse- 
ments tie fircnt pas defaut : k-s nuirhro^ ot 
leurs dames prirent part a des excursions 
ayant pour but la visite aux ctiriosites locales, 
on to .-^..i.nt . ,is- i1i.'"i( i-,-^^ !■! fin-dement 1 a'^- 
sombl. ■ ■ ; . / '■ :. ,'M|not. 



a travor> les valltfes de Sosa et le Ribabona. 
I'ar ce inoyen I'eau est apportee a plus de 
-•47,(X>o acres de terres jusqu'ici completetnent 
>tcriles on peu s'en faut, faute d'irrigation. 
Ce grand siphon est forme de deux tubes 
Iprineii.aiix. d'une longueur de ?h de mille et 
de !_■ ]iied- ; ]iouecs do diametre; ils sont 
revetns d'niie lolc d'.acier d'une (!-paisseur de 3 
iiiillimetres, cnserres dans des cercles de fer et 
eiicaissc'S dans du beton. Les tuyaux debitent 
7,7a3 gallons d'eau par seconde. 



Tremblement de terre de Valparaiso 

I'r, t:r,-inil triniMenntu Ac lerro a ^"alpar,'U- 
-011 fCliilit a delrnit. k- i^> :iont dernier, une 
grandc partie ' ' die ot on'^onveli des cen- 
tainos do por-ie,,. ~ -ou« '■•- •■"'ncs des bati- 
nient- eerouk's. Deux s( , - violentcs fn 

nnt n-~entios. a qtielqno- inoniouts d'inter- 
valle. dans les pretnieres heures de la soiree : et 
comme a San Francisco on avril dernier, elles 
furent suivies par des incendies dans diffe- 
rentes parties de la ville. re qui ajonta aux 
ravaires deia causes par le tremblement de 
torro T.o nombre des morts est quelque chose 
coinme 2,noo: quant aux ])ro]iriett's dctrnitos, 
on k- I value do 2; millions ,a 50 millions de 
dollar^. A Smtiaco <'"^,denieiit les soctMisscs 
tnront violentcs ; il y out nombre Ac morts et 
lies degats considerables, et la devastation 
^'otendit a phisiours autres potitos villos et 
villages. \'alpara!-o o-^t uti port de mer forti- 
fit". et, on mi'mie tonij)-. l;i principalo ville rom- 
merciaio 'lo la oi'te oroi<knlak- (le 1' Xnu'rique 
du Sud. F.llo a line pojmlation d'au moins 
T ;o.ooo I'lmo';. Kilo i>o--rde de va-tos etnblisse- 
nient- indu-!riol-. niie ecole navalo. nn niusee 
d'histoire naturollo ot iilusieurs institutions 
eonsacreos a I'ednoation. 



Nouvelle Zelande 

Le gi.uverueur de la Xouvellc Zelande. dans 
-on discours d'ouverturc du Parlementa a 
Wellingloii, a dit ipie I'encouragement du 
commerce avec les Ktats-Unis et le Canada 

!.eraii Inn des sujets tpii serait pris en conside- 
ratuiti dnraiu la >os<iou jire-enle. Les mom- 
bres de la chambre seraient »;-galomcut pri(fs de 
discutor les ]ir)pt'=itions de retio\ivellement des 
-ubsides pour le ser\ ice de- po-te- outre San 
Francisco el Tile \'aiiconvei. Le di>C(iur.- lai- 
-ait ('galement une .illiision -.ympalhique aux 
prop '!< !( eij.rooite avoo I'Australie et 

exi)rimait Tcspeiir r|ue rexpusitiou prochaine 
do la Xouvollo Zelande pourrait soutenir la 
ionipar;ii-on .i\ee les procedes en usage dans 
1( - expo-iiioii- de raucien monde. 



Colossal siphon d'irrigation 

On s'intt^resse vivoment a la mise en service 
du siphon gigantesque qui transporte les eaux 
du canal d'irrigation d'Aragon ct de Catalogne 



Odessa et New York 

M. le vico-eon-td Smith, ecrivant d'< Ulessa. 
-0 rejouit du fait qu'une nouvelle conipagnie 
de bateaux a vajiour va relier ce port a celui 
de N'ew York. Le commerce sera ainsi facilite 

eiitre le- Ftats-Liii- .i li - port- de la Mer 
Xoiie. et ]iei!t el ! e oi'iix du Levant Ot do la 
Mcditerr-nieo. \ oiii ee que M. Smith e'crit : 

■Cr.i.e a rnniiative do M. A. Kzhevu>ki, 
■ Ineetii'.r ik- la eonipagiiic russo do Xavigation 
.'I vajiour et do Commerce, cette compagnic est 
sur le ])oiin d'et.dilir nu -orvico do bateaux a 
v.q.eiir eiitrc Ode--a et Xew York, pour pas- 
-.auer- it inareh.indi-e-, ei les vaisscaux seront 
liarfaitcmont auK-nages pour le transport des 
emigrants. I'n steamer prendra la mer vers la 
fin do septembre. 

"La dnri-o Ac la travcrsce d'Odessa a N^ew 
\'ork «era de vingt jinirs. Les steamers parti- 
ront a des dates fixes. On espere envoyer 
doux steamers dans le cours de I'annee qui 
^'achcvc. ot les eomnuinications avec I'Ame- 
rique reprendront ensuite au printenips de 
I'annee prochaine. 



I 



)) 



Export Implement Age 



19 



Export Implement Aqe 

PARA CIRCULAR KN El. KXTRANJERO SOLAMKNTE. 

PHi6dico indepcndienle. dedic.do exclusivamente al 'omento 

"del com"rcio de exiK>rtaci"n en ma.iuinar.a para la Agri- 

cuUura y U-therias, bombas. n.olii.os de y.ento, 

aperos de labran/a y suminislros i cortijos, 

haciendas, intcenios de hacer aiucar, 

sitios de labor etc. 



I'RKCio DE Suscrii>ci6n: 
tor un afio, porte franco 



I Peso 



Remltase por giro sobre Nueva ^ork 6 por libranza 
postal inlernacional. 



francamente les conccdian a todas las Repii- 
blicas Americanas. Su discurso Cue cordial- 
mente recibido. y se espera que contribuira 
mucho a desvanccer la desconfianza en el 
l)rop6sito de los Estados Unidos. Mr. Root 
sc a])rovech6 de la celebraci(3n de esa coufe- 
rcncia para visitar las capitales de esas rcpi'i 
blicas Sud-americanas, en todas las cuales fue 
recibido con cordial entusiasmo. 



])rincipal ciudad comercial en la costa occi- 
dental de Sud America. Tione una poblacion 
de 150.000 6 mas habitantcs. Tiene tambi«in 
grandcs establecimientos industriales, una 
escuela naval, un museo Ac historia natural y 
varias aeademia- e iustitucione> doceiites. 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 
loio Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa., E.U. del N.A. 

t« misma firtna publica el "Implement Age" el "American 
"Fertiliier"." cl CarriaRe .Moutniy y el ' Vehicle Dealer, 
propiedad legalizada por Ware Bros. Co. en 1910c.. 



Tomo XV. Flladelfia. E. V. de N. A.. Diciembre de 1966 l«o. 3 

En el Directorio para Compradores, en la prl- 
mera parte, hallaran nuestros lectores los in- 
formes en el idioma espanoi, a fin de que puedan 
entablas una correspondencia mas satisfactoria 
con nuestros anunciantes. 



Los fabricantcs de iiistrumentos agrtcolas 
amerkanos conocicron liace ticiupo la necesi- 
dad de d(-rnbrir lo .pie necesitan k)S haconda- 
dos V labradores de los paises exiranjeros y de 
proiK.rcionarsel.. despucs. Los instrumeutos 
agricolas americanes para el couiercio de ex- 
portaci.-.u -0 adaptan para la- re-ione- en .pie 
se liace u-o .le olios. 



Base del Comercio 

Lo- manulacluren.s amerieaiio- de in-lru- 
mcutos y vehiculos agriclas e>ian bu-caud.. 
d comercio Ac I.k paises hispano-auioricauo-, 
y de tod..- lo- d.tna- del muu.l.. por .1 nurito 
de su- pr.Hkuto, N -n ■ .q.acidad para satisfacer 
debidanienie t.wlo- 1'- requerimiem.>s -kl co- 
mercio y .k- l.>s agricultores sobre base- iiia- 
cooii.-.mk.a- .I'le la- .ino puoden olreec r -u- 
cotitpeti.lore-. S. la- eireuii-laiieia- no -on mv 
extraordinari,!-. .kberiaii lo> e..mereiaiiu- ol,ie- 
ner .iompre -..- nuie.uuia- en l-s meiea.!..- 
,„a- h.naio-. t-.maiid.. on cneiita el ment.. .k 
lus ])ro<lueto>. ' 



Los Embarques Puntuales 

Los mauufactureros americanos do instni- 
mentos y matpiinar agric.ila- reeunoceu la im- 
jxjrtancia de hacer con prontitud sus eiivios 
para coiresponder a los i)edidos .pie reciben 
del oxtranjero. Esta es una de las razones por 
las cuales os satisfactorio tratar con los manu- 
factureids americanos de instrumeutos agri- 
c(jlas. Los compradores extranjenis puedeii 
estar .seguros de .[ue to.kis los recursos de la 
oficina y de la fabrica se emplean para iwner 
pront(» en camino toda mercancia pedida. Ra- 
rm %'eces hay demora alguna en la fabricaci<'m 
de los articukis pedidos, los cuales se tiencn 
en almacen listos para el eiul)aripje de los podi- 
ijo- extranjeros. b'n los casos exceiKionales 
en .jiie no se lieue a man. > la marcancia al reci- 
bir-e el podi.li', tieuen siemiiro el almacer y el 
paii.. lleiios .le la materia prima necesaria para 
tabricar las uiai|uinas sin perdida de tienqMi. 
El .sistonia do inspecci.'m a cada pas.i y ou ca.la 
.le].artamemo fabril es tal. tjue se evita la 
posibilidad do ..blenerse la rapidez a costa de 
la calidad. 



Una Voz de Gigante 

Durante la celobraeioii .iel Solstioio .le 
\ eran.. en el tope de la torre dc Fitel un 
megafoiio extraordinario, ca])az do traii-mitir 
la V. ./ humana a una distancia de cerca de dos 
millas -0 jiuso alii para asombrar a los parisi- 
enses. I'.l apart.) luo inventado por .MM. 
Laudet V C.ammoiit. La inmensa magnitica- 
ei.in ikl -oni.l.) se pr.i.hice con la ayii.la .le 
una serie tie explosiones de un detonante gas. 
l-.l peri."!., v la inlen-idad de las detonaciones 
-i.n regidas por k)S movimientos de la aguja 
sobre el 'record" tonogratico que lleva la 
improsi.Sn Ac las vibraciones sonoras. Segi'm 
la mavor .. menor cantidad de gas que se 
adinite oil el aparato. asi es la niay<M (> menor 
iutensiilad del sonido. C«i «» maquina las 
l.al.abras dichas en un t.mo ordinario .se oven 
claramente a una distancia de mas de 300 pies. 



Las Repiiblicas Americanas 

En un .liscurso pnmunoia.l.. on una so-i-.n 
especial .le la Cnloreiicia Ac las Kopublicas 
llispauo Americanas en Hi.. <\c Janeiro les 
aseguro el Secretario .lo Fsta.l.> Mr. K->t a 
los representantes do esas roi,ublieas (lue l..s 
Fsta.l..< rni<lo> n.. .lo^oaban ma. terrif^rio 
que el ipio yo toman, y .|ue tratarian los .k-ro- 
chos de la naci.m m;\s debil eon el mi>m.^ 
respeto que los .lol mas po.lero>o Imperio, y 
que no reclamaban mas privilcgios que los que 



El Terremoto de Valparaiso 

I n uraii terremoto en \albaraiso. Chile, el 

10 lie \coMo ,le-tru\o nna gran parte do la 
ein.lad. \ -ei.nlt.'. a .-enu n,u. - de sn- habilanu - 
en la- riiina- .le lo- .■difieio- .lerriba.lo-, >e 
-inti roll -l.i- treineii.lo- eluKpies con un ni- 
terv;d lie pi.K-os 111. .metilo- a princi])!.'- <l<- la 
noche. V, eom.i on San I'raiioi-c.) en el nu- 
de \bril, tuer.in -egui.L.s p.ir inceii.lio- en 
,li!\rent iiartes de la ciu.la.l, los eiiale- (X- 
lendior.Mi el area .le ,lostni.ei..n. La ]ier.lida 
de vidas se caleiila en iin.i- J'"'. ^ ''T *1^" 
propieda.le>^ .lo ?-'.;.<*»<>,.)."' a ,^ ;o... ««>..> ".. Ln 
Sanliauo tambien fuer.ui my luerie- lo> toni- 
blore-. habion.lo liabi.l.. alii tambien una 
per.li.la eon-i.lerable .le vi.la- y pr.ipio.lades 
V varia- ein.la.les v villas mas po<iueua- 
^nlrieron loiubifi e.'ii-i.lorablomonle. \ al- 
parai-o es un ])Uort.. do mar tortifica.lo. y la 



Una Planta Novel de Fuerza Motriz para 
una Hacienda 

En esta e.la.l de eolo.,:de- pl.mta- <le lii.lr.-*- 
electrical fuerza nioiriE Km solamoiito por lo 
-(iieral .|uo -emejantcs instalacioiies (pie re- 
.jniereii ia s-iluci-'m Ac dificiks problomas .le 
iimeuieria mocaiiica. o (pie Hiperan A t.ida- las 
.lenia- en taniauo las (pie dan higar a eomeii- 
tari. .-. Como asuuto de contraste. el EU'ctma! 
ir„rhl meiicbna una planta de fuerza notriz y 
alumbra.lo eketr,..- c -tablecida on una ha- 
eieiida .le eampo en d interior -lei I'.-ta.l.. .le 
XticNa Ncak, qiu I- probablemenie 'a unica 
,lr -n ela-e en lo- l-^-iados Lnido- : eieriameiite 
~.,lo p.u-a- -eiiuiante- pne.le baker m e- .pie 

b,i\ alt;uii.i-. 

r,,r 1,1 haeien.la eii ene-lioii .one un n.> 
o-na oirn.nte e- uormalmento .le un..- 4-o'« 
pie- eubios .le a-iia por minnt.., v ,1 I.i ..rdla 
.le -emeianlo ri.> >e r..n-!ni\.. la -iugular 
l)laiita .le tuer/a iiioln/ .Uvine.i. Ina ropresa 
Ac\ tip., .le -nni,." .le ,V < pie- .lo .aneliura se 
e,.n-truv,. e.Mi unir..- .le e..neret.. n un m.i.lero 
.le reteu eii el -uel.., v -e eubriu oni tabla .lo 

I . 1.1 ,, 111. .-nil- lie •.!•.'■ 'I -ohre una 
pmabete <le 4 puiL^a.ia- .i< -,. 

-,,li.la armazon do ma.lera .lura. la ultima 

encajoua.la y asegurada a lo> mur.- v s.)loras 

e..u pernos, Lua .loble batieiite do lablones 



Hiiase el Favor de Mendonar el Nombre de e.te Peri6dico Cuando se Conteste a los Anundos. 



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i8 



Export Implement Age 



<lre k- service consulairc plus eft'ectif, inais 
cju'll rcste encore Ih^hucou]) a fairo personnc 
ne saurait en doutcr. 

Conime preuvc dc Ictiori i|uc fuiit k-s pays 
t'trangcrs jxnir avciir dans kur service consu- 
lairc dcs homines specialement prepares, il 
n'est i>ent-etre pas inutile dc dire un mot des 
qualifications necessaires pour etre admis dans 
ce service en (".rande Rrelagne: il est absohi- 
ment necessaire que I'anglais soit parfaitement 
conipris. Le candidat doit, de ])lus, parler 
frant^ais et an nioins nne autre lanijue, I'espa- 
gnol ou Tallemand, et il doit pouvoir i>arler 
ces langues couramment. 11 doit encore avoir 
tine connaissance approfondie des lois anglai- 
ses et conmierciales ayant trait a Texpedition 
des marchandises, au\ instruments negoci- 
ables, aux lettres dc change, aux billets a 
ordre. aux contrats pour Ic transport dcs 
marchandises, a I'assurance maritime, etc. 

L'Allemagnc a des cours analogues pour ses 
Tepresentants du service consulaire. Le con- 
sul allemand parle conime un indigene la 
langue du pays ou il doit remplir ses fonctions 
ct, de plus, le fran*,-ais et I'anglais. 

C'est a cette education speciale que ces deux 
pays doivent induhitablement Icur vastc com- 
merce exterieur; sur les quais de toutes les na- 
tions civilisees on voit des marchandises por- 
tant la marque de fabriquc anglaise ou alle- 
mande. 

En i860 nous etions au pied de la liste dcs 
quatre grandes nations manufacturiercs, a 
savoir: la Grande IJrctagnc, la France, TAUe- 
magne et les Ktats-Unis. Quarante-cinq ans 
plus tard nous occui>ons la tete de la liste . 
notre production manufacturiere egalc cellc 
des autres grandes nations combinees. 

Pour retenir notre position et pour augnicn- 
ter encore notre pro<luction, il nous taut rc- 
garder aux pays de I'Asie, de I'Afrique. de 
TAinerique ccnindc, de I'Aincrique du Sud. 
du Mexique ct de 1' Anstralie nu les industries 
manufacturiercs ne M>iit eiu-.-re que peu de 
veloppees. 

Nous avous Ic sentiment qu'il serait bon de 
faire sentir au Congres le besoin d'encouragcr 
la construction d'une marine marchando 
americainc. on tout au moins la iiossession 
par des Americains de navires marchands. 11 
n'y a pas a nier que le pays neni possedc pas Ic 
commerce exterieur qu'il dcvrait. Nous ne 
pouvons nous empecher de presser nos mem- 
bres de donner phis d'attention a ce sujet. 
Notre puissance manufacturiere a considera- 



hleniem augmente, ce qui justifie notre respec- 
tueusc demande de prendre en consideration 
cc rapport de votre comite. 

F. K. Myers, '■chairman," 

T.a question du tarif a ete discutce par 
r.\ssnciation ?vec un profond interet. Le 
sentiment dcs membres est que le tarif doit 
etre nmdifie ?nrtout en ce qui touchc le fer 
et I'acier. La decision suivante a ete adoptee: 

11 e-t decide f|ue nous favorisons la prompte 
revision du tarif. dc fa(:on pourtant a troubler 
le moins possilile I'etat pre-^ent des afifaires, et 
le Comite executif recoit charge par la pre- 
scntc d'agir en consequence de cettc decision. 

L'asscmblee passa trois jours a Chicago i 
ecnuter dcs rapports et a discuter des ques- 
tions dc commerce. Toutefois les divertisse- 
ments ne firent i»as def;uit : li<; membres et 
Icurs d;\nie« prirent part a des excursions 
ayant pour hut la visite aux curiosites locales, 
on ^e rcndit nix th<'"itrc« et finalemcnt Ta*- 
scmhlee <;e lennina par un f^mnd banquet. 



a travcrs les vallees de Sosa et le Ribabona. 
I'ar ce moyen I'eau est apportee a plus de 
j47,ooo acres de terres jusqu'ici completement 
steriles ou peu s'en faut, faute d'irrigation. 
Ce grand siphon est forme de deux tubes 
principaux, d'une longueur de ?8 de mille et 
dc 12 pieds 5 pouces de diametre; ils sont 
revetus d'une tule d'acier d'une epaisseur de 3 
millimetres, enserres dans des cercles de fer et 
encaisses dans du beton. l^es tuyaux debitent 
-.700 gallons d'eau par seconde. 



Tremblement de terre de Valparaiso 

IV. grand tremblement de terre h Valparai- 
son CChili> a dctniit. le i^ aout dernier, nne 
grandc partie de la villc ct enscnvcli des cen- 
tnines dc pcrsnnnes sous les mines des bati- 
mcnts ecroulcs. Deux secousses violcntes fu- 
rent ressenties. a quelqncs moments d'inter- 
valle. dans les premieres heures de la soiree : ct 
comme a San Fmncisco en avril dernier, elles 
furent suivies par des incendies dans diffe- 
rentes parties de la ville. ce qui ajouta aux 
ravatrcs deja causes par le tremblement de 
terre. Le nomhre des morts est quelque chose 
comme 2,000; quant aux proprietes detmites, 
on les evalue dc 2; millions a 50 millions de 
dollars. .\ Santiago egalement les secousses 
furent violentes; il y cut nomhre de morts et 
des degats considerables, et la devastation 
s'etendit a plusieurs autres pctites villes et 
village-i. \'alpn.raiso c'-.t un port de mer forti- 
fie. et, en nieme tein|i>, la priiicipale ville com- 
mercialc de la cote occidentale de r.-Xmeriquc 
du Sud, Kile a une population d'au moins 
1 :;n.ooo anics. File ^lossede de vastcs et.nblisse- 
nicnts industricls. mie ecoU' n.ivale, un musee 
d'histoirc naturelle et plusieurs institutions 
consacrees h I'education. 



Nouvelle Zelande 

Le gouvcrneur de la Nouvelle Zelande, dans 
son discours d'ouverture du Parlementa a 
Wellington, a dit que I'encouragement du 
commerce avec les Etats-Unis et le Canada 
serait I'un des sujets qui serait pris en conside- 
ration durant la session presente. I^s mem- 
lircs •](■ la chambre seraient egalement pries de 
discuter les propositions de rcnouvellement des 
subsides pour le service des postcs entre San 
Francisco el I'ile \'ancouver. Le discours fai- 
:-ait egalement nne allusion sympathique aux 
propositions de reciprocite avec I'Australie et 
cxprimait I'espoir que I'exposition prochainc 
de la Nouvelle Zelande pourrait soutenir la 
eomparaison avec les procedes en usage dans 
les expositions dc I'ancien monde. 



Colossal siphon d'irrigation 

On s'interesse vivement a la mise en service 
du siphon gigantesque qui transporte les eaux 
du canal d'irrigation d'Aragon et de Catalogne 



Odessa et New York 

M. Ic vice-consul Smith, ccrivant d'Odessa, 
sc rejouit du fait qu'une nouvelle compagnie 
<le bateaux a vapeur va relier ce port a celui 
de New York. Le commerce sera ainsi facilite 
entre les Etats-l'nis ct les ports de la Mer 
Noire, et peut-etre cenx du Levant et de la 
Mediterranee. ^■oici ce que M. Smith ecrit : 

'•('.race a I'initiative dc M. A. Rzhevuski, 
directcur de la couifiagnie nisse de Navigation 
h vapeur et de Commerce, cette compagnie est 
sur le point d'etablir un service de bateaux a 
vajieur entre Odessa et New York, pour pas- 
>aijers et marchandises, et les vaisseaux seront 
liarfaitenient amenages pour le transport des 
emigrants. Vn steamer prendra la mer vers la 
fin de septembre. 

"La dtiree dc la traversee d'Odessa a New 
^'o^k sera de vingt jours. Les steamers parti- 
ront a des dates fixes. On espere envoyer 
deux steamers dans le cours de I'annee qui 
s'achevc. et les communications avec I'Ame- 
rique reprendront ensuite au printemps de 
I'annee prochaine. 



3) 



EXPORT IMPLEMENT AGE 



19 



A ^^ francamente les co.icedian a todas las Repi.- principal ciudad comercial en la costa occi- 

EXPORT Implement age ^ieas Americanas. Su discurso fue cordial- dental .le Sud America. Tiene una poblac.on 

,... C..C...K .. .. ..x...«o so..-.,.B. „,ente recibido. y sc espera que contribuira <le . 50,000 6 mas habitantcs. Tiene tamb.en 

,«i6dico independiente, aedic.do exciusivamcnu ai fomento „,„eho a dcsvancccr la dcscoufiauza cu el graudcs establecmucntos mdustnales, una 

^^X-V'^'^SS^'^^^^ prop6sito de los Estados Unidos. Mr. Root escucla naval, un musco dc histona naUiral y 



aperos de labranza y suminislros S cortijos, 

haciendas, itiKenios de hacer azticar, 

sitiosde labor etc. 



Precio db SUSCIIIPC16N : 
Por un aBo, porte franco . - - • 

lUmitase por giro sobre Nueva York 6 per libranM 
postal internacional. 



I Peso 



se aprovecho de la celebracion de csa confe- 
rencia para visitar las capitales de csas repu 
blicas Sud-americanas, en todas las cuales fu»? 
recibido con cor<lial entusiasmo. 



varias aeademias e instituciones docentes. 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 
loio Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa., E.U. del N.A. 

L« misma firtna publica el •' Impletnent Age" el "Ainerican 
"Fertilixer:- el • CarrlaRc .Mouthiy y el ' Vehicle Dealer, 
propiedad legatizada por Ware Bros. Co. en 191X.. 



Tomo XV. Ftladelfi.. E. U. de N. A.. Dictembre de 1906 No. 3 



En el Directorio para Compradores, en la prl- 
mera parte, hallaran nuestros lectores los In- 

lormes en el Idioma espanol. a fin de que puedan ;.,cfrnni.Mitns airri 

entablas una correspondencia mas aattelactoria tactureros amcncanos de mstrumtntos agn 



Los Embarques Puntuales 

Los manufactureros americanos de instru- 
mentos y maquinar agricolas reconoccn la im- 
jwrtancia de hacer con prontitud sus envios 
l)ara coi respon<ler a los pcdidos que reciben 
del extranjero. Esta es una de las razones por 
las cuales cs satisfactorio tratar con los manu- 



con nuestros anunciantes. 

Los fabricantes tie instrumentos agricolas 
ainericano> conocieron hacc tiempo la necesi- 
tlad de descubrir lo (pic necesitan los hacenda- 
dos y labradores de los paises extranjeros y de 
proporcionArselo despues. Los instrumentos 



colas. Los compradores extranjeros pue.lcn 
estar .seguros de que todos los recursos de la 
uficina y de la fabrica se emplean para poner 
pronto en camino toda mercancia pedida. Ra- 
ras veces hay demora alguna en la fabricacif^n 
de los articulos peditlos. los cuales se tienen 
en almacen listos para el einbarque de los pcdi- 



agricolas americanes para el comercio <le ex- j^^^ extranjeros. I'.n los casos cxceiicionales 



Una Voz de Gigante 

Durante la celebracion del Solsticio de 
Verano en el tojje de la torre de Rifel un 
megafono extraordinario, capaz de transmitir 
la voz humana a una distancia dc cerca de dos 
millas se puso alii para asombrar a los parisi- 
enses. V.\ aparto fue invcnta<lo por MM. 
Landet y C.ammont. La inmensa magnifica- 
cion del sonido se produce con la ayuda de 
una serie de explosiones de un detonante gas. 
El i>eriotlo y la intensidad de las detonaciones 
son regidas por los movimicntos de la aguja 
sobre el "record" fonografico que lleva la 
impresion dc las vibraciones sonoras. Segun 
la mayor 6 menor cantidad de gas fpic se 
admite en el aparato, asi es la mayos u menor 
intensida.l <lel sonido. Con esa maquina las 
y)alal)ras tlichas en un tono ordinario se oyen 
claramente a una tlistancia de mas de 300 pies. 



portacitm se a<laptan para las regiones en <pie 
se hace uso dc ellos 



Base del Comercio 

Fo. manutaeiureros americanos (k instru- 
mentos y vehiculos agricolas c>tan buscando 
el comercio de los paises hispano-amcricanos, 
y dc todos los dem:\s del mundo por el mt-rito 
dc sus productos y su capaci.lad para satisfacer 
tlebidamcnte todos los requerimientos .lei co- 
mercio y «le los agricultorcs sobre bases mis 
ccon6micas (pie la< que pueden nfrecer >us 
competidores. S. la> circunstancias no son mv 
extraordinaria.. del.eri.nn los comercianle-.l.te- 

ner siemprc sus mercaiR-ia> en L- ineicadM. 

mds teratos. u.mand.. en cueiita el inevito de 

los protluctos. . 



en que no se tiene a inaiio la marcancia al reci- 
birse el pedido. tienen siempre el almacer y el 
patio llenos de la materia prima necesaria para 
fabricar las maquinas sin penlida de tiempo. 
El sistcnia de inspeccion a cada pasu y en cat la 
departamento fabril es tal, que se evita la 
jKisibilidad de obtenerse la rapidez ;i c.i>ia de 
la calidad. 



El Terremoto de Valparaiso 

In gran terremoto en \'albaraiso, Chile, el 
K) de .\gosto destruyo una gran parte cle la 
ciudad, y sepnlto a centenares de sus habitante-; 
en las ruinas de los edificios derribados. Se 
>iiuieron dos tremcndos choques con uii ni 
terval de jiocos momentos a principio'- ile la 
noche. y. eomo en San Francisco en el mes 
de .\bril, fueron seguidos i)or incendios en 
(liferent partes dc la ciudad, los cuales e\- 



Las Republicas Americanas 

Fn un discurso prominciado en una sesi6n 
especial de la Conferencia dc las Republicas teu-Hen., el area de destruceion. La perdi.la 
Hilpal^o Americanas en Rio de Janeiro les <le vi-las se cakula en unas ..00, v la de 



asecuro el Secretano de Fstado Mr. R.^>t a propiedades de $25,000,000 a ^50.000.000. Kn 

los^epresentantes de esas republicas que los Saiuiago tambien fueron my fuertes los ten. 

^;, t rnidos no deseaban mas territorio hlo.es. hahien.lo habi.lo all, tambien una 

que' el que ve tenian, v que tratarian los dere- perdi.la considerable de vidas y propiedades, 

Is de la nac,6n mas d.bil con el mismo v varias ciutladcs v v las -s peque,.s 

respeto que los .lei mas pcnleroso Imperio. y sufrieron tomb.fi -"-^-»'^- ^ ^^ ^^^ ' ; ,,,, ,,,,, ,,,,„, ac tablones 

<jue no reclamaban mas privilegios que los que para.so es un pnerto de mar fort.hcado. > P 

Haiase el Favor de Mendonar el Nombre de este Peri6dico Cuando .e Conteste i lo. Anuncio.. 



Una Planta Novel de Fuerza Motriz para 
una Hacienda 

En esta edad de colosales plantas de hidro- 
clectrical fuerza motriz son solamente por lo 
general que semcjantcs instalaciones que re- 
quiercn la soluci.m de dificiles problcmas <lc 
ingenieria mecanica. 6 .pie superan a to.las las 
demas en tamano las que dan lugar a comen- 
tarios. Como asunto dc contraste. el Electrical 
World menciona una planta de fuerza notriz y 
alumbrado elt^'tricos establecida en una ha- 
cienda de eanii)o en el interior del h^tado de 
Xueva Nm'I,. .|ih i> prohablemcnte la unica 
de su clase en lo> i'.Ma.los I'ni.los ; eiertamente 
s,,l,, poca- s.uKJantcs puede haber .m es .pie 
hav algunas. 

|',,r la haeieiKla .n cuestion corre un rio 
CUV a c-rrieiile e^ nonnalmente de unos 4,000 
l>ies euhieos .!.■ agua p<}r mimito, y a la ordla 
de M-mejante rio se construyo la singular 
lilaiita de fuerza motriz electric:.. I'na reprcsa 
,lcl tipo ,1c -tluio" de .V. pi.- de anchura se 
cwnstruvi. c..n muros de ^'oncret.. y Un ma.lero 
dc reten cu el suelo, y se cubri.J con tahla de 

I ,. , ,1.. 1 mlhrad'lS (Ic lO'ii^'ir silbfC Ulia 

])inabele <le 4 puiga.ia^ ot .-,( 

soli.la armazoii .le ma.kra .lura, la ultima 

encajonada x asegurada a los nuiros y soleras 



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INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



20 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



21 



rccibe la caida del agiia que corrc sobre la 
reprcsa e iinpide que mine los muros. Coino 
hasta la cabcccra del ajijua solo bay 4'/! pies, 
fue iiccesario itistalar una rueda comparativa- 
mente jjran<lc del tipo vertical, de 30 pulgadas, 
cuya potcncia sc fija en 17 V. caballos de fuerza 
por catla 1.^3 rcvnluciones por minuto. Un 
cable (Ic nlumio a descubierto corricndo sobre 
cnicenis numtados sobrcs postes de cedro 
erigidos a cada 100 pies, conduce la corriente 
elcctrica del gencrador a los cdificios de la 
hacicnfla, dislantcs 1,500 pics. El generador 
que tiene una capacidad de 12I2 kilowatts, 
a 250 volts y 1,100 revolucioncs por minuto 
recibc la fuerza mecanica desarrollada por la 
rueda hidraulica por medio de tin engranaje. 
Las parcdc's del pozo de la rueda, que tambien 
soportan el cano 6 conducto del agua, y a su 
vez la casa del generador son tambien fabri- 
cadas de concrete sobre buenos cimicntos de 
arena gruesa, estando forrado de maflera el 
fondo del pozo para impedir se socave. I^ 
planta lia estado ya unos cinco meses en 
cperaciijn nocbc y dia. sin atenderse mas que 
dos 6 trcs veces a la scmana, y sin regulador 
de ninguna clase. I'n aumento de agua de unas 
diez veces su caudal normal no protluce cambio 
aparcnte en el voltaje. Winte y cinco luces 
de una potencia <le 16 velas y 220 volts en la 
casa y 8 en el granero 6 henil dan tm alum- 
brado excelcnte. Un calentador de 400 watts, 
que ha reemplazado la acostumbrada estufa 
de carbon de piedra conserva una t^mperatura 
de 75 grados Fahrenheit en dos habitaciones 
de 16 por 13 por 71^ pies y 12 per 13 por 7^ 
pies respectivamente cuando la temperatura 
fuera esta a cero. Un motor de una fuerza 
de y'i caballo hacc funcionar una separadora 
para darle a una pesada cuenca dc separadora 
de nata y una piedra de molino, siendo nece- 
sario este comparativamente grande motor 
para darle a una pesada cuenca de suparadora 
una velocidad de unas 7,400 revolucioncs por 
minuto. Se proponen hacer todas las 
operaciones de la cocina con ese motor. 
asi conio aplicar su fuerza a totlas las maqui- 
nas de la hacienda a que se pueda aplicar, tan 
pronto como se hagan los necesarios cambios 
en la instalacion electrica. 

Esta planta novel ya ha atraido considera- 
bles pesquizas de parte de los hacendados 
progresitas, pues en muchas partes del pais 
se encuentran caidas y corrientes de agua que 
pueden suministrar una fuerza de diez a cin- 
cuenta caballos, dcMide se podrian instalar 



nlantas semejante a la descrita arriba. Se 
nota con interes que una pequena industria 
manufacturera sc ha establecido rccientemente 
en esas cercanias ; de manera que esta es una 
inesperada, auncjue tal vez exagerada ilustra- 
cion dc la idea de la "vuelta a la madre tierra," 
I)ara contrarrestar el inipulso hacia las ciu- 
dades. Esa instalacion les abre el camino de la 
elect ricidad a los hacendados para inducirlos a 
hacer del campo centres industrials al mismo 
tiempo que agricolas, aunque en pequena y 
modesta cscala. 



Convendon de los Manufactureros Ame- 
ricanos de Instrutnentos Agricolas 

A nuestros lectores de todos los paises le in- 
teresara saber lo que la Asociacion Nacional 
de Manufactures de Instrumentos y Vehiculos 
Agricolas Americanos estan tratando de Uevar 
a cabo con la organizacion de sus trabajos, 
y de consiguiente reproducircmus aqui dos 6 
tres de los mas imj)ortantes papeles que se 
leyeron en la decima tercera Convencion anual 
rccientemente celebrada en Chicago. 

Hay que tener entendido que esa Asociacion 
no cs cii scntido alguno de la palabra le que 
sc llama uii "'J'rust," para dictar los precios en 
lo mas minimo ; pero se com])one dc los princi- 
pals manufactureros de instrumentos y vehi- 
culos agricolas, tnanufactureros que venden 
sus productos por medio de negociantes a des- 
tajo y comerciantcs por mcnor, y el objeto de 
la Asociacion es fomentar los intereses del co- 
mcrcio y de esa industria [>nr todos los medio^ 
legalcs. 

El in forme de la Comision sobre el Comer- 
cio extranjero fue presentado por su presi- 
dcnte, Mr. E. E. Myers, de la firma de F. E. 
Myers & Bro., de Ashland, Ohio. U. S. A., 
y nuestros lectores se interesaran particidar 
mente en el contenido de este informe, pues 
demuestra la importancia que dan los fabri- 
cantes de instrumentos y vehiculos agricolas 
de los Estad'-s l'ni(li>> al comercio de exporta- 
ciini. VA intdinie dice asi; 

hifiirinc </(' 111 i\>iiiisi6ii suhrc cl Comercio 
lixtraujcro. 

Sr. Prcsidi'nic y Scnnrcs de la Comcticioti: 

El comercio extranjero esta tan intimamente 
aliado con el comercio domestico. (|ue nos es 
preciso crear mejores relaciones comerciales 
con los diversos paises extranjeros. Se ban 
estudiado nuestros informes anicriores, y han 



resultado ser instructivos. Desgraciadamente, 
cl informe del ultimo afio se presento dema- 
siado tarde y no se discutio como se esperaba. 
Tal impresic'm nos ha hecho su importancia, 
que no podemos hacer menos que referirnos a 
algunos de sus principales puntos, y con el 
(Icl)id(j respeto os incitamos a que con toda 
atencion los delibereis. 

I. a Ripublica de los Estados Unidos es la 
"mas jnvcn" entre las predominantes naciones 
de la tierra : !a mayor habilidad y vigor da la 
naci(')n y de ])aises extranjeros son nuestros 
inventores, nuestros manufactureros y nues- 
tros artesanos. Nuestros nunierosisimos ciu- 
dadanos de natividad extranjera recomicndan 
nuestros instrumentos agricolas, e instan a los 
comerciantcs de sus respectivas paises a que 
los compren. Nosotros debemos igualar de 
algun modo las condiciones y adoptar los mas 
amplios metodos que es posible, por medio de 
subvenciones 6 de otro modo, a fin de colocar- 
nos en posicion de podcr competir con otras 
naciones, y, hasta donde sea posible, transpor- 
tar nuestros productos con un costo mas bajo 
y bajo mejores condiciones dc lo corriente, a 
fin de alcanzar asi la suprcmacia industrial y 
comercial del mundo. America deberia cruzar 
los dos grandes oceatios, y conquistar. Los 
maravillosos y iiermanentes recursos del Con- 
tinente Occidental seguramente revolucionaran 
las condiciones comerciales. Xuestra fuerza y 
estacion en el alineamiento de las naciones ex- 
citan la envidia de las demas, y son el arbitro 
flel mundo. Los americanos podrian vivir y 
prosperar por muclios siglos con sus propios 
productos. Y mientras sea esto una verdad. 
y nosotros fieles a nosotros mismos. deberia- 
mos triunfar, como jKidemos hacerli>, en de- 
sarroll. I y expansion comercial. En un gran 
nnmero de nuestros mas antiguos Estados nos 
estamos transformando rapidamcnte de agri- 
cidtoros en industriales v comerciantcs. 

Estamos. no si'jIo a la cel>eza de las grandes 
naciones fabrilcs del mundo, sino que nuestra 
producciijn iguala la de Alemania, Francia y 
la (Iran Rretana combinadas. A la verdad, 
no necesitanius ya el proteccionismo oficial. 
Sin proteccion potlcmos competir con cualquier 
pais del mundo. Aunque el trabajo es barato 
en los paises extranjeros, no lo es para para et 
producto de ese trabajo. Si podemos dar 
nueve u ocho horas de trabajo al dia a nuestr(» 
artesanos y obtener los resultados que obtene- 
mos, ayudados por nuestros tratados de reci- 



procidad, ipor que hemos de continuar esa cano es tan vitalmente importante como la articulos de cierta hechura, por la razon de que 




proteccion ? 

Vuestro presidente, con las observaciones 
que ha hecho en los paises extranjeros, com- 
parando sus recursos y habilidad con los nues- 
tios, recomienda que entremos a competir con 



cuestion : tendrian que contender con competidores, y 

"i Que hemos de hacer, y estamos en posicion que esto no les deparia ninguna utilidad. No 

de ir a buscar debidamente el comercio ex- les cotizeis vuestros precious a personas des- 

tranjero?'' conocidas. Las casas extranjeras consideran 

Incitamos vuestra seria deliberacion sobre semejante metodo parecido al de las casas de 

cualquiera otra nacion, y tambien recomienda ^^^^ particular. No intenteis, en ningunas cir- catalogo. Escribid pidiendo nuevos informes 

que reconstruyamos nuestras scondicione cunstancias, distribuir vuestros pro<luctos en sobre lo ijue se nccesita, y en el interin tratad 



arancelarias. 

Las naciones del mundo civilizado necesitan 
los productos de nuestras fabricas por su reco- 
nocida superioridad y construccion. El mer- 
cado de articulos manufacturados en paises 
extranjeros pasa de u4,ooo,ooo. La produc- 
cion de las fabricas de este pais ha aumentado 
con tres veces mayor rapidez que su poblacion. 
Las posibilidades de los Estados Unidos jamas 
se han realizado tan completamente. Tene- 
mos los mas grandes depositos de carbon de 
piedra y de gas del mundo para transforman el 
material en el articulo acabado. Tenemos el 
mayor capital para la produccion en gran 
escala; la mejor maquinaria, mas ingeniosos 
mecanicos, los mas inteligentes y jirosperos 
hombres de negocios, y el mundo entero es 
nuestro mercado. Nuestra demanda y nuestro 
asombroso desarrollo y nuestro buen exito no 
se pueden dcscribir dentro dc los limites de un 
breve informe. Dudamos que se haya calcu- 
lado con exactitud su significacion y su valor 
6 que hayamos sondeado los misteriosos me- 
dics de la Providencia. Tenemos la esperanza 
de que esta breve relacion de nuestro desa- 
rrollo industrial habra movido a cada uno de 
los miembros de la Convencon. Si vosotros 
comprendeis, como espero que podeis y que- 
reis bajo el punto de vista de nuestro patri- 
monio y de nuestras oportunidades, no necesi- 
tareis mas informacion. Asi es que no os dare- 
mos los datos estadisticos. Nuestro objeto en 
este informe es evocar inspiracion, y entonce.s 
vuestro propio criterio os dira cualcs son las 
cuestiones vitalcs, y lo que proporcionan los 
mercados extranjeros. 

Detras de la demanda generalincnte en cre- 
cimiento tenemos material, obreros y capital 
sin igual en nuestro globo, y una creciente re- 



un pais extranjero, si no teneis la capacidad y dc saber quiems son lus compradores y su 

el capital, ni planes bien difinidos, dc modo l)osici()n. Tencd a vuestros parroquianos al 

que podais depender de los compradores ex- corriente sobre los cambios y mejorainientos 

tranjeros, y que estos os consideren dignos dc iiltimamente introducidos. Y en vez de subs- 

confianza, pues el comprador extranjero dis- tituirlos, i)reguntad, ix>r el cable si es nece- 

tante es preciso que confie en nosotros para 'iario. si inieden usar u no los instrumentos coii 

avenirse con nuestro sistema de: "una remesa '"^ cambios introducidos, Substitucion de los 

<lel importe con el pedido, y debeis comprar- articulos pedidos se ha llevado a cabo tan fre- 

nos a nosotros, etc," Os recomendamos un cuentemente, que los compradores extranjeros 

tratamiento mas liberal de los parroquianos, '''U' tenido algunas veces que protestar ante 

reciprocidad. y lat acumulacion de datos esta- nuestros Consules, y muchas perdidas se han 

disticos fidedignos. Esto significa trabajo, des- sufrido por no haber querido los compradores 

vio y capital; significa que dediqueis todo. o rccibir la mercancia. Esto ha tendido mucho a 

por lo menos una gran i)arte de vuestro es- crear una desconfianza entre el manufacturero 

tablecimiento al comercio con el extranjero, y americano y cl comprador extranjero. Tratad 

que entreis en la arena con la determinacion de cuidadosanuntc de evitar los errores en el 
veneer. Desgraciadamente muy pocos em- 
prendieron el negocio del modo debido. 
Algunos que embracaron sus productos 
desaccrtadamente se vieron obligados a hacer 

viajes personales para salvar sus cuentas, y, cimstancia trateis de deshacersos de mercancias 

afortunadamente despertaron al conocimiento anticuadas 6 malamente fabricadas. 6 de repu- 

de las necesidades y posibilidades. La propo- tacion desconociila. 



emi)a<|uc 6 las avcrias en el transporte de la 
mercancia, y ved que to«kis los articulos scan 
do hunea cali<lad, esmeradamente fabricados y 
(pie se cmbarquen a tienqx). En ningima cir- 



sicion se OS presenta : si decidid ir a buscar ese 
comercio, id bajo uu plan bien dcfinido; cs 
decir, estudiad la situation y examinad voso 
tros mismos el terreno, de manera que acre 
diteis, en vez dc desacreditar la nacion, Xo 
copieis los viejos y anticuados instrumentos de 
labranza, simplemente para suministrar los 
que han estado comprando ya. Los comerci- 
antcs de todo el mundo se dirijen al manufac- 
turero americano en busca de algo mejor que 
lo que antes tenian para hacer el mismo tia 
bajo, Lo i|uc del)eis saber es para qne clase di- 
trabajo se necesita el instrumento o apero, v 
hiego estar absolutamento segurcs de ipie hari 
bien esc trabajo, 

W ocuparnos del asunto debemos entender 



Favorables conmentarios hizo im presidente 
.interior sobre una resolucion presentada por 
vnestro presidente y que fue adoptada unani- 
inente, y tiene por objeto hacer que los manu- 
factureros competidores, por su propio interes 
prohiban el embarque dc los productos conoci- 
dos cunio inferiorcs, no de construccion mo- 
derna, y de malos materiales. El manufac- 
turero (|iie hare t'-to. alin^.tnilii dc la confianza 
del compradt)r deberia ser objeto dc odio. 
Debemos iiispirar confianza. teniendo el irias 
escrupuloso cuidado, no solo dc suminstrar una 
mercancia de los nieritos que le atribuimos, 
>ino exactemente lo que se pide. y satisfaciend6 
los dcseos de cotriprador, sin atender a losre- 
(|uerimientos de nuestros parroquianos dc este 
pais. 



Una investigacion personal y una madura 



V considerar la naturaleza de la fuerza aiii 

putacion ,K>r nuestros triunfos mecanicos e mal que tienen para hacer funcionar los instru 

industriales. La cuestion que teneis que resol- ^^^^^^ Cuando se Uegue a este punto. pre 

ver es esta : parad esmeradas y detalladas descrijjcionnes reflexion me prueba concluyentemente que no 

"iQuereis ganar el comercio extranjero, y en el idioma del comprador. El cotizarles los podemos imponer nuestros metodos nacionales 

estais dispuestos a apoyar nuestra posicion precios indistintamcnte a todos los compra- a los diversos paises extranjeros, como no 

tal como la hemos bosquejado.''" dores extranjeros ha hecho que algimas casas podriamos obligarlos .a aceptar nuestra moneda 

Ningun asunto ante el manufacturero ameri- importadoras importantes hayan rehusado corriente. No trateis de hollar las antiguas 



H^tfase el Fa^vor de Mencionar el Nombre de este Peri6dico Cuando le Contette i^ lot Anundot. 



H^aie el Tavor de Mencionar el Nombre de este Peri6dko Cuando le Conteste A los Anunciot. 



22 



Export Implement Age 



tradicinncs > costumhrf^. Os rccomendamos y pueda liahlarlos corriciitcincnte. Debe con- pasatiempos, y los niiembros y sus sefioras sa- 

que cstudici- \ .-> fainiliarizeis con los infor- occr lambicn pcrfectamcnie las leycs comerci- licron a visitar los objetos mas interesantes de 

nu^ consulaics ^<>\>vv cl conicrcio, los cxtrac- ales hritanicas relati%'as a los cnibarqucs, docu- la ciudad. participaron cii excursiones, fueron a 

tos csia(lisiicn.>. la> rclacionos cuinercialcs, las iiunuis ncijociablcs, Iclras (k- cainbio, pagares, los tcalros. y se terminaruii los procedimientos 

tablas sicoinicas del conicrcio. precios, etc. coiitratos para el transporlc de niercancias, con un .t,^ran banquete. 



Estai? faniiciarizado con los mas importan- scfjuros maritimos. etc. 
tes niercad(»s extraiijeros y siis condicione.=; .\lemania tambien tiene un cnrso de estudios 

gencrales. NOs referimos re>])etiiosamente al para sus reprcsentantcs en cse servicio. 

Departaniento <le (.'oniercio. Tratados, Precios Xo se puede nejj^ar el hecho de (|ue este pais 

Aduanas, v Kclaciones de Reciprocidad con donde sirve tan bieu coino un natnral, adcmas 

los paises extraiijero.s, especialmcntc con Cuba, del francts y el iuLjle^. 

las Islas Filipinas. Australia. Alemaiiia. Rusia p-,, ,,v;,,y cstabamos a la cola en la lista de las 

y Krancia. cuatro i^randes nacionnes manufactureras, a 

I'n notable i)aso ])ara el mejoramicnto de- saljer: Inj^laterra, Francia, Alemania y los 

nnestro servicio consular -e dio cuando el Kstad..> Iniilo-,. C'uarenta y cinco anos des- 

Prcsidcnte 1\ mm veil en un mensaje especial pues eMamos a la cabcza de la lista: nuestra 

al Conj^neso : ecomend.) el nombramiento de jirodnccion fabril iguala lioy la de las otras 

seis agentes csiKJciales del Dcpartamento de tres grandcs naciones combinadas. 
F.stado. con el rango diplomatico <le "Agrega- Tara mantener nuestra jKisicion y anmcntar 

dos Comcrciales." cligiendolos preferentcmcnte propoicionalmente tcncmos (pie dirigirnos a los 

entre los Consules. para ser asignados, sujetos paises del .\sia. Africa, Sud y Centre America 

a ser transferidos. bajo la direccion del Secrc- y Australia, paises cpie no ban dcsarrollado to- 

tario de Estado. y enviados al extranjero a lia- davi.i mi industria fabril. 

cer un estudio U la- condiciones existentes en Kos inclinamos a incitar al Congrcso a que 

los paises extranieros. con el objeto de preparar .-.tieiida a la ncccsidad de fonientar la construe 



Sierras sin Dientes 

Segun cl ])eri6dico Cosmos cl uso de discos 
de liierro girando con gran velcKidad, pero 
sin dientes en los filos para aserrar metal se 
lia hecbo muy comi'm en los talleres. Entre 
otras fabricas en (|uc se emplean esas sierras 
sin dientes se cuentan los grandes talleres de 
liacer cafiones <le Kriipp, donde las gruesas 
planchas para acorazar buqnes se cortan 
algimas vcces de esta manera. El proce- 
dimicnto no es nuevo, .\lla por los aiios de 
1824 Darrier y Coll.ulon. de Ginebra, Suiza, 
hicieron un exi)erimento con veloccs discos 
giratorios de bierro. y ballaron (pie cuando un 
disco de sictc pulgadas de diametro giraba 
con una vclocidad peri feral de 10 inetros por 
scgundo, podia cortar con un utens^lio de acero 
apreiatlo contra el ; ])crc) se avcrio el utensilio 
de acero. Con una vclocidad de ^lO inctros 



\i'<T segundo ])uede cortar el disco de bierro 

para cl I)ep;irtaniento de ConuToio y Trabajo ciijn de biuincs americanos. (i al mcnos la po- ],^^;,^ ^\ cimrzii v la agata. 

informcs sobie el r. murcio y nianutacturas, y sesion de buipics por ciudadanos americanos. 

a visitar lo- v'on>ula.los para examinar '•us X,, -^ piu-de negar el becbu de que estac pais AMERICAN LUMBER IN EUROPE 

no M- e-ta ai)rovecbando de la parte del comer- luiropt-an consumers ..I lumber can rely 

cio ixiLinjero i|ue le eorre>i)onde. Xo pode- upon prompt sbipmcnts of lumber during 1907. 

iiio- (hjnr lie instart a niuMP (- reiiiescntante a It i'- estimated tbat witliin six years or so 

, I . .,,„,.,- , ., ,, , i.-,,r.i„ „,•,^,,^,•- t'l'^ imsincss bas doubled and prices bave ad- 

<pie ileilKpien mayor ateneiun \ iKigaii in.iyn- 1 

^■s|\ur/ii- en c-te a-unto. \ue>tra cai)acidai! 

faliril ha creeido enornu-nte. justiticamlo la 



trabajos y >u^erir al Departainente de j,>tado 
aquellos cainbio> (|ue tieiidan al mejuramieiito 
y efieaeia del servicio 

1. -- - ..-rule- \;in a cubrir inia i^ran exteii- 
si('>n de territorio. I 'no tie cllo', ira a I"S 
Estados del I'.alkan. Alemania. Suiza, Ru-ia. 



\aneed materially. It bas been only witbin 
the last five vrar> that Smitbern pine and 
h.inlwood ixpiirters have become educated to 



V 



lai-es de la l"*uropa Septentrional, considor.ieii'.n (lue eon A mayor res|)eto soliei- x\w needs ol tbe l*,uropi.-an*markets, and c<w- 



( >t!. . a I'ranei.i. It:dia. Portugal, F.spafia y 
otros i.ai>e> en las costas del Mediterraneo; el 
tcrccro a la Grp.n Brctana y sus dipeixleiuias ; 
el i-itarto a McMeo. I'uitrn Aiiuriea. la- Antil- 
las V Su<l Aiiieriea: el (piinto al Asia, i)ar- 
ticularmente a la Rn>ia .\siatie;i, China y el 
lapon. V el -ixi.i sr re-ervara para -erviei" 
especial \ nii-ione- particul.ire- a cvialqiiiera 
parte del niundo. 

Xucstros represeiit.iute- en el servicio con- 
sular estaii reconociilus en la> naciones extran- 
ieras coino aueiiu- conu-reiale-. y de eon-i- 
guiente no e^ inoporturo referirnos a(|ui a Ifis 
requisitos ncce>arios para obiencr el nombra- 
miento para la (irau I'.relana. 

1'.- ah-ohitamente necesario (pie e-tc com- 
prcnda perfcctamente bieu el Wlcnia ingles. I'.l 
candidato debc tamliien bahlar el f ranees, otro 
idioma |«>r lo menus; el espanol (j el alcman, 



se(]uently have been al)le to i>lace tbeir products 
advantageously to themselves. ,ind at the same 
time to assure ,1 ^r^'wiuL; ileniand t'or them 
in the principal llriii>h and continental centers 
of distribution. 

.\nother factor is the im])rovement in tbe 
finances of tbe millmen operating in tbe South- 
ern States. I'ive years ago. a great number 
if small mills, and in fact many of tbe larger 



lanios cu (.ste infornie de vuestra Comissiuu. 
Re>])etui i-aniente lo Muneto. 

!•". I-*. Myer-. 1 'residente. 

1 ,a A>' Ki.ieioii (liseiiti<i eon ^'ran intercs la 

eue-tion de los arancclr- I'.l p.arecer general 

de lo- miembros fue i|ue debian rcajustarse los 

derecho- arancelarios. y especialmenle los (]ue 

afectan el a.ero v el bierro. Se adopto la mills, were operating uixni small cajHtal. Xat 

, . urallv thi\ were forced to sell their i)roduct, al- 

s.gmenle re-ohieion: ,,,^^^^- .^^ jj j^.,-^ ,,,^. ^.,^^. ,-,,^ j,^^. ^^^^^ ^^-^^^^ 

Sb: KI-.Sri'.I.\ !•■. : Due estamos en favor de t'^*-'.^' '•''^"^*1 S^-t- 'I'l^'y had to realize on their 

tnitput at once in order to keep L^oing. 
la pronta revision de los aranceles. adoptandose -pi,;, eondition was thoroughly well undcr- 

la- niedid.'is que nieno- pertnhaeiou cause en stood hy importers, who. ])rofiting by tbe op- 

, . r ■' 1 I ■ .. „ i„ portunitv to dictate in regard to prices, im- 

la ])risente enndieion de los ncgoeios. y por la ' ■ ^^ . . 1 ' 

]>rtsente -e instruve a la Coniisii'm I'.jecutiva 
ipie aetue de eonformidad eon esta Resolucii'tii. 
l.,i Couvenrio!) oeiipi'i tres dias en Chicago, 
i>\en<lo jus iniiirnies pre^^ent.ados. \- discuticiido 
cuestiones de intercs ruinerri.al. 



C 



proved it to the fullest extent. The result was 
tbat selling prices were fixed ;it such a narrow 
margin alxne actual cost of pnMluction and 
delivery that the trade was not very profitable, 
and held no great encouragement to the manu- 
facturers. With the advancement of domestic 
prices and consccpient larger profits, however, 
tbe millmen began to get in better shape for 
Se proveyi) liiego un esuurado iirograma de the handling of their lumber. 




Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 

NUR PVK'S AUSLAND BBSTIilMT. 

Bin unabbtnriKes Blatt. das ausschliesslich dem Exporthandel 

in landwirtschaftlichen Maschinen. Pumpen. Wind- 

motoren and sammtlichen Anikeln der Land- 

und Milchwirtschaft gewidmet iat. 



Abonnbmrnts-Preis : 
Fftr eln Jahr, portofrei - - . . , Mk. 4.^5 

Gelder lionnen per Tratteauf New York oder durch inter- 
nationale Postaoweisung iibersandt werden. 

WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHBUS 

1010 Arch Street, 

Phlladeipkia, Pa., Vcretnlgte Staatcn von Noitl-Ainarlkn. 

Von denclben Verlacaanstalt werden ferner herausgegeben- 

•"The Implemenl Age rhe American Fertilizer." "The 

Carriage Monthly" uod "Tbe Vehicle Dealer." 

Terlagsrecht (copyright) vou Ware Broa. Co., 1906. 



Band XV. Philadelphia, Vercinigte Staaten, Doe. 1906. No. 3 



Im Firmenverzeichnis fiir Kaufer das im ersten 
Theil dieses Blattes wledergegeben ist, werden 
ansere geehrten Leser die betreffenden Waaren- 
artikel in deutscher 5prache wiedergegelien 
flnden. Es geschieht dies um ihnen die Mog- 
lichlceit zu geben, mit unseren Inserenten leiciiter 
korrespondiren zu koonea. 



Der amerikanische, Fabrikant landwirt- 
schaftlicher Cerate und Maschinen hat seit 
langem bereits ausfindig gemacht. was die 
wirklich wichtigen An forderungen auswarti- 
ger Lander ist mit Bezugnahme auf die Land- 
wirtschaft und alles was zur event Branche 
gehort. Landwirtschaftliche Cerate welche in 
Amerika fiir den Export konstruht sind, 
passen sich bestens jedein I^ndesteile an fiir 
den sie eigens gebaut worden sind. 



Die Basis des tfandels 

Amerikanische Fabrikanten landwirtschaft- 
licher Cerathe und Fahrzeuge suchen in siid- 
amerikanischen und anderweitigen Landem 
ausgedehntere Handelsbeziehungen, und zwar 
auf die Verdienste ihrer Waaren, event, auf 
ihre Fahigkeit gestiitzt den Anforderungen 
der Handelswelt und der landwirthschaft- 
lichen Cemeinwesen auf mehr wirtschaftlicher 
Basis wie irgend andere Konkurrenten es voll- 
bringen, geniigen zu konnen. Wenn nicht 
sonderartige Umstande vorherrschen, soliten 
Kaufer ihre Waaren auf den billigsten Mark- 
ten einkaufen, jedoch stets das Verdienst und 
die Qualitat der W'aare nicht ausser Acht 
lassend. 



Satfen ohne Zahne 

Dem "Kosmos" zufolge, ist die Anwendung 
von eisemen Kreisscheiben, welche mit grosser 
Schnelligkeit in Bewegung gesetzt werden 
konnen, zum Sagen des Metalls in vielen Fabri- 



ken jetzt zur Awendung gebracht worden. 
Diese Sagen haben keine Ziihne an den Ran- 
dern um das Metall durchzusagen. Zu den 
vielen Maschinenwerkstatten wo diese zahn- 
losen sagen bereits eingefiihrt worden sind, 
gehort die beriihmte Krupp'sche Kanonenfa- 
brik, wo zuweilen sogar Stahlplatten in der 
Weise geschnitten werden. Dieser Prozess ist 
keinesw«gs neu. So weit zuriick als 1824 
versuchten bereits Darrier und Colladon, in 
Genf, mit rotirenden Eisenscheiben Experi- 
mente anzustellen. Sie fanden, dass wenn eine 
im Durchmesser siebenzoUige Scheibc mit 
peripheraler Schnelligkit zehn iMeilen die 
Sekunde getrieben wurde, das betreffende 
Stahlhandwerkzeug noch grossere Leistungs- 
fiihigkcit ausiiben diirfte, dass das^Werkzeug, 
jedoch, wenn es dagegengestemmt vvird, 
beschjidigt werden miisse. Bei einer sechzig 
Meter die Sekunde erzielenden Schnelligkeit 
.sei die Fjsenscheibe sogar imstande Quartz 
und Agat zu schneiden. 



Papier aus Baumwolle 

Baumwollenpapier gehort zu den allcr- 
neuesten Erfindungen. Der Siiden ver- 
sichcrt uns, dass allerlei Arten Papier von 
flen besten Leinewandsorten bis zur gewohn- 
lichsten Art, aus Baumwollenhalmen herge- 
stell werden kann. Und ausser diesen \'arie- 
taten von Nebenprodukten konnen daraus audi 
Artikel wie Alkohol, Stick.stoff, Materialien 
fiir Schiessbaumwolle und rauchloses Pulver 
in lohnenden Quamitaten fabrizirt werden. 
Es ist berechnet worden, dass auf einem ein- 
zigen Morgen Landes, der nur einen Ballen 
Baumwolle protluzirt, wenigstens eine Ton 
Halme zusanimengelesen werden kann. Nach 
solcher Berechnungsbasis kann jahrlich aus 
dieser neuen Industrie eine Masse von etwa 
10 bis 12 Miliionen Tons Rohmaterial er- 
zielt. werdai, Es diirfte nicht allein den 
crforderlichen inlandischen Bedarf vollkom- 
nien decken, sondem material zur Ceniige 
abwerfen tun Stoff cxler Lumpenbrei, event. 
v6rarbeitetes Produkt ins Ausland versenden 
zu konnen. Das Hauptmaterial woraus heute 
Papier verarbeitet wird, wird vorzugsweise 
aus der Fichte gewonnen die jahrlich, jedoch, 
in Anbetracht der Walderentlecrung und der 
hohen Preise die fiir diese Holzgattung ver- 
langt wird, fast unerschwinglich .scheint. Auch 
oflFeriren die Markte anderen Cebrauch fiir 
dieses Material. Die Verwertung eines 
Abfallsproduktes wie das der Baumwollen- 
halme in Papier verarbeitet. diirfte sich 
unzweifelhaft als ungewohnlicher Vorteil fiir's 
ganze Land erweisen. 



Konvention amerikanischer Fabrikanten 
von Geraten 

Unsere Leser in alien Landem werden mit 
Interesse vernehmen, was die "National Asso- 
ciation of Agricultural Implement and Vehicle 
Manufacturers" (Die National Vereinigung 
s'on Fabrikanten landwirtschaftlicher Cerathe 
und F^ahrzeuge) durch Organisationsarbeit 
zu erreichen sucht, und wir woUen deshalb 
zwei oder drei V'ortrage mitteilen, welche 
auf der kiirzlich in Chicago gehaltenen Kon- 
vention verlesen warden. 

Es muss verstanden sein, dass die Associa- 
tion in keinem Sinne des Wortes ein Trust ist, 
(jder dass sie in der geringsten Weise die 
Preise zu kontrolliren such, sondem dass sie 
sich aus den hervorragendsten Fabrikanten 
von landwirtschaftlichen Ceraten-und Wagen- 
Fabrikanten, welche ihre Fabrikate durch 
"Jobbers"' und Klcinhandler in den Markt 
bringen, ziisammensetzt ; und dass der Zweck 
iler Association der ist, die besten Interessen 
des Geschaftes in jeder legitiinen Weise zu 
fordem. 

Der Bericht des Kommittees fiir auslandi- 
schen H-andel wurde durch den \'orsitzenden, 
Ilerrn F. E. Myers, der von der Firma F. E. 
Myers & Bros., Ashland, Ohio, U. S. A., un- 
lerbreitet, und unsere Leser werden in diesem 
Berich ein besonderes Interesse nehmen, da 
er die Wichtigkeit demonstrirt, welche dem 
Auslandhandel von den Fabrikanten von land- 
wirtschaftlichen Geraten und Fuhrwerkcn in 
den \'creinigten Staaten beigemessen wird. 
Der Bericht laiftet folgendermassen : 

Berichte des Kommittees fur ausiandlschen 
Handel 

Herr Prasidcnt und meine Herren im Kon- 
vent ! 

"Der Auslandhandel ist so eng mit dem 
Inlandhandel verbundAi, dass wir bessere 
Handelsbeziehungen mit den verschiedencn 
Liindern des Auslandes schaflFen miissen. 
L'nsere friiheren Berichte waren belehrend 
und wurden studirt. Ungliicklicherweise aber 
wurde der letztjahrige Bericht spat ausgege- 
ben und er wurde auch nicht besprochen, wie 
man es erwartet hatte. Uns ist die Wichtig- 
keit der Hinweisung auf e'inige der Haupt- 
ziige zu Gemiite gefiihrt worden, und wir 
ersuchen mit allem Respekt um Ihre sorg- 
faltige Erwagung. 

"EHe Ver. Staaten sind die jiingste unter 
den herrschenden Nationen der Welt. Unsere 
rahlreichen im Auslande gcborenen Mitbiir- 



Hi^ase el Favor de Mendonar el Nombre de este Peii6dico Cuando se Conteste i los Aaundob 



Es %Hrd gebeten. sich bei eventueUer Beantwortuntf in diesem Blatte enthaltener Anzei^en auf diese Zettschrift beziehen zu woUen. 



22 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



23 



tradicioiu-s n r. -luinlirt^. t )s rccoincn(l:inii)> y i,iic<l;i lial>larl(is c.nrii-ntciiu'iitc. IKhc roii- pasaliompos. y los micml)r..s y sus .^cfinras sa- 

t|\ic cstu.lin- \ ..> fainiliarizcis cun los iniur .kap tainbini |)iilVclanH-mi' las lives coimrci- licn.n a visitar los objctos mas intcresantes tie 

ims cniisulan-. >,.\)vv d coiiU'icio. los cxtrac- aU s hiit.niioas n-lalivas a los cinhan|ucs, docu- la ciudad. parliciparon en cxcursioncs, fucron a 

tos estadi>iii. -. !.i> iilacionc-^ conierciak's. las nuiito. iie<jocial>ks, ktras dr camlii«>, paj^'arr-, los tcalms. y sc icnniiiaron los procediinicntos 

tahlas .sifiiptic,i> del fdmi. rein, pivcius, cif. rtmiralos para el iran-|Hiric dc niercancias, r<ni 1111 ^nrn 1>an(|iu'le. 

Kslais )":innciari/ad., O'U l< - nia- inip..naii- -'•■.unn- maritinio^. etc. 
tcs inc'rca<lii^ i \lranui>is \ vu-. ri iiidicioiif, AKiiiania laiiiliim liiiii' un rin --n dr rstudios 

gfiKTaU's. Nii-. rtl\ riiiii IS ii.-|pilni)s;inu-nto al par;' -tis rrpris(.'niaiili'S vu cm' sirxicin. 

D<.-i)artaiin.-nti' ik- C'nnurri.i, Trata'lns. | 'rocio> X., ■-.■ piifik- lUjL^ar il IutIm di <[V.c v-\v ji.-ns 

Adiianas. v KilariMias dc Riciprncidad luii dondc sirvc Ian liicn I'oiiio iiii natural. adiiiia< 

los ])ai>t.s r\trunurt», optciainKnto c>>u Cnha, del franos y v.1 inL;l( -. 

la- Islas I-'ilipmas. Au-tralia. Akniania. UuMa |.-„ iSi c Lsi;il,ani. .s a la i.>la en la lisia dc las 

y J rancia. cuairn L;rin<ks nacinnni-s niannlaciunras. a 
L'n notal)]. pas,, j.ara il nuinraniirniM dc- •-akcr : Ini^laurra. i'rann,i. Akniania y li'- 

niicstro scrvu-i,. cnsular -c <h<> cuandu cl I-.>i;i.!m- rnid..^. rn.in-nia y cinco ani>s .Ics- 

I'rcsidcnic k H s, vclt en un nun~.iic especial l)nes rstann.s .1 la eal)i/a de la lisla : nncstra 

al l'.,n-re-.<, ;rc..niend.. el n. .iiil.rauuento dc |n-i "huci/.n I'.iliril i-nal.a h<v l;i dc las ,,tra- 

sci- ;iu. nie~ i -pecialc- .k-l I )cpartamcnl. • ile nes ^raiidcs nacinnc- c inikinadas. 

Kslado. e,,n el ra.n-.. .lipl.Mnatio. de "Ai^re-a- I'ar.i niantener nucsira i..,sieh,n \ aunientar 

(los Conierci.ile-;' cli-iendi'l's prelerentcnientc pr..p.,rei, rn.dmente icneni,,- .[uc dinL;irni>s a ],.- 

cntrc h-- i^'un^ule-. jiara -cv asi-nad..-, -.uiet-s ibises dJ \m 1. Ai'ri.-a. Slid y C'eiitr,. America 

a --cr trail-fen. 1'.-. l,a|,i la dircccH>n del Secrc- v Aiisirali.i, pai-e- ipie m . lum dcsarn .llado tn- 

,la\ 1,1 -u iiidii-tria lahril. 

.\i,- iiulinann '> a ineitar al (.'oniiTix , a ipie 



tarin dc l',-t.'id-., y eiuiad,'- al exiranicm a lia- 

Ccr nn csUldi" 'le las (■, .udici, ,ne- rxistrmi's I'll 

lc»pai-e- 

para el 1 k p.ir:a:;A m, > dc (.■niiierci,! y 'i'raliajo 

inldrnu's s.ihr,' el ciiiurcin \ nuniiilaclnras. y 

suladi'- ]iara e\aininar s\is \,, ^,. piiede iics^ar el licelii' de ipic (■••lae jiais 



c, ,11 cl , ,lii(_|i > ,le preparar ;.ticiiila .1 la in-ee-id,iil de ii'ineiitar la cnnstnie- 

iiin ,1c lini|iie-. atneneaiii is. n al iiK'nns I:i pi, 
i-iiiii ,], lni<|iics pur cindadaitiis anuricaii">- 



Sierras sin Dientes 

Sc^nn el pciii'idico {\>miios cl nso do discos 

<k' liicrro L^irandi) cmi ijran vdncidad, pero 

sill dieiiU's en Ins iili,s para a-errar metal so 

lia lu'cliii niuy cninnn en Ins tallcres. I'.ntro 

iitras f.ihrica- en ifuc si- iniplean csas sierras 

sin dicnies s^. cncntan l,i- ^randes i.dlercs de 

liaccr cinniK's dc Knipf^. dondc la- -mesas 

planchas ]iara acorazar Imipics s, c(>rtan 

alt;nnas \cces dc esta m.'mcra. Id proce- 

dimiciun nil es miexn. Alia jtnr in- afin^ dc- 

i,'^J4 harrier v ("nll.'idnn. de <iinciira. Suiza, 

hicicrnii nn cxperimeiiin cnn \clnccs discos 

i^iratnii, ,s lie hierm. \ hallamn ipic cuando un 

discn di- -iitc |iiili:,idas di' diamctm ^iralia 

i.'i.n una vclneidad )icril\r;d dc 10 iiietrns pi if 

^c-iiiii|n, pnilia eniiar i-nn 1111 uteiisdin iK' .accro 

apretadn c,,ntr.a 1 1 ; pir, 1 -e aeerin el lUen-ilio 

ik' acein. t'nn una \elnciilad de <«i nutros 

)inr -e^iindn juicdc COftar cl iljsrn d,.- hicrro 

lia-!.i el ciKUVn \ la ,i'';ita. 



a visitar |ns v 1 ,1 

trak.ain- ^ -ii^i.rir ;d I >e]i.irta!iicntc de i.-Kn 



n< • -e 1 -la a]irn\ ecliaiidi 1 dc la parte del cnuicr 



AMERICAN LUMBER IN EUROPE 

I'.urniic.in ennsuiners nt Inmker can rely 



:ii|iielln- e.iinlii,,- i)ue tiiiidan .il incinraiiiitiitn ij,, txnanjern qiic le ci incspnndi.'. Xo pmh u])iin prompt sliipniciUs of lumber duriiii; \if)~. 



\ eiKM' la I'l 1 -I- r\ tcin. 

I !,.■- van .! ciilirir iina u;raii ( \tcii- 

si,,n lie I' -n;,, 1)11. I nn de idln- ira a In- 

I'-tailn, ,iel Uilkaii, Meiiiania. Sm/a. Kn-ia 



Hin- dejar dc iii-i.iri a iiiie-iin- rrpre-i nianic a 
i|iii ilc,|ii|ncn n'a\, r aieiuinii \ liai;an iiia\nia-- 
e-l'iur/n- ell e-ie a-iititn. Xue^tra cajiaeidad 
labril ha ereeidn enniniciite, jtistitic.aiidn la 



It is estimated that within six m.ii- nv so 
iliis business has doubled an<l prices li;i\e ad- 
\aiici'(l materially, Il has been only within 
the l.isi \\\\.- \iars that Southern piiu' ami 

liardwnn,! fvpnricrs lia\i- ln'cnnu' cducaied to 



\ ,11.,- pai-e- de la l-",nrnpa Se))ient n. ,nai. c.nsi.lrr.ieion <iiie cnn el in.a\nr rcspi.to s,,|ici- ,1,^. ,,^.^.,j,, ,,t the l-'.m-opian in.arkcts, and con- 
( Mr., a I'r.iiu-ia, ll.iHa, I'nnn-al, I'.-iKina > lain, ,- i u e-ie iiiinriiic i|c \ ucstr.a l'niiiiss„,ii. 



ni]..- pai-e- ell la- c,-ia- del Mi'diterramn : el 
lerccroa l,i I'liaii I'.rH.ina \ -ii- de]ien(lencia- ; 
el cnartn a Mexu-n, i,'iiiirn Xnuric.i. l.i- Aiilil- 
la- \ Slid Anicrici; el ((uiiitn :d A-ia. ii,ir- 



ticulani lellle .1 i.i 



Rn-ia \siaiiea. ( bin 



.1 



japnii, \ el -e\in se ri-i'r\ara p.ira -ei\ lem ,|tr,i-]|, ,- ai .incel.n'i, ,s, v i -pt ci.diiieiite los (pio 
especi.d \ luisinncs particularcs a ciial'iuier.i aieei.m cl aeem \ 



sii>nieiite resolncinii 



p.irte del innn,|o. 

Xne-trns reprcseiitanic- en el s^rvicio con- 
sular I -laii recnnnciilns on la- nacinncs i-xiran- )a prnuia re\i-ii,ii de In- .ir.uiceles, .-idnptandnsc. 
jera- cniMn aL;e!ite- i nnurei.'dt--, \ de cniisi 

uuieiitc iin (- iimpnrtm-o rct'erinin- .iipn a los p, prcscntc cnndici('in dc Ins ucl;, ,ci,,-, y pnr l.i 
rcqui'-itns nece-arins para nl 
miento para la (iran I'lretana 



sci|uenll\- have been able to place tluir pniducts 
.idvantaLiaonsh to tbeiiiscU rs. and at the s.uiie 
lime to as-nre .-i ,.^t, iw iii'_; demand I'or them 
in tilt- ]iriiici]>al I'lrin-li and continental centers 
,•1' di-iribution, 

\iioiJi,r factor is tlu- iiii|irn\ enu-iii in the 

tinaiices of ilu' niilliiien o|)eratiiiL; in the Soiith- 

irii Slate-. I'ivc year- ;i;;o. a Ljicat number 

lit sni;ill mills, .-uid in t;u-t main o| the lar.^er 

t-1 liierro. Sc ado]it(i la iiiill>. uerc o]n-r;iliiiL: iijion small capilal. Xat- 

urallx tlie\ were |nii-.-(l to s^-ll their product, al- 
most ,is n left the saw. for tlu- lic-t |)rices 
Sk kl-:sri-.l.\ l-' ; < tne e-iamos en lavor de '''*'^ ^'""1'' -^■'- ''''''^ l'-"*'' '" realize on their 



Kcspctuo-aiiK'nle lo -onieln. 

I".. I-'. Myer-. I 'rt -ideiile. 

1 .,-i Asociacinn iliscinio cnu L^ran interc'^ la 
•iH-slinii dc In- .ii-,mci-|es. l-'l parri er ^'-ni-ial 
k- In- mit-mbrns nie (juc ik-bi;in re.iiii-i.ii'sf los 



iiil]inl ,-il oiict.- in orik'r to keep ^.jnini. 
Tills cnnditiiiii \\,is tlinrnuijhlv well tinder- 



1- inedidas i|!u- nu-iins pcrtiibacioii cause en siood by im]iiirtcr-, who. jirotitiiiu; bv the op- 

)iortiiiiiiy In dici;ue m regard to prices, im- 

IHova-il it to ilk' fullest .■xtent. The result was 

rcquisitns nece-arins para nbteuer el noiubra- prt-ente si- instnive a la I'ninisii'm b'. ieciiii\ a t|,at selling; jirice-^ were lixcd .at such ;i n;irrow 

pie actne de cntiinnnidad con cst,-i Rc-nliuinu. mar-in .ibnvc actual cnst nf prnduction and 
, . . deliver\ that the trade w.is not verv profitable, 

b'.s ab-olutamcnte nccesario .pie e-lc coin- ka i. oiucncion ociipo tres dia^ en C IncaK". .„„i i,^.j,, ,„, ^,-^.,„ ,.,,0 ,ur,i.-cmciit to the nianu- 

irciida tH-rfcctainentc bieii cl 'dmna intjles. I'd oyeiido lus infonne- iiresi-mados, v discuticndo faclurers. With the ,iiK .-incemciit of doinestic 



prices and consi.(pU'ni l;trL;cr pintil-. linwcver, 
the millmcn be^ran tn mt in better shape for 
idiniiia iinr 1.. menu-; A cspaiiol n el aleman. Se pinvcyi'. hu--n un e-nu rado pro-raina de t|,^, liaiKllintr of their lumber. 



candidaio deb.- tambieu halilar d fr.ances. otfo cucstirmes fie inteies cnnurcird 




Export Implement Aqe 

NUR fur's ausland bestimmt. 

Ein unabhangiges Blatt. das ausscliliesslich dem Exporthandel 

in landwirtschattlichen Maschiiien, fumpen, Wind- 

motorcn urnl satnmtlichen Artikcin der Ljuid- 

und Milchwirtschaft gewidmet ist. 



Abonnbments-Preis : 
Fur ein Jahr, portofrei - - . . . Mk. 4.25 

Gelder Iconnen per Tratteauf New York oder durcit Inter- 
nationale Postanweisung ubersandt werden. 

WARE BROS. COMPANY 

PUBLISHBRS 

1010 Arch street, 

Philadelphia, Pa., Verelni|[te Staaten von Nonl-Amcrlka. 

Von derselben VerlagHan«taIt werden ferner herausKegeben 

•"The Implement Age" ■• 1 he American Hertilirer " "The 

Carriage Monthly" und "The Vehicle Dealer." 

Verlagsrecht (copyright) von Ware Bros. Co., 1906. 



Band XV. Philadelphia, VereinigteSUatcD.Oac. 1906. Mo. 3 

Im Firmenverzeichnis fiir Kiiufer das im erstea 
Theil dieses Blattes wiedergegeben ist, werden 
unsere geehrten Leser die betreffenden Waaren- 
artllcel in deutscher Spraclie wiedergegeben 
linden. Es geschieht dies um ihnen die Mog- 
llchkeit zu geben, mit unseren inserenten leichter 
korrespondiren zu kdnnen. 



Der amerikanische. Fabrikant landwirt- 
schaftlicher Gerjitc und Maschinen hat seit 
langem bercits ausfindi^ gemacht. was die 
wirklich wichtigen Anforderungen auswarti- 
gcr Lander ist niit Bezupnahme anf die Land- 
wirtschaft und alios was zur event. Branche 
gehort. Landw'irtschaftliche Geriitc welche in 
Amerika fiir den lixport konstruirt sind, 
passen sich bestens jedeui I^ndesteile an fiir 
den sic eigens gcbaut worden sind. 



Die Basts des tfnndels 

Amerikanische Fabrikaiiten landwirtschalt- 
licher (icrathe und Fahrzeuge suclien in siid- 
amerikanischen und anderweitigen Liindern 
ausgedchntere Handelsbezieliungen, und zwar 
auf die V'erdienste ihrcr Waaren, event, auf 
ihre F.ahigkcit gestiitzt ilcn .\nforderungcn 
<ler Handclswelt und der landwirthscliaft- 
lichen (icmcinwesen auf mohr wirtschaftlichcr 
iiasis wic irgcnd andore Konkurrentcn cs voll- 
bringen, geniigcn /u koiiuen. W enn nicht 
sonderartige Umstande vorherrschen, sollten 
Kiiufer ihre Waaren auf den billigsten Mark- 
ten einkaufcn, jedoch stets das Verdienst und 
<lie Qualitat der \\ aare nicht ausscr Acht 
lassend. 



ken jetzt zur Awcndung gebracht worden. 
Diesc Siigen haben keine Zahne an den Riin- 
dern uiu das Metall durchzusagcn. Zu den 
vielen Maschinenwerkstatten wo diese zahn- 
losen sagen bercits eingefiihrt worden sind, 
geluirt die heriihmte Krupp'sche Ixanonenfa- 
brik, wo zuweilen sogar Stahlplatten in der 
Weise geschnitten werden. Uieser Prozess ist 
keineswegs neu. So weit zuriick als iS_'4 
vcrsuchten bereits Darrier und CoUadon, in 
(".enf, mit rotirenden Eisenscheibcn Kxperi- 
mcntc anzustellen. Sie fanden. dass wenn einc 
im Durchmcsser siebenzdllige Schcibc mit 
perijjheralcr Schnelligkit zehn Meilen die 
Sekumle getrieben wurde. das betreftende 
Stahlhandwerkzeng nocli -rossere I.e'Stungs- 
fiihigkcit ausiiben diirfte, ilass das Wcrkzeug, 
jedfKli, wenn es dagegeiigestemmt wird. 
beschiidigt werden miisse. Rei einer sechzig 
Meter die Sekunde erziclenden Schnelligkeit 
sci die Kiscnscheibe sogar imstaiule (Juartz 
und Agat zu schneiden. 



Sagen ohne Zahne 

Dem "Kosmos" zufolge, ist die .Anwcndung 
von eisemen KreisscheilK'H, welche mit grosser 
Schnelligkcit in Hewegung gesetzt werden 
konnen, zum Sagen des Metalls in vielen Fabri- 



Papier aus Baumwolle 

l'.aunnvollcn])apier gelkirt zu den aller- 
ncuesten I"'rfindungen. Der Siiden ver- 
sichert uns, dass allerlei Arten I'apier von 
den besten Leinewandsorten bis zur gewdhn- 
licb.sten Art, aus liaunuvollenhalnien lierge- 
stell werden kann. I'nd ausser diesen \'arie- 
tjitcn von Xebcnprodukten kdnnen daraus auch 
Artikel wic Alkohol, Stickstoff, Materialien 
fiir Schiessbaumwolle und raucbloscs Pulver 
in lohnenden Quantitaten fabrizirt werden. 
Ks i.st berecbnet worden, tlass auf eineni ein 
zigen Morgen Landes, der nur cinen I'.allen 
ilauniwolle produzirt, wenigstcns cine Ton 
llalmc zusammengelcscn werden kann. Xach 
soldier ricrecbnungsbasis kann jabrlich aus 
diescr neueii Industrie cine Masse von etwa 
10 bis \2 Millioncn Tons Rohmaterial er- 
zielt. werden. Es durfte nicht allein d<ii 
erfordcrlichcn inljindiscbcn I'.cdarf vollkoni- 
mcn decken, sondcrn material zur (ieniige 
abwcrfen um Stoff o<ier Lumpenhrei, event. 
verarbeitetcs I'rodukt ins .\usland vcrsemUii 
zu kdnnen. Das Hauptmaterial woraus hctite 
Papier verarbeitet wird. win! vorzugsweise 
aus der Fichte gcwonnen die jahrUcli, jedoch. 
in .\nbetracht tier Waldercntlecrung und der 
hohcn Preise die fiir diesc Flolzgattung ver 
langt wird, fast uncrschwinglich .'^cheint. .\ueh 
offcriren die Miirkte andercii Ccbrauch fur 
dieses .Material. Die XcrwertuuL; eim - 
Abfallsproduktes wic das der llaumwollen- 
halmc in Papier verarbeitet, diirfte sich 
unzweifclhaft als imgewohnlicher \'orteil fiir's 
ganze I, ami erweiscn. 



Konvention amerikanischer Fabrikanten 
von Cerate n 

Unsere Leser in alien Landern werden mit 
Interessc vernehmen, was die "National Asso- 
ciation of .Agricultural Implement and Vehicle 
Manufacturers" ( Die National X'ereinigung 
von Fabrikanten landwirtschaftlicher Gcrathe 
und Fahrzeuge) durch ()rganisationsarl)cit 
zu erreichcn sucht, uinl wir woUen deshalb 
zwci oder drei \ ortriige niitteilen, welche 
auf der kiirzlich in Chicago gehaltenen Kon- 
vention verlesen wurden. 

F^s muss verstandcn scin, dass die Associa- 
tion in keineni Sinnc ilcs Wortes ein Trust ist, 
oder dass sic in der geringsten Weise die 
Preise zu kcjutroUiren such, son<lcrn dass sie 
sich aus den hervorragenilsten Fabrikanten 
von landwirtschafllichen Geraten-tin<l Wagen- 
I'^abrikaiUen, welche ihre Fabrikate durch 
■Jobbers ' und Kleinhiindler in tlen .\Iarkt 
bringeii, zusammensetzt ; und dass der Zweck 
der Association der ist, die besten hueressen 
des tlcschaftcs in jeder legitimen Weise zu 
fdnlcm. 

Der k.ericht des Kommittees fiir auslandi- 
scheii ll-andel wurde ilurch den \orsitzenden. 
Ilcrrn F. E. Myers, der von der Firma F. E. 
Myers & Bros., Ashland, Ohio, U. S. A., un- 
terbreitet, und unsere Leser werden in diesem 
Uerich ein besonderes Interesse nchmen, da 
er die Wichtigkeit demonstrirt, welche dem 
.\uslandhandcl von tlen Fabrikanten von land- 
wirtschaftlichen Geriiten und h'uhrwerkcn in 
lien \ ereinig'en Staaten beigcmesscn wird. 
Der k.ericht laiftet folgendermassen : 

Berichte de« Kommittees (ur auslandischen 
Handel 

Herr Prasideiil und meinc llerren im Kon- 
\ cm I 

Der Aiisl;indhandcl ist s, , t^n^ nut dem 
Inlandhandel verbuntltfn, dass wir hessere 
I landelslKzitbimyen mil den vcrschictlenen 
l.andcrn des .\iislaiides schafFcn mussen. 
I nscre fnihercn Ikrichte waren belehrend 
und wiirdcn studirt. L'ligliicklicherweisc aber 
wurde der letztjahrigc iiericht .spat ausgege- 
ben und er wurde auch nicht besprochen, wic 
man es erwartet hatte. Ins ist die Wichtig- 
keit der Hinweisung anf c'inige der Haupt- 
zugc zu Gemiite gcfuhrt worden, und wir 
ersuchen mit allem Respekt um Ihre sorg- 
faltige I'^rwagung. 

"Die \'er. Staaten sind die jiingste unter 
den herrschenden Nationen der Welt. I'nsere 
zahlreichen im Auslandc gclKirenen Mitbiir- 



H^gase el Favor de Mendonar el Nombre de este Peri6dico Cuando se Conteste i los Anundos. 



Ei wird gebeten. sich bei eventueller Beantwortung in diesem Blatte enthaltener Anzeigen auf diese Zeitschrift beziehen zu wollen. 



INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



24 



Export Implement Age 



^ 

J 



ger empfflilcn unsere Gerathe unci dringen 
bei ihren landsniannischcn Handlern darauf, 
dass dieselbcn sie kaufcn. Wir imisscn auf 
irgciKl cine W'tisc ein Glcichgcwicht schaffen 
und cine nrnglichst brcite Mothode von Sub- 
sidicn odcr andcren Hvilfsniitteln adoptiren, 
inn uns auf cnic UaMS zu bringcn, wclche es 
iins crmuglichcn wird, niit anderen Nationen 
zu kunknrriron und unscrc W'aaren so weit 
als niDglich und zu den nicdngsten Trans- 
portraten und Bedingungen versenden zu 
ki'.nnen und die konimcrziclle und industrielle 
Suprematic dcs Krdkreises zu erhalten. 
Amcrika solltc hcide Occane kreuzen und 
Sieger werdcn. Die gewaltigen wundcrbaren 
IlullMiiiclkii <k> wcstlichen Kontincnt wer- 
den sichcrlich in den kommerzicllcn \'erhalt- 
nisscn eine I'mwalzung hcrlKMfuhrcn. Unsere 
Starke und Stellung in der Reibc der Na- 
tionen ist der Gegcnstand dcs Neidcs anderer 
Nationen und der Scbiedsrichtcr der Welt. 
Die Anierikaner konnten auf Jahrhundertc 
hinaus von ilircn eigcnen Prmlnkten leben 
und dabei gedcihen. Und so langc dies wahr 
ist. und wir fiir uns selbet bleiben, solllen wir, 
wie wir es kiiuncn. in kommcrziellcr Expan- 
sion und Entwicklung trimpbiren. Wir ent- 
wickeln uns in ciner grossen Zabl der altesten 
Staaten in rapidcr Weise von landwirtbscbaft- 
licben zu konimcrziellcn Industrien. 

"Wir stehn nicht nur an der Spitze der 
grossen Industric-Nationen der Welt, son- 
dern unser Produkt kommt in Menge dem 
von Deutschland. Frankreicb und Grossbri- 
tannien zusammen gleicli. \\ ir bedurfen sich- 
erlicb keines hohen Schutzzolles. Wir konnen 
obnc Scbutz mit irgcnd einem Lande der 
Well in substantieller Weise konkurriren. 
\\ enn aucb die Arbeit im Auslande billig ist, 
so ist "^ie es doch nicbt angesichts der gelei- 
steten Arbeit. Wenn'wir unsere gcscbickten 
Arbeiter neun und zehn Stunden den Tag 
arbeitcn lassen und, wie wir cs thun, Resultate 
erzielen konnen, die durch Rcziprozitat und 
Vertrage unterstiitzi werdcn, weshalb soUten 
wir dann bei SchutzzoU bleiben ? 

"Ihr Vorsitzender, welcher Beobachtungen 
im Auslande gejnacht hat, empfiehlt nach 
einem Vergleiche mit unsercn Hulf.s<|uellen 
und unserer Fahigkeit, dass wir es mit irgend 
einer Nation aufnehmen, und empfiehlt femer 
eine Rekonstruktidh unserer Tarif Verhalt- 
nisse. 

Die civilisirten Nationen der Week verlan- 



gen das Produkt unserer Fabriken wegen 
ihrcr anerkannten Ubcrlegenheit und Kon- 
struktion. Der Markt fiir fabrizirte Waaren 
in auswiirtigcn Liindcrn beliiuft sich auf iiber 
vicr .MillidMcn Dollars. Die Produktion fabri- 
zirtcr W aarcn in unscrcm Lande hat dreimal 
so schndl zugcnonmicn, als die Bevolkerung. 
Die Mtigiichkcitcn der \er. Staaten haben sich 
nicnials in solchem Maasse dargethan in der 
ganzcn \\ clt sind wir die grosslcn Produccn — 
ten der hauplsachlichsten Industrie-Artikel. 
Wir habcn von aller Welt den grossten Vor- 
rath an Kohlcn und Gas, uni Rohstoffe in das 
feinste i'rodukt zu vcrwandeln. \\ ir besitzen 
den ausgicbigsten Vorrath an Kapital fiir 
(iross-Produktion, die beste Maschincrie, die 
gcnialstcn .\rbcitcr, die erfulgreichstcn Ge- 
schaftsniiinner, und unser ]\Iarkt ist die Welt. 
Unsere Nach f rage und die wunderbare Ent- 
wicklung und der Erfolg konnen in unserem 
kurzen Bcricht nicht beschrieben werden. Wir 
slellen die Frage ob sein Werth und seine 
Wichtigkcit in annehinbarer Weise veran- 
schlagt wordcn sind, oder ob wir die mysteri- 
iisen Wege der \'orsehung ergriindct haben? 
Es ist unsere Hoffnung, dass dicse kurze Dar- 
legung industrieller Entwicklung jedes Mit- 
glied der Konvention anregen wird. Wenn 
Sic. wie wir hoffen, es der Fall sein wird; vom 
Standpunkt der uns erblich iiberkommenen 
Gelegenheiten die Lage betrachten, werden 
Sie wcnig weitcrer Information bediirfen. 
Deshalb lassen wir statischc Angaben fort. 
Unser Zweck in dieseni Bericht ist, Inspira- 
tion zn wecken, und dann wird Ihr eigenes 
Urtheil Ihnen sagcn, was die Hauptfragen 
sind, und was die aushindischen Miirkte 
bieten. 

"Hinter der allgemeinen wachsenden Nach- 
frage haben wir Material, Arbeiter und Kapi- 
tal, wie es nirgends anderswo auf der Welt 
zu finden ist. und das zunehmende Renommee 
des Erfolges. Die dem Konvent vorliegende 
Frage ist: 

"WoUcn Sie Handel mit dem Auslande 
haben. und sind Sie gencigt. tmsere Stellung- 
nahnie. wie -^ic skizzirt wurdc. zu unter- 
stiitzcn? Kein Thotna vur deni amerikani- 
schen Fabrikanteu isl von solch cniinenter 
W'ichtigkeit. als die Frage : 

"Was soUen wir thun und sind wir geriistet, 
uns um das .\usland-Geschaft in gcieg- 
neter Weise zu bewcrben ? Wir empfehlen 
dringend eine ernstliche f^berlegung dieses 
Punktes. Unternehmen sic es auf keinen Fall, 



Ihr Produkt auf auslandischem Felde zu ver- 
breitcn, wcnn Sic nicht die Kapazitiit und das 
Kapital dazu besitzen, und Sie nicht nach fest- 
cm Plane vorgehen, sodass man sich auf Sie 
verhisscu kann. und Sie des Vertrauens des 
auslandischen Kiiufers wiirdig befunden wer- 
dcn konnen, da der fern wohnende auslan- 
dischc Kaufcr Zutrauen zu unserem System 
von Bestcllungen gegen Baar und ihrer Ilaft- 
barkcit habcn nuiss. Wir empfehlen liberalere 
I'.eliaiidUmg von Kunden, Reziprozitiit und die 
Sammlung von durchaus zuverlassigtyi Stati- 
stikcn. Das bcdeutct Arlieit, Neuerung und 
Kapital. Es bedeutet, dass Sie Ihr gauzes* 
Etablissement oder wenigstens einen grossen 
Theil desselben dem Auslandhandel widmen, 
und dass Sic in das neue Fcld mit dem Ent- 
schlusse, erfolgreich sein zu wollen, eintreten. 
Ungliicklicher Weise machten nur sehr Weni- 
gc den rechtcn Anfang. Einige, welche ein- 
fach darauf los schickten, waren gezwungen 
pcrsonlich Reisen zu machen, um Posten zu 
retten, und wurden dabei zu ihrem Gliick mit 
den Bediirfnisscn und Moglichkeiten bekannt. 
l-'.s kommt nun auf Sie an. Wenn Sie be- 
schliessen, das Gesch.nft zu suchen, so suchen 
Sie es nach einem festen Plane, das heisst, dass 
Sie die Situation studiren werden, und dass 
Sie das Terrain selbst recognoscircn, sodass 
Sie ein Kredit anstatt ein Misskredit fur un- 
sere Nation sein werden. Kopiren Sie keine 
alten und veralteten Gerathe, liefern Sie ihnen 
nur, was dieselben schon zu kaufen pflegten. 
Handler in der ganzen Welt ervvarten von 
dem amerikanischen Fjibrikanten etwas Bcs- 
seres, als sie fruher zur Verichtung ihrer Ar- 
Iwit batten. Was Sie wissen miissen, ist, zu 
welchem Zwecke das Geriith verwendct wer- 
den soil, und vcrschafFen Sie sich die absolute 
Gevvi.-isheit. dass dasselbe den Zweck erfiillen 
w inl. 

' Daliei miis^cn wir den Charaktcr der Be- 
triebskraft, Thier o<lcr andere Kraft, mit wel- 
cher das Geriith betriebcn werden soil, in Be- 
tracht Ziehen. Nachdem dies, geschchen, 
miisscn Sic sorgfaltige Besciireibungcn jedes 
Details in der lx:trcffendcn I^ndessprache 
vorbereiten und klare Illustrationen beifiigen. 
Das unterschiedslose Quotiren von Preisen fiir 
ausliin<lische Kiiufer hat einige <ler grossen 
Imjwrt Firmen veranlasst, gevvisse Marken 
von Waaren zuriickzuweisen, weil die Konkur- 
renz ihnen keinen Profit lassen wiirde. Quo- 
tiren Sie keine Preise fiir unbekannte Fir- 
men. Auslandische Firmen betrachten solche 



If 



Export Implement Age 



'5 



%) 



is 






Auszugen, kommerziellen Beziehungen und lioncn hinweiscn. die nothig sind, um cine 

Ernemiung in Grossbritannien zu erhalten. 

•■l%s ist absolut nothwendig, dass Englisch 

perfekt verstanden wird. Der Kandidat muss 

cbcnfalls franztisisch sprcchen und wenigstens 

noch cine andere Sprache, spanisch oder 

Vertriige, Zollc und RcziproziUits Beziehun- deutsch iui<l er nuiss sie thessend sprechen 

anderungen und Verbesserungen auf dem S^n mit fremden Landcni, bcsondcrs Cuba, die i<,.nncn. l%r muss ferner eine griindliche 



Methoden als die von Katalog Hiiusern. Er- 
suchen Sie um weitere Informationen betreffs 
deren Wunsche, und in der Zwischenzeit 
suchen Sie ausfiiulig zu machen, wer die be- 
trefifende Firma und wie deren Stellung ist. 
Halten Sie Ihre Kunden immer durch interes- 
sante Literatur betreflfs aller gemachten Ver- 



Hande'stabellen u. s. w. 

"Sie sind bekannt mit den wichtigen aus- 
landischen MJirkten umf deren allgemeinen 
\ erhaltnissen. Wir verweisen Sie respekt- 
vollst auf das Ilandels Department, die Preis- 



Laufenden. Und statt andere Gerathe zu sub- 
stituiren, kabdn Sie lieber, wenn nothig, ob 
die veriinderten Waaren gcbraucht werden 
konnen odcr nicht. Das Substiluiren von 
Ordres ist so haufig gewesen, dass auslan- 
dische Kiiufer bei unsercn Kon^dn Protest botschaft an den Kongress die Ernennung von 
erhoben haben, und viele \ erluste erlitten scchs Special Agenten des Staats Departe- 
worden sind, weil die Firmen die W'aaren ments cmpfahl. mit dem diplomatischcn Thel 
nicht aTnichnicn wollten. Dies hat viel dazu Kommerzicller Attaches, welche vorzugs- 
beigetragen, ein Gefiihl des Misstrauens weise aus dem Konsulardienst entnommen 
zwischen dem amerikanischen Fabrikanten werden, und vom Staatssekretiir nach dcssen 
und dem ausliindischen Kiiufer zu erzeugen. Ermessen ins Ausland geschickt werden 
Hutcn Sie sich ganz besonders vor Irrthii- sollen. um die Yerhiiltnisse in fremden Liin- 
mern beim \'erpacken oder Bruch beim Trans- dem zu studiren. fiir das Departcment des 
port, und achlen Sie darauf, dass alle Waarren Han.lels und der Arbeit Berichte iiber 1 landcl 
von guter Qualitiit sind. gut gcmacht und zu und Gewerbe herzustellcn, die Konsulate zu 
rechtcr Zeit abgeschickt werden. \ersuchen bcsuchen unil deren Arbeit zu prufen, dem 
Sie unter keiuin Umstiinden. veraltete oder Staats Departcment Anderungen zu cmpfeh- 
schlecht gcmachte Waaren so\s ie solche von Icn, welche auf allgemcine Vcrbesscnmgen 



I'hillipinen. .\ustralicn, Deutschland, Russ- Kcnutniss dess britischcn Handelsgcsetzes 

land und Frankreicb. beziiglich <les Versaiule-., Handelsspapiere, 

"Ein bcmerkenswerther Schritt zur Bcs- Tratten, Wechsel, Kontrakte fiir Transport 

serung unsercs Konsulardienstes wurde ge- ^]^.^ Waaren. See Versicherung u. s. w. be- 

than, als President Roosevelt in einer Special- sitzen. 



"Deutschland hat auch einen iiludichen Kur- 
.-.us zur Unterwcisung ihrer \'erlrcter in 
ilicsem Dienst. Der deutschc Konsul spricht 
die Sprache des Lamlcs, bei welchem er ak- 
kreditirt ist, wie ein Eingeborener und ausser- 
dcm franzosisch und englisch. 

"Diescr griindliche Trainirungs Kursus ist 
uhne Zweifel lie Ursachc des grossen Aus- 
land-Handels clieser bciden Lander und der 
Waitren mit den Stempeln "Made in England" 
odcr 'Wfadc in Germany" auf den Wer f ten der 
]Ain<li-r in der ganzen civilisirten Welt. 



unerwiesenem Ruf abzuladen. 

"Giinstig beurtheilt wurde von einem frii- 
heren Priisidenten eine von Ihrem \'orsitzer 
unterbreitete Resolution, wclche cinstimmig 
angenonunen wurde und welche dahin lautcte. 



"Im Jahre 18(19 standen wir unten auf der 
Liste der vier Grossen fabrizirenden Na- 
tionen, niimlich Grossbritannien, Frankreicb, 



und Starkung «les Dienstcs abzielen sollen. 

"Dicse .\gcnten sollen ein grosses Territo 
rium decken. hjner soil nach ( )esterreich. den Deutschland und Ver. Staaten. Funfimdvier- 
r.alkan Staaten. Deutschland. Schweiz. Russ- zig Jahre spiitei stehcn wir an der Spitze der 
land und anderen Limdern des nordlichen Liste. Unser Manufaktur-Produkt kommt 

dass konkurrirende Fabrikanten sich fiir das Europa gcschicj<t werden; einer nach Frank- dem der amlcrcii -....s.,. Nuiionen zusammen- 

\ erbot der Verscndung von Waaren, die be- reich, Italicn. *Portugal, Spanien und den gcnommen glcich. 

kanntermassen von geringercr Qualitiit, von anderen Liindern am Mittelmeer; ein drittcr ..^-j^^ unsere Stellung zu halten und ent- 

unmoderner Konstruktion und schlechtem nach Grossbritannien und ihren Kolomen ; ^precliend zu starken, nuissen wir unser Au- 

Material sind, interessiren sollten. Der Fa- ein vicrter nach Mexiko, Central .\merika, ^renmcrk auf die Lander .\siens. Afrikas, 

brikant, der solches thut und das \'ertrauen Westindien und Siid-Amerika ; ein fiinfter ^i,,]. „m| (^\.ntral-.\merikas. Mexiko und Aus- 

dcs auslandischen Kiiufers missbraucht, nach Asien, besonders dem asiatischen Russ- fralicii, richten wclche n<Kh keine wohlent- 

sollte das Odium tragen. Wir mussen Ver- land. China imd Jai)an. und der sechste soil fiir „.j(.i^c|ten Industrien besitzen. 

trauen einflossen durch Anwendung iiusser- Specialdienste und besondcre Missionen n.icli 

ster Sorgfalt nicht nur in der Lieferung des irgend einem Theile der W clt in Reserve ge 

von uns Versprochenen, sondern auch des halten svcrdcn. 

Bestellten, gemiiss den Wiinschen des Kiiu- ••Utiserc \ crtrcter im Konsulardienst wcr- 

fers und obnc Riicksicht auf hicsige VerhiiU- den von fremden Nationen als unsere Ge- 

nisse. I'ersonliche Untersuchung und sorg- scli.iftsagentcn betrachtet, und als solche soil 

faltige Cberlegung ergeben zur Evidenz, dass ten sie die fiihigsten Manner sein. welche wir 

wir unsere amerikanischen Methoden in frem- erhalten konnen. In letztercn Jahren ist viel 

den Landern nicht mehr aufzwingen kdnnen, gethan wordcn. um ihre Leistungsfiihigkcit 

als wir sie zwingen konnen, unsern Courant zu erhohen, abor dass noch Raum fiir \erbcse- 

anzunehmen. Versuchen Sie nicht, rucksicht- serungen vorhanden ist, steht ausscr Frage. 

los iiber altehrwurdige Traditionen und Sit- "Um zu zeigcn, wcl<*e Sorgfalt auf die 

ten weggehen zu wollen. Wir empfehlen ge- Heranziehung besonders geschulter Vertreter 

naues Studium und enge Vertrautheit mit in dem Konsulardienst fremder Nationen ver- 

Konsullr und Handelsberichten, statistischen wendet wird, mochten wir auf die Qualifika- eine eingehende Erwagung des Benchtcs 



•■\\ ir sin<l ueiicigt. dem Kongress die Noth- 
uetidigkeit der Ennuthigung dcs aincrikani- 
-elicn SchiflTliaues o<ler wenigstens des lUsitzes 
von Schiflfsinteressen in H;m<len von .Xmeri- 
kanern ernstlich zu Gemiithc zu fiihren. Es 
kann die Thatsache nicht in Abrede gestellt 
werden, dass unser Land sich nicht des Ans- 
lan<lshandels erfreut. dessen es sollte, Wir 
konnen nicht umhin. unsere Mitgliedcr drin- 
gend um grossere Anstrengungen und um 
mehr Aufmerksamkeit auf diescn Gegenstand 
zu ersuchen. I'nserc Manufaktur-Kapacitat 
hat enorm zugenommen, und das rechtfertigt 



Es wfad ^ebeten, tich bei evenlueller B^uitwortung in dtetem BUtte enthaltener Anzeigen auf dieie Zeitjchrift bezaehen zu wollen. 



El wird gebeten. lich bei eventueUer Beantwortung in dieiem Blatle enthaltener Anzeitfen auf diese Zeitschrilt beiiehen zu woUen. 



26 



Export Implement Age 



K 



Export Implement Age 



\) 



Ihrcs Coiiiitc^, um wclche wir Sie respektvoll 
crsuchen." 

AclmiiijLivollsi unterbreitet 

F. K. Myers, Vorsitzer. 
Die Tarit IVage w iirde vun der Association 
mit grossem Interessc bcsprochcn. Die An- 
sicht iler Mitplieilor i>t <iass die Tarif Liste 
neu adjustirt wer.lcii M»llte, speciell in Bezug 
auf Stahl iind Kiboii. 

Folgende Resolution wurde angenomnien : 
"BeschlosscH. dass wir zu Gunsten einer 
proniptcn Tarif-Revision sind, nnd zwar in 
eincr Weise, wt-lclu- dii- i^eringste Storung 
der gegenwartigon Cescliaitsverhaltnisse ver- 
ursacht. und das I-'xecutiv Coniite wird hier- 
init angc\vie>en. dieter Resolution entsprecli- 
cnd vorzugelK-n. " 

Der Konvent verbrachto drti Tage in Chi- 
cago wiihrend welchcr er Derichlc anhorte und 
Fragtn von Geschiifts Interessen besprach. 

Fur ein reichhahigcs L'ntcrhaltungs I'ro- 
gramm war Srrge tjetragcn worden, nnd die 
Mitglicdcr neljst deren Damen nahmen an 
lokalcn Besiclitigungs-Excursioncn, Theater 
Partitn und schUessHch an eineni grossen Ban- 
kett theil, mil wclchem der Konvent seinen 
Abschluss fand. Xeue Beamte wurden er- 
wiihlt. 



Cine praktische KraHanl&ge ftir eine Farm 

In der gegenwartigen Zeit tier gigantischcn 
hydro-elektrischen Kraftanlagen vcranlassen 
in der Rcgel nur solche Werke Kominentare. 
welche die Bewaltigiing ungewohnlicher 
Schwierigkeiten durch die Ingenienrc invol- 
vircn o«lcr alle andcrn an Grossartikcit weit 
iJbertrcfFen. Des Kontrastos wegcn tnacht 
<lie "I'.lectrical W orM" anf einc elcktrische 
Kraft- und Bclcuchtnngsanlage auf einer Fanu 
iin Inncrn di- Staales New York autnurksam. 
welolu- vielliicht die einzige ihrrr Art in den 
\'eriinii;t<n Staaten ist : sicherlich k.mnin 
wenige ihrcsgleichen. wenn iiberhaupt ^oiche 
existiren. 

Durch die lutrettende Farm fliesst <in 
Strom mit itwa 4.o«>() Kubikfuss per Minute 
unter normalen \ (.rliidtnissen, und an dcni 
rfer dicse- Stromes wurde die cigenartige 
Kraftanlagf konstruirt. K'^ wurde ein klciner, 
y, I'uN'^ linitiT Danuu des (iefalle-Typ, mit 
Betonmauern und F.rdlwschungen sovvie vier- 
zolligen Hemlock- i'lanken auf schwerem 
Holzgeriist. lelzteres in <lie Bi.^^chungeu 
versenkt und an ckn Maucrn durch Bolzen 
befestigt. konstruirt. Fine doppeUe Planken- 



lage emptTmgt den Fall des Wassers. welches 
sich itber den Dainm ergiesst, luid verhiitet 
die Untcrminirung der Mauern. Da das 
Cicfiille nur 4' _■ I-'uss bctriigt stelUe es sich 
als nothwendig heraus, ein verhaltnisniiissig 
grosses Rad, von 30-zolligem vertikalcn Typ, 
su installiren, welches zu 17V2 Pferdekraft 
bci 113 Unidrehungen in der Minute unter 
einem Gefiille von 4'-.. Fuss taxirt ist. Die 
flurch dieses Rad erzeugte Kraft wird durch 
ein Paar Kannnra<lgctriebe, die durch Trans- 
mission mit eiiuni Generator von 12^^ Kilo- 
watt Kapazitat bei 250 X'olts luid 1,100 Uni- 
drehungen in der Minute verbunden sind, 
liberlragen. Fin nichtiibersponncues Ahi- 
miniumkabel. welches auf Ouerstangen an 
Ccderpfahlen gespannt ist, die in Entfernun- 
gcn vol etwa 100 Fuss aufgcstellt sind, fiihrt 
den clektrischen Strom von dem Generator 
nach lien, etwa 1.500 Fuss entfcrnten Fami- 
gcbiiuden. Die Maucrn der Radgrube, welche 
audi die Schleuse, und dicse wiedcr ihrcrseits 
das Giliaudc der Kraftstation tragen, sind 
ans r.eton auf einem guten Kiesfundamcnt 
gebaut, und der Bodcn der Grube ist mit 
I'lanken belegt, um Auswaschungen zu vcr- 
hiiten. Die Anlage ist jetzt seit etwa fiinf 
Monateiu Tag und Xacht in Bctricb, wobciman 
ihr nur zwei- odcr dreimal die Wixrho Bcach- 
tung zu schcnken brauchte. und ohne einen 
Regulator irgend einer Art. Fine Zunahmc 
des Wassers in dem Strome, welche etwa das 
/ehnfache des iiblichen Qiwintums betrug. 
verursachtc keine merkliche Aenderung in 
der \'oltage. r"iinfun<1zwanzig ifr-Kerzen- 
starke 220-\'olt Faiupen ini Hausc, und acht 
in der Sehennc liefern cine schr gute I'eleuch- 
tmig. k.in 4,ooo-\Vatt Heizapparat, welchcr 
den iiblichen Kohlenoleii crsetzt hat, halt die 
Ti-miieratur vnu zwei Zimmern von 16 x 13 .k 
7'.- 1-U--S risj). 12 X 13 X 7'.^ Iniss. jedes mit 
/AMI benstern. auf etwa 75 Grad Fahrenheit. 
uinn die Tcmperatur <lraussen etwa Zero ist. 
k'.in 'j Pferdekraft Motor betreiln den Rahm- 
Separator. Butlerfass und Schleifstein. 
DiesiT verlialtnissm;is-ig grosse Motor ist 
nothwendig, um einen .scliweren Sei>arator- 
kiibel auf eine Geschwiinligkeit vou etwa 7-400 
I'mdrehnngen in der Minute zu bringcn. Es 
liegt die Absicht vor. das K(X-hen el)enfalls auf 
elektriscbem W ege zu besorgen und die Kraft 
fiir alle I'arnimaschinen zu liefern, sobakl die 
n<itliigen Aenderungen zur Anwendung der 
elektrischen Kraft getroflfen werden kiinnen. 
Diese neuartige Anlage hat bereits viile 



Anfragen von fortschrittlichen Farmern 
veranlasst, da cs sehr vicle Platze auf dem 
Lande gibt, wo geringe Wasserkraft von zehn 
bis fiinfzig Pferdekraft, nutzbar gemacht und 
Anlagen. wie die obige, konstruirt werden 
konnten. Von ganz besonderm Interesse ist 
die Thatsache. dass ganz kurzlich in unmittel- 
barer Xachbarschaft eine kleine Fabrikanlage 
entstanden ist, so dass sich liier eine neue und 
vielleicht iibertriebene Blustration der Idee | 
der ••Riickkehr zu <lem Landbau." im Gegen- 
satze zu dem Zug nach den Stiidten. ergibt. 
Die Installation bahnt den Weg dafiir, dass 
elektrisch betriebcne l^ariuen in<lustrielle so- 
wohl als laudwirthschaftlichc Stiittcn werden 
konnen. wenn auch in kleinem und bescheide- 
nem Masse. 



Neues Reglement fUr Postkarten 

\\ ie aus untenfolgendem Cirkular erseheii 
werden kann. darf am und nach dem ersten 
Dktober nicht allein die eigentlichc Schreib- 
scite jeder Post- und Ansichtskarte sondern 
gleichfalls der linke Teil der Haupt- oder 
Adresseite fiir Mitteilungen bcnutzt werden: 

Xach dem jiingst in Rom ( Italien ) tagenden 
Beschluss dess Wltpostvereins, soil vom I. 
( )ktober 1007 an gestattet werden, Postkarten 
und Ausichtskarten welche zwischen den 
Landcxn der Post I'nion versandt werden 
nicht allein auf der event. Schreibseite son- 
dern auch auf der linken Ecke der Adresseite 
zu bcschriebcn. Und da solche Karten augen- 
blicklich in tier nur iiblichen Form gebraucht 
werden ki'imien, unrl zwar bei der Beforderung 
von P.riefschaften die in ilen Landern des 
W'eltjwjstvercins zum Austausch gclangcn ; 

.^ei hierbei beschlossen, dass alle Postkarten 
<Iie eine Mitteilungs Rubrik an cler linken 
I'cke tragen, dicsclbc zum Schreibcn von 
Mitteilungen verwcndet werden diirfen, 
wahrcnd die rechte Eckt- ausscbliesslich fiir 
die Adresse rescrvirt l)leil)cn nuiss. Solche 
Karten die in r>riefschnften vorgefundcn wer- 
den, mu>>en nur aK l'i»tkarten bctrachtet 
und bchandelt wenlen, luid wenn das iibliche 
Postgebiihr dafiir l)ezahlt. event, solche Post- 
karten mit den erfonlerlichen internationalen 
Briefschaftsbcdingungen verschen worden 
sind. sie an den btrcffenden Adres,saten 
franko ohne weiter Postgebiihrberechnung 
abgeliefert werden miissen. 

Obige Ordrc, Xo. 1047. datirt Washington, 
D. C, den 28. Jnni. kkVi. wurde vom General 
Postmeisler (icorge \\. C'ltrtelvdU unterzeich- 
net. 






The American Thresherman's Outfit 

The Traction Engine and Its Crew -Threshing Grain on Western Farms The 

Present and the Past 



li 



Cs wird gebeten, sich bei eventueller Beantwortung in diesem Blatte enthaltener Anzeigen auf diete Zeitschrift beziehen zu woUen. 



W here do they sleep? I »ut umler the stars, 
i'lu- tirt-d men do not care where they speml 
ill. ilc.ir ■.uninier nights. They may rest in 
llu -liadow i.f the straw slack, they may lie 
undir ilie ni.iehine. They are content, and 
kiM.w ii.i waking until the stui callN iheni to 
w-li. 

Till da\s arc l"ng im the thrc-liiiig ina<'lnue. 
The ^la-iiu i- -IimH and t\er\ in\nir wain> to 

iiiaki- the IiinI <'i llu linu-. lb- counts on 

ilu< -hiiig ;n.iHKi IiU'-Ih 1- i.f uluat iu the sea- 
()„ hnndre.ls of American lann> one niav hav d-nu- m-.n- f. simpiifv the iluv-lnuu >.l ^>^^K and uva^ ,h< Uuw. IK- uill have bard 
st.md on a kn-.H. and l.H.kmg off acr...s ,hc the W eM ihan anything else that ba> hem m u . rk i.. d. , .In^, iKvan.- llu uluai .^ -.u- 
fields, see a dozen puffing engine> making the vente.l. The w-.rk is thu> .Imu. n.,,re rapidly 1,1,1.- ligln and ih. ,v an mans we-jN n, 1 r 
horizon picturesMue as ihev kee,. as tnany and with less expense f.-r help. ^in.u Xn.Mhing ,l,.,i I'""'!''- ' ' ;' ;' 

separators rattling in their work. The trac- The farmer who engage ilnv^lui. .mi ..n inninnu "i du' iiia. nu.. „,..k.. ,t tin m-u 

tion euHue is the antnu.obile of ihe plain. U the i-rairies to-,lay has no sueh ia;k Lm i„> diH,. nli „„ tlu ''"p '-'• 

is the farmer-s api-roach to luxurv of the city fantily as .Iocs the tanner back b.,a.t. It i^ I „;;„. d mv . I. n. h . t " ; '' ' '^/j^ ;^» ' 

resident. an<l has done tuore f-r liim than any .eldo.n that the crew i. b.,arded a. tlu; .am, .a^..„. ^uA ..„. ^..n„^ -■';''■"■ .'," > '^ - 

..ue invention ..f late vcarv Theb-^vwlio house, if this i. done. ..t omum- ilu tt ,- in .u muv. an-lwa-] 1 .U llu nM. It^.ttu, 

used U> .Irivr tlu' weary' h.,r>es ,,n ilu-ir' nnin.l ble for llu- -^ I wile. 1>ni tlir laiin-r pay-,nlv liapp<n- thai w.av. 

m llu- ..M-f.-i-hioued horse power will apjire- 
cirui llu- statement: he will nj.'iri wluu he 
-ri > llu engine go through tin -ik.i 'if the 
prairie t.iwn. C'l.'-e behind it c .nu-- the great 
n-.l sf|,arat.tr. with it- pipes and platforms-, 
tlu-ii tlu- e." k -lia,u\. like a house mi wheels, 
which it i- , luM llu waUr wagon that niu-t 

keep the engine in l' 1 trim, and at lasi ihe 

coal was^ou, . .r the rig ..f tlu- ..wner. 

It makes ;ni i,mi..-in;^ pr.lCe■^-iou as ii win-l- 
il> wa\ aiT'i-- llu- ].lain-. aii'l i-~ an i-\ i.l.-iu-t- 
.i| tlu- applie.-in.iu nf invt-uti\<- talnit |.. the 
nei'.K ..f ll,e \\(--~lern fannir It is llu- epi 
imiu- >'i tlu; laniu-r'- inngri---. and t.. it- ae- 
ciiinpli-linu ,,! i- .liu hi- -m.e-- in wluat rai- 
in- til .-I laig< druvee. A(-e..r.ling I., tlu- New 
^ Mi-k 'I'niirs. the -epar.-ilur ..f t,, <lav i- n.,t llu- 
r.ld fashi..ned m;ichine that <lid ..nl\ half tlu- 
w..rk. A- it pulls into the fiel.l it i- ei|uil>l>ed 
I, ,1 tlu miisi efficient work. » >ne ..f the lask- 
ihai .lr..\e bo\> auav from the farm in the old 
i|a\- W.I- -taekiu!.; -iraw at the business end 
,.| a -traw carrier Thm i- n-.w no need of 
that. The 111. "Urn ma.-hiiu- ha- a luiu; ]n]K- .-it 
the rear tiul at llu- b.ilt.iiii ..f winch is a fan 
dial -md- .1 bla-t ..f wind lhnin-.4h the tube. 
It 1- r.ill.d a win.l -i.uki-r. and llu- -iraw and 
refu-( are -ent wl,er»-ver tlu- man at the lower 
end direct- W h. 4. -la.k- mav b. prei)are.l 
with.uit the iniuh of a f.-rk ..r ..| a bit -if hand 
labnr. There are s^.ver.■d kin.l- ..f lh«-se im- 
|,r..\.ni.iii-. lint all w..rk ..,1 llu- -.'uiu- geiu r:d 
|.ruu-iple and are making llu- harve-t rhea]HT 
;iii.l easier f'T ihe fanner 

There ll-e.I |.) Ik- al-. > a fe.-.lt r wlm was 
bi^hh pai.l atul .li-l a ureal .1. al ^f .langenms 
wi.rk'. I U- -t.'.'d al tlu- tr.^nt .^l the machine 




ON A LARGE AMHKICAN FARM 
HiuWng KM.n from th. ti.W oa a Ur«. I..rm .n lh« NorthwcM p.>r..on ot the Vn,Ui S-...- . A , . p, i! t.'.-n.-. By men 
wcU-b,..ll wigoni drd*n by * h,gh typ. of dHfl hor«. wjU hir.u-»jd, th< immen.c .. '< .<ni. 

tHnsl^rrid from fuld.-. lo hariv.. Ilwnc- to ih.: ifr^Jt itUni oi I- 



-i\ cent- a bushel fur ihe ihre-lnuL:. It du- 



ll, ilii.-ll.' ;n llu- ..Id .l,-,v- w.ililu'd iIm 

'i'-"> -' ' . , , , 1 .1 1 ...,,., - ,11, •, ,111-1 \iv\ 1 '11 -1 U li W.I- -I I nndf, the 

„„, ,., Lnndles, head firs,. ,n.,. the roarmg enw ,s l„,anU-. In ihe hre-ne, >'' - ' - ; ;' , ^ ^^^ ^.„; ,„;., ,„,„„, ,., ,he 

n,..i„h ..f the machine. He wa- -.-uutuncs eenis, a-.l . u- u.n-.-wiU- ha- "" -'■'';'" ■'.,,„, J. .,!,!, ehalke.l llu- talh ..„ a 

.,,.re..nti,len, al...n, In- p..-Ui..n an.l caught he c..„k -haniy ,s --' '> 1"- -^ ;; ) , , " „ „ .„, ' ,,, „„„,,,„ „,aclnne has an 

In- hands in ihe e..^- a,ul -pin.ll.-s. !„s,„c an tlu wih-l 'l"; ';;^"';;^'; "I, '^ .'"""•;;' ,." . „. ,a,n- ,1k,. .arru- the wluat up !•> du- t-p 

,,„, ,,ncemawhilehcl..s, hi-hle. It was u i.e . ., one ... t u- men, Slu- has -, u „u . ^ ^ ' ' [ ,„, ,„,, „u-n pourl u in,-. a 

a .kinu.n.n- ta-k IVhiiul him were the ban. rm. erran-K f,.r he,, usiialh ., I-.n, wli,. , . , ■ 1 I \ , „'^^,^,, ^^,., ,,^ ,„„, 

',„le,:. wb,. als,. Mruggle.l with fate and '''-'Inu. o. d ,r,,n, ,,,w n t-. he cai^,,,. u^^^^^ : ^ • J . 1,-1 e an.l u.d. - anv cbanunig 

u.Tke.l as hanl a- auv ..ne ar.nmd the ..re sirawd.urmng engine-. I. U n,.,, u . u ^, ^ ^^ ,„,,„ ,--,l„l„s . W li. n the 

n.aelnne. W ul, -harp kinve- thev severe.l the t us km.l. S. there are gas, .hue .„g u -, 1. ' J J^,^ ,„ ,„ „V ,,.1.1 ,t- ,<o.r,l ,- .he 

.v,-ps ..f IKU ..r siraw thai lu-ld .he bmuIU- ihev are n... co,nn,„n ' ''^^;; ';;'^,;;"^^ Jj, V, 'J,,,-,, -.uKinen, i, nia.Ie. S-meliiiu- 

1 I .1, ., ■ , ,.,. itn -irn\ 1,1 the umler a tn-e, it tliere lie ...le w iiltm haiii "i '' " "'.. i. . 

I..t;el UT. an. I llu-u pa— <<l llu sit.iw n. ui '"' • , ,. . , „ ,.■ ■.'I ,- , .n llu- I.,-- ..inn- n,,.,,- 11, m ..in- maehiue ,s 

fer.ler. 1, wasawell-pai.lta-k. That »...,, s >'- ^^''l -'":;;^»';;; 7';, !^;;,;; ' m.l l ,-,,.:; .b.^^anu nnu. Tlu n there 1- a 

e..„e. The m.Hlern .nachine ha- a sef feeler -uimm-i buv -s hl,,w ' ^ ' "p' '; , J' , .., ;^,,„v l..,ween llu- .ivw- ,,- t,. uhuh 

„,a, lakes ,1,,- plaee ..f b„th the-c workers, I, ;;-''';'"•;;• 'l-'-;' '^ ' /i \i " ' ,i j ' " . -a 1 1 ■ du ' la-l-r w,.rk.-is. \11 ,lav an-l far 

l,a, a hopper like appara.n- that receives llic ihe attraUi.-n- ''''. ^,^ ^ ''''"' ''''J.. '■'.,, „„., „,.. , v.nin, llu- ,„a,!niu- lanl./an.I ca,, 

i''''';''-^'^'''^-^-;;'-vtn';h;;n^::'eher:nd :z ,^; 'd - e.'::r:.,M,f;'and'd:!:b,' .;; :.:„ e,„npa„. ^,n-„. .- -,..- „i.„„. ... -.u.. 

';;S::ih::r;;; ;:;;' d!;:t!h.uW Wthe mXe ll,,., is beapd ingl, ,,.,.ks .... beannf,,, .. ,h. ,u ...Idn, .ram l.a.,- „ ,- .l„ n du .-„,1 



make- iiu-m ni loi nie ( \ m.'n > ■•> <•■' ■• ■ -- . , , ,,,,., 

nit,, which tluv aic fcl These imi.rovemcnts huiigrs men wlu, cme m from (he sta. k 



eoiiie- aii.l the ilial- ar, aiiNiou-lv -cnumi/eil 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



27 



I) 



? 



Ihres Coniites, um welche wir Sie respektvoU 
ersuchen." 

Achtutig\'oUst unterbreitet 

F. E. Myers, Vorsitzer. 
Die Tarif Frage wurde von der Association 
mit grossem Interesse besprochen. Die An- 
sicht der Mitglieder ist dass die Tarif Listc 
neu adjustirt werden sollte, speciell in Bezug 
auf Stahl und Eisen. 

Folgende Resolution wurde angenommen: 
"Beschlossen, dass wir zu Gunsten einer 
prompten Tarif-Revision sind, und zwar in 
einer Weise, welche die geringste Storung 
der gegenwartigen Geschaftsverhaltnisse ver- 
ursacht, und das Executiv Comite wird hier- 
mit angewiesen, dieser Resolution entsprech- 
end vorzugehen." 

Der Konvent verbrachte drei Tage in Chi- 
cago wahrend welcher er Berichte anhorte und 
Fragen von Geschafts Interessen besprach. 

Fiir ein rcichhaltiges Unterhaltungs Pro- 
gramm war Sorge getragen worden, und die 
Mitglieder nebst deren Damen nahmen an 
lokalen Besichtigungs-Excursionen, Theater 
Partien und schliesslich an einem grossen Ban- 
kett theil, mit welchem der Konvent seinen 
Abschluss fand. Neue Beamte wurden er- 
wahlt. 



Eine praktische Kraftftnl&ge fur eine Fftrm 

In der gegenwartigen Zeit der gigantischen 
hydro-elektrischen Kraftanlagen veranlassen 
in der Kegel nur sdche Wcrke Kommentare, 
welche die Bewaltigung ungewohnlicher 
Schwierigkeiten durch die Ingenieure invol- 
viren oder alle andern an Grossartikeit weit 
ubertreffen. Des Kontrastes wegen macht 
die "Electrical World" auf eine elektrische 
Kraft- und Beleuchtungsanlage auf einer Farm 
im Innem des Staates New York aufmerksam, 
welche vielleicht die einzige ihrer Art in den 
Vereinigten Staaten ist; sicherlich konnen 
wenige ihresgleichen, wenn iiberhaupt solche 
€xistiren. 

Durch die betreffende Farm fliesst ein 
Strom mit etwa 4,000 Kubikfuss per Minute 
imter nonnalen \erhaltnissen, und- an dem 
Ufer dieses Stromes wurde die eigenartige 
Kraftanlage konstruirt. Es wurde ein kleiner. 
36 Fuss breiter Damm des Gefalle-Typ, mit 
Betonmauern und Erdboschungen sowie vier- 
^oUigen Hemlock- Planken auf schwerem 
Holzgeriist, letzteres in die Boschungen 
versenkt und an den Mauern durch Bolzen 
befestigt. konstruirt. Eine doppelte Plankcn- 



lage empfangt den Fall des Wassers, welches 
sich uber den Damm ergiesst, und verhiitet 
die Unterminirung der Mauern. Da das 
Gefalle nur 41/2 Fuss betragt stellte es sich 
als nothwendig heraus, ein verhaltnismassig 
grosses Rad, von 30-z6lligem vertikalen Typ, 
su installiren, welches zu 173^ Pferdekraft 
bei 113 Umdrehungen in der Minute unter 
einem Gefalle von 4>4 Fuss taxirt ist. Die 
durch dieses Rad erzeugte Kraft wird durch 
ein Paar Kammradgetriebe, die durch Trans- 
mission mit einem Generator von 12^ Kilo- 
watt Kapazitat bei 250 Volts und 1,100 Um- 
drehungen in der Minute verbunden sind, 
iibertragen. Ein nichtiibersponnenes Alu- 
miniumkabel, welches auf Querstangen an 
Cederpfiihlen gespannt ist, die in Entfernun- 
gen vot etwa 100 Fuss aufgestellt sind, fiihrt 
den elektrischen Strom von dem Generator 
nach den, etwa 1,500 Fuss entfemten Farm- 
gebauden. Die Mauern der Radgrube, welche 
auch die Schleuse, und diese wieder ihrerseits 
das Gebaude der Kraftstation tragen, sind 
aus Beton auf einem guten Kiesfundament 
gebaut, und der Boden der Grube ist mit 
Planken belegt, um Auswaschungen zu ver- 
hiiten. Die Anlage ist jetzt seit etwa fiinf 
Monatem Tag und Nacht in Betrieb, wobeiman 
ihr nur zwei- oder dreimal die Woche Beach- 
tung zu schenken brauchte, und ohne cinen 
Regulator irgend einer Art. Eine Zunahme 
des Wassers in dem Strome, welche etwa das 
Zchnfache- des ublichen Qi^ntums betrug, 
verursaclite keine merkliche Aenderung in 
der Voltage. Fiinf undzwanzig i6-Kerzen- 
starke 220-Volt Lampen im Hause, und acht 
in der Scheune liefem eine sehr giite Beleuch- 
tung. Ein 4,000-Watt Heizapparat, welcher 
den iiblichen Kohlenofen ersetzt hat, halt die 
Temperatur von zwei Zimmern von 16 x 13 x 
7>^ Fuss resp. 12 x 13 x jj/^ Fuss, jedes mit 
zwei Fenstem, auf etwa 75 Grad Fahrenheit, 
wenn die Temperatur draussen etwa Zero ist. 
Ein J4 Pferdekraft Motor betreibt den Rahm- 
Separator, Butterfass und Schleifstein. 
Dieser verhaltnissmassig grosse Motor ist 
nothwendig, um einen schweren Separator- 
kiibel auf eine Geschwindigkeit von etwa 7,400 
Umdrehungen in der Minute zu bringen. Es 
liegt die Absicht vor, das Kochen ebenfalls auf 
elektrischcm Wege zu besorgen und die Kraft 
fur alle Farmmaschinen zu liefem, sobald die 
nothigen Aenderungen zur Anwendung der 
elektrischen Kraft getroflFen werden konnen. 
Diese neuartige Anlage hat bereits viele 



An fragen von fortschrittlichen Farmem 
veranlasst, da es sehr viele Platze auf dem 
Lande gibt, wo geringe Wasserkraft von zehn 
bis funfzig Pferdekraft, nutzbar gemacht und 
Anlagen, wie die obige, konstruirt wferden 
konnten. Von ganz besonderm Interesse ist 
die Thatsache, dass ganz kurzlich in unmittel- 
barer Nachbarschaft eine kleine Fabrikanlage 
entstandcn ist, so dass sich hier eine neue und 
vielleicht ubertriebene Illustration der Idee 
der "Riickkehr zu dem Landbau," im Gegen- 
satze zu dem Zug nach den Stadten, ergibt. 
Die Installation bahnt den Weg dafur, dass 
elektrisch betriebene Farmen industrielle 58O- 
wohl als landwirthschaftliche Statten werden 
konnen, wenn auch in kleinem und bescheide- 
nem Masse. 




O 



Neues Rcglement fiir Postkartcn 

Wie aus untenfolgendeni Cirkular ersehen 
werden kann, darf am und nach dem ersten 
Oktober nicht allein die eigentliche Schreib- 
seite jeder Post- und Ansichtskarte sondem 
gleichfalls der linke Teil der Haupt- oder 
Adresseite fiir Mitteilungen benutzt werden: 

Nach dem jiingst in Rom (Italien) tagenden 
Beschluss dess Wltpostvereins, soil vom i. 
Oktober 1907 an gestattet werden, Postkarten 
und Ansichtskarten welche zwischen den 
Landern der Post Union versandt werden 
nicht allein auf der event. Schreibseite son- 
dem auch auf der linken Ecke der Adresseite 
zu beschrieben. Und da solche Karten augen- 
blicklich in der nur iiblichen Fomi gebraucht 
werden konnen, und zwar bei der Beforderung 
von Briefschaften die in den Landem des 
Weltpostvereins zuni Austausch gelangen ; 
Sei hierbei beschlossen, dass alle Postkarten 
die eine Mitteilungs Rubrik an der linken 
Ecke tragen, dieselbe zum Schreiben von 
Mitteilungen verwendet werden diirfen, 
wahrend die rechte Ecke ausschliesslich fur 
die Adresse reservirt bleiben muss. Solche 
Karten die in Briefschaften vorgefunden wer- 
den, miissen nur als Postkarten betrachtet 
und behandelt werden, und wenn das iibliche 
Postgebiihr dafiir bezahlt, event, solche Post- 
karten mit den erforderlichen intemationalen 
Briefschaftsbedingungen versehen worden 
sind, sie an den btreflFenden Adressaten 
franko ohne weiter Postgebtihrberechnung 
abgeliefert werden miissen. 

Obige Ordre, No. 1047, datirt Washington, 
D. C., den 28. Juni, 1906, wurde vom General 
Postmeister George B. Cortclyou unterzeich- 
net. 




The American Thresherman's Outfit 



The Traction Engine and Its Crew-Threshing Grain on Western Farms 

Present and the Past 



1 



I 



-The 



o ^ 




El wird gebeten, sich bei eventueller Beantvortung in diesem Blatte enthaltener Anzeigen auf diese Zeitschrift beziehen zu woUen. 



1 



( )n hnndretls of .\mcrican tarnis one may 
stand on a knoll, and iiKiking off across the 
fields, .sec a dozen puffing engines making the 
horizon picturesque as they keep as many 
sci)arators rattling in their work. The trac- 
tion cntrine is the automobile of the plain. It 
is the farmer's approach to luxury of the city 
resident, and has done more for him than any 
one invention of late years. The Iwy who 
used to drive the weary horses on their round 
in the old-fashioned horse power will appre- 
ciate the statement ; he will rejoice when he 
sees the engine go through the street of the 
prairie town. Close lichind it comes the great 
red separator, with its pipes and i)latforms ; 
tlicn the cook shanty, like a house on wheels, 
which it is: next the water wagon that must 
keep the engine in good trim, and at last the 
coal wagon, or the rig of the owner. 

It makes an imposing i)rocessinn as it winds 
its way across the plains, and is an evidence 
of the application of inventive talent to the 
needs of the Western farmer. It is the epi- 
tome of the farmer's progress, and to its ac- 
complishment is due his success in wheat rais- 
ing to a large degree. .Xccording to the New 
York Times, the separator of to-day is not the 
old-fashioned machine that did only half the 
work, .^s it pulls into the field it is eiiuipped 
for the most efficient work. One of the tasks 
that drove 1m)vs awav from the farm in the old 
days was >tackintr straw at the business end 
of'a straw carrier. There is now no need of 
that. The modern machine has a long l)il)e at 
the rear end at the bottom of whicii is a fan 
that sends a blast of win<l throu«;h the tube. 
it is ca!lc<l a wind stacker, and the straw and 
refuse an- sent wherever the man at the lower 
end directs. Whole stacks in.iy be prepare.l 
without the touch of a fork or of a bit of hand 
labor. There are several kinds of these im- 
l)nivements, but all work on the same general 
principle and are making the harvest cheaper 
and easier for the farmer. 

There tised to be also a feeder who was 
highly pai<l and did a great deal of dangerous 
work! He strxxl at the front of the machine 
and let hun<lles. head first. iiUo the roaring 
mouth of the machine. He was sometimes 
overconfident alxiut his |>osition and caught 
his han<ls in the co^rs and spin<11es. losing an 
arm. < >ncc in a while lie lost his life. It was 
a dangerous task. Behind him were the band 
cutters, who also struggled with fate and 
worked as hard as any one around the 
machine. With sharp knives they severed the 
wisps of hav or straw that held the bundles 
together, and then passed the straw to the 
feeder. It was a well-paid task. That. too. is 
gone. The modern machine has a self-feeder 
that fakes the place of Ixith these workers. It 
has a hopper-like apparatus that receives the 
bundles as thev are pitched into it. and cuts the 
hindinfr twine that holds them together and 
makes them fit for the cylinder of the machme 
into which ihev arc fed. These improvements 



have done more to simplify the threshing of 
the West than anything else tliat has been in- 
vented. The work is thus done more rapidly 
and with less expense for helj). 

The farmer who engages threshers out on 
the prairies to-day has no such task for his 
family as does the farmer back l'*ast. It is 
seldom that the crew is boarded at the farm- 
house. If this is done, of course there is trou- 
ble for the good wife, hut the farmer pays onl> 



W here do they bleep? Out under the stars. 
TIk' tired men do not care where they spend 
the clear summer nights. They may rest in 
the shadow of the straw stack, they may lie 
umiiT the machine. They are content, and 
know no waking until the sun calls them to 
work. 

The days are long on the threshing machine. 
The season is short and every owner wants to 
make the best of the time. He counts on 
ihreshing 50.OCXI bushels of wheat in the sea- 
son, and may do better. He will have hard 
work to do this, because the wheat is some- 
times light and there are many weeds in the 
straw. .\nything that hinders the rapiil 
running of the machine makes it the more 
(iitVuult for the thresher. 

••| fitnired myself rich at the opening of the 
season." said one young speculator in this ven- 
ture, "and 1 was jKior at the end." If often 
happens that way. 




ON A LARGE AMERICAN FARM 

Hauling grain (rem th. iUU on * Urg. t«m in th. No,thw«. portion of th. Uniud Sti.... A fypic.I K.n.. By mM« d 

w«U-buUt ».gon. drawn by . high type of draft hor.«, w.U ».arn«M.d. th. imm.n.. crop, arc m a .hort ttnw 

transicrrtd from fltkfa to barns, tl«nc« to the great artsries of travel 



six cents a bushel for the threshing. If the 

crew is boarded by the thresner he receive'- 7 

cents, and the housewife has no extra labor. 

The cook shanty is usually presided over by 

the wife of the manager of the outfit, or by the 

wife of one of the men. She has some one to 

run errands for her. usually a boy. who is also 

haulinp- coal from town for the engine. There 

are straw-burning engines, l)ut not all arc of 

this kind. So there are gasoline engines, but 

thev are not common. The c<Kik shanty is set 

under a tree, if there be one within reach of 

the field where the men are at work. The 

summer breezes blow through it. and the 

fresh cMlor of the field is a pleasant a<ldition to 

the attractions of the well-filled dimier table. 

There are few luxuries on that table, but 

plenty of the necessities of life, and the bread 

that is heapeil high looks very beautiful to the 

hungry men who come in from the stacks. 



The tlire-her in the old days watched the 
measure very eli>sely. It was set tmder the 
machine and was emptied frecpiently by the 
farmer or hi'- bi.y. who chalked the tally on a 
piece of board. 1 he m<«lern machine has an 
apparatus that carrie- the wheat up to the tojt 
of the se|iarator and then pours it into a 
wa^on bv means of a tube. It also weighs and 
records every bushel, and m:>kes any ch.-mgiug 
of the figures an impossibility. When the 
machine ptdls out of the field its record is the 
one on which settlement it maile. Sometimes 
i>n the big farms more than i>iie niacbiue is 
running at the same time. Then there is a 
lively rivalry between the crew- .1- t<> whieh 
-hall be the' faster workers. .\11 day and far 
into the evening the machines rattle and roar, 
each company striving a^ to its abi1it\ to shell 
out the goldni yrain. l.ate it i^^ when the end 
comes and the dials are anxiously scrutinized. 



INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



aS 



Export Implement Age 



Tlic losers arc cxpccliil tu do what is right 
whiii iR\t tlic iiRii |4<. to town — and they 
do it. 

I >n Satunlav iiij^hl the men visit the county 
seal. Ilicy liavc deserved the recreation and 
are anxious to enjoy it. They put on their 
ln-<t elothe> and walk up and down the streets, 
lau.iihiny and liaviii!.; a yooil time. It is late 
when thev ride in the rontjii wai:;on to the farm 
and pre])art tu i.iko a loni; sKep Suinlay 
niorninLT. The iravelin<.j harvesters who come 
ont of the l".ast to help cut the j^rain are not 
fjenerally the .>ne^ who form the threshinj^ 
crews. Thev are too migratory, and are apt 
to desert in tlie inid-t of a hip run. The men 
who want to tr,, on the crews are picked up 
aniontr the threshiuLr experts of the farm lands 



teams that haul the shocks take thein to the 
^idc of the machine, and when the threshing is 
done the same horses are hitched to the ]ilows 
and set to turning over the chocolate rihhons 
of sod in preparation for the next year's croji. 
It saves once handling the wheat to do this, 
and every hour is precious when the farmer is 
trying to save his grain. 

The threshers of the West are tr\ing to 
form an organization that is to make the rates 
for threshing permanent. Some of the 
machine managers are willing at a pinch to 
cut out the rates, an<l this is ohnoxious to the 
others. Hence the movement to miite. In 
Nebraska there has in some counties licen 
formed an iron-clad agreement, and the farm- 
ers ]iav the rerpiired amount ami give the 



^^^H 


^^B 






■ 


*• m 




^ 


i^ 





pert, Air. C.ellibrand, who visited^ American 
sources of hardwood supply. This expert 
helieves as a result of his studies that an era 
of higher prices is ahead in the hardwood 
hunber business. Mr. Oellibrand has made 
a particular feature of dimension stock in 
hickory, ash and persimmon wood, the two 
former being for liandle-makers and textile- 
mill specialties, and the latter for shuttle-mak- 
ing. 

lie is connected with one of the largest 
mills in l.tiuisiana, which was recently erected 
at great cost for the manufacture of these arti- 
cles. For many years he has been trying to 
get a satisfactory source of supply for these 
specialties and has had great difficulty, owing 
to the growing demand in this country which 
has made it hanl to get material for export. 

In regard to the general hardwood business 
in the South. Mr. C.ellihrand says he is experi- 
encing ever-increasing difticnlty in fiutling dry 
slock for shipment. The domestic demand, 
espicialh for high-grade white oak. has put 
up prices to ^ucii an extent that the l-jiglish 
iracle will not meet them, ami Knglish buyers 
nuist either jvay more or go v ithout. 

Mr. (lellibraud considers that there is no 
(jiulit lint that the i)rices for hirdwooils gen- 
er.iilv in the South will increase slowly, but 
sureiv. ( )f course, there may be some set- 
backs, owing to the increased production 
caused bv the high )>rices, as has recently been 
true in xell'iw pine, but the general trend is 
hound to l)e toward higher values, and a few 
\ears hence the present range of prices will 
l)e rcgarde<l as ridiculously low. Hardwoods 
liave been too much neglected in the South, and 
liar.hvood timl)er lands have practically been 
given away, but this state of affairs is now 
coming to an en<l, and people are beginning 
to know what they really have in value which a 
lew ve.tis ;il:ii \\,i- considered of little account. 



A LA.RGE AMERICAN FARM-SACKED WHEAT READY FOR SHIPMENT 

Scckinc wheal in the Krcat wheat fIcUt oi the Northwett where every poulbic labor-uving method ia employed to harveil the crof* 
and traniport them to central polntx for ihlpmcnt to the markets of the Nation and the World. 



long in advance. They are farm boys, and 
knt>w liow to meet the conditions on the aver- 
age farm. 

Down in Southeastern Kansas is a threshing 
crew that is composed of boys, none of whoin 
is tnorc than twenty-ouc years ol<l. They are 
in a co-of)er,iti\ e cnuipany and have been 
making money. They do their work well and 
work hard. 

Modern improvement in the manufacttirc of 
farm implements is making it possible that 
the farmer of the near future will do his own 
threshing. There are being introduced stuall 
"f)ony" machines that can he run by a small 
gasoline or steam engine — the same one that 
g^rinds the feed for the up-to-date farmer — 
and is sold so cheap that it will pay the man 
who raises too acres of wheat to buy one. 1 f 
these become common the occupation of the 
Iirofessional thresher will be lost. He will 
liave to depend on the business of the men 
who are ton pofir to own a machine of their 
own. 

.\ great deal of the threshing of this year 
was done directly from the shock. The 



privileges demanded or tliey do not get their 
wheat thu-slied. In Kansas this has not liecn 
so successful, but the thrcslicrs arc working 
on it and hope to siicceed belore the season is 
over. 

Threshing coiumences down in Oklahoma 
late in June. It does not end until snow flies. 
Some farmers stack their grain and wait their 
pleasure for the final work of the harvest. If 
the autumn is fair, the work in that State will 
nearly all be fini'^hed bv ()cl. i. Then the 
machines and engines will he sirred until next 
smnmcr. 



AMERICAN HARDWOODS ABROAD 

The increasing use of .Xmerican hardwriixls 
in l-'.uropean carriage, wagon and implement 
plants and the appalling scarcity of .\merican 
hardwocxls, especially with reference to hick- 
ory, is bringing alxnil a discussion abroail. .X 
little light can he thrown upon this suhiect 
for the benefit of luiropran consumers in an 
investigation recently made by a London ex- 



A NEW AMERICAN PUMP 

.\ new conlrifugal pump of American make, 
which will doubtless interest European and 
other mechanics operating plants of moderate 
capacity consists essentially of two shrouded 
wheels, mounted on the same shaft in a double 
i-.isi . The case is so partitioned that the w ater is 
drawn from the source of sup])ly. and put 
under pressure b\ the first wheel. an<l then 
<lelivere<l to the siu-tinu chamber of the second 
wheel. The srrond wheel imparts to the water 
the same amount of energy it receives from 
the first wheel, thus increasing the pressure, 
an<l then delivers the water iuti' a spiral dis- 
charge conduit which terminates in a diverg- 
ing nozzle connecting with the main pipe. 

The case is <livided through its horizontal 
diameter by bolted flanges, so that its top half 
may be (|uickl\ freed and lifted off. without 
disturbing either suction or discharge connec- 
tions, thereby atTording easy access to the in- 
ternal parts at once. 

By means of bi^tcil circumferential divisions 
of the case, provision is made for either using 
the suction and discharge end of a case together 
as a single-stage mimp, or for adding as many 
intermediate sections as may be necessary to 
afford any flesired pressure at any fixed s]ieed. 
.'Ndditional stages, therefore, can l)e installed 
after a pump has been in operation without 
wasting any part of the existing case. 



t 



Export Implement Age 



29 




WE BUILD 

EDgioes aim Boilers 

From 3 to 50 horse-power, in a 
variety of sizes and styles 
special 1 y wel 1 adapted for 
foreign trade. Importers in 
position to handle such goods 
will find it to their interest to 
get our catalog. Prices and 
full information furnished 
promptly on application. 

James Leffel 4 Co. 

Num. 138 
Springfield, Ohio. U. S. A. 



WIR BAUEN 

masctiinen um Kessel 

Vou 3 bis 50 Pferdekraflen in 
eiser Auswahl von Grossen und 
Sorten, die sich besonders fiir 
den auswiirtigen Handel bestens 
eignen. Ei n f uh rhandl e r 
welche in der Lage sind solche 
Waaren zu fiihren, diirften 
finden, dass es sich in ihrem 
Interesse erweisen wird, sich 
unsern Katalog, der Preise, 
voile Be.schreibung, usw., ent- 
halt. komnien zu lassen. Der- 
selbe wird franko auf Verlangen 
sofort versandt. 

James Leffel 4 Co. 

Num. 138 
Springrield, Ohio, U. S. A. 



Nous Construisoni 

EI D[$ CHiiyDl[lt[$ 

de la force de 3 a 50 chevaux- 
vapeurs et dans une varidte de 
dimensions et de genres sp6- 
cialement adaptes i I'industrie 
(^-trangcre. Les importateurs 
qui ont occasion de s'occuper 
de cos articles trouveront grand 
int^rct a oblenirnos catalogues, 
nos prix et de completes in- 
formations qui sont fournies 
promptement sur demande. 

James Leffel 4 Co. 

Num. 138 
Springfield, Ohio. U. S. A. 




I 



STEEL ANGLE LEG 

MORTAR BARROW 

Just the thing for contractors, cement and concrete workers. It carries a 
man's load. Tray made of No. J5 steel, measures on top, 28x36: on bottom, 
20x2J. Depth at wheel, J8'4 inches; at handle end, 9 inches; has heavy rod 
rolled in edge. Handles are heavy, of selected hard wood. Legs and braces 
of angle steel. Heavy steel wheel, 16 in. in diameter, running on a ?>( steel 
axle through lugs bolted on under side of handle. Weight per doz. 850 lbs. 

LANSING WHEELBARROW CO.. 

LANSING. MICHIGAN. U. S. A. 




EXPORT OPFIGE. B 2 PRODUGE EXGHANCE 



Quincy 
Beauty 

Riding 
Plows. 

For use with 

Horses or 

Cattle. 



Collins Plow Co. 




QUINCY, ILL., U.S.A. 



Eli 

Baling 

Presses. 




Medal « and 

Diplomas 

World's 

Columbian 

Exposition, 

Chicago. 



Quincy Steel 

Lever 

Harrows 



All kinds vf 



for Steam 
and Horse 
Power. 



™t.H. Steel Plows. 




Collins' 

Hardened 

5teel 

Plows 

are the 
BEST. 




Special attention given to Packing of Export Goods, 



IN USE AT PRESENT TIHE IN 
MANY FOREIGN F1EL08. 



SEND FOR 

CATAIjOQUBf. 



30 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Aoe 



H 



MANUFACTURE OF AMERICAN 
PLOWS 

In agricultural work the pknv ib all import- 
ant, and in America representative firms are 
making many varieties, the principal types 
l>cing the well-known turning ])Iow, the disc 
plow, and of late the autonU)bile plow. There 
are main firms engaged in such manufacture. 
and some being very extensive. According to 
the American Invcniur, the process of manu- 
facture as carried on by these companies is as 
follows: In the foundry the castings for the 
l)oints and base are turned out by the thous- 
ands, and these castings are brushed over, to 
remove the sand and allow inspection. Should 
they {)rove to have sand holes, cracks or flaws, 
or be defective as to weight, size or hardness, 
they will be turned back to be melted again. 
If the i)oints and bases stand inspection, they 
are then drilled in jigs into which they roughly 
fit. after having their irregularities hastily 
removed on a grin<lstone. They are. when 
properly drilled, faced on the bottom ami side 
by a gang milling machine rea<ly for a first 
grinding. This is <lone bv setting the ]ilow 
base in a cradle swung under a large grind- 
stone running alx>ut 6=; to 90 revolutions per 
minute. The wheel is of common grindstone 
form, h to 10 inches wi<lc and in some cases 
much less. A stream of water from a pii)e 
three-(|uarters of an inch in diameter ( undei 
10 pounds i)ressure) is played upi>n the stone 
and takes up much of the dust of the wheel. 
The stones have from straight to curved cross- 
sections. The cradle is balanced so that heavy 
castings can l>e handled by one man and also 
easily removed by him. 

In grinding the plow points the grinders sit 
on platforms straddled over the wheels, and 
with large leather gloves or protectors take off 
the rough edges of the castings. In the larger 
])oints cradles are re.sorte<l to as before. The 
smell fif brimstone is prevalent in the grinding 
rooms. The life of a grinder is short, as his 
lungs s(Hin become affected by the .small par- 
ticles of iron containe<l in the air that he is 
constantlv breathing. 

The ix)ints in some cases are chilled, this 
beinc accomplished by ))lacing alone the i)oint 
part of the mould a piece of iron or steel to 
cause a chilling or hardening of the molten 
iron along the cutting edge. Wrought iron 
and steel are nut so chean as cast iron, though 
all enter in the manufacture of plow i)oints de- 
signed for various kinds of service. The 
chilled cast-iron plow however, has many ad- 
vantages besides that of cheapness, which 
have ma<le it a favorite during recent years. 

The plow handle is in the greater number 
of ]>lows that are sold, made of one of the 
hard wixids, n.ik and hickory being used for 
the nv»t part in .American manufacture. The 
timber to be used for plow handles is cut while 
green to the desired size, usuallv 3 inches 
wide, I'j to 2 inches thick and from 3 to 5 
feet lotirr. It is .-dlnwcd to kiln-dry under 
pressure or to "seasoti" out in the weather for 
6 months or a year. In such cases, however, 
it is not exjMjsed to sunshine, as warping 
occurs when it seasons with the unrlcrside 
moist and simliglit e\pi,snre on the top. Sea- 
soning in the air with a proper smdight shelter 
is considered the best. When the timber has 
thus lost all its desire to warp and is said to 
be fully seasoned, it is taken to a wood- 
working machine of the lathe type with a 



pul 



revolving cutter. The crude plow handle is 
clamped into a revolvable holder, which turns 
it and allow the cutter to shape the handle. 
It is then placed in a steam chamber, and 
steamed from 10 to \o hours, when the handle 
can be bent in bending machines, or bending 
rocks, where it is held in the bent shape and 
allowed to dry slowly, thus giving the charac- 
teristic turn of the plow handle. 

llie plow handle being dried, it is then 
readv for finishing. This is done on several 
belts, some of rough sandpaper and the others 
<■' fine sandmner. The belts are arranged on 
leys and are of ditYerent sizes and widths, 
hich run at the rate of 200 revolutions per 
minute; the round parts of the handles can 
be also finished on them. A skilled hand can 
finish one of the handles every four minutes, 
or close to 2(X> a day. After finishing, the 
handles are drilled in gantr drills, and then 
jiass to the assemblers to fit the rungs after 
bolting the handles to the plow base, to which 
the point was fitted previous to a last grind- 
ing. This last grindiu"^ leaves a finish that is 
covereil with a light coat of varnish which 
prevents rust. 

The beam of the plow is usually made of 
oak. ash or hickory, and as a rule, is strong 
ent)ugh to stand any strain a team of horses 
can exert ui)on it. the plow base usually has 
a ])oint or lug ])rojecting vertically, an<l 
l)asses through the beam, which is perma- 
nently fastened by a IkjU through the beam, 
or a key on toj) of it. The handles are both 
l>olted to the beam according to the style of 
plow, whether it be a "breaking" plow, a 
"turning" plow, "shovel." "double shovel," 
"scraper" or a "bull tongue." 

The wheel jjIows are made most often of 
wrought iron or steel, with levers to be oper- 
ated bv the driver to raise and lower the plow. 
In the "sulky plow" the driver rides on a seat 
situated upon the frame in easy reach of self- 
locking levers for raising and lowering the 
plow boily and point. 

The next operation, before the plow is 
ready for the market, is the nainting. This is 
df)ne by lK>ys who paint the parts and then 
stencil the name and size of the plow on the 
beam and handles, when it is finished ready to 
be sold. As a rule the plow factory sells its 
))roducts by the car loail. according to the kind 
of plows wanted, all the retail business being 
done by the small country town dealer. 

The life of a plow, when properly cared for. 
it might be said, is imtil a better invention or 
device takes its place. Disc plow manufacture 
is the pnxluct that has cotne into prominence 
ill the list few years, ami will l>c a lca<ling 
feature in the future. 



JAPAN AND THE FUTURE 

Japan is opening its arms, so to speak, to 
the capital of the world ,ind is inviting capital- 
ist^, business men. skilled artisans and men of 
brains to come and join in its development. 
( )kura, the greatest statesman of Japan urges 
bis fellow countrymen to devote themselves 
to developing strong companies devoted to 
prosperous business enterprises. In order to 
achieve such objects, he points out that it is 
necessary to co-operate with the more highly 
civilized countries, and calls the attention of 
the business people to the fact that the Japan- 
ese before they co-operate with foreigners must 



unite their small business enterprises, which 
at present are indulging in petty competition, 
lapan, he says, must not only introduce 
foreign capital, Init also call for the investment 
of foreign skilled arts in its conmiercial and 
industrial life. He says without qualification 
that Jai)an owes her present prosperity to the 
skilled labor of foreign instructors in all the 
modern arts and sciences, and that with this 
new skill in the industrial arts, Japan's eco- 
nomical future promises to develop exceed- 
ingly. 

It Was Mr. Okura who, with some colleagues, 
formed the Anglo- Japanese bank, with a capi- 
tal of 20,000,000 yen. At first a desire was 
expressed to allow half of the capital to be 
invested by foreigners; but Mr. Okura did 
not agree to that, for he did not think that 
high interest on ready money to co-operate 
with cheap English capital on equal terms was 
the proper way. "It was better for us," he 
said, "to devote our energy to the .ictual man- 
agement of the details of the business; and. 
therefore, we alllowed ourselves only 1-20, 
namely 1,000,000 yen. as our share in the 
enterprise." 

.Mr. ( )kura's theory of foreign co-operation 
is most interesting. He explains it in these 
words : "Co-operation with foreigners is 
necessary. You have already heartl of the 
glass factory for which we formed a comi)any 
with a Frenchman, and, hereafter, the rest 
of the European and American peoples will 
come to co-operate with us and we shall wel- 
come them. 

"It remains for us to endeavor to make these 
foreigners satisfied with our methods of busi- 
ness management ; for many Eun^peans and 
Americans may still consider that the Japan- 
ese people are in the management of com- 
merce and industry not sufficiently atlvanced 
for mutual co-operation ; and in order to efface 
such erroneous conceptions, the best way is 
simply to let them see that our ideas and habits, 
customs and usages in the business line are 
the same as those of westerners ; cf>nse(|uently. 
the division of profit is a secon<lary consider- 
ation, and the security of capital the main 
cause for anxiety." 

Mr. Okura believes that now that Japan has 
become one of the world's powers, the war 
nnist be regarded as an exhibition of Japan's 
real capacity which must be cultivated, inas- 
much as Japan has already contracte<l a politi- 
cal alliance with one of the mightiest countries 
in the world. "Now that we are entering into 
an economical alliance with all wealthy coun- 
tries." says Mr. Okura, "we Japanese must 
welcome co-operation w ith foreigners. In such 
a combination of ability and wealth and intelli- 
gence, the future of our coniniercial and eco- 
nomical enterprises will be as safe as the rock 
of Ciibraltar." 



FLOATING EXHIBITIONS 

'■ermany has been using a floating exhibi- 
tion with great advantage to her commerce 
for some time past. A steamer fitted up with 
all kinds of sample goods is sent cruising 
about among foreign ports, with experts on 
board able to give the foreigners all the infor- 
mation thev want. 






V 
I 



Monitor Seeding Machinery 

We make Broadcast Seeders and 
Sowers and Drills 

of all sizes and styles ; with Hoe, Shoe, 
Single and Double Disc Furrow Openers, 
equipped to suit the needs of any and all 
territories. 
We Claim to Make the Best Seeding Machines on Earth 

Machines that will produce the best results. Space is too limited 
to go into details, but if you will make request we will send 
illustrations and full particulars. 




MONITOR DRILL COMPANY. 



No. 6 Moalter 
Ava. 



Minneapolis, Minn., I). S. i 



"1900" Ltin, WASHING MACHINES 

The "1900" Ball-llcariai Wiskim Micklies rcpre- 
»enl over twcnty-oiie years' praciical experience, 
and, unlike any other wa.sher niM.>n Oie market, 
t» Mi (ear »»i weir Ibe tirnenl. >Mit toss and 
tumble the garment thrutigh a «kirl»««l •! Wller, 
thuaUrtlK Ike «iler Ikroifk the ItMSl or cMrse*! 
Ickrics. causing the clothes to become ABSO- 
LUTELY CLEAN, wllkait kailin n scrikkiifl. »itk**l 
WMr tr letr, ■■< wilktvl Ike isc •! ckeaicils. 



Awarded Cold Medal at World's 
Fair, St. Louis. 



ICrEIENCE : Einl Nititul 5aak al BiiikialM. N.Y. 

Send orderi direct or throuKh export houaes. 
Id latter case send duplicate to us to avoid errors. 




Illuatraled Catalogue Sent Postpaid on Request 

The "1900" WASHER COMPANY, Binghamton, N. Y., U. S.A. 




Do You Want 

Export Trade? 



P.opin the new year by subscribinjj for TiiK 
I-'.M'oKT Imi'I.k.ment Age. 



^ 



AN "AD" IN THE 

''Export Implement Age 



»» 



an independent journal, devoted exclusively 
to export trade in American Agricultural 
Machinery, Farm Supplies, Vehicles and Ve- 
hicle Materials, Machine Tools, Hardware 
Specialties, Etc., will bring you inquiries. 
Write for rates. 

THE "EXPORT IMPLEMENT AOE** 

1010 ARCN STREET. • PMIUDEIPHIA. PA. 



JOHN DEERE PLOWS 

TURN THE SOIL 
THE WORLD OVER 



These plows are the embodiment of sixty-eight years of 
experience — that is why they are the highest type of perfec- 
tion in the art of plow building. Constructed upon strictly 
scientific principles, of the l^est materials, by artisans of the 
highest skill, in the largest plow factory in the world. 

Manufactured in all sizes and for all purposes, from a seven- 
inch walking plow to an Engine Gang turning fourteen feet of 
soil at one time. 

Exported in Lar^e Quantities to Till 
Parts of ttie Globe 

Boxed compactly for foreign shipment and in most con- 
venient form for handling. 

We solicit correspondence from importers, either direct or 
through American forwarding houses. 



DEERE & CO. 



MOLINE, ILL., U. S. A. 



32 



Export Implement Age 



SOME RECENT INVENTIONS 

Onion-Picker 

Na.83l,6ia E. C. Jonea Scpt.25, 1906 

This iiivtnliun for wliicli a patent was re- 
cently issued to Ednuind C. Jones, of Harvey, 
Illinois, is jjriniarily intended to be used for 
picking or j^atiicring unions, yel may be em- 
ployed for gathering other vegetables of like 
growth. 

As the machine is propelled forwardly. the 
ixjitiled ends of the runners 47, will take up tlie 
tu|)s 57 of the vegetables, an(l the runners hold 
them at a sufficient distance from the ground 
to enable the spokes of the clamping-wheels 




to grip or clamp them at the rear ends of 
the runners, thus carrying the tops and onions 
upwardly in the revolution of the clamping- 
wheels until the onions are brought itv.c con- 
tact with the bristles 45 of the brush 4.^, wlicu 
the same is used, which will remove any dirt 
clinging thereto, after which the tops v. ill be 
forced into contact with the knife or cutter 
42 and severed from the bulbs, tints per 
mitting them to fall into the basket 56. s. hen 
the same is used, or upon the ground when 
the basket is disjiensed with. 

Supporting Mechanism for Harvester-Reels 

No. 82'>.0I6 E. A. johniton Aug. 2 I, I ■'Ob 

This invention relates to supporting mech- 
anism for harvester-reels, and is particularly 
designed to support the grainward end of the 
reel in grain-harvesters in what are usually 
called "witle-cut machines," or those having 
unusually long platforms and associated cut- 
ting mechanism, its object being to prevent the 
reel from sagging at its outer end and coming 




secured against rotation by means of the rear- 
wardly and grainwardly curved arm portion 
24, engaging with the reel-supporting arm 6, 
and having its grainward end projecting be- 
yond the tubular shaft, and secured thereto is 
one end of an arm 25, that is substantially 
eijual in length to the arm 6, and is arranged 
substantially in the same place, said arm 25 
being j)ivotally coiuiected at its op[K)site end 
with the upper end of a vertically-arranged 



in contact with the cutting mechanism or car- 
rier-apron, and to provide such preventive 
means as will not obstruct a free passage of 
the cut grain to the carrier-apron, and which 
will not necessitate the employment of addi- 
tional means for adjusting the reel to its var- 
ious operative positions. 

Within the tubular shaft to is a shaft 23, 




bar 26, that is substantially equal in length 
to the arm 7, said arm 26 being pivotally con- 
nected at its lower end to the forward end of 
the curved bar 21 in a manner having the 
pivotal connection of the bars 25. 26. and 21 
substantially in line with the pivotal connec- 
tions of the arms of 6 and 7 and that of the 
latter, with the supporting means carried by 
the seat-supporting pipe and the elevator- 
frame. When the reel is adjusted in either a 
vertical or fore-and-aft direction by the opera- 
tor, the arm 25 and the bar 26 will follow the 
movements of the arms 6 and 7 an<l be con- 
trolled thereby, and by reason of the torsional 
strength of the shaft 2.^ the grainward end of 
the reel is maintained at substantially the 
sanie level as the stubbleward end at all ixisi- 
tiuns lit adjustment thereof. 



Colter Attachment for Potato- Dlscers 

No.83l,346 A. L. Hoover Sept. 18, 1906 

The object of the invention is to provide 
a colter attachment for potato-diggers, said 
attachment carrying colter-wheels which are 
adajjted to cut the ground in advance of the 







potato-plow and at each siile thereof, said 
wheels being so mounted and carrie<l by a 
bell-crank lever that they may be thrown o>it 
of the ground, and at the same time the potato- 
plow will be elevated alxjve the ground. When 
the above oijcration is reversed and the colter- 
wheels brought in cmitact with the ground, the 
potato-plow is also lowered into the soil. 

The inventor is .\rtluir L. Hoover, of Averv, 
( )hio. 

A plow-bearing implement and a tongue- 
bearing truck, a bell-crank lever fulcrumed tn 
the im|)lement and connected to said trutk. 
forwardly-extending castings secured to said 



bell-crank lever, pins supported by said cast- 
itigs, arms swiveled to said pins, colter-wheels 
journaled in said arms, and a lever mechanism 
oi)eratively connected with said bell-crank 
lever. 



Plow 

No. 828,160 S.V.Wcekm Aug. 7, > 906 

The main object of this invention is the pro- 
duction of means whereby a plow may be 
a<l justed to accurately regulate the width of 
the furnjw and determine tlie amount of cut of 
the discs. 

.\nother object of the invention is the pro- 
duction of means for permitting the angular 
movement of the furrow-wheel with relation 
to the line of draft, whereby the plow is 
adapted for close turning at the end of the 
furrow. 

The imjiortant feature of the invention re- 
sides in the connection of the furrow-wheel 
to the main plate (jf the plow structure, which 
is so constructed as to permit adjustment of 
the furrow-wheel to vary the width of the 
furrow cut by the discs, and also to permit 




independent movement of the furrow-wheel to 
vary its lead. With this feature in view the 
main plate i of the plow structure is formed, 
or, provided adjacent the furrow-wheel with 
a bearing, or sleeve 7 projecting laterally from 
said main plate. Within the sleeve is mounted 
a spindle 8. terminally projecting beyond the 
sleeve and secured against longitudinal move- 
ment therein by a suitable key 9. To the outer 
end of the spindle is connected a rearwardly- 
extending arm lo, terminally suppt>rting a ver- 
tically-arranged sleeve li. 

A spindle 12 is revolvably mounted within 
the sleeve II, being held therein by a key 13. 
The spindle is preferably enlarged at its lower 
end, as at 14, to bear against the lower end of 
the sleeve II, and to said enlargement is 
secured or formed integral therewith a for- 
wardly-projecting sleeve 13. The axle 16 for 
the furrow -wheel 1 7 is provided at its inner 
end with a forwardly-projecting arm 18, 
arranged at right angles to the axle 16, and 
being revolvably supported in the sleeve 15, 
being held against movement therein by a key 
19. 



TO PREVENT POTATO ROT 

A method to prevent potatix's in cellars from 
rotting claims that the jKjtato fungus causes 
rutting. This fimgus, if present on some pota- 
toes in the cellar, spreads to other potatoes 
and causes rot. A solution of one pound of 
chloride of lime dissolved in 25 gallons of 
water is usi-d for washing the potatoes by 
means of a broom. Tluy are then spread out 
to dry. Through this procedure the spores of 
the fungus are killed. 



J 



I 



Export Implement Age 



THIS JOURNAL 

is CAi^iaeively devoted to American agricultural iniplemeiitf* 
and machinery, pumps, windmill!*, farm tools, <lairy sup- 
plies and hardware apecialticH, and it 

REPRESENTS THE OLDEST AND LARGEST 
HOUSES IN AMERICA 

who present their goods through our columns. We pub- 
lish each month. Each issue full of facts. 

One Dollar (Four Shillings) is the subscription price 
for ON K YEAK (Vi issues), which also entitles you to receive 
information by writing us direct, on any Huhjeet connected 
with the lines we represent. The Export Implement Ti^e 
is certainly worthy of your interest and support. 

We should be pleased to place j'ou in communication with 
the manufacturers ot any special class of machinery that you 
desire to purchase, and you may also consider our services 
at your further command. 

St^n Enclosed Blank and remit by International 
Money Order to K.M'OKtr iMPLEME.NT AuE, No. 1010 Arch St., 
Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



DIESE ZEITSCHRIFT 

ist ausschliesslich amerikanischen landwirthschaftlichen Ma- 
schinen und Gerbithen, sowie der Fabrikation von Puinpen, 
Windmotoren, Landwirthschafts-Werkzeugen, Molkereiaus- 
stattungen und den diversen Branchen der Stahl- und Eisen- 
waaren-Industrie gewidmet. Dieselbe 

VERTRITT DIE ALTESTEN UND DIE BEDEUTENDSTEN 
FIRMEN IN DEN VEREINIGTEN STAATEN 

die ihie Erzeugnisse dutch die Spalten dieses Blattes zur 
Anzeige bringen. Das Blatt erscheint raonatlich. Jede 
Ausgabe enthalt nur werthvolle That.sachen. 

Bin Dollar ( vier Mark) i.st der Abonneraentspreis pro 
Jahr (12 Ausgaben) fur dieselbe und jeder Abonnent ist 
ausserdem berechtigt an uns in seiner Mutter.sprache zu schrei- 
ben, und sich Auskunft uber irgend ein Thenia der von uns 
vertretenen Branchen zu erbitten. Das Export Implement 
flj}e ist wahrlich Ihrer Unterstiitzung und Hires Inletesses 
wiirdig. 

Wir sind gerne erbotig, Sie mit den Fabrikanten irgend 
■welcher Maschinensorten, fiir die Sie sich intercssiren diirtten, 
in Verbindung zu setzen und wird es uns freuen, wenn vSie 
sich unserer Dienste in irgend welcher Weise bedieneu vvollten. 

Man unterzeichne das beigefiigte Schema und sende den 
Betrag durch "Internationale Oeldanweisung " an das 
KxpoBT iMi'UKMKNT Agk, No. ioio Arch Street, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CE JOURNAL 

est exclusivement consacre au.K machines et instruments agri- 
coles Amcricains, i>ompes, nioulins a vent, outils de fenue, 
appareils pour laiteries, articles spcciaux de quincaillerie. 

IL REPRESENTE LES MAISONS AMERICAINES LES 
PLUS ANCIENNES ET LES PLUS VASTES, 

les quelles off rent leurs produits par lintermcdiaire de nos 
colonnes Le journal est tnensuel. Chaque numero abonde 
en faits d'utilite pratique. 

Abonnement pour un an: Un Dollar {quatre schelllni^a 
ou cinq francs.) Tout abonnc qui vondra bieu nous ccrire 
directement recevra tous les renseignerments qu'il pourra 
desirer sur les matieres dont s'occupe le journal. L' Export 
Implement Ttj^e est assuremeut digne de votre inter^t et de 
votre concours. 

Nous serions heureux de vous mettre en relations avec les 
fabricants de n'importe quelle categorie de machines que vous 
pouvez desirer vous procurer, et nos services vous sont, 
d'ailleurs, compl^tement acquis. 

Siiner le bulletin cl'lnclus et envoyer un mandat de 
poste international h. 1'Export Implement Agk, No. 1010 
Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa. (Etats-Unis d'Amerique). 



ESTA REVISTA PERIODICA 

se dedica exclusivaraente d los instrumentos y niaquinaria 
agricolas de manufactura norte-americana, bonibas, molinos 
de viento, herramientas de hacienda de canipo, uten.silios para 
lecherfa y cspecialidades en ferreterias, y 

REPRESENTA A LAS MAS GRANDES Y ANTIGUAS 

CASAS DE AMERICA, 

que ofreccn sus productos fabriles en nuestras columnas. Se 
publica todos los meses. Cada numero esta Ueno de hechos. 

Un Peso {Guatro Qhellnes) al aiio es el precio de la 
subscripcion (12 nitraeros), y la subscripcion os da derecho 
a recibir itifornies. si nos e.scribfs directamente, .sobre cuahpiier 
asunto relacionado con el ramo de negocios tpie representamos. 
La Export Implement Tl^e es A la verdad digna de que 
OS intereseis por ella y contribuydis a su sosten. 

Tendremos niucho gusto en jwueros en corre.spondencia con 
los fabricantcs de cuahjuiera clasc especial de nuupiinaria 
(pie desceis conipTar, y podeis tanibien considerar nuestros 
servicios a vuestra di.sposicioii. 

Firmad la Planllla en bianco Inclusa, y remitid 
vuestra subscrijKion en un Ciiro Postal Internacional a la 
Exn.KT iMiM.K.MKNT A(;K, No. luio Arch Street, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U. S. A. 



No. 1010 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



T 



34 



Export Implement Age 



AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY 



The Wonderful Saving of Labor— The Progress 
Made in the Use of Machines 
and Appliances 



I'anii nuicliiiKiy may sumc time tlo work 
fur lis lliat will be worth ^i,ckx),<kx).o(X) a 
year, says the ll'orUI's U'orl:. Theoretically 
it is already savinjj us nearly three-fourths 
that sum; for as far hack as iH*/;, if all the 
crops lo which machinery is adaiitcd could 
have 1k(.ii planted and leathered by hand, they 
woulil have cost nearly i?7(X).f)OC),(XX} more 
than if they had all l>ecn planted and gath- 
ered by machinery. It has not r>nly ad<lcd so 
much to our wealth, but it has made us the 
ft)reiiiost exporting nation. an<l it is changing 
the character «>f the farmer by freeing him 
from monotonous hand-toil. 

More than that, it is fast changing the 
imnuinorial conception of agriculture and the 
pastoral and idyllic associations that have 
gathered alK»ut it since the time ^i Abraham. 
Wealth, industry, commerce, the clianicter o{ 
men and even their sentiment are all atTected 
by it. .Ml the great crops are mw planted 
aiid all excein cotton are gathered by machin- 
erv. I,et us follow a crop throughout a sea 
sons work and see the changes that have 
collie in its treatment. 

The ploughman no longer trutlges slowly 
and wearily back and forth across his field. 
He rides a sulky plough with a si)ring seat. 
There are special ploughs for every neeil : turf 
))loughs. stubble ploughs, subsoil ploughs, 
ploughs for heavy work, ploughs for light 
work and gang ploughs turnin"- three fur- 
rows at once. So simple are many of them 
that a Ixiy may <lrive one. I'loughing by 
.iteam is not commonly practiced in the Mid- 
dle West, but on the great wheat ranches of 
the Pacific coast it is common. On the tule 
lands of California a r)0-horsc-i>ower traction 
engine <lrawing 21 feet of disk i)loughs will 
break the ground to a depth of 10 inches at 
the rate of 45 to ('<n acres a <lay. With niould- 
lx>aril ploughs, designed esjiecially for this 
work, a strip 28 leet wi<le can Ik- broken 
This means that a man and a pair of horse- 
with a single mould-board plough winild have 
to cross a field 28 times to do the same work 
that the traction engine docs by one trip uf its 
ploughs. A farmer of the central west wlm 
n.ses a small traction engine and a gang i«f 
four 14-incli |>loughs says that it costs him 
from 50 to A2 cents per acre to break bi^ 
ground. I lo considers steam ec<inomical. 

The plowing <lone, the manure spreader 
replaces the hand fork and its backache. 
While the farmer with a jmir of horses drives 
back and forth across his fields, from the roar 
of his wagon the fertilizer is mccbaiiicdly 
spread evenlv over his land. Manure, com- 
mercial fertilizer, cornstalks, straw, lime. 
ashes or litter frf)ni the barnyard, are sjiread 
with greater economy, because with greater 
evenness, than by band, to sav nothing of the 
saving of time and of toil. 

The land made rcad\- for the reception of 
the seed, machinery still docs tlic work that 
muscles used to <lo. The sower gucs forth to 
sow. but not as he once did, drop|iing the 
seed into the soil, trudging backward and for- 
ward from dawn till twilight. His grass or 
his grain is broadcasted or drilled in with 



mechanical evenness, and the machine auto- 
matically registers the acreage sown. In like 
manner his corn is drilled in, listed or planted 
in hills, his jx^tatoes are planted and even his 
cabbage, his cauliflower and his tobacco 
plants from the seed-beds are set out by 
machinery, an<l the work is done better than it 
could |M)ssibly be liy hand — this, liesides the 
saving of time an<l toil, hven in the vegeta- 
ble garden seekers for all kinds of seeds are 
now extensively used. The machines arc 
jni.shed in frcmt of the operator, ami they auto- 
matically drop and cover the seeds at the 
desired distances and depths and at the same 
time mark off the next row. 

l'rom|)lly after the crop is planted come the 
weeds. Thev once meant the hoe. blistered 
hands, weary backs, and, in a wet season, a 
long and weary battle. To-day the farmer ha-^ 
choice from a great variety of cultivators, 
either guideil by handles, the driver walk- 
ing behind, or made with wheels and a scat, 
the driver riding in front. Thus corn and 
potatoes are ridged up and the ground is ke]>t 
clean and in good condition. There are hand- 
cultivators worked on the same princii)le as 
the hand-seeders, and there is a great variety 
of boos, rakes and ploughs for the cultivation 
of special crops, which have su])planted the 
ol<l hand tools on the great seed farms and 
market gardens. 

I'ut it is when we come t«» the harvest that 
we find the greatest marvels in machanical 
ingenuity. Every one is familiar with the 
mower, the ted<ler and the In>rscrake to save 
the hav crop. To these have been ad<led the 
bay-gatherer ami .stacker, tlrawn by horses, 
and a press o|>eratc<l by horse-jjower. 

To harvest and to jjress a ton of hay by 
hand re<|uires thirty-five and one-half hours 
of lalx)r: with modern machinery, eleven 
hours and thirty-four minutes. The greatest 
saving is in the cutting and the curing of the 
cn)p, which by hand recpiire eleven hours and 
bv macbinerv one hour and thirty-nine min- 
utes. 

r.ut it is the harvesting of the two great 
crops, wheat and C(jrn. that the greatest 
advance in agricultural mechanics has been 
made. Drawn by horses, the self-binder cuts 
an eight-foot swath across the field of ripened 
wheat. Rut instead of leaving if strewn 
behind as the mower docs the grass, it gathers 
it and automatically binds it in bundles. ( ^r, 
if a header be preferred, the heails of the 
standing grain are taken off cleanly and 
poured in a steaily stream through a chute 
into the wagon that is driven beside it. I'ut 
evin more than these — the most s|iectacular 
scene of agricultural progress i> the combined 
harvester and thresher which is used on the 
great grain ranches in t'alifornia. .\s far as 
the eye can reach stretches a sea of golden 
grain. It is a glorious sight, this immense 
plain of ripened wheat — the foiwl of a nati<»n 
awaiting the band of the reaper. Where arc 
ibc harvesters who shall garner a crop so 
large? Measured bv the methiHls of small 
K.astern farms, the nmblcin uf •>a\iiig such a 
crop seems hardly less than the ennttying of 
the great lakes with a dipper. Rut the steam 
harvester moves steadily forward into it. On 
one side the grain falls in a great swath. Tt 
melts away before the maj('>tir advance of the 
machine. On the other "ulv with the same 
regularity drop sacks of grain read\ for the 
miller. The ranchman following with his 



team ])icks up a sack filled with threshed and 
winnowed wheat from the verv spot where but 
five minutes before the wheat stalks stoo<I in 
the sunshine. In the broa<l path between the 
standing grain and the line of brown sacks has 
passed (nie of the greatest triumphs of .Amer- 
ican machinery, the combined harvester and 
thresher. 



A PNEUMATIC GRINDER 

The verv ra]>id growth of use of jjiieumatic 
tools abroad, of American manufacture, makes 
it advisable to call attention to a imeumatic 
tool grinder just brought out by the Pneu- 
matic Tool Co.. Chicago. 111. The machine is 
(if the recijirocating piston type, having four 
piston rods, direct acting on the crank, and 
is e(|uip])ed with the Thor-Corliss valve motion, 
which gives it great i)ower and a speed of 
approximately 3.0:0 revolutions per minute. 
The grinding spindle proper is liebl in the 
housing extended from the end of the motor 
in line with the crank shaft. It is not a part 
of the crank shaft, however, but is connected 
with it. The grinding siiindie itself runs on 
bearings that are a combination of ball and 
plane Jiearings. There is a large bronze bear- 
ing next to the motor and then a four-j)oint 
ball bearing, which acts as a supi)ort for the 
shaft, 

.\t the outer end i-> a metallic packing that 
also acts as bearing. an<l at the same time 
prevents the lubricating oil from running out 
of the machine, 'i'he motor and shaft run in 
a bath of oil. and the ix'culiar bearings for 
the grinding s|)iiidle make it possible for this 
to run at a liigh speed without getting hi>t or 
losing its lubricant. A grij) handle in line 
with the grintling sj)ind!e and the outside of 
the housing of the same spindle serve as 
handles. Slandrels of any suitable length 
or .shape may be attached to the grinding si)in- 
dle for driving emery wheels, soft polishing 
wheels or discs. The machine weighs about 
JO pounds, consumes approximately 20 cubic 
feet of free air jkt minute, and is very easily 
handled and ojn rated. 



AN INSTANTANEOUS WRENCH 

Implement and vehicle inaiiuf;i^tiirers at 
home and abroad are always interested in 
a wrench that will do its work better than the 
wrenches in the shop. .\n instantaneous 
wrench has been brought out by the I'nion 
TtMil C'o., Pioston, Mass.. which is designed to 
be operated with one h.uid, and which by 
the instantaiu-ous action uf the jaws can be 
adjusted and rele.isid (|iiieki\. ( )ii the eight- 
inch size there is a Utile plunger which oper- 
ates with the thumb. 1"here is a movement 
of one-half inch on this pluiiu;er. ubicli opens 
the j;i\\ om inch. 

< In the nii<ler side of the handle is a slight 
projietioii which enables tlu- opcMator lo ^et 
a firm gri]) on the tool. (An the 14-iiHli si/A' 
there is a lever on the handle, and when 
this is hrouglit into action, the jaws oprn two 
inches. Rek'asing the lever instantaneouslv, 
drives the milled jaw iiitri ])osiiion on the 
pipe or rod. The eigbl-incli si/e wti^lis 13 
ounces, .and the 14-inch size weighs ^' , pounds, 
I'lolli have japanned hamlies. The wearing 
parts are made of high-gradt.', dioji furycd 
sleel. The jaw and heel are case hardened, 
ground and polished. 



.4 



Export Implement Age 



Fl». 779— No«.8'-i and lOM 




4ft 



ff 



Weight: No.S'i 
lbs lb!i.: No. 
loH. iho lbs. 



OHIO 



CUTTERS 

I'or cutting liay, corn, clover, alfalfa, 
chaff or olht-r foilders. 20 ilifferent 
sizes, in various styles, weij^hing from 
40 Ujs., up to 4,500 11)S. 

Kasy running, for hand or power; 
very large capacities; strong rigid con- 
struction; very <lural)le. Machines fur- 
nished to cut any length from !s inch 
up to I ',i inches. 

Send for tinely illustrated catalog 
with particulars and prices f. o. b., 
New York. 

The Silver Mlg.Co. 

U. S. A. 



SALEM. OHIO. 




PUMPS 



For All Purposes 




Cistern and Pitcher Spout Pnmpa Trip'«-x Power Pomps for every dnty 

Hand and House Force Pumps Kotary and Double-Actlng Pumps 

Deep Well Pumps and Standards Power Pumps for All Purposes 

Iron, Brass and Bras^-llned Cylinders Ho se Power Pnmps for Various Dutlea 

Windmill ,T-Way Pumps and Standards Rail'oad and Factory Pumps 

Deep Well Power Pumping EnBines Spr»ylni{ Pumps and Noiiles 

Artesian Well Brass WorkinR Barrels Garden and Hand Fire Engines 
Hydraulic Rams and Pumping Motors IrrigaUng Pumps and Cylinders 




11^ 






^M 



%y. 







Henderson's Full Circle Hand 
Power Cold Tire Setters 



Scientific Hydraulic 
^,0 Edge Grip 

Are Labor and Money Savers 






MAnuf.icturc.H bv 



KEOKUK 
IOWA 

J. H. MORROW, Brighton. Ont..GiniMl AK<nt tor Cjn.ida, U.S. A. 

OrdjM tr.im Otlur Co„ntrl« Mav b€ PUcid Direct or Throutjh Ejix-rttr.. 



THE STANDARD TIRE SETTER CO.. 




Our General Cata'ogue in Kng- 
lish, containing 300 p^'ges, will tie 
sent to importers u|iun applica- 
tion. 

We also issue a C.i-neral Cata- 
logue in SpaiiiNli. Hiid a Special 
Catalogue of our Triplex and Heep 
Well Power Punlp^. Also one of 
Spray Puraps. 




THE DEMING QOMPTINY 

S7\LEM, OHIO, U. S. A. 



\ew York Sales OfUce : 50 and 5S Pine Street 




WIND MILLS 

Halladay Standard. U. S. Solid Wheel. 
Gem and Comet 

Pumps, Tanks. Feed Mills. Corn Shellen 
and Wood-Sawing Machines. 



© 



MOULINS A VENT 

Halladay Standard, a U. S. Roue Solide, 
Bouclier et Comete 

Pompes. Reservoirs, Moulins a Fourrage, 

Cgrenoirs de Mais 

et Machines pour scier le Bois. 




MOLINOS DE VIENTO 



Halladay Universal. Rueda Solida. U. S 
Asegurador y Cometa 

Bombas, Tanques. Molinos de Forraie, 

Descascaradoras de Maix 

y Maquinas para aserrar madera. 



Kiablii- . 



U. S. WIND ENGINE AN 

BATAVIA, ILLINOIS, U 



WINDMOTOREN 

Halladay Standard. Ver. St. massiv. Rad, 
Schild und Komet 

Pumpen, Wasserbehalter, Futtermiihlen, 
Mais-Fnthiilsemaschinen 
und Holzsage-Apparate. 

D PUMP CO 

. S. A. 



Export Implement Age 



KELLYS DUPLEX GRINDING MILL 




FOR CORN ^N1> COB 



Corn With the Shucks on and jilt 
Kinds of Grain 

The only Mill tli:it '^riiuis on both sides of the revolving burr, 
giving double the ^;rin(luiK surface of any other Mill nunle. Made 
ill sizes from 4 to .'o horse-i)ower, and to grind from s l.> 5.' bushels 
per hour, l.ilieral arrangements made with agents. Addre.ss the 
manufacturers, 




/^ 



lai 0. S. KELLY CO. 



SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 
U. S. A. 



If 



Send 3-cent stamp to pay poataie) tor our I905 
eATALOU, with a tull list of requirements in 



Full square, lurued head Carriage, 
Star Grade Carriage, Tire, Ma- 
chine, Plow, Elevator and Stove 

Axle, Spring Bar, Saddle, Short 
Spring atid other 

PRICES QUOTED ON APPLICATION 

NUTS, WASHERS, RIVETS, ETC 



BOLTS 
CLIPS 



COLUMBUS BOLT WORKS, Columbus, 0., U. S. A. 



USED THE WORLD OVER 

STUDEBAKER 

WAGONS, CARRIAGES, HARNESS, 
== AUTOMOBILES === 

fOR BLSINtSS USE AND FOR PLEASURE DRIVING 

Printrd Mailer in I r.glUh or Spanish 

STUDEBAKER BROS. MFG. CO. 

NIW YORK. CHU AGO, S^S PR/INCISCO. PORfiafSD, ORt., 
KANSAS CITY. SALT lAKT CITY, DtNVlR. BAllAS 

Far.lory and f xerullvr OHlcesi SOUTH BEND, IND., U. S. A. 






Famous Soil Turners 



FOR 



EXPORT TRADE 




"Bissell 

Chilled 

Plows 



STEEL 

AND 

WOOD 

BEAM 

PATTERNS 



Wood Beam 
Plow 



They do the work and do it long and well. 
They're made for all kinds and conditions of soil. 

They're low in price. 

Large or small orders can be shipped promptly. 
Catalogue in English, German, French and Spanish 
for the asking. 



The Ohio Cultivivtor Co. - Bellevue, Ohio 



l^lmh, 




JLk. 



, EXPORT, 

IMPLEMENT Age 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to American Agricultural 

Machinery, Farm Supplies, Vehicles and Vehicle 
Materials, Machine Tools, Hardware Specialties, Etc. 



TEXTE FRANCAIS 
Papier Rose 



TEXTO ESPANOL 

Papei Amarillo 



DEIJTSCHER TEXT 

Blaues Papier 




Vol. XV. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA., U. S. A., JANUARY, 1907. 



No. 4 



i 



Fabrikantf n 
<f,A von AA 



MORGAN 6 WRIGHT 

Gummiwaaren Bester Qualitat 




Automobil Radreifen, t'ahr/eu}; Kadreifen, 

Hufciseii Poister 

Schluuchr, kaut^chukhand. Thurmalten. VrrpackunK!' 
t tpnsilirn. Mebr^orrichtunjctn, cfrippits Ma 1 1 c n w r rk. 
i'rlral-Maschincnbrutci, Kni>trnmaltcn, KInice >ur Rah. 
mabsonJerer, u. b. «. 

'waii/ifc^ J;»!uc laiigc Krf.ih'.utii^ in Atrr i-R\tiiknii<>n \>^u 
*iimttt;*art*ti Vn*-**; L;ii<t r brMeht Bti»* dm aiiftf.'iH**?* m 
-. ...neii pa, yualil.U uuU Willi »ltl« gBrolilirl. >.! Knlinnt-t- 
pTompt be«illwurtet, 

M0R6AII & WRIBNT Dttrott, Mich., U. S. A. 

il4 \\ . 47th Sirect. MiNN NOKK 



badrtilrn lur Kahr»«ugc— Sjiildc iind 
I'fiUlrr. Fur Haspd irdi r fi» 




k hnkt f Aiitomobttradre-ilcn 



A Plow with Reversible 

Point and Wing 




and for this reason a plow Ihat is a rapid seller 



The farmer ■pprectalts it bi-caiise it is always reaiiy with a fresh cut- 
ling edge. The iipptf edge iH always being sharpened while the lower one 
is being used. The matter of reversing them is very qtnck and simple no 
wrench being required, ami there is no necessity for turning the plow over 

We hlfhl) rectmncnd (his Plow far Cla^. Gravel, Sisae ar ■ Hard Pan Sail 

PfT Puilhtfr F'articnlrtr s ,*tii! if u e^ ,*i'il' t',- 

South Bend Chilled Plow Co. "^ZT 



DAVID BRADLEY 



,n(iuhlt lam.. 
StrrI Hii Prtss 



KNOWN THE WORLD OVER 



Never 

Piit of 

Always 
Rs^dy 
to Work 



Wfc^^ng Atushmc^t 



&«t «fid Sifnplc«t In CMi- 




• t^h standing with the loreiKn ^^dc. It do€i mote than f« 
if 4U ioiidittons. Write lor Itterdturc. Wi antwer cof- 



The Davtd BridUv Eii.i 
claimed tor *t, and dvc^ r*!-' 
r»' p , Uiije in dny 1,jt . 

]. I T.ti^s I}B\ 'Meexcrfitricg d« iicero para rmbalar Ileno Ci blca 

cuuu'.ui.ien i<h1(* el n, =,. - ,.,^ ^^ (je^. ..«.,. n- y fstA siempr? liMa parft el Irabajo. 
Ks 1b niejot, y *u (oti^iniccion e<» ma»*tf^ uttiguuft t>tra |ire'n*.s itsmA*- fabri- 

cada. Tiene iin iii.'rp'sorio |*'*ff^ ^"T*t. ' "ra hjivui Brail'ey oiupa itna alta 

^ " ^e le ainljuyc y **u trabsjo r» 

nde diieMtbi- fttipreftoi*. CoP- 



perfecto bato !'.*Sa- 



'iiii i->i ' nil- - ■: 
d'uii Mrctjiirtii 
tion dan* !p r- 



tinr (ic l^vid htaiiiry eHtcotinur dati* Ir inctide totier. 
I'' niat*t tDu|nut!» an travail Kile eai In Birillrtir f et la plua 

ii I Mtiijmitr Itotitt »r"-^ ■ ■ ..-...* . .. _ , !, , -^ . ^,jj,jp 

I,H l*re»*'ip ii F*tin ' i! » 



Mddc t.v llAVIl) BR4lil[^ Mfd 



imim. ILL.. L, S. 4. 



■F.l PAki 

"A I ■ 



/ 



Lawn Mowers 

FOR HORSE 

anZ HAND USE 

.Xd.iji'fil t' ?■ all niarki.t'- 
ot liic world. 



CHADBORN & 
COLDWELL 
MFG. CO. 

NEWBUR6H 
N.Y. 



U. S. A. 




SESD FOR 
CATALOGUE 
vlAO PRICES 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



Imyers 



RAItHH 
HAMJLI 



PIMPS 



dU'k'! \4\\t Sttt 





; ]•!■" 



1JS 



&Bno 



*.. 1.4 






Juiia isl.t li>6Si 



iin.' d^Talopad nmm 



B 

u;y are adApted 

. Undtr. pumping urL.iUi ijua!.; 
■jitli, on which a mimIUt c\ In 
rdinary iMnn; 



ise, or can be used with larger 
if the Himif 
i! with till- 



F. E. MYERS & BRO. 



ASHI AM) 
OHIO 



ReliM.u* dliicev»r«d An*(ieii awl opaMMI «ni n H»« World to el»H- 

I^»- -rnd tii» T,' 

i»#th(i4« 'or r -.r. 

*^'^.-. «,( - ii^ns >*-.Qr* fnr - i» rirv n ru-:-» tfi«n any ot>i*r natural 
tlanent Miat.<<in Ktr, 

Ta« rt»nl(i>- »!.o «uri'llc»d t! » p'JPir *"«* Bf '•<Tirl''^'«» '"!» *" • 

hmm*¥ts;nr ?u hl» In Hlltv, ani' of conrsi •nnl* •.■<> m»«. puBir , 'f-T W>:RS: 

H«v# 'nij -nilii ■.■.).,r i^n-k tr t If llr«? 

--:v ..V • ; slTi-tOW S»W»* PSOTI". 

?til» Ur* mil- tn th* •%«%« of »h« •«» «• ■ Itn* 

.' er, iwnf iiiiifksd Bdv«iitair« r«iill«r to tli«n««l»«« th«^ 

■"■: I. '; L»:K..>' i» rniCRK, «t uny hOiil* of t'ti« fjinUfl, •.r4-j 

?•.»: Sir* «»i«ii Ifili;' .<lHit»d fo- lu.ml nnl »lmlnlll i«« luirt d*^ 

' vi|«f« p>-»{«p« to tm>*rB<!% »1''. .--wii*" m «■ •«clu»l»« 
■i.l« .r till* ita« in bU iMMCuptM t'^^rt^aT. ^ ... ... .. 

"I'". 






expoKf ofuct 
B 21 Produce Exchange, New York, U.S. A. 



Imperial 



Extension 
Reversible 



Disc Harrow and Cultivator 



Two Machines for One Price 




««ft!MIP» 



)v -Lnr 




inin-.. 



Catalogue, Yours. Free. AGENTS WANTED iti unoceupied territory. Patent Interlocking Hubs 
prevents Disc turning betwet ti spindles and cutting ot axle. 

THE BUCHER & GIBBS PLOW CO. ^-^I Produce Exch«nQe,^NCW YORK, N. Y., I). S. A. 



I 



I 



Directory for Buyers. 

The names of firms given below, 
together with the goods mentioned, 
are atranf;ed for the convenience of 
buyers. Their products are given in 
the English, French, Spanish and 
German languages. These establisb- 
nents are among the leading ones in 
the United States, arc strictly reliable, 
have extensive facilities and are 
prompt in transacting business. Tbey 
fully understand the export trade and 
carefully look after all foreign orders. 
The Export Impi.kmhnt Agh is kept 
on file in their offices, and any mention 
of the journal will be an incentive to 
even greater promptness on their part 
is obliging you. Inquiries from for- 
eign buyers deairing information reU 
ative to American agricultural ma- 
chinery or implements addressed to 
them will be given careful and prompt 
attention. Write in any language 
you prefer. 



Repertoire a I'Usage des 
Acheteurs 

Les maisons ci-dessous et les pro- 
duits mentionnes out ete classes dans 
cet ordre pour la commodile des ache- 
teurs de langues anglaise, frangaise, 
espagnole et allemande. Ces etablis- 
sements sont parmi les principaux des 
Etats-Unis, ils sont absolument 
s^rieux, ils possedent de grandes 
facilit^s, sont prompts en affaires, 
lis connaissent a fond le cemnierce 
d'exportation et donnent tons leurs 
soins a I'execution des comuiandes 
qui leur viennent de I'etranger. Ils 
conservent une collection de I'Export 
Implement Age dans leurs bureaux, 
et la simple mention de ce journal 
stimuleradavantage encore, si possible, 
leur lele et leur promptitude a obliger 
leurs clients. L'Kxport Implement 
Age, de son c6te, donnera une pronipie 
attention aux demandes de ronseigne- 
ments sur machines et instruments 
agricoles am^ricains, que peuvent lui 
adresser les acheteurs de I'etranger. 
Ecrire dans la langue que Ton pr^fere. 



Directorio par& Ids Com- 
pradores. 

Los nonibres de los articulos que 
fabrican las firnias u casas mencionadas 
a continuaci6n se dan, para conve- 
niencia de los conipradores, en los 
idiomas ingles, francOs. espafiol y 
aleman. Esos estableciniientos, que 
iC cuentan entre los princijtales de los 
Estados I'nidos, estJin coniplctamente 
acreditados, son dignos de toda con- 
fianza y lienen las niayores facilidades 
para ejecutar y despachar con pronti- 
tud tudos sus negocios. Conocen A 
fondo el comercio de exportacion y 
atienden con el mayor esniero a todos 
los pedidos que reciljen del extraojero. 
Los ntimeros del Export Implement 
Age se coleccionan en sus oficinas, y 
toda referencia a esta revista es un 
incentive para atender con mayor 
prontitud aun a vuestros requerimien- 
tos. Todos los informes que pidan 
los compradores del extranjero seran 
suministrados d la mayor breve<lad 
por esos fabricantes sobre la ma- 
quinaria agricola e inslrumentos de 
labranza americanos. Escribidles en 
cualquier idioma que prefir&is. 



Firmen-Verzeichnis fiir 
Kaufer. 

Die Erzeugnisse dt-r unten ge- 
nannten Firnien sind fiir die Kequem- 
lichkeit ausliindiscber Kaufer in eng- 
lischer, franzosischer spanischer und 
deulscher, Sprache hier wiederge- 
geben. (tenainile Htablissetnente ge- 
hiiren zu den tK-deutendstfn in den 
Vereinigten Staaten; siesind in jeder 
Weise ziiverlassig, liesitzeii ausge- 
dehnle l-acilitaten und erfreuen sich 
eines ehrenvollen Kufes. .Alle von 
ihnen unteriioninienen Geschafts- 
transaktionen werden in proniptester 
Weise zur .^usfijhrung gebracbt. Jedes 
hierin genanntc- Haus ist mit deiii Ex- 
porthandel wohl vertraut und um aus- 
wiirtige Auftriige eifrig bemiiht. Dai 
Export Implement Age wird von 
all diesen Firmen gelcsen, dient ihnen 
sozusagen als Informations-Register 
und diirfle somit eine Angabe dieses 
Journals bei event. Waarenbestellung 
nur zur Anregung gros.serer I'rompt- 
beit dienen, um pp. Kiiufern in best- 
miiglicher Weise entgegenkomuien xu 
konneii. Jetle auswartige Anfrage 
binsichtlichamerikanisch rlandwirth- 
schafllicher Maschinen und Gerathe 
wird nicht allein promple, sondem 
auch stets sorgfaltige Aufmerksamkeit 
erhalten. Interessenten konnen sich 
jeder belit-bigen Sprache zur Korre- 
spondenz l>edienen. 



Ambulance* 
Carres de hospital 
Krankenwagen tAmbulanzenj 



Baling Presses i Hay, Straw. Etc. ) 
Presses k foin, paille, etc. 
Prensas de Embalar ( Heno, I'aja, etc. 
Ballea Pressen i fiir Heu. Stroh, u. s. i 

Rrwiley Mfg. Co.. David. Bradlrv, IIL . . 

Colliiii Plow Co.. Quincv. Ill 

Briel Co., OeorKcQuincjr. Ii: 



Carriages 

Voitures 

Carruajes 

Kaleschen und Wagen 

Dkpiion d( Wolf, Oneida, N. Y 

Bludebaker Bro*. Mtg. Co., S«utb Band, Ind. 



C<Md Shutes 

Charbon (Dalles a) 

Canales para Descargar Carb6n de Piedra 

Kohlen Lade-Rionen 



a 

m 



LaiKtnc Wheelbarrow Ca.. LaiMint, Miob. 



M 



1 

3« 

6 



Beet Implements (Planting, Cultivating and 

Harvesting ) 
Bctteraves Instruments pour la culture des) 
lastrumentos para el Cultivo de la Remolacha 

(Semhradoras, Cultivadoras y Cosechadoras ) 
Riibengerate (zum Pflanzen, Pfliigen und Ernten) 

Moline Plow Co.. Mollne, ni « 



Binders, Self ( Wheat, Rye. Oats, etc.) 

Lieuses Automatiques (Ble, Orge, Aroine, etc.) 

Agavilladoras Automaticas (Trigo, centeno avena, 

etc.) 
Sdbstbindemaschinen (fiir Weizen, Roggen, Ilafsr 



Boilers. 
Chaudieres. 
Calderas. 
Kessel. 

I/effel ft Co., Jamee. Sprinirflrlil. Ohio 



Carriage Cloth 
Wagentuch 
Pano de carruaje 
Drap de Voiture 

FairflelU Kubber Co., The. FeirOrld, Conn. 



Carriage Materials 
Articles pour voitures 
Materials for Carriages 
Wagenmaterial 



Carts (Riding) 
Charrettes ( i si^ge ) 
Carr<*ones (de Alontar) 
Frachtkarren (Reitkarren) 

Dapenn A Wolf Oneida. N. V 



Corn Crushers 
Mais ( Concasseurs «le ) 
Trituradoras de Maiz 
Mais Zerquetschmaschinen 

Sprout, Wnldron & Co.. Muncy, Pk, 



Corn Harvesters 
Mais I .Moissonneuses de) 
Cosechadoras de Maiz 
Mais Erntemaschiaen 

SUndard Harrow Co.. CUca. N. Y. 



Bolts and Nuts. 

Boulons et Serous. 

Peroos y Tuercas. 

Bolzen und Muttern (Mutterbolzeni 

Columbua Bolt Works, ColumbM, Ohio 



Brakes (Vehicle) 
Retrancas (Vehiculo) 
Freln (de Voiture) 
Bremsen (fijr Pahrzeuge) 

faMer Co . The Mor(an, Fiebkill on Hudeon. N 



Cider and Wine Presses 
Pres-soirs a vin et A cidre 
Prensas para Hacer Cidra y Vino 
Kelterapparate fiir Wein und Apfelwein 

lAniing Wheelbarrow Co . ].,sni-irig, Micli. . . 



Clothes Washing Machines 
Linge (machines 4 laver le) 
Maquinas de Savar Ropa 
Wische Waschmaachinen 

"IMO" W»»herCo.. RinRhaniton. N 'N' 



Coal Cars 

Charbon ( wagons pour) 

Carros para Carb6n de Piedra 

Kohienwaggons 

lianaiac Whia lb a w w O*., Lanalac, Mtcb. 



Corn Huskers and Shredders 

MaJs (Instruments i enlever et k d^chi'er lea 

bracties du ) 
Desgranadoras y Picadoras de Maiz 
Mais Enthiilsemaschinen und Auswerfapparate 

Fmrilrv Mfg. Co., llBvtil. Rrwlley. Ill 



Corn Planters ( Hand ) 
Mais ( Semoirs de, i. ma'". ) 
Semhradoras de Maiz (A Msno) 
Maispflanzer i fiir Handbetrieb) 

Ohio CuliivBlor Co., The, Betlerue. Ohio . 



II 



Com Planters f Horse) 
Mais ( Semoirs de. d cheval ) 
Semhradoras de Maiz ( para Caballo) 
Mais Pflanzmaschineo (fiir Pferdebetrieb) 



Bnulley Mfg. Oo., David, Bradlex. Ill, 
Moline Plow Co.. Moline, III 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 



Corn Shelters i Fland i 
Mais ( Kgreiioirs de, a main ) 
Descascaradoras de Maiz (de Maiio) 
Mais Pflanzmaschinen (fiir Ilandbctrieb) 

Marneillcd Mfg. Co., Mmr»eillo«, III * 

P»t<:li, A. H.Clarksvill*. Tenii ^ 

Sprout. Walilroii & Co., Muncy, t*« j 

Standard Harrow Co., I'tica, N. Y 3 

D.S. Wind Kmine and Pump Co., Bat»Ti». Ill :" 



Corn Sheilers Power) 
Mais ( Egrenoirs dei, a energie mecaniquc 
Descascaradoras de Maiz (para Fuerza ineciaica) 
Mais t>flanzinascliinen fiir Pferdebetrieb) 

Marseille* Mfg. to, Marseilles, III * 

Patch. A. H., Clarksville, Tenn * 

Sprout. Waldroii * Co., Muncy. Pa | 

Standard Harrow Co , t'tica. N. Y • 



Cotton Planters 
Coton (Semoirsdel 
Sembradoras de Algodoa 
Baumwoll Pflanzmaschinen 

OliloOiiHivator Co , The. BellBTue. Ohio 31 



Cultivating Machinery ( Hand and Lr<«rdeii) 
Culture du sol i Intruments pour la), dmain'et 

pour le jardiii 
Maquinaria Cultivadora i de Mano y para HuerU) 
Qarten Pfliige fiir Handbetrieb) 

Deere Pliiw Co., John. Moline, III 

Mollne Plow i>o.. .Moline. Ill 

Standard Harrow Co , Utica, NY 



31 
>> 

1 



Cultivating .Machinery Horse and Field) 
Culture du sol < Instruments pour la), i cheval et 

pour le champ 
Maqninaria Cultivadora rde Caballo j para el 

Campo) 
Bodenkultur (ieriite fiir Pferdebetrieb) 

Hr,«llev MfK. Co , Uavid. Krailley, 111 

I>e«re f'low Co., Johii. Moline, 111 

Moline Plow Co., Moline, III 

Ohio Cultivator Co.. The, Bellevue, Ohio 

standard Harrow Co., L'lica, K. T. . . . • 



Feed and Ensilage Cutters 
Coupe-aliments, coupe-ensilage 
Cortadora de Forraje y Ensilaje 
Putter- und Uriintutter (Ensilage) 
maschinen 

Marseilles Mfg. Co.. Marseilles. 111. . . . 
Silver MfK. Co.. !)alem Ohio 



Feed Mills 

Moulins pour aliments 

Molinos de Frorraje 6 Pienao 

Futtermiihien 

Sprout. Waldron & to. Muncy. Pa. 



Engines and Boilers .Stationary) 
Machines a vapeur et Chaudieres < ftces) 
Maquina» de Vapor y Calderas Hija«| 
Maschinen und Kessel ' Stationar) 



I,e(T?l a I' 



Scbneide- 



I 

31 
3 



Engines Traction and Portable) 

Machines k vapeur ( Pour la traction et transpor- 

tables 1 
Maquinas (De Tracci6n y Porlitilea) 
Trak.tions- Oder Zugmaschinen und LokomoMUn 



36 



Files I Letter and Card 

Systemes de classification i lettres et cartea) 
Quarda-Cartas y Tarjetas 
Skripturenordner fiir Briefe und Kartep) 



lam"", SprinRfleld, Ohio i9 



Forgings Carriage 
Pieces forgees Voiture; 
Forjaduras para carruajes) 
Schmiederelen KalescUen-) 



Gardening Tools liandi 
Jardinage Outils de) a main 
Herramientas de Hortelano (de Mano) 
Qiirtnerei Handwerkzeug 



Qrain Cleaning .%lachinery i Rice, Coffee, Grain, 

Hlc.) 
drains Machines a nettoyer lea): riz, caf<, grain, 

etc. 
Maquinaria pare Limpiar (jranos (Arros, Caf£, 

Oranos, Kto. > 
Qetreide Reinigungsmaschinen (fiir Rets, 

KafFee, Korii, u. s. w. i 

^[»rniit. Wjil.lroii A »"'» . Miim-y. Pa 



Hand Carts (Push) 

Charrettes A bras 

Carretillas de Mano (de Bmpuje) 

Hand-Schiebekarren 

Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, 111 1 

DeminKCo.,The, Salem, Ohio M 

Lanaing Wheelbarrow Co.. L«aalng, Uleh ti 



Hand Tools (ShoveU Rakes, Hoes, Scythes, 

Forks, FUc. ) 
Outils k main ( I'elles, rateaux, boues, faux, four- 

ches, etc. ) 
Herramientas de Mano ( Palas, Rastrillos, Aza- 

dones, Guadaiias. Horquillas, etc. ) 
Handwerkzeug (Schaufeln, Rechen, Haken, Sen- 

sen, Gabeln, u. s. w. 



Urain Drills 
(irains Semoir.sdei 
Sembradoras de (iranos 
Drillmaschinen 

.Monitor Drill I'o . Minnoaixilis. Minn. 
Superior Dr:!! I'o.. SpriiiKrtf»Id. Ohio . 



Oram Orinding Mills 
Urains .Moulins a moudre les) 
Molinos para (iranos 
Schrotmiihlen 



Kelly <"o.. Then. S, Sprinfrlirld. Ohio 

Marseilles Mfn Co. Marxeillcs. 111. . . . . 

Sprout. Wahlrofi A Co . Mtiiu'v. Pa 

U. fl. Wind Kngine and Pump Co., Batarta. III. 



m 
^ 

3 



Harrows i Disc, Spring-Tooth and Spike-Tooth) 
Herses (a disques, a dents 61astiques, i dents 

droites ) 
Mielgas 6 Rastrillos (de Disco, con Dientes d« 

Resorte y Otros i 
Eggen (mit Scbeiben-, Federzabn- und Speicbca- 

zabn- Vorricbtung ) 



Bradley Mfg. Co . David, Bradlev, 111 1 

Buclier& Uibbs Plow Co., Canton, Ohio 1 

Collins Plow Co.. QuiDcy, 111 M 

Deere Plow Co., John, Moline, III tl 

.Moline Plow Co , Moline, 111 • 

Ohio Cultivator Co., The, Bellevue, Ohio M 

Standard Harrow Oa.. Utica, N. Y I 



Hay Loaders 
Foin Chargeuses de> 
Cargadoras de Heno 
Heu Auflader 



Marseilles Mfg. Co., Marseilles, III. 



Hay Presses 
Foin I Presses A) 
Prensas para Heno 
Heu Pressen 



Bradley Mfi: I... David. Bradley, III. . . 

Collins Plow ('o. Qutncy. ill 

Ertel Co., Cteorge. Quincy, III 

Ohio Cultivator Co.. The. BellcTue, Ohio . 
Standard Harrow Co., Uttea. N. T 



I 

n 



Hay Rakes 
Foin Rateaux a ! 
Rastros para Heno 
31 Heu Rechen 



Bradley Mfg Co . David. Bradley, 111. 
Moline Plow Co., Moline. Ill 



Hay Tools i For Handling Hay) 
Foin I Outils pour la manipulation da) 
Herramientas para Heno ( para Manipular el Heno) 
Heubearbeitun^.^-Apparate und Werkzeuge 



Myers. V. K. it Bro., Ashland, Ohio . . . . 
I'.S. Wind F.n«inei>nd Punp Go., Batiivi 



III. 



rfods ( Steel and Wood ) 

Auges ( Acier et bois) 

Artesas de Cargar (de .\cero y de Madera) 

Tiinchkiibel (Morteltrdge, aus Stabl und Hole) 

Lansing Wbaalbarrow Co., LjkBsiag, Mich. 



21* 



Implement Parts (Rake, Teeth, Knife Sections, 

Etc. ) 
Places de rechange ( Dents de riteaux, conteaux 

de faucheuses, etc. ) 
Partes de instrumentos ( Dientes de Rastrillo, 

Secciones de Cuchilla, Etc. ) 
Thelle von Landwirthschaftsgeriithen (Recbea- 

zahne, Messertbeile, u. s. w. ) 



Incubators 

Conveuses artificielles 

Incubadoras 

Brutmaschinen (Inkubatoren) 



Krtel Co., Oeorge, Quincy, III. 



Lawn Mowers 
Tondeuses de gazon 
Segadoras 6 Cortadoras de Cesped 
Rasen Miihnuuchlnen 

Clipper Ijiwn Mower Co., Dixon, ill 

Chadborn A Coldwell .Mfg- Co.. Newburgb, N. Y 

Leather ( Imitation) 
Leder (Imitation) 
Cuero (ImiUci6u) 
Cuir (Imitation) 

FairHeld Rubber Co., The, Pairlleld, Cona 



Potato Machinery 

Pommes de terre (Machines pour la culture det) 

Maquinaria para Patataa 

Kartoffel-Maschinen 



Bradley Mfg. Co., David, Bradley, 111 1 

Moline Plow Co., Moline. HI « 

Standard Harrow Co., Utica, N. T t 



Pumps, Hand and Power ( Lift, Force and Spray ) 
Pompes, k main, et k Energie mecanique ( Pom- 

pes aspirantes, foulantes, pulv^risatrices) 
Bompas de Mano y para Fuerza Mecanica 

( Aspirantes, de Forzar y de Rociar) 
Pumpen, Hand- und Kraftpumpen (Hebe-, 

Druck- und Besprengungs- Pumpen) 



Deming Co , The, .Salein. Ohio 36 

Myers, K. B. & Bro., Ashland, Ohio 2 

U. S Wind Bngina and Pump Co., BataTia, III >.'> 



Reapers. 
Moissonneuses. 
Cosechadoras 
Qetreide-Miihmaschinen. 



Rollers ( Field or Road) 
Rouleaux (pour champs et pour routes) 
Rodillos ( para Campo y para Caminoa) 
Feld- und Weg-Walzen 



Machine Tools 
Machines -outils 
Herramientas Mecanicas 
Maschinen- Werkzeug 

silver Mfg. Co , Salem, Ohio 



Mowers. 
Faucheuses. 
Segadoras. 
Miihmaschinen. 



Mills (Corn and Hominy) 
Moulins (pour mais et bouilie ) 
riolinos ! para Moler Maiz Pino y Gnieao) 
Miihien ( fiir Getreide und indianiscbea Reia, 
Hominy) 

Sprout, Waldron A Co., Muncy, Pa 3 

Standard Harrow Co . Utica, NY i 



Oil Cloth 
Toile Ciree 
Wachstuch 



Plows Walking, Riding and Disc) 
Charrues (ordinaires, a <!iege, i disques) 
Arados ' de Caminar, de Moutar y de Disco) 
Pfliige ( Geh-, Fahr- und Scbeibenpfliige) 



Bradley MfK. Co., David, Bradley, 111. . 
Bucher (fc Uibhs Plow Co.. (antoa. Ohio. . 

Collins Plow Co.. qiiincr. Ill 

Deere Plow Co.. John. Moline, III. ... 

Moline Plow Co . Moline. Ill 

Ohio Cultivator Co., The. Bellevue, Ohio . . 
.Hiiuth Mend Cliilled Plow Wr>rk?«. South Hem 
Standard Harrow Co., ITtica. NY 



Ind 



29 

:tl 



Bradley Mfg. Co., Darid, Bradley, III. . . 
■ .ansinir Wheelbarrow Co.. Lanaing, Mich. 
Ohio Cultivator Co., The, Bellevue, Ohio . 
Standard Harrow Co.. Uticm. MY 



Rubber Goods 
Articles de caoutchouc 
Articulos de Caucho 
Qummiwaaren 



Rubber Tires 

Qummireifen 

Bandes de roues en caoutchouc 

Llantas de Caucho para Ruedaa 



I 

29 

3« 

S 



MorKaii & Wright. Chicago. 111. 



Scrapers ( Road ) 

Ratissoires < pour routes) 

Dragas i para Caminos) 

5trassen Scharr-Maschinen (Straaaen-Bbener) 

standard Harrow Co.. Utica. N. Y 



Seeders, Broadcast (Gram and Grass) 
Semoirs pour semer k la voice i Grain et grami- 

nees i 

Maquinas de Sembrar Semillas al Vuelo (Graaos 

V Seniilla de Verbast 
Breitsiima.schinen (fur Getreide und Graa) 



Sleigha 
Traineaiu 
Trineos 
Schlittea 

Dapw>n * Wolf, Oneida, N. V. 



Sharpeners and (irinders 
Machines a remoudre et a aiguiser 
Afiladoras y Amoiadoras 
Schiirfe- und Schleif-Apparate 



Sprayers and Nozzles 
Instruments d'arrosage 
Rociadoras y Boquereles 
Besprengungs-Spritzen und Ueboroaaaa 



DeiiiiiiK Co., The, Salem, Ohio. 
Myers. P. B. ic Bro.. Ashland, Obio . 
Standard Harrow Co.. Utica, N, Y. . 



sulk Cutters 
Coupe-chaume 
Cortadoras de Tallos 
Stengel Abschnelder 



Street Sprinklers 

Arrosage des rues (Tonneaux pour 1') 

Regadoras de Calle 

Strassen Bespreng-Wagen 

Studebaker Broa. Mfg. Co., South Bead, Ind. 



U 



Sugar Cultivating Implements 
Sucre Instruments pour la culture de la caaaa A) 
instrumentos para el Cultivo Azucararo 
Zucker-Anbau Qeriithe 



Threshing Machinery 
Machines k battre 
Maquinaria de Triilar 
Dresch Maschinen 



Tire Setters 

.Machines k fixer les bandes de rouaa 

Maquinas de Poner Llantas 

Maschinen zum Aufsetzen von QummlralfMi 



Standard Tire Setter >'o . Keokuk, Iowa 



Tread Powers i Horse, Dog, Sheep. Etc.) 
Machines a utiliser I'energie de la ouuvka 

I Cheval. Chien. Motiton, etc.) 
Motores de Pisada > para Caballo, Perro, Cara«f«, 

etc. 1 
Kraft -Tretmaschinen ( Pferde, Hunde, Schafa 



Trucks (Hand Warehouse) 
Trues I'jnmaga.sinage a bras) 
Carretillas de Mano para almac^n 
Transport Handwagen (fur Waarenhaaser ) 

I^oaing Wlie<-n>Rrr<>» Co. Lmnsing, Mich 



Export Implement Age 



Wagons Business < 
Charettes id'afTaires) 
Carros (para negocios) 
Wagen i Cescbaftswagen ) 



A'agons and Buck- Wagons 
Charrettes et charrettes a lessive 
Carretones y Carretas 
WagcD und Bockwagen 

Ohio \alley Wagon <.'<», Tluv Maneltft. Ohio 

Wagons and Cart.s ( rami 
Wagoonets et charrettes i Ferme) 
Carretones y Carretas (para Hacienda 
Landwirthschaftliche Wagen und Karren 

L^nnng WhFclbnrrow Cn , I«nainic, Mich 

fHudcbftkrr Broil Mfg. r<i , Si.iiili Kriid, Iiiil 



Weeders 

5wcloir8 mecaniques 
Desyerbadoras 
Jiite Maschinen 

SWtndaril Harrow Co., Wtm,1t,y. 



Well Tools and Drilling Machinery 
Outils pour puits et machines A forer 
in^trumentos para Abrir Pozos y Maquinaria 

para Horadar 
Brunnen-Werkzeug und Bohr-Maschinen 



Wheels and W heel Materials 
Roues et articles pour roues 
Ruedas y Materiales para Ruedas 
Riider und Rader material ien 



Wheelbarrows 
Brouettes 
Carretillas 
Schlebekarren 

liansiriK Wheelbarrow Co.. LannnK, Mich. 



Windmills (Towers and Tanks) 
Aloulins i vent ( Tours et reservoirs) 
Molinos de Viento (Torres y Tanques) 
Windmtihlen (Thurm- und Biittcn) 



MareeilleaMfg. Co., Marseillea, 111 

U. S. Wind EnK>i<c>nd Hump Co., BatHvia. III. 



36 



29 

m 



Wheels (Carriage ) 
Roues ( Voiiure ) 
Ruedas ( Carruaje ) 
g Rader ( Kaleschen und Wagen) 



Wood Sawing Machinery 
Bois (Machines k scierle) 
Maquinaria para Aserar Madera 
Holzsage-Maschinen 



MarseillesMfB. Co., Marmillea. Ill 

U. 8. Wind Bncincaiid Pump Co., BaUvia, III. 



4 
SS 



Alphabetical List of Advertisers. 

Annonces par ordre Alphabetique. 

Lista Alfabetica de las casas que se Anuncian en esta Revista. 

Alphabetisch geordnetes Inhalts-Verzeichnis von Inserenten. 



Fairfield Hnbher Co., The. Fairfield, Conn. 



Bradley Mfg. Co., l>Bvid, Bntaiey, 11«. . 
Bncber & Oibb* Plow Co., Canton, Ohio . 



" 1900" Washer to., BinjjhiMnton, N. V 31 

Ohio Cnltivator Co., The, Bellevue, Ohio .... M 

Patch, A. H., ClarkBTille, Tenn 5 

Potter Co., Moigao, Fivhkill-on-Hndran, K. ^ , . :t 



Kelly Co., The O. S., 8pringfi«ld, Ohio 



Chad)M>nrn & Coldwell Mfg. to., Ne«hurgli, N. Y. 1 

Clipper Lawn Mower Co., Dixon, 111 6 

Collins Plow Co., Qninoy, 111 29 

Colnniluiii Bolt Works, Colarnhns, Ohio 3fi 



LaaaiDg Wheelbarrow Co., Lansing, Mich. 
Leflel A Co., .Tamee. Springfield, Ohio . . 



36 



29 



Itapmn A Wolf, Oneida, N. Y 3 

Deere Plow Co., John, Moline, 111 31 

I>en>in(; Co., The, Salem. Ohio 36 

Ertel Oa., Om., Qniney, 111 6 



Haraeillee Mfg. Co.. Marseilles, 111. . 
Moline Plow Co., Moline, III. . . . 
Monitor Drill Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Morgan A Wright, Chicago, III. . . . 
Myera A Bro., F. E., AsUand, Chit . 



29 SilTer Mfg. Co., The, Balem, Ohio 

South Bend Chilled Plow Co., South Bend, Ind 

Bproat, Waldron AC!o., Mnnoy, Pa 

Standard Harrow Co., The, Utica, N. Y. . . 
Standard Tire SetterCo,, Keoknk, Iowa . . 
Stndebaker Bros. Mfg. Co., South Bend, Ind 
4 Snperior Drill Co., Springfield, Ohio 

« 
31 
1 
9 XJ. 8. Wind Engine and P«mp Co., Batana. III. 



Si 

a 

3 

30 



Export Implement Age 



Machinery for Grinding all Kinds of Grain 
Machines a moudre tous genres de grains 
Maquinaria para moler todas glase de granos 
Maschinerie zum Mahlen aller Getreidesorten 




Write for one of our IxKiklets which gives a full description of French Burr and 
Attrition, Fee<l and Meal Mills, Cotton St-ed and Linseed Oil Cake Mills, Kmer>- 
Rock Mills, Cotton, F.ar and Ore Crushers, Magnetic Separators, Corn Shellers, etc. 

Ecrivez pour un pamphlet coiitenant description d^taill^-e de nioulins d meules 
de France et a frottemcnt, de moulins pour grains de cotton et de tourteaux de lin, 
de moulins A pierre d'emeri, de hroyeurs d'^pis et de niin^rais, de moulins niag- 
n^tiques, d'^-cosseurs, etc. 

Escribasenos pidiendo uno tie nuestros libritos, en que se da una complete 
descripcion de nuestros Molinos de Piedra Francesa y de Roce, para Piensoy para 
Harina, Molinos de Seniillas de Algodoii, y para moler Tortas de .^ceite de Semil- 
lasde Linaza, Molinos para Rooa de F^nuril, Tritura<loras de Algo<16n, Mazorcas 
y Minerales, Separedoras Magn^ticas. Desgranadoras de Maiz, etc. 

Man verlange eines unserer Biichlein, das voile Beschrcibunj; unserer fronzii- 
sischen Mahlsteine und Reibevorrichtung enlhalt. wie auch aller l-utter-V'oricli 
tungen, Mehl-Miihlen, Baumwollen.saameii- und Leinolf^aanien Kuchen-Miihlen, 
Schmirgel-Bergniiihlen. Baumwollen-, .Aehren- und F;rzzirstiicktluugs-Maschinen. 
magnetische Separatoren, Korn-Iuithiilseniascliiiieii, u. s. w. 

SPROUT, WALDRON & CO. 



Drawer M. 



IVI U IN C V% F» A., U. S. A. 



EASY RIDING 

This two- wheeler is our leading 
specialty for export. 

We equip it with RUBBER TIRES, 
if desiretl, put on with two wires. The work, 
like the job itself, is sold under our positive 
guarantee. 

ItT US StND YOU THE ftiCES 




Dapson & Wolf 

ONEIDA, NEW YORK, O. S. A. 



WHOLESALE MAKKRS t'F 



FINE CARRIAGES 



"POTTER'S" 

■ SPRING BRAKE BLOCKS 

Have Lad tha Market for Nineteen Yeara, and Hia 

ADJUSTABLE SPRING BRAKE 

la a Winner From the Start 
Equally satisfactory for steel or rubber tired vehicles. 



NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 

The Morgan Potter Co. sr: 



HUDSON 
.S.A. 



The Standard Harrow Co. 

N. Ym U. S. a. 




ABERDEEN, SR. 

SPRING-TOOTH 

HARROW 

Unequalled Strength 

No Clogging 

Reversible Polnli 
on Teeth 



THE STANDARD LINE mclude.s one and two-section Spring- 
Tooth Harrows and all styles and sizes of Spike-tooth and 
Disc Harrows, Cultivating Implements. Potato Harvesters, 
Potato Sprayers, etc., and is one of the most favorably 
known lines in the leading agricultural countries. 

We guarantee prompt service for all export orders. 
Our factory is only five hours' ride from New York City. 

WRITE IN YOUR OWN LANGUAGE FOR CATALOGUE F 



I 



ZI6 ZAG STEEL 
SPIKE-TOOTH HARROW 

20-Tooth Sections 
H-inch Teeth 





Start the ^ew Year "Right 



by cAdvertising in the 



Export Implement cAge 



Write for lilies And Special Locations. 
We rnjiy be able to fafor you. c4d- 
dress inquiries lo 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 



WiOlcArch Street, 



PHILADELPHIA 



36 



Export Implement Age 



Wagons ( Business i 
Charettes (d'affaires) 
Carros ( para negocios I 
Wagen ( Geschaftswagen ) 



A'agons and Buck- Wagons 
Charrettes et charrettes a lessive 
Carretones y Carretas 
Wigen und Bockwagen 

Ohio Valley WsKonCo., The. Marietta. Ohio 



Well Tools and Drilling Machinery 
Outils pour puits et machines a forer 
instnimentos para Abrir Pozos y Maquinaria 

para Horadar 
Brunnen-Werkzeug und Bohr-Maschinen 



Wheels and Wheel Materials 
Roues et articles pour roues 
Ruedas y Materiales para Ruedas 
Riider und Riider material ien 



Wagons and Carts ( Farm ) 
Wagonnets et charrettes ( Pertne) 
Carretones y Carretas (para Hacienda i 
Laodwirthschaftiiche Wagen und Karren 



L«nnng Wheelbarrow Co., I«nsinK, Mich. . 
Hludebaker Bros Mfg Co , Hoiith Bend, Iiid 



Wheelbarrows 
Brouettes 
Carretillas 
Schiebe karren 

Lansing Wbeelbkrrow Co., LsnainK. Mich 21 



Windmills (Towers and Tanks) 
Moulins k vent (Tours et reservoirs) 
MolinoB de Viento (Torres y Tanques) 
Windmiihlen (Thurm- und Biitten) 



MarselllnMfK.Co., MameillM, 111 

U. 8. Wind Engine and Hump Co., Batavia, III. 



86 



f) 



29 

as 



Weeders 

Sarcloirs mecanlques 
Desyerbadoras 
Jkte Maschinen 

standard Harrow Co.. Ttlea. N. Y. 



Wheels (Carriage) 

Roues (Voiture) 

Ruedas (Carruaje) 

Riider ( Kalesctaen and Wagen) 



Wood Sawing Machinery 
Bois (Machines i scierle) 
Maquinaria para Aserar Madera 
Holzsage-Maschinen 



MarMlllaaMfg. Co, Maraeillea. Ill 

C. 8. Wind Engine and Pump Co., Batavia. Ill 



4 

8S 



Alphabetical List of Advertisers. 

Annonces par ordre Alphab^tique. 

Usta Alfab^ca de las casas que se Anundan en esta Re vista. 

Alphabetisch geordnetes Inhalts-Verzeichnis von Inserenten. 



Fairfield Kabber Co., The. Fairfield, Conn. 



"1900" WadjerC©., Binghamton, N. Y. 



31 



Ohio Cultivator Co., The, Bellevue. Ohio . . 



Bradley Mfg. Co., bavid, Braoiej, lli. . . 
Bnober & Oibba Plow Co., Canton, Ohio . 



Patob, A. H., ClarksTille, Teno 

Potter Co., Morgan, Fi»hkill-oo-Hnd«OD, K. ^ , 



36 



5 

3 



Kally Co., TheO. 8., Springflald, Ohio 36 



Chadbonrn & Coldwell Mfg. Co., Newburgh, N. Y. 1 

Clipper Lawn Mower Co., Dixon, 111 6 

Collins Plow Co., Qainey, 111 29 

ColnmhuB Bolt Works, ColnmbaR, Ohio 36 

iHipson & Wolf, Ooeida, N. Y 3 

Deere Plow Co.. John, Moline, 111 31 

Deminp Co., The, Salem, Ohio 36 



Etia 0*., Om., QaiMy, 111. 



• • • • 



Lanaing Wheelbarrow Co., Lansing, Mich 29 

Leffel A Co., Jamea, Springfield, Ohio 29 Silver Mfg. Co., The, Salem, Ohio 

Sootti Bend Chilled Flow Co., South Bend, Ind. 

Spront, Waldron &Co., Money, Pa 

Standard Harrow Co., The, Utica, N. Y 

SUndard Tire SetterCo,, Keoknk, Iowa . . . . 

Stndebaker Bros. Mfg. Co., South Bend, Ind. . . 

MaraeillM Mfg. Co., Maraeillea, IIL- 4 Snperior Drill Co., Springfield, Ohio 

Moline Plow Co., Moline, 111 g 

Monitor Drill Co.. Minneapolis, Minn 31 

Moigu A Wright, Chicago, 111 j 

Myan A Bro . F. E., AsklMid, Ohi 9 V.6. Wind Engine and l»«np Co., Batavia, IIL 



3« 

1 
,1 
3 
3 
3« 



Export Implement Age 



Machinery for Grinding all Kinds of Grain 
Machines a moudre tous genres de grains 
Maquinaria para moler todas glase de granos 
Maschinerle zum Mahlen aller Getreidesorten 




Write for one of our l)ooklets which gives a full description of French Burr and 
Attrition, Fee<l and Meal Mills, Cotton Seed and Linseed Oil Cake Mills, Emer>- 
Rock Mills, Cotton, Ear and Ore Crushers, Magnetic Separators, Corn Shellers, etc. 

Ecrivez pour un pamphlet contenant description ddtaill^e de nioulins k meules 
de France et ^ frottement, de moulins pour }{rains de cotton et de tourteaux de lin, 
de moulins k pierre d'^meri, de broyeurs d'^pis et de niinerai*, de moulins mag- 
n^tiques, d'dcosseurs, etc. 

Escrfbasenos pidiendo uno de nuestros libritos, en que se da una completa 
descripci6n de nuestros Molinos de Piedra Francesa y de Roce, para Piensoy para 
Harina, Molinos de Semillas de Algo<16ii, y para moler Tortas de .Aceite de Semil- 
las de Lina7.a, Molinos para Roca de Esmenl, Trituradoras de Algo<16n, Mazorcas 
y Minerales, Separedoras Magn^ticas, Desgranadoras de Maiz, etc. 

Man verlange eines unserer Biichlein, das voile Beschreibun^ unserer frr.nzo- 
sischen Mahlsteine und Reibevorrichtung enlhalt, wie auch aller I-utter-Vor-icli 
tungen, Mehl-Miihlcn, Bauniwollensaanien- und I.#in61saameii Kuchen-Muhlen, 
Schmirgel-Bergniuhlen, BauniwoUen-, Aehren- und Erzzt rsiiickelungs-Mascbineu, 
magnetische Separatoren, Korn-Enthiilseniascliinen, u. s. w. 

SPROUT, WALDRON & CO. 



The Standard Harrow Co. 



UTICA, N. Y., U. S. A. 



Drawer M. 



iVI U IN C V, R A., U. S. A. 




ABERDEEN, SR. 

SPRING-TOOTH 

HARROW 

Unequilled Strength 

No Clogging 

Roverslblo Point! 
en Teotli 



THE STANDARD LINE includes one and two-section Spring- 
Tooth Harrows and all styles and sizes of Spike-tooth and 
Disc Harrows, Cultivating Implements, Potato Harvesters, 
Potato Sprayers, etc., and is one of the most favorably 
known lines in the leading agricultural countries. 

We guarantee prompt service for all export orders. 
Our factory is only five hours' ride from New York City. 

IN YOUR OWN LANGUAGE FOR CATALOGUE F 



WRITE 



L 



ZI6 ZA6 STEEL 
SPIKE-TOOTH HARROW 

20-Teoth Section* 
,4 -Inch Teeth 




EASY RIDING 

This two-wheeler is our leading 
specialty for export. 

We equip it with RUBBER TIRES. 
if desired, put on with two wires. The work, 
like the job itself, is sold under our positive 
guarantee. 

lET US SEND YOU THE PilCES 




Dapson & Wolf 

ONEIDA. NEW YORK, O. S. A. 



WHOLESALE MAKERS OF 



FINE CARRIAGES 



Iff 



"POTTER'S' 

■ SPRING BRAKE BLOCKS 

Have L«d th* Market for Ninetean Years, and Hia 

ADJUSTABLE SPRING BRAKE 

la a Winner Frem the Start 
Equally ■atlsfactory for steel or rubber tired vehicles. 

NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 

FISHKILL-ON-HUDSON 
YORK, U.S.A. 



The Morgan Potter Co. '.^' 




Start the cKeiv Year %ight 



by c/ldiitrtising in Iht 



Export Implement cAge 



Write for T^ates and Special Locations. 
We may be able to faifor you. cAd- 
dress inquiries lo 



WARE BROS. COMPANY 

WWlcArch street, PHILADELPHIA 



36 



INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE 



Export Implement Age 








Extend your trade 
beyond ttie seas 






AMERICAN manufactures are not only in demand, 
but in many cases are given the preference in 
foreign countries. Especially is this true of Agri- 
cultural Machinery, Farm Supplies, Vehicles and Hard- 
ware Specialties. If you are manufacturing any of these 
goods voice it abroad and make the world your field. You 
can do it just as easily as you can secure home trade if 
you'll talk through the 

Export Implemen t Age 

IT REACHES ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES 
WRITE US FOR ADVERTISING RATES 



J 



Export Implement Age 



Superior Grain Drills 



Semoirs Superieurs de Grains. Manu- 
factures en une grande vari^l^ de dimensions 
pour (trains seulenient on pour Grains et Fer- 
tilisants melanges, avec Disque, Houe et Soc 
creussnt les silloiis. Nous nianufacturons des 
mod^'es sp^ciaux de Semoirs de Grains pour 
I'EuiftM.t, I'Australie, I'Amerique du Sud et 
le Sud de TAfrique. Demandez les Catalogues 
descriptifs illustres. 

Sembradoras Superiores de Granos. Se 

fabrican de niuchus tamaiiusde sembrar Granos 
s61a 6 combinada con Fertilizador, con sur- 
cadores de Disco, de Azad6n 6 Zapatillas. 
NoBotros fabricamos Sembradoras de tipos 
espwciales para Kuropa. Australia, Sud America 
y el Africa del vSur. Enviese por un Catdlogo 
descriptive ilustrado. 

"Superior" Getreiderillen. Wird in viel- 
seitiger Auswahl von Grosseu hergestellt: Ein- 
fache Getreiderillen una Kombinationen von 
Gelreide und Pflugrillen niit Schcil)en, Hauen 
und Scbuh-Lockerungs Vorrichtungen. VVir 
fabriziren Ijesonderc Arten von Getreiderillen 
fiir Europa, Australien, Siid-Amerika und Siid- 
Afrika. Man verlange illustrirte beschreibende 
Kataloge. 

We manufacture special types of 
Grain Drills for Europe, Australia, 
South America and South Africa 



Made in a large variety of sizes in Plain Grain 
and combined Grain and Fertilizer, with Disc, 
Hoe and Shoe furrow openers 




THE SUPERIOR DRILL CO., Springfield. 0., U.S.A. 

DIVISION THE AMERICAN SEEDING MACHINE COMPANY, Incorporated. 



THE FAIRFIELD RUBBER CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Carriage Cloth, Imitation Leather, Etc. 

FAIRFIELD, CONN.. U. S. A. 

We believe vou will find our cloths more desirable fabrics than have been presented 
for your consideration. 

Not only do we offer our lines as superior to any, but some are special with un. 

We warrant all our goods in every manner, and in all climates. 

All we ask is a trial of uur productions, as we know the result will be in our favor. 

Our many years' connection with the foreign trade places us in a position to know 
fully ns to their wants, and the large orders we receive from that field convinces us thst 
the high standard at which we have kept our goods is appreciated. We refer with 
pleasure to any leading Export house in New York as to the merit of our cloths. 

Send for quotations through any Export house, or write us direct. 

When ordering goods in our line, ask for goods made hy 

The Fairfield Rubber Co. 




GUiPPCR L.AWIN 
MOWER GO. 



DIXOM 

luuinois 



-TTHE MOWER that will km 
^ all (be Weeds in your Lawns. 

If you keep the weeds cut 
so they do not go to seed, and 
cut your BTnas without breaking 
the small feeders of roots, the 
grass will become thick and the 
weeds will disappear. 

THE CLIPPER WILL DO IT 

Ask Your Dealer tor Thoni 



The Export Implement Age 

is an independent journal devoted exclusively to the Export 
Trade in Agricultural Machinery, Pumps, Wind Mills, Farm 
Tools, Dairy Supplies and Hardware Specialties. 

Advertising Rates Furnished Upon Application 



BlJKkHdwkNill 




Instantly Adjusted to 
Grind Fine or Coarse. 



WILL DO GOOD WORK and LAST 

Grinding Plates are of the Hardest and Strongest 
Metals. Can be replaced at slight cost. 

i>.icked in barrelsol l.!e.n.h. Gross weixhi, 24ii Ih-.; 
nri, 2M ll)«. Measurciiicnl (iH iiibi< (wi. 

Am Hm PATCH fMakor, 
GlarksvUte, Tann., C/. Sm Am 



Order through any Reliable Cthnmission Hoose. 



PATCH'S PATENT 

Black Hawk (orn Sheller 




SHELLS 

FAST. 

SHELLS 

CLBAN. 
SHELLS 

EASILY. 



BBwaro of 
Imltatlonm 



CapacilT 

ttsl2 

busiieli 

ear csra 

per 

hour. 



Packed 10 in a barrel. Om«w, 1W> Rm.; 
Net, 15UU>H. Measurement (iH cubic Ism. 

MADE ONLY BY 

A U DATm CLARKSVII I.E. 

A. n. rAlv^n. tenn., u.s. a. 



Export Implement Age 



Uaequalled 
Facilities 
for Prompt 
HtDdling ol 
Export Business 




SHANGHAI KIDD 
DISC CULTIVATOR 



Forty-six inches from lowest point of arch to the ground. 
Adjustable in width from 48 to 72 inches. Popular for culti- 
vating Corn, Cane, Tobacco, etc. Packed for export, weighs 
830 pounds. Occupies 25 cubic feet of space. 

STALK CUTTERS. WALKING AND RIDING 
PLOWS, DISC PLOWS. DISC HARROWS, 
PIPE-LEVER HARROWS, CORN PLANT- 
ERS AND DRILLS. LISTERS. COTTON 
PLANTERS. CULTIVATORS— B E E T 
SEEDERS, CULTIVATORS and PULLERS 



nOLINE PLOW CO 



MOLINE, ILL, U. S. A. 

FOREIGN ACCNCIE.S: 

J. < J. DRYSDALE < CO. MALCOMESS ^ CO. 

Sole Agents for Argentine Sole Agents for South Africa 

Buenos Ayics, South America Cast London. South Africa 




buildinj? hay straw, wool, cotton and corn fodder presses should certainly make 
UH ex|>ertN. and we claim that our uresseg are the simplest, eatiest draught 00 

-na" 



Despues de 37 anos 



37 Jahre 



r 



37 YEARS 

the team and the smoothest balers on the market to-day. 

Our presses will bale from lo to i8 tons a day in hay. 
Our presses will bale from lo to 15 tons a day in straw. 
I>__,,J- ^y Bfin^Af g"* nous construisons des presses & foin, & paille, & lalne, i coton, i 
LTCpulS ««/ OIIIICCJ fourraKe de mats, nous avons induhitablement acr|iiis une experience qui 
a fait de non» des experts, et nous n'hisitons pas & dire que nos presses sont Its plus simples qui 
soient aujourd'hui sur le march^ et celles qui latiguent le nioins I'attelage et fonctionnent Ic plus 
ais^ment, Nos presses eintmllottent de 10 & 18 tonnes de foin par jour. 

Nos presses emballottent de 10 & 15 tonnes de paille par jour. 

que const ruimos pre nsas para heno, paja, lana. Blgod6n y forraje de 
maiz tenemosque ser e»pertos enese ramo, y por lutanto reclamamos 
que nuestras prensas son las mAs simples y las mAs livianas pata el acarreo por parejas de 
cat>allos, y las eiifardadadoras mejorc-s que ezisten hoy en el mercado, 

Nuestras prensas enfardan de 10 & 18 toneladasde heno por dia. 
Nuestras prcn.sas enfardan de 10 A 15 toneladas de paja por dIa. 
ununterbrochener Fabrikation von Heupressen, Strohpressen.WoUe- und BaumwoUen- 
pressen. wie aiich MaisfutterPressen, sollte uns wahrlich in den Stand gesetzt haben, 
Eipertrn dieser Branche geworden «u sein; wir beanspruchen deshalb Tiir unsere Pressen, dasa »\r die einfacbsten in Koostruktion slnd, 
bctm C.e.spann den letchtesten /.ug haben und zum Kmballiren die vorzuKlichsten Dienstc IcistCB. Vosere Preisca siadlia Stande lebto 
18 "Touncngehall" Heu und lo bis 15 "Tonnengehalt" Stroh taiglich lu embaUiies. 




FRONT VIRW 

VCK DK PACK 

VISTA DKI. HRRNTH 

VORDHRANSICHT 

Catalogue tree 

Catalogue franco sur demande 

CatAlogo (i rat is 

Kataloge frel 




Our " Qem " Full Circle 



We make a line of both Full Circle and Half Circle Preases, 

Virtcea, f. o. b, cars New York City, on our Gem Pull Circle Balers, property crated for export: 

Net Weight. Gross Weight. Space Prices. 

8s 18 Baler , . 2,650 ( 1,4^7 Kilos) 3.7<» ■ • • . 115 cubic feet . . . $}is.as {£44.16.10) 
X 18 Baler , . 2,775 ('•5'* Kilos) . , . ■ 3.800. . . . 171 cubic feet . . . J18.00 (/'45. 
••s » Baler . , 2,975 (1,636 Kilos) . . . .4,000, . . . 1 20 cubic feet . . . jai.jo {X*6. 



16.10) 
8. 4$ 
3. o) 



Nuestra Prensa "Qem" Circulo Entero 



Moaotros fabricamos un surtido completo de prensas tanto de medio cfrculo como de dreala 

cntcro. Los precios de enbarque de la Prensa "Gem" son franco & bordo de los carroa 

hasta New York, y ac empaquetan con segnridad para ezportarlas. 



Peso Bruto, 

18. . 2.650 ( 1,457 KilosJ 

'.775 (I.5>6Ki'o») 

Prensa 17 z 22 , . 2,97s (1.636 Kilos) 



Prensa 14 s 18 . 
Prenaa 16 x tS . 



Neto. 

• 3.7'<> • 

3.800. 

, 4,000 . 



Predo. 



Notr* presse "Qein" A cercle entier 



|a"5 >5 (/■44-i«.«») 
21S.00 (jC^S. ' 



••4 
3.0) 



Kous fabriquons un assortiment de presses & demi-cercle et & cercle entier. 
yrtz 4e >oa presses "Gem" ft cercle entier, mises en wagon ft New York et convenablemcat 

emball6ea pour I'cxportation: 
Poids net. Poids brut. Espace. Prix. 

. 2,650 (1,457 kilos^ . . . .3.700. . . . ii5p{eds culws , . $215.25 (^44.16. l*^ 
»,775 (i.5'6kiIoa) . . . .3,800. . . . 171 pieds cubes . . . 218.00(^^45. 8.4 



14 x 18 . 
16 X iS 



17 X 22 . . 1,975 (■■636 kilos) 



I.-;. 



. 3,800. 
. 4,000 . 



120 pieds cubes . 



"1.50 (j£*6. 3. a 



Rspacio. 
. 1 15 pits ciSbicos . 
. 171 pi^s ctkbicos . 
. 120 pits ctibicos . 

Unsere Voll-Zirkel " Qem " Presse. 

Wir fabriairen tin AMortiment too Voll- und Halbzirkel-Preaacb. 
Preise unscrer Vollzirkel Bmballage-Preaaen, frei Board New York, fertig f Ur daa 
Bxportversaod verpackt: 
Nettogewlcht. Bruttogewicht. Rauminhalt. Preise. 

lixiSPreaae. . 2,650 (1,457 ■''•) 3.7<» • • • . 115 Kubikfuss . . . I215.25 (/°44.i«.m) 

16x18 Presse. .2,775(1,5265110) 3 8ao . . . . 171 Kubikfuss . , . 2>i.oo (^'4}. (. 4] 



17 X 22 Presse . . 2,975 (1,636 Kilo) 



. 4.<xw 



, 120 Kubikfuss . 



GEO. ERTEL CO. • 59Z Kentucky Street. Quiacy, 111., U. S. A. 



Export Implement Age 



Vol. XV. 



Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. X., January, 1907. 



No. 4 



The Trade of the World 

Each Country Dependent Upon all Others and Each is 
Benefited by Exchange of Commodities 



If uf c<ni!<l f.ai..\\ the lines of progress in 
trade from tlu- lieunnniii}.; of history, as far 
liack as we can li">k, tin- spread '<i civilization 
will he plainly (lelinealetl hy the ports, vessels, 
and carriers incident to trade. Trade is the 
nuiinsta> of peace, and the elimination of war 
during periods wlun coiintries become seltish, 
may he ascrihed to the desire for trade. 

The world is imw on a peace basis, and 
the great commercial want of the i)resent 
age throughout tin- world is tra<le From 
evcrv country the same cry goes no— "Trade, 
trade!" The world is taking on new condi- 
tions an<l entering upon a broader iiathwav. 
The energies of all \)i.:"\<\v are being stimu- 
lated in the direction of creating material for 
trade. The policies of all governments are 
hiing shape<l to develop trade and comunnd 
the greatest posMlilr sliare of it. Armies and 
navies are created to secure trade, indirectly. 
au<l cami)aigns are inaugurated and fought 
with that one end in view. The oldir coim- 
tries have reached a point of development 
wherein foreign trade has become a necess-tv 
to healthful existence. The one -reat over- 
straining tho,i-ht of thi'= age scenis to be to 
-,. to m.irket. Shipvard-^ are buz/.iiig with 
activitx to this end. Locomotive works, car 
works, engineering plants, eUviric.il works, 
and material, manufactories of all kmds, ai<- 
overcrowded with work, looking to the pro- 
duction of greater facilities to haul .and sail. 
It re<|uires no tlu-ori/in'j to s, ,■ to what all 
this points, or to consult statistical t;d)les to 
measure the force of the momeulum that this 
great, uoild-widc CNpaiision of energies has 
ac.|uind. The cdN for goods, merchandise 
;m<l e«|uipment come from ,dl the world. 
Railroad construction is the -re.itest taclor 
There is haii^.r dim^itm ^uid dre,I-iug. mine 
o].ening. lumber gettin-. faclorv buildup and 
land cultivation, all being pushed lorward at 
a spee.l an<l euergv which is taxing the pro- 
ducing cai.acitv of all. Ship bties are being 
established, with old and new counlries, and 
towns and villages are gnnviug out of their 
I'ormer lelhargv into a new commercial hfr. 
The people of all rounlries are evidentlv 
stimulatctl with ambitii'ii to have and to know. 



It would border on monotony to^ go into 
details of this great movement, Energy is 
manifested among all peoples. \\ hen we turn 
our eves to South .\frica, for instance, we 
begin to understand tlie powerful incentives 
which prompte<l the Uritish (lovernment to 
enter upon the task which it has undertaken. 
That region, one of the richest on the face 
of the globe, is already entering ujion a career 
e,f development which will make it one of the 
greatest, if not the greatest, markets for 
luiropeaii and .\mericaji ])roducts ou the laee 
of the earth. 'I'lie demands of the great 
nations of the earth are for e.Npansioii, ;md 
South .\frica is the first region to swing into 
line under this evidutionary force, which has 
develo])ed itself with sucli ptiwer during the 
last (|uarter of a century. < )ne of the mo^t 
distinctive features of general progress during 
the past deeatic has been the development and 
establishing of opportunities to earn wages. 
Interdei)endeiice has increased. \'o on 
nation can get along by itself ;is readily as leu 
vears ago. Mutual dependence has develo|)ed, 
tnd ocean commerce h,is multiplied. luih 
vidual habits, from king to i)easant, .ind from 
president to citizen, have become more expen- 
sive, aiul machinery has become a more 
powerful factor in production, llehind .all. 
the wishes of the masses of the ])eople :ir-- 
now more respected in all governmental 
sources. .\ still more important factor bear- 
■ng oil this complex situation is the escape 
valve to popular discontent and povertv, as 
well ,1- to ambition that has been o|)eued up 
to the world in recent years, through emigra 
tiou to foreign countries. .Ml these c.iuse- 
.'ire at work, each in its own wav ;nid field, t" 
lessen the danger of jianic and dejiressjon 
The forces of nature arc being harnessed, 
ileetrieal eiierLnes ,ire serving man. .md new 
fields, mines, and forests are weleoniing 
liiterprise In addition to all these strong 
causes, the people themselves are le,irning 
more, and le.irning self-control, econoinv, as 
well .IS dieiplining themselves. It is eviiKnt 
that depressions. an<l accomp;iu\ in^ )k riods oi 
eomfKirative poverty, are becoming mote 
iniprolijilile. If the uhcit cvoi) I'ail- in one 
region, sup|ilies from other regions pour m. 
Scareitv of any sort in one localitv i- omi- 
i-nme bv abundance in others. The aggre- 
irated productive cai)acitv of machinerv is a 
niighl\ protecting pouer. which cannot be 
controlled to the ilisaiK ant,igr of the world. 
even though it be owned and conlrolled be 
the few. These considerali<nis are general. 



'Ihe real power, after all, is not in govern- 
ments, in trusts, in coiiceiitr.ited capital of 
any kind, but resiiles in the intelligence of 
the people, voters, or voteless, .\t the present 
time it is custuinary to think and sa\ we will 
run along prosi)erously for a while, and then 
plunge into ane)ther abyss of ilistrcss. I'os- 
sibly we mav. Social and eioiiomic forces 
take strange turns sometimes. The chances 
are altogether the other way. The productive 
power of s(x-iety was never as great. K.urope, 
at times, seems half-inclined to build up^ a 
C'hinese trade-wall around herseli. 'I'hc 
Inited States is playing with reciprocity 
olive branches from the top of their tariff 
wall buttresses, and fortified with the 
accumulated industrial wealth of the busiest 
vears that a people ever exi)ericnce<l. The 
chances are that the worhl will, during the 
next few years, fill its stomach with giwid 
food, cover its back with comfortable raiment, 
raise over its head ])r(>tectin.g nxifs, and sur- 
round itself with comparative luxury. .\nd 
out of all this material goo<l will follow 
intellectual realizatie.n that will make the dis- 
asters of recent history an impossibility. 



OUR HOME MARKET 

.Xiucricins boast that the home market and 
the free interchange of products between the 
various Slates is alone sufficiently large with- 
out the necessity uf finding markets abroad, 
but such belief is erroneous. The very fact 
that there is ni' restriction of trade between 
the States of the Union is the strongest 
evidence that can he presented in favor of 
satisfactorv trade relations with all other 
countries. If . ach State had authority to 
place tariffs on articles from other sections 
of the country, the result would be disastrous. 
While jealousy ma\ prompt some of the 
States to place a tax ujKjn traile whenevct| it 
is possible to do so. yet such unwise legislation 
Ii.i- .dwavs been felt more severely by the 
States which induli^ed in tho>,c privileges 
ih.ui b\ Competitors, ;,s eapital never fails to 
tr.tvel the easiest and l)est road to profit- 
niakmi;. I'*ach State makes its own laws, but 
nil State can i)revent a free tra<le within the 
Initt.l States. There is .i strong bond of 
mutual interest which makes each connnmiity 
and each State dependent upon one and the 
whole. 

There is no reason why our trailc relations 
with other cnuntries should not be .arranged 
on a basis wherebv ailvantagcs would be 
gained bv all countries. .\bs.>lute free trade 
between foreign nations and this country 
will probabU never 1h' serioUNlv cousi<lered 
b\ t"ongress, .is the revenues nf the \ nited 
States wouM be atTected. and the result is 
usiiallv direct taxation in conseijuencc, which 
seems to be repugnant to our people; but it 
iloes not mean free trade to arrange with 
other nations to .allow us to sell to them while 
we als. . purchase in their markets. F.xchango 
of products makes both parties the beneficiar- 
ies of the transaction. 



8 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Age 




PROGRESS ON THE NEW YORK TERMINAL OF THE PENNSYLVANU AND NEW YORK CENTRAL AILROADS, IN NEW YORK CITY, UNITED STATES, WHICH WILL COST A HUNDRED MILLIONS. 



Courtesy oj A'tdgwai's, 



TIGHT BINDING TEXT CUT OFF 



lO 



Export Implement Age 



Export Implement Aoe 



IT 



GASOLINE MOTORS. 



Their Usefulness In ARrlculturc-Alcohol Will 
No Doubt Supplant (lasoline. 



TIk' omstaiilly incrcasiiiij n>c of Miiall 
l...wir K^'i"^''''»''»^' c.iuipnunt fcr a^iricnltural 
•)un»oscs lias of late years lir.Mi;;].! alMuU a 
},'rcat change in the activities of certain laig^' 
inaniifactiirinti firms. The \iii-ti>-<late Cana- 
ilian fanner has come to realize that in unkr 
to work a- (VMii, .mually as ix.ssihle he must 
have meciiamcal jiower e<|nii)nienl, and he has 
lonn.l that nothing is so j)ractical and in every 
wav desirahlc for his pnrjM.se as the gasohne 
or ' kerosene engine, with which wdl he 
dasse.l in verv near Inlnre the alcohol engnie. 
The ll'orlit. of Toronto, mentions that an 
American concern is now manufactnring an 
engine hnrning kerosene direct in the same 
manner as gasoline has heretoft)rc heenitsed. 
Thev state that this same engine will withont 
anv alteration hnrn alcohol. 

this ]mts the mamtfactnring of fnel almost 
in the hands of the farmer, as cheap alcohol is 
made from i)otatt)es. sugar-hcets, as well as 
cereals; in fact, potatoes produce the greatest 
amount of alcohol per hushel <.f any farm 
product, and as the farmer produces the 
products from which alcohol is made, there is 
no reason why he should not make his own 
fuel, shouM tlie day ever come when gasoline 
or kerosene is too expensive for i>ower pur- 
poses. 

The amount of ].owcr necessary for the 
farm ilepcnds entirelv upon the purpose for 
which it is to be used. There are thousands of 
farms to-day which arc using from two to six 
horse-power. Power of this size would he 
used for pumping punx.ses, the grinding «)f 
feed for the stock, sawing wood, runnmg 
cream separators and the like; in fact, doing 
all the work that was previously done by hand 
and up to the capacity of four to five horse- 
power sweep. Then again, there arc farms 
which require a much larger amount of power 
to run a baling press, ensilage cutter, sep- 
arator, and feed mill— the siz--s sold ranging 
from eight to 32-horsc-power. These small 
engines are either stationary or semi-i>ortal>le 
f.r can be mounted on trucks and moved from 
point to point. 

Tliese outfits are Iniilt in sizes from hve to 
U'-h'T-e power, inclusive. With these nioil- 
ern iniproveinencts availal>le the farmer is 
independent of anv outside source of power. 
iMigines are huilt in two tyi)es— horiz(Mital 
and vertical. The vertical engines are desu- 
ahle on acct.nni of being built with an od- 
tight tank case in wbich are inclosed all tlie 
working parts, s,, that these parts are run in 
an oil lialb. This constructio:i also h.is tin; 
advantage of shutting ont any possibility of 
dirt getting into the engine, and an engine 
so built can be run in the open without any 
I)rotcction with no danger to the fine p.arts or 
bearings of the engine. There arc no small 
ilelicate parts to get out of order or need 

repairs. . 

The life of a gasoline engine is about tour 
times that of a steam engine, and the first cost 
is Init ,i trifle more; and when one stops to 
consider thai 110 alten<lant is rc<piirod after 
the engine is s|.-,iied. it will be realized at once 
that the cost of power is nnich less than for 



steatn power; even if the wood could be 
obtained for fuel and used at no expense, as it 
would require a man to fire it at least, and a 
mans time would be worth more than the